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The Cumberland Islander Mar 27, 1925

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
<?
Provincial Library     ja")2?
With which is consolidated tlie Cumberland News.
FORTY FOURTH YEAR—No. 13.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBIA        FRIDAY.    .MARCH    27,    1925 <u*^^g*0£> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Local Soccer Team Winners Of B.-K. Cup
MEET VETERANS AGAIN
SATURDAY FOR SHIELD
The Brackman-Ker Cup    Is    safe.
again  for another season  only this'
year it is resting ln  the custody cf
Cumberland  United,  by  the  decisive
Cumberland United, who took the tlu-
al game from the Nanaimo War Vet-
arans last Saturday by thc decisive
score of 4 goals to nil.    Anyone un-1
versed In the freaky turns which foot-
ball sometimes takes    would    think, I
(rom the score, that the winning tea u
had a very easy time, but such was
not the case, far from it In tact.     The
Veterans had every bit as much of tbe j
play,  every  man  pla.ed good foot-
ball, and the forwards, who were ex-
tremely fast and aggressive, did any-!
thing they wanted  to—except score |
—end the latter was what they needed
more than anything else.
Tom Blair. In goal for Cumberland, i
was the chief factor In keeping his
citadel safe from the attacks of thc
Vets. He was absolutely unbeatable
for two reasons: one, because he was
playing the finest game he has ever
played In Canada, and two, because
he had a horse shoe for a mascot.
Of tbe latter the Nanaimo Herald has
to say: "When plar started yesterday,
Contl lost the toss. Conti believes
In luck and said: 'Never mind, we lost
the toss, but we'll win the game.' He
figured on the law of percentages,
one could not lose all the time. Last
week the Ladysmith team had a horse
shoe tacked to their goal post. When
they changed ends they forgot their
shoe, and Blair took charge. Ladysmith lost three to nil, and Blair took
the horse footwear to Cumberland
with him. Yesterday he carried it
onto the field wrapped up ln his cap,
and laid It conspicuously on guard by
his goal. He did not forget it at half
time, and was still carrying it carefully after the game. It la likely
that It Is bound from now on to accompany the Cumberland team ln
their travels. Blair admitted himself that two goals were way beyond
his to save, and if the horse shoe did
not do It, he does not know what did."
Of the game Itself w« cannot say
very much. Half time ended wltn
the score standing 1 to nil in favor
of Cumberland, Heyland scoring after
live minutes of play although If it
hadn't been for tbe Unlted's sterling
defense we would have a different
story to tell. Fowler added two more
In the second period while Bannenmn
copped the fourth just one minute
from Ihe end of play. At one part
of the game the ball was driven
straight for goal and Blair could not
reach It with his hands hut the ball
bit him ln the face. The blow put
him out for a few seconds, but before
he dropped, it had been gathered from
the rebound, shot once more, and
this time hit the post, only to again
rebound Into play from where It was
gathered up and sent flying back, this
time to hit Blair's body as It was sinking to the ground. They were three
lightning-like shots, and how any o.
them missed ls a wonder.
Following the game the cup was
presented by Mayor V. B. Harrison to
Captain Contl. who was hoisted onto
the shoulders of his team-mates. In
a few well-chosen words of thanks,
White Apron Brigade Await Orders
J. W. Tremlett
Resigns Office
As Secretary
Mr. James W. Tremlett, who hos
been associated as secretary with the
Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association since its beginning In 1921,
has resigned his position, It became
known on Tuesday last after tbe
Board of Management held its regular meeting. By profession Mr. Tremlett Ib an engineer and It Is to return
to thla work that he has severed his
connections with the C.L. & A.A. He
wlll Join the survey party of the Bloedel, Stewart and Welsh Logging Co.,
which Is at present operating on the I
company's land near Campbell River.
Actual logging operations on this land
are expected to commence shortly.
Mr. Tremlett's absence from Cumberland will be greatly felt, especially In sporting circles, as he was keenly Interested ln sport himself and was
never unwilling to aid the members
of the club, or any other organization
In whatever line of sport they chose
to follow. Needless to say, his numerous friends, ln this city and in the
district, wish him every success In
his new work.
(Continued on Page Five)
Local Entertainers
Will Perform At
Campbell River
Residents of Campbell River have
a treat In store for them tomorrow
night when they will be entertained at
a concert and dance by the Cumberland Melody Makers, a party of seven
well known musicians and singers of
this city. Although the members of
the company, which is composed of
Mrs. O. Johnson, Mra. S. Davis and
Messrs George Gallagher, Harry
Thomas, Herbert Thomas, William
Jackson and Harry Jackson, have
been heard on several occasions in
Cumberland, the concert which they
are providing for the Rlverites will be
entirely different from anything which
Ihcy have hitherto attempted and, If
favorably received, it Is the Intention of the Melody Makers to present
the same program in this city at some
future date.
Immediately following the concert,
which will be held in the Community
Hall, a dance will be held and refresh
ments will be served. The entertainment will start at 8:00 p.m.. general
admission being (1.00 and 25 cents for
children.
Don't   forget the   Saturday   Night
Dance at the G.W.V.A. Hall.     Good
time assured. Gents 50c. Ladles 10c.
Dancing 9-12. Everybody welcome.
Aged Couple Are
Married At Bay
A marriage of much Interest to residents of Vancouver Island was sol-:
emnlzed at Union Bay on.Saturday|
morning last when Mrs. S. Holt, of |
Nanoose, become the bride of Mr. Wll-
Ham Smith of Bowser, Rev.  Walker!
officiating.     The Interest Is caused
by the fact that Mr. and Mrs. Smith
ore old timers of this part of the Island,  being  76   and   66   respectively,
and  ore  already  both   grandparents.
After the ceremon.- the happy couple
came to Cumberland where the..* spent
several hours visiting frlendB in this
city.
Athletic Assn.
Asks Applications
For Steward
At a meeting of the Board of Management of the Cumberland Literary
and Athletic Association, held In the
Lecture Hall on Tuesday evening last,
It was found that Mr. Jomes W. Tremlett hod tendered his resignation as
secretary and asked to be released hy
April 1st. This came quite as a surprise to the Board but the resignation
was accepted as the members felt that
they should not stand In the way of
Mr. Tremlett ln securing a better position. The question of a successor
then came up ond after lengthy discussion it was decided to abolish the
old ofllce of secretary and have In Its
place a "club steward." Notices
stating the duties of the steward have
already been posted around the city
and applications for the position will
be received by the Board of Management up until 8:00 o'clock Saturday
evening, March 28.
Applications, ten ln number, for associate membership were received and
accepted and subscriptions to 31 periodicals were ordered to be renewed.
At a previous meeting 8 other periodicals had already been renewed,
bringing the total to 39 which the
club now receives, as well as 8 daily
and weekly newspapers.
A general meeting of all members
Is called for Sunday evening at 7:30
o'clock when It Ib expected thnt the
club steward will be appointed.
"KINO OF IVORIES," RADIO ENTERTAINER, RELEASED FROM PRISON
Photograph of Harry M. Snodgrass, convict of the .Missouri state penitentiary, who gained nation-wide
fame as the King of the Ivories." Snoilgrass recently won a nation-wide contest as the most popular
radio entertainer and has received over $1,600 from radio fans In all parts of the country. He says he
will give all the money he receives from radio fans to his wife and eight year old boy, "to try aud repay
them for all the hardships they have gone through since 1 got Into trouble."
FAREWELL PARTY FOR
DEPARTING MEMBER
Many Thrills In Story
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mc-1
Lcllan, corner of Pendrlth Avenue and |
Fourth Street, was on Friday even-1
Ing the  scene  of  a  farewell  party ( -
given by the members of the Lady Whether you ore for the bootleg-
Forresters Lodge ln honor of Mrs. j ger or against him, you wlll cer-
Melroy Brown who Is leaving Cum-1 lalnly find a tremendous "kick" as
berland for North Wellington, there j well as novel entertainment In Thom-
to Join her husband and make their;as *f*v.Ince'» spectacular "Those Who
future home . The evening was de-' Dance," a First National release which
llghtfully spent In music and playing I will be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre
games   and    excellent    refreshments
were served.
On behalf of the lodge Mrs. Charles
Stockand presented the departing
member with a handsome clock In an
Ivory setting. Mrs. Brown is the
youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
McLellan.
District Superintendent Severs
Connection With Coal Company
After Seven and a Hall Years With the Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd., Mr. Charles Graham Leaves Company to Engage in
Business for Himself—Will be Tendered Banquet
Of Great Liquor Plot
en other types of the modem underworld play their part tn the novel romance of a young lawyer who turns
his wits against a gang of bootleggers
after the tragic death of his young
sister from wood-alcohnHsni, ami a
girl from a small town who drops lu
with the life of New York's underworld to save her brother from the
same gang.
There is a throbbing heart interest in every sequence of this remarkable drama, for tho characterizations
have been interpreted in masterly
fashion. Blanche Sweet, fresh from
winning laurels In "Anna Christie.''
has found opportunity for equally
dramatic work fn the role of "Rose
Carney." The change which she effects on the screen from the innocent, ignorant girl from "up-state" to
the sophisticated, bobbed-haired, cigarette-smoking underworld "queen"
is an amazing revelation of cinema
art
Friday and Saturday, April 3 and 4.
With one of the biggest casts presented this season, Ince has told a
story that has set tongues wagging
wherever his production has been
shown. The bootlegger, the "hijacker," the rum-runner, ,the "stool
pigeon." the ward politician and a doz-
Mr. Charles Graham, for the past
seven and a half years District Sup-
Intendent of the Canadian Collieries,
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., at Cumberland, has
severed his connection with that company to enter business for himself iu
Vancouver, where he has acquired
the establishment known as the Vancouver Fuel Company, with offices on
Drake Street.
Up to the present day Mr. Graham
has been a prominent and active mining man of both llritish Columbia ami
Alberta, holding first class credentials
In both these provinces, his B.C. certificate being dated 1905. Chief
among the Important positions that he
has held In these western provinces
are  the   following:   Manager   of   the
j Western Fuel and Coke Company of
Nanaimo;    Superintendent     of     the:
: Princeton coal mine of the Princeton j
Coal   and   Laud  Company;   Superin- j
| ten dent of the Merrltt mine of the
Nicola Valley Coal Company;  Super-
[ intendent of Corbln Coal and Coke
Co.,    and E. B. C. Railway;    Super-
j intendent at Michell wilh the Crow's
: Nest Pass Coal Company; and, as men
tioned above, Dlst. Supt. at Cumber-
| land for the past seven  and  a half
■ years with the C.C.(D)Ltd. He Is
also a prominent member of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, as well as being president of
the Cumberland General Hospital
Board and president of the Hospital
Association of British Columbia.
.Mr. Graham is an enthusiastic supporter of all kinds of sports, but his
acknowledged favorite is soccer, and
it is iu a large measure chiefly due to
his efforts that the Cumberland United team has made a name for Itself
throughout the Dominion of Canada
aa evidenced by tbe interest shown in
it during the last Connaught Cup
series, in which the team was a finalist.
A banquet Is to he held In thc Onion
Hotel tomorrow evening at which Mr.
Graham Is to be the guest of honor.
He leaves on Sunday morning to take
over his new business.
HOME  COOKING  STALL
The Ladies Aid of St. George's Pres
by ter I an Church are having a home
cooking stall In the basement of the
church, tomorrow afternoon, March
28, from 3 to 6 o'clock.
GLASSES SHINED
AND TABLES ALL
READY FOR THE
AMBER LIQUID
Up to the time of going to
areas no word has as yet been
received hy local hotel men as
',o whether or not they have
been been granted licenses for
'he dispensing of beer by the
glass, but such word is expected
it any moment. In one or two
30aes the white aprons, glasses
and tables are already standing
■y to await orders and the am-
'ier fluid will begin flowing a few
'ours after the receipt of the
icensc, but other hotel keepers
■re not so optimistic; they want
the license first before they
make any actual preparations.
In any event it will only be a
law days before residents of the
city will be able to drop in at
any of the parlors for an appetizer and they may be assured
that the old atmosphere of a bar
room will be in evidence. Local
hotel keepers have also been informed that they must order
their supplies from Vancouver,
and if this is the case, many
may not be able to purchase
their favorite label.
Island lloli-ls Huve Licenses
Several hotels on Vancouver la-
land have already received their licenses and are now open for husiness.
They are:
Nanaimo—Windsor. Newcastle, Occidental, Queen's and Balmoral.
Nanaimo RIVor—Cranberry.
Cowlchan Lake—Riverside Inn and
Cowichan Lake.
Cowlchan Hay ■ BsMa Vista.
Chemainus—Horse Shoe Bay aud
Lewisville.
Ladysmith— New Western, Abbots-
ford. Frank Traveler's and  Hayvlew.
Cassidy—Cassid'   Hotel.
(Continued  on   Page  Five)
Messrs R, Robertson and R. Bennle
went to Vancouver on Sunday morning and returned on Tuesday. While
In tho city they attended the bookey
match between the Cougars and Can-
adlens.
Cream of Llllles cures chapped
hands overnight.     Lang's Drug slore.
TIDE TABLE, MARCH 27—APRIL
3 INCLUSIVE
Time   H't.      Time
Date Time
H't
Time   H't
H't
The  time  used
27....
1:17
5-8
7: no   12-.1
13:52
3-0 i 2n:22
u -e
Is  Pacific  Stand
28....
2:03
6-7
7:38   11-9
14:33
2-8 1 21:19
11-5
ard,  for the  lid
2!)....
2:52
7-0
8:11   11-6
15:16
2-9 i 22:19
ll-l
Meridian West. II
30...
3:46
8-4 i
8:45   10-9
16:02
3-2 | 23:23
11-8
Is counted from 0
31....
■1:62
9-0 i
9:24   10-3
10:52
3-5 |
to 24 hours, from
1...
0:32
11-3
6:10     9-1
10:16
9-7 ! 17:47
3-S
midnight to mid
2....
1:42
11-6
7:52     8-9
11:41
9-2 | 18:40
4-0
night
3....
2:32
11-8
0:11     8-3
12:59
9-1     19:47
1-0
Local Girl Won
Prize In Fire
Essay Contest
Announcement has recently hen
made of the prize winners In the lire
prevention essay contest and residents of Cumberland were pleased to
note that Miss Claudia Harrison, of
tills city, won lirst prize for Vancouver Island (Vicloria excepted), in
tho public school division. This
contest was arranged by the Brftitsb
1 Columbia Pond of thc Ancient and
i Honorable Order of Ihe Blue (loose,
' asBlBted by the B.C, Fire Insurance
Agents' Association, the provincial
fire marshals olllcer and the Department of Education, with the object of
Inculcating a desire In our rising generation to bo more careful with lire
* and to appreciate the value of our
forests. The province was divided
into sections and for each of these
there were to be two prizes, one for
; the best essay trom a high school
pupil and one for the best essay from
a public school pupil; second prlz-s
are also to be given In each case.
These prizes are gold and silver
medals and nre to be presented publicly where possible.
Attempts arc being made to secure
Miss Harrison's essay for publication
iu the 'islander", as the copy kept
by tbe writer was destroyed just two
or three hours before the results were
announced. Miss Claudia ls a pupil
of Mr. II. B. Murray In the entrance
;clnss here.
Cumberland May
Not Enter New
Intercity League
The constitution of tbe new Intercity league has been approved of by
the B.C. Football Association and permission been granted to proceed with
tho present plana which intimate that
the now league Will start Its now
schedule within two weeks.
Local   soccer   fans   who   hoped   to
see Cumberland enter the league, may
I ho disappointed, for certain parts of
the constitution do not meet with the
• teams approval, and unless these can
j ho altered the management deems it
i Inadvisable to risk  tbe step.     Thoy
'object to the clause which states that
Mainland teams visiting Cumberland
must lie guaranteed $150.00, for it lu
a   well-known   fact   that   Kate   money
for Bocoer games in this city seldom
reaches   that   mark,   and   unless   thin
guaranty is lowered tha team will not
compete.
Seml-tlnals    for    the    provincial
championship will he played on April
tl,      Mainland cup winners and Mission will pla.. in Vancouver on that
date  while the Jackson  cup  winners
I and Cumberland will play in Nanaimo
I the  same  day.      The   Province  Cup
! ("mal. for the championship of British
\ Columbia, will be played In Vancouv-
; er on April Utb.
Entertains Friends
j     On Ninth Birthday
	
I     Miss Audrey Phillips. neleP of Mr.
| and  Mrs, (J.  \V. Clinton of this city.
I entertained several of her small gfrl
; friends on Friday afternoon last, the
. occasion being a celebration of her
, ninth birthday.     The afternoon was
i pleasantly spent in singing and playing Karnes of which one was a guess-
iiit; contest in which    Miss    Muriel
, Shortt   proved   herself    most    adept,
dainty refreshments were served and
; much excitement was evidenced hy the
| girls when Miss Audrey blew the nine
\ candles   out   ou   lite   large   birthday
cake. THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,   MARCH   27,   1925
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVEKY I-'RIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
Fill DAY,    MARCH    27,    1925
THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The weekly newspaper, unlike the metropli-
tan dailv, has a peculiar place in the home. It
becomes a part of the family, because its new.-
stories concern the activities of the home town
folks, and what deeper interest could be developed than among those with whom we live and
move. The community is the ante-chamber ol
the home, and the weekly newspaper the avenue
that leads from one to the other. Our message
is this: Give to your newspaper co-operation.
Results will come back to you in a community
aSKet—a wide-awake, forceful influential newspaper, and a power in influence for good in you-
community.
A CLEAN-UP SUGGESTION
Why not have a "Clean-Up Day" (or I
"Clean-Up Week") i'or Cumberland? Here l
some thing for all citizens to think about and fo
all organizations to "do about." Is is somethiii:
Cumberland needs.
We can not all agree on politics, religion, o
whether cross-word puzzles are going to elevate
the race; but we can all get together on thj pr-.
position that a great thing for this town would b
a little trimming up,  painting  up,  fixing  up-
Cleaning Up.
The best way to do this is to Organize
Then create public sentiment,—that is, make i.
Popular to clean tip and (Juite unpopular not t
clean up and lastly. Go out and clean up!
The most democratic organization known .
a crowd of good-natured, good-willed, whole
souled, community-loving citizens, all out togeti.
er giving the quick exodus to rubbish, tin can:
weeds and dead-stuffs that lay useless and an eye
sore to passers-by. This is everybody's bus.
ness, and it is exerybody's business to see to i
that the work is done. After the actual cleaning
up is done let us not be content; let us appeal t
individual pride and encourage the neeessar-
trimming of trees, painting of buildings, the carpenter work for that tumbledown fence, or a nev
hinge for that garage door.
We have mentioned above three things whicl
in our opinion are necessary to do the work; or
ganization, popularity, and execution.   The Cum
berland Islander will do its part in two of thom
help popularize the movement by giving of it.
news space for publicity, and give of its manpower on the appointed day.     But the organizing
of the campaign is highly important.    What club
or organization will take the lead?     And the lead
having been taken, who would not co-operate in
this worthwhile undertaking?      Under direction
of the constitute authorities, the town could be
set off into two, three, or more zones, with a captain and workers assigned to each.      Business
men who could not leave  their  posts  would  be
privileged to hire substitutes.     In the evening of
Clean-Up Day, the ladies could serve a community
feed for the workers.     We can scent the hot dogs
and the steaming coffee already!
Some may have other and belter plans, and
The Islander hopes to hear of them. Our purpose mainly is to call attention to the need. Let
the plans evolve and the work go forward. The
result will be a cleaner and more attractive community.
CANADA IS CANADA
Some Canadian writers express a fear that
Canada may lose her population and some of her
prestige due to the "absorption" of American
interests, and the fact that so many of her people
are going to the United States. This is hardly
possible, not plausible, and we can see nothing in
it to arouse undue apprehension. How about
the reverse of the proposition? Are not thousands of Americans attracted to the vast areas
where Canada's rich soil returns its bounteous
harvests? American money is invested in Canada, and American tourists in unnumbered
throngs seek inspiration yearly in her majestic
mountains and on her shores.
There can be no injurious loss of population
or of prestige in either country so long as such
great reciprocity of social and economic life continues. And why should it not continue? Canada is Canada, and it is short vision that fore-
jasts less than a greater Canada for the future.
WIFE TRADERS
Did you notice in the daily newspapers recently the account of a wife-trading deal between
two farmers?
These couples lived on adjoining farms and
the monotonous life they led caused Jim to fall in
love with Jack's wife, and Jack's wife to fall in
love with Jim. One couple had been married
eight years and had three children, the other
couple had been married seven years and had two
children.
The very primitive and simple solution to tho
love tangle was to simply trade wives, but the
children stood in the way. Here was a situation
equal to the rottenest novel ever written. But
what happened ? The children were sent to their
grandparents in each instance.
When Jim's little ones arrived at grandma's,
that good, old-fashioned lady wanted to know
"How come?" She did a little investigating on
her own hook, and when she found out what Jim
was up to she promtly notified the authorities and
had her naughty boy and the rest of the quartette arrested.
It is a fine thing we still have sensible, old-
fashioned mothers in the world, to stem the rising tide of free love and wife trading.
Who is this person  Action  that  everyone
strips for?
Happiness has to be cranked while troubh
has a self-starter.
Most young men expect to marry girls that
look like magazine covers and work like cook
books.
First cast the rubbish out of thine own back
yard before asking thy neighbor to trim the tree.-,
in his front.
' Here is something worth remembering:
| "Keep your face towards the sunshine and the
! shadows will fall behind you."
One nice thing about the garage mechanic
is that he never charges anything for the grease
he leaves on the cushions.
You may scour, you may clean up the old
home if you will; but that 8 per cent, mortgag
seems to cling 'round it still!
Modern inventions make it hard for crim-
I inals. A burglar on a dark night can't tell wheth
' er he's opening the safe or tuning in on the radio.
There are some people who imagine that thc
| eight hours work and the eight hours sleep recom-
I mended by doctors are the same eight hours.
Some Facts and Figures
CANADA Kit I IT CROP SMALLER
VERNON,   March   26, — Although
earlier estimates in 1924 predicted a
much smaller movement of fruit ami
vegetables from British Columbia
during the season ol 1024, the final
figures tor shipments show that the
crop thut went to lhe market was hut
It per cent less than In 192:1. Total
shipments i'or 192:1 were aboul 6,000
ears. While lor lhe season jusj clos-
Ing the movement was ahout 000 ears
less than the previous year, or approximately :,.i ars.
CITIZENS own 81,000 AUTOS
QUEBEC,   March   20.   Eighty-four
thousand automobiles arc now being
operated by litizens of tlu- province
ot Quebec, representing, al an over
age upkeep of (800 per year each, a
total expenditure for maintenance
alone of $25,000,000 in eneli twelve
months, according i<* a statement
made hy the president of lhe M treal
Automobile 'trade Association,
duction in Canada !'*>r the season of
1923-2-1 had a value of $15,(143,817, a
decrease from the preceding year ot
over 11,000,000, according lo a bulletin issued hy the bureau of statistics,
j I'lie prlcinpal kinds of pelts, those
showing a total value of over $500,090
i in order of value, were ns follows:
■ .Muskrat, $8,440,868; beaver, 19,642,-
092; mink (2,113,669; white fox, $1.-
293,606; silver fox $902.2S2; red fox
$916,984; patch or eross fox $1142.291;
' eo,,ote  or  prairie  wolf $626,146  and
' lynx $616,849.
0.8. CAPITAL  Kill CANADA
WINNIPEG, .March 26.—II is understood Hint negotiations of United
States eapillalists wilh a view In na-
tnlilishiua three canneries in Canada,
one In tho neighborhood of Winnipeg,
have advanced to a stage where application has been made for a $1,000,000
federal eharter. The name of tho
company will be Allied llritish Canneries and Distributors, Limited. It
Is proposed to erect one- cannery In
Quebec and another In llriilsh Columbia.
Kill PRODUCTION DECREASES
OTTAWA. March 211.    Haw fur pro
II'.ihiii IIOR8E8 SHIPPED
RBSOINA, March 21. Upwards of
16,000 horses were shipped from western Canada lo eastern Canada in 1921
lhe hulk of these coming from the
province of Saskatchewan, which ls
maintaining its lead as the greatc-t
horse breeding province ill the Dominion, with.a total of 1.1711.745 bond,
an increase ol 33.44 over 1923.
HILLING PROSPECTS Illlll.Ill
MONTREAL, Mai-eh 20.-Prospects
are excellent for a busy season during
I92**i for ihe Canadian milling industry, l-'lour was exported to forly-
four different countries during Jan-
[ unry. no less than 347.228 barrels having gone lo Russia alone. The nexl
heaviest buyer was Great Britain,
with 233,846 barrels, followed by Germany Willi 89,810 barrels. Greece
took 18,408 barrels; Denmark 14.70(1;
China UI.77S; the Irish Free Stale,
14,889 anil Jamaica 13,485 barrels.
I Miring Ihe twelve months ending Jan
unry exports of Hour wore 11,800,006
barrels, or 75.nun more than for Ihe
preceding year.
TIMBER SALES *l.2.->n.ll(m
VICTORIA, March 26.-Tlmber sales
made by the forest branch during tha
..ear 1924 exceeded $1,250.0110. according to a report of the provincial minister of lands. In all 7119 sale contracts were executed, covering at*,
area of 14U.652 acres. The amount
of material included in these sale.,
is estimated as follows; Saw log timber, 302,813.0011 board, feet; poles and
piling (1.336,0011 lineal feet; hewn railway tics, 8,418,688 pieces; shingle
bolls cordwood and other cord materials. 47.040 cords.
COSTS LESS I'D RAISE BABIES
THAN D008
IIOSTON, March 26.- It costs 58.00
less to raise a baby for ten months
than It does to buy a pedigreed chow-
dog, statisticians who class babies as
an addition lo the high cost of living
nolbwlthstandlng.
Bernard Tarpey, a Boston policeman, and his wife have lhe figures.
I Their new daughter, Marie Veronica,
ten mouths old, hns cost them $142.23
since the day the stork left her. The
very least a pedigreed chow dog can
be bought for Is $150.
HALIFAX SHIPS APPLES
HALIFAX, March 20.—A total of
1.003,(172 barrels of apples have been
shipped lo the English market from
Ibis port since the beginning of the
shipping season to February 34, London, according to shipping Dgures,
with imports |o date of 354,715 barrels
remains the premier importing center for Canadian apples. Liverpool
comes next. Willi 2I.7.S23 barrels, and
Manchester third. *lth 172.CS5 barrels
THERE ARE MANY BRANDS AND PRICES ON THE MARKET, BUT
—. V *
Comox Creamery Products Are Best
ASK YOUR GROCER FOR
Comox Creamery Butter
"     Strawberry Jam
ii Prktafntfic    ",i00K F0" TI,K TAU
I UldlUcS*       0N THE BA,!"
"    Creamery Eggs
THEY ARE  GRADED
"   Whole Wheat Flour
COMOX ICE CREAM WILL BE AT YOUR FAVORITE PARLOR EARLY *
^|DP=" NEXT MONTH.     "IT'S BETTER
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B.C.
"Once in awhile between f'riendtt-Lovy Distance"
Make It A
Weekend  Habit
Every weekend use the longdistance telephone to chat with a
distant friend or relative. This is
not an expensive habit, for the new
night rates are specially low, and
both you and the parties whom you
call will enjoy a talk-trip of this sort.
It is an excellent way to maintain
friendships, and is quicker, more
convenient, and more satisfactory
than letter-writing.
(FOR SALE—Fifty (50) acres, five (5)
j acres cleared, with 4 room house,
j good condition, oulcr buildings in-
[ eluding garage, barn and chicken
house. Situated near Koyston
I Station, Vancouver Island. Apply
'• full particulars P.O. Box 72, Cumberland, B.C. 12-13.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat Quality
BEEF. VEAL. MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
ProprleUr
IRRIGATED DISTRICT SUCCESS
CARDSTON, .March 26.—A successful season In 1924 Is reported by the
United Irrigated district, in tbe vicinity of this town. The district trustees have met their obligations for the
year and have a balance In the bank.
Thc average value per acre o( the pro
duet Ion on the project last year was
$2!U3, taking Into account crops both
on Irrigated and non-Irrigated lands
lu the district.
PLANT CLIPPED WORLD'S MARK
I
]    NEW   YORK.   March   20.—Walking
the mile and a bale   in    10.05 3/5
! against a large field of handicapped I
j opponents, Willie    Plant,    America's
most outstanding heel and toe performer, clipped 2/5 of a second from ;
tho world's record for that distance at
I the post olllce clerk's games nl the;
69th    Regiment    Armory     Saturday
night,
l
n
til AMERICANS EMTEH CANADA
OTTAWA, March 26—Immigration
to Canada during the month of January totalled 2,007, made up of 51.1
Britishers, 632 Americans, and 81(2
from other countries, according to a
report issued by tbe department of
immigration and colonization. In addition, there was recorded 1,715 returning Canadians from the United
Slates.
OIL DRILLING RESTARTED
CALGARY, March 26. — According
to Illlnols-Alberta Oils Limited, drilling operations will be resumed on
their Turner Valley well on April 1.
Considerable Interest Is attached to
this announcement as this Is the nearest well to Royalite No. 4 and Is on»
of the oldest producers In the field.
II In down to 3,040 feet now, and according to the president of the Illlnols-Alberta Oils Limited, is producing 300 to 400 gallons of gasoline
dally.
ave
on your
Groceries
One way to save on your
groceries without reducing
your menu Is to order them
trom Frelone's. Wo guarantee our qualltyas well as
price.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. .Ilh and Dunsmuir.
LEONARD
EAR OIL
dea|mess
/Ht^ Price*'/25
jS.p1'MM Druggists
IDJJP*1'
I nun uum"tWttai"m ntmisi.
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Olllce Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
.1 FRIDAY,   MARCH   27,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
MARY PICKFORD'S VIEW
OF   OTHER   WOMEN
"I have never known a woman
whom I did not admire for some quality," Mary Pickford said ln discussing
IN PLACE
OF MEAT
—serve this unique roast as
the main dish of the meal.
Yourfolkswill be delighted.^
Recipe, and scores oi
otherStir our lie* book..
the traits she most desires in the woman of today.
"I admire the woman who ls reasonable—the woman who is not narrow-
minded. The business woman and
the housewife have my enthusiastic
admiration. I would never censor
the business woman because she Isn't
a housewife or the housewife because
she doesn't go to an ofllce every day.
"As I have said, 1 find something interesting in all women. Women by
* ature are kind, sympathetic, gener-
CU3 and self-sacrificing. These characteristics do not only make for personal happiness, but spread a friendly
glow wherever they go.
"Of course, I admire the educated
1 =
Plumbing* ft Healing Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124 Phone 157
Courtenay or Cumberland
Your  needs  will   receive  Immediate
attention. .
woman, regardless of what she specializes in. The world is advancing
so rapidly that the uneducated woman
finds it difficult to keep abreast of
modern progress. By education I do
not necessarily mean the woman who
Is versed In textbooks. Education
comes by studying the everyday problems we meet, by solving them, and
profiting from the experiences."
Miss Pickford's latest photoplay tea
ture, "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon
Hall," will be showing at the llo-Ilo
Theatre tonight and tomorrow night.
POSSIBILITY OF
WAR ON PACIFIC?
NEILL THINKS SO
The possibility of war on the
Pacific and the doctrine of preparedness for such a peril was preached
in the House by Mr. Neill, tho member   for  Coinox-Alhenii.      He  asked
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   nnd   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
An Amazing"
Famous Domestic Science
authority and Director of
tliu Maple Loaf Club, who
will give personal ad* ice on
How to arranfle and Prepare special and unusual
dishes fof luncheons,
socials, etc.
v.   *       .-Wfflffl
How to add new delight
and wltolesomenoss to thu
children's school lunches.
^S~
How to bib. and serve
new dUhc. for th. dally
homo mi-mi-
Wouldn't you enjoy a visit with a famous
domestic science authority?
Here is your opportunity to have Anna Lee
Scott, the noted Domestic Science expert come
to visit you every month for five months in the
form of a course of 20 lessons on Cookery Arts
and Kitchen Management—written in an un-
' usually interesting and charming way and sent
to you by mail—without cost.
You also have the privilege of joining the Maple
Leaf Club, directed by Anna Lee Scott, which
entitles you to her personal advisory service on
any subject pertaining to household management—absolutely FREE.
You pay no money for the course. All lessons
are sent postpaid. You study lessons when and
how you choose. No blanks to fill in. No
examinations or correspondence required. You
may write in for advice, however, and Anna
Lee Scott will gladly answer inquiries regarding
any household problem.
How to Join the Maple Leaf Club and
Enroll for thie Valuable Course.
Free to eveiy User of MAPLE LEAF FLOUR
for Bread, Cake and Pastry.
Excellent baking results are guaranteed to every user
of Maple Leaf Flour, and every bag contains coupons
entitling you to free membership in thc Maple Leaf
Club and to this valuable course. (24 lb. bag—
1 coupon; 49 Ib. bag—2 coupons; 98 lb. bag—4 coupons)
Send only four coupons addressed to the Maple Leaf
Club, Maple Leaf Milling Co., Limited, Winnipeg,
Manitoba, and you will be enrolled as a member of the
Maple Leaf Club and receive the course FREE.
Ask your dealer today about Anna Lee Scott and the
wonderful course.
MAPLE LEAF MILLING CO., LIMITED
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
the House lo declare that Canada
should consider lhe defence of her
sea coasts and her lines of com nerce.
It is evident that Mr. Neill Is no
pacifist, nor one who Is going to allow himself to he led Into any sense
of false security. He sees symptoms
abroad that portend either war or the
makings of it and he thinks thai Canada should get ready. He hadn't
finished his discourse when automatically the day ended at six o'clock, bul
he described the menace and made
what he called,his main points. Neill
ls one of the most original figures In
the House. He classes himself as an
Independent, bul when comes lhe test
Ing time of a division he is u mally
with the government.
Nevertheless, he is not of their
temple or caucus, nor Is he one upon
whom they can place an Implicit reliance. He is u Scotchman whose
migrations have landed him on the
Pacific and he shares all the asplra-
THE B. C. MINING GAZETTEB
Through our connection with the
publishers of tliis up-to-date mining Journal, we can offer, to si
limited in inher only,
THREE MONTHS' FREE
SUBSCRIPTION
without obligation  on  your part.
Call or write
GRANT MAHOOD & CO. LTD.
Members Vancouver stock
Exchange
522-525 Rogers Building
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
— Active In All Mining Stocks
■ We Buy and Sell All Snares
tions and entertains all the fears of
the people on that coast.
A fluent talker, hla utterance has
ahout ft the saving remnant of humor,
although on the subject brought up,
none of that attribute was brought Into play. He says he doesn't believe
In crying peace when there isn't any
peace, or when the conditions are
potential of war. He admits that
there is a League of Nations, supposedly the arbiter of all  international
I disputes aud a guarantee for the per-
i petuatlon of peace, but he doubts its
' utility.
Great Britain is in it and he thinks
she is embarrased because of the fact
that she is there. The Mother Country, he believes, would have never
gone in, had it known that the United
States would not join nor that ahout
fifty per cent of the white race was to
stand aloof. He enumerated tho Important works on the Pad Ilo Coast of
Canada Ihat would bo susceptible of
attack In the event of war, the harbor works at Vancouver, the elevators
the Esquimalt dock and a great stretch
of coast line utterly deficient ln de-
: fence.
What he called the most important
thing of all was the shipping Interests, going in and out of Pacific ports
and handling merchandise to the volume of two million dollars a day. He
thinks that the situation fn Europe
suggests a conflagration breaking out
; almost any time, while on the Pacific
there are five nations, any one of
which may erupt and start something.
i The whole situation, he thinks, suggests the need of preparation by an increased measure of defence on the soa
coasts and channels of commerce.
As he hadn't concluded his speech
and will not be able to do so until
iThe Gem
Barber Shoo
A
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBEBT EVANS
Practical  Barber,  and   Hairdresser, Shampooing,  Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp ' Treatment.
FREE RECIPE BOOK
Write the Borden Co., Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
I.
BABYS
OWN
SOAP
A few drops of Shiloh bring** quick
relief to throat irritation, noarse-
neas and coughing. Shiloh in economical—a favorite remedy for
over fifty years. At all druggists,
30c, 60c and $1.20.
SHILOE
r FOR
COUGHS
.
fsrBuby
Sat
'You
Use Celery King
a gentle laxative"Tea"
that purifies the blood
At your drttrgUt 30e and 60c!
tho next private members' day, the
attitude ot Uie government la not officially disclosed, although it Is not
believed that they share the pessimism of the member for Comox, or
doubt ihe efficiency of the agencies
of peace, or even believe that Just
yet, the nations are turning back towards the vortex of war.
FINANCIAL RUIN
BRINGS HAPPINESS
Financial ruin generally is considered a calamity—especially by the per
son ruined. But In "Horn Hich," a
First National picture showing at thu
llo-Ilo Theatre nett Monday and Tues
day, such a state of uffairs brought
the elusive happiness sought by a
young couple.
Tbe young couple. Jimmy and
"Ciiaddy." belonged to a social set
that was noted (or tho dizzy pace It
set. Pleasure-seeking was Its solo
objective, and nothing was allowed in
Interfere with gayeiy. Therefore it
was with considerable alarm that the
two discovered that they were to bo
visited by iho stork.
Such an event was unheard of In
Ihelr set! It simply wasn't being done
Ho Jimmy and Cbaildy determined to
hide their disgrace from the world for
fear that it would affect their social
status. Only their near relatives
wore aware of the existence ot their
baby.
Desperately trying to keep their position In society, the couple plunged
madly Into the whirlpool of gayeiy
Until they drifted apart. Jimmy
came to his senses first. All he
wanted now was a home and hla
family together. Chadcly would not
agree. Then came the crash. An
acquaintance in whom Jimmy had
placed his trust maliciously told him
that his money was gone.
Jimmy and Chad, established In a
huniuble bungalow, found the key to
happiness, and the former, meeting
the acquaintance later was able to say
out of the bottom of bis heart:
"Thanks for ruining me."
Claire Windsor and Bert Lytell
play the parts of the husbaud and
wife.
SYNOPSiS OF
LAND ACTAMENDMENTS
"@1ADIAN Q&
WHISKY
Are sold under a triple guarantee.
As lo Age As lo Genuineness
As to Qiiility
By the mamifac-
turers whose
name and trademarks are their
most valuable
commercial asset.
By the stamp
of the Dominion
Government
over lhe capsule of every
bottle.
By the fact
that they
can be purchased through
lawful channels.
Read the label on the bottle.
Read the Government Stamp over the
capsule of every bottle.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Montreal, Que.
Distillers nf Fine
Whiskies since 1858
London, Eng.
New York, U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Contrbl Board or by the Government of Britl&h Columbia.
ritE-EMi'Tioas
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over la years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
lo become British subjects, eendi-
tional upon residence, occupation,
aud improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
'•How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing tbe Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any (ior-
urn in <.-nt AgtuL.
i Records will be granted covering
j only laud suitable for agricultural
[purposes, and which ia not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over G.uOu board
feet per acre west of the Coast Hauge
and ->. -no feet per acre east of that
Hauge.
Applications   for   pre-emptions   are
to   ne  addressed   to  the  Land  Com-
missione/ of the Laud Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, ami ure mude ou priuied
forms,  copies  of   which   can   be obtained from tbo Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
years   and   improvements   made
j to  value  of  Jiu per  aero,  including
clearing ami cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown 'Grant can be
received.
For moro detailed Infoimatlon see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Laud."
PCBCIUSB
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lauds, uot being timberlaud,
for agricultural purpones; minimum
price of flrst-otftlB lu ruble J land Is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land I- &u per acre. Further information regarding purchase or leu-te
of Crown lands is glveo iu Bulletin
No. 10, Laud Series, "Purchase and
Loe.se of Crown Lauds."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding Mi aero*,
may be purchased or leased, tbe eon-
•tltlons including payment of
Btumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveycd areas, not exceeding M
acres, may be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in tbo first year, title being
obtainable after residence and improvement conditions aro fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing aud industrial purposes areas not exceeding ti40 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under tbo Grazing Act tbe Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based ou
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for rango
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settles,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead.
-rf PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,   MARCH   27,   1925
m
Saturday Night
DANCE
9.30 to 12
m
i
llo=Ho Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
I
Two Shows
NIGHTLY
7  and 8.45
I
THE GREATEST ACTRESS
OF THEM ALL.
MARY PICKFORDL
THE   IDOL   OF   THE
SILVER SCREEN
IN
"Dorothy Vernon of
Haddon Hall"
Here FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
FRIDAY  AND SATURDAY
27—MARCH—28
this Week
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
27—MARCH—28
The Greatest Costume Play of the <Age
\ ADULTS 50<*
CHILDREN 25c
COMEDY AND NEWS REEL
PICK
•OOJUrouY' tieRnon
OB JlflDOOn    tlfiLU*
ADULTS 35<
Mon. and Tues.
I
30 MARCH 31
jjttW lld*4^gj •Retain
Adapted from the novel by Hughes Cornell
with
Claire Windsor Bert Lytell
n,zSl. Kenvon Cullen Land,s
Matinee at 2.30 Saturday Afternoon
EVERY SCHOOL CHILD SHOULD SEE THIS PLAY
WED. & THURS.
1 APRIL 2
William
Desmond
IN A THRILLING, LAUGHING FEAST OF
"PHIT tlPFM  *» KLr, •       K\KK<   PICKFOR.0     in .
y^nisuuarjn  io*p .coRotnv ueRnon op. ii/iooon nflUJ
COMEDY-DRAMA
RIDIN'
PRETTY
SUPPORTED BY ANN FORREST, BILLY SULLIVAN AND A GREAT TROUPE OF CHARACTER
PLAYERS.
SEE
A man go tearing after a fast trani.
SEE
His racing car collide with a heavy truck.
SEE
A thrilling race between a motorbike and a racing
train.
SEE
A lightning leap from the fast-moving motorbike to
the train.
If you don't get a big laugh and a great big thrill out
of this photoplay, we'll stop showing motion
Pictures.
ALSO  CHAPTER 12
The Ghost City
AND A
TWO-REEL COMEDY
ADULTS 35<> CHILDREN 15<>
Friday - Saturday
3 APRIL 1
There's an under-current of restlessness in this dizzy
age—and this is its dramatic revelation.
%s.H.
oresents
BLANCHE SWEET
WARNER BAXTER
with
We've caught you at
last, you traitor.
You'll   never   leave
here alive.
BESSIE LOVE
ROBERT AGNEW
THRILLS
THRILLS
PLENTY OF THEM!
THRILLS FRIDAY,   MARCH   27,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
j The Judge:The Sheriff 'Sigelyjjgarrt Business, w
every
week
iOW 010 vou oo
i| THAT AND SIMQlE
HAMDEP, TOO.
I JUST FACED
/THEM WITH A
[38 IN EACH BAND
YOU MUST HAVE MADE S Qf*) ( \ J*
THEM BELIEVE VOU if^hVlhce0V
MEANT TO SHOOT  #Taen AOTQHT
^3
■**=e=SK5fe( IREMIMOED THEIAN
j HOW DID VOUlTHAT W BROTHER |
1 OO THAT   M      WAS THE
UNDERTAKER AND lAtAj
AHALF PARTNER Hi HIS A
BUSINESS/ 	
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
YVM.MBRRIFIEM),    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunimulr Arena*, Comberlend
MANY THRILLS
IN   STORY   OF
BIG RUM PLOT
(Continued From Page One)
Bessie Love, as the hardened little
underworld queen, who otters a finished model for Rose's reincarnation:
Warner Baxter playing the difficult
role of the young lawyer who falls
SHOES!
Solid Leather Shoes for Boys, Amherst Red Stitch,
Sizes 1 to 5i/2 $3.95
Sizes 11 to 13 $3.40
A Good Strong Wearing; Shoe—
Sizes 1 to 5.     Special _ _ $3.35
Sizes 11 to 13.     Special $2.95
Boys Pants and Knickers, all sizes from 4 to 15 years.
Boys' Caps, a new line at $1.25
Jazz Caps, at 35c. and 75c.
Boys' Sweaters, a good assortment and ranging from
$1.00 _ to  $4.50
Boys' Hosiery—All Wool Sockings, in Black & Brown.
Boys' Golf Hose, assorted colors, Cotton Hose, Rock
Rib, the best for hard wear.
A. MacKinnon
Nine Reasons Why You Should Buy This Waver
Assures a beautiful Marcel Wave in five   (5)
minutes.
It will not burn or singe your hair.
It will save its cost many times in the first month.
A wave when you want it—No waiting for the hair
dresser.
After the swim, put a quick wave in.
Costs practically nothing to operate—Fits in any
socket.
A quicker and better wave than is possible with
any other appliance.
Your appearance depends  on  your  hair  dress.
Here is quick beauty.
Absolutely guaranteed.
PRICE 93.50
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/i-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaui* of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Marcel Waver
in love with Rose, and Mathew Beiz,
one of Ince's discoveries, portraying
the unscrupulous bootleg king, offer a
gallery of telling contrasts.
The action story against which th**
producer has silhouetted a hauntlngly
powerful romance, ls one of the fast-.
est-movlng and most thrilling on rec-
ord.    Aside from the daringly unconventional situations which result when j
the heroine and her sweetheart pass
themselves  off as  "affinities" to  get!
evidence which will tree Rose's broth-1
er from the death chair, there is a i
wealth of dramatic incident, such as
the light on the decks of the "rum-i
runner," the trapping of the truck-
load of contraband liquor and the clim
ax when Rose and her sweetheart pit >
their wits against the cleverest crooks
of the underworld when they are trap
ped at the annual ball.
Nanaimo tennis uml fans, und lie felt   It was certainly tough luck on them
that tin-  Vets  were  deserving of ns I lo have lost, judging from the game
much credit as any team In the city j they had played,
for the way lliey hud played the game |     In the evening the two learns were
Sheik of Mena Village Host to
Canadians
LOCAL SOCCER TEAM
WINNERS OF B.-K.UUP
(Continued From Page One)
Sacki expressed his appreciation of
the manner In which the Cumberland
team had always been treated by the '
UNION   HOTEL
CUXBMLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   aervioe.
II  room,  eltetrlMlk*  heated.
Bxcelleit ralilM—
Por reeerretlene Phone 16.
K. TATK8, Manager
New Car Service
CAB FOB HIKE OAT 0B NIOBT
M TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Photographed above are Nasr Enani
Knattab, who recently succeeded
his father as sheik of Mena Village,
■nd Deane H. Dickason, well-known
newspaper man accompanying the
Canadian Pacific S.S. "Empress of
Fiance" on cruise of the world, who
lent the following interesting despatch covering the caravan trip of
th; Canadian and American tourists.
and the death of their host, Enani
Khattab (right.)
"Thirty-two of us left Cairo by
river steamer, debarking sixteen
miles up the Nile at Bedrashen.
whence we journeyed hy cnmel, don-
key and sand-cnrt through Old Memphis and its necropolis Sakkara, another sixteen miles out on the Ly-
bian desert. There a Bedouin camp
was pitched. We ate Bedouin food,
listened to Bedouin music and watch- j
ed Bedouin dancers far into the
right. Wc did not reni-h camp until |
8 o'clock the last two hours' riding
having been mude in the light of the j
moon. At midnight the moon was
at eclipse. Our host. Enani Khattab, undoubtedly the most popular
and probably the most wealthy of the
Bedouin sheiks of Egypt, hnd been
laughing, dancing nnd conversing |
with thc rest of us. At one he «*o*il;
tn his village. Mena. at the ha*"* of
the Pyramid1*, to rest prior I" return
ing with US to Cairo thc nexl mini
A Bedouin Camp.
ing. He was conversing with hla
voung daughter when he was seized
with an attack of the heart and died
ilmost instantly.
His son Nasr, 24, popular and
handsome dragoman, who hod guided
us from Cairo to the camp, succeeds
him as sheik of the Mena Village,
with about 6,000 inhabitants. The
guests wcre permitted to finish their
breakfast^ before the news was
lirokm to them. We returned—on
humble horde, snddened nnd grieving—after a night of exquisite ad-
.'enture. More than 10,000 attended
bis funeral in the quaint little village
■imong them a considerable number
if our passengers who had grown to
respect nnd admire Enani after a
few short hours with him. Hi- spoke
seven languages and in a gentle, well
•nodulated voice that must have
-nrncd him great reverence from his
•uhjeetfl, who as sheik—mnyor, po-
'!••<• -nn'ztstratOi justice of the peace,
•!lv 'ouncll, et al—he ruled nobly
an J ."ill.
ggMM
/r^ '  'v ■■■• \" A\\',v'
or ~
Achieving Home Beauty
Nothing can be more inspiring than a freshly painted
home. Bright and immaculate, it seems to reflect the pure
joy of living.
Paint brings beauty but even more than that, it protects
and preserves and adds years to the life of valuable
property.
B-H English Paint assures painting success. The first
brush-dip tells its own story of quality. Absolutely pure
and free from grit or lumps, it spreads with silky smoothness, leaving a trail of matchless beauty that transforms
the dullest surface.
B-H English Paint
protects and preserves to an unusual degree. It spreads further —
effectively — gallon lor gallon, than any other paint. Its lustrous
film is air-tight. The sun cannot blister it. It is tough and un*
yielding yet elastic enough to expand or contract with the temperature   Therefore its beauty lasts and lasts
Alex. McKinnon
Wm. McLellan, Jr., (Painter & Decorator)
Cumberland, B.C.
licit arc a few
typical B-H Products
II II Knili.h I'.inl
(For in.i.li- anil out.Me
u«) .
Bli frcMonrlle
(A flat oil wall flnlihl
IIII Bara, Reef aa*
r.le.ilor Paint
(For outbuilding,!
Bli Frtaeola
(A cold water finish)
B-H Manilas Spar
Varnish
(For boats or unusually
exported- surfaces)
BH Floor Pslnl
(Hade to walk on)
Ctil-Natatl Slalm and
Varnlahr.
(For interior woodwork
Ull furniture)
Brandram-Henderson Limited flans to assist Property Owners
We will ilodty furniih lull particular, of the new plan, whereby owner, of
property can benefit by arranietnenta which enable them to paint their
property on the partial payment plan bam.   Write to us for full detail,.
M-HENPIPSQN
the guests of tbe Great War Veterans
Association t*t an enjoyable smoker
and concert at which there were many
well-kown football men. .Mayor Harrison was greeted with much applause
when he stated that he was sure ho
was only voicing the wishes of all
football players and fans of .N'anaimo
when be expressed the hope that now
that Cumberland had won the Upper-
Island premier honors they would go
all the way through and bring back
the Provincial championship. Mr.
William Walker, manager of tho winning team, also gave a speech aud
Harry Jackson, assistant trainer,
rendered his well-kown mimic number, this latter being the hit of the
evening.
The United will field the same team
tomorrow fn Xaiiaimo in the Davenport Shield final. The Vets are
again their opponents.
MINING MEN MET
IN LADYSMITH
j     A meeting of the Vancouver Island
I branch  of the Canadian  Institute of
i Mining and   Metallurgy  was  held  In
| Ladysmith, B.C., on Friday, .March 20.
j There was a  large attendance pres-
I ent from Cumberland, Lantzville, East
Wellington,    Nanaimo,    Fernie    and
I Vancouver, as   well  as  a  good  num-
! ber of local men.     The Secretary oi
i the H. C. Division, .Mr. Lamb; the Sec-
I letary of the Vancouver Branch, Mr.
McBvoyj    Professor   ttrock     of     the
University of B.C.,  Professor Natal!,
of    the    Geological     Survey;     Nicol
Thompson of the Council and Inspector   Mlard,   of   the   B.C,   Mines   Staff,
were among the visitors present. The
meeting was called to order by Chairman Jas. w. Jemson, at s p.m., after
which the following program was carried out:
Chairman's remarks; Piano solo,
W. A. Owen, Cumberland; Quartette,
Nanaimo .Male Voice Choir; Paper,
"A safe method of lighting the working facts of coal mines by electricity,"
Edward Hughes, Cumberland; Discussion on the paper by Messrs o.
O'Brien, Thomas Graham, Chas. Graham. W. II. Moore, Jas. W. Jemson
and tbe author; Violin and Aecor-
dlail solo, .Messrs Herod and Contl,
Ladysmith; Quartette, Nanaimo Male
Voice choir; Speech, chas. Mortimer Lamb, of Vancouver; Speech,
Dean Brock, U.B.C., Of Vancouver;
Violin and Acoordlan solo, Messrs
llerod and Conti. Ladysmith; Refreshments; Quartette, Nanaimo
Male Voice Choir; Speech, Nicol
Thompson, Vancouver; Speech, Bernard McEvoy, Vancouver; Violin aud
Accord Ian Duet. Messrs, Berod and
Conti, Ladysmith; Song, Walter Joyce
Ladysmith; Song, Mr. Organ, Ladysmith; Speech. Thomas Graham. Cum-
beHand; Quartette. Nanaimo Male
Voice Choir; God Save Tbe King
A communication was received from
Mr. Jas. Touhoy, regretting his Inability to be present to give his paper
on "Outbursts or gas at Cassody," ami
hoping  to   be  able  to  give   It  at   the;
next meeting, Mr. Jemson, Chairman of tho local Branch voiced the
appreciation of the meeting to the
visiting members and to the local com
mlttee and the artists who had made
the meeting such a great BUCC6BB especially Mr. Hughes, for his able and
educational paper, after which the
meeting adjourned.
m^/m r^mia
Merchant
j    TAILOR
! CLEANING   AND   PRESSING
SUITS MADE TO OUDER
Ladies' & Gent's Tailoring
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   MARCH   27,   1925
The Short Route Between Pacific Coast
and the
OLD COUNTRY
Continental Limited
9.30 P.M., Daily, From Vancouver
All Steel Equipment       Radio       Unexcelled Service
Bookings on Any Transatlantic Steamers
Reservations and  Full  Information From
E. W. BICKLE
Dunsmuir Ave. — CUMBERLAND —    Telephone 35
=*&-===-o~
B.C. GAME BOARD
ANNOUNCES OPEN
SEASON DATES
VICTORIA, B.C.—The Provincial
Game Board lias announced thc open
season dates for 1925 as follows:
Moose—Males, in Atlin, Fort George
Omineca, Cariboo, September 1 to December 16; in Columbia except west
of the Columbia River, October 1 lo
October 31.
Cariboo—Males, throughout the pro
vince, except Queen    Charlotte    aud
south and east of tbe main line of the
old Canadian Northern, September lo
December 10;  south and cast of the
old Canadian Northern, September 16
to October 15.
Wapiti  (Elk)    Males. Fernie, Cran-
| brook and Columbia, except part of
1 Columbia west of Columbia Itivcr, Oc-
J toher 1 to October 16,
Mountain Sheep-Males, north ot
I the old Grand Trunk. September 1 t.i
/November 15; Fernie. Cranbrook and
j Columbia. October 1 to 81; Cariboo
I District south of 52 parallel and west
' of Fraser River, and Lillooet south of
I Fraser River. September 1 to Novem-
i ber 15.
m
E£
ft
SEE
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given yery
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
■35
B£
K
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as tbey wear loafer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
^^=-^-~ a*1, bc-j^   -. r-i-rt ^*nn
Lumber
In every sorts of liuilding materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS.
SHINGLES,
KILN  DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    lUKNISHINOa
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE  WITH  REASONABLE CHARQII.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
| Night calls: 184X Courtenay
[office;  15!i Cumberland
GOVERNMENT L1QU0B  ACT
Notice of Application for Beor
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihat,
on the 10th day of April next, the undersigned intends to apply to thc
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part ol
building known as Alert Hay Hotel,
situated at Alert Hay. British Columbia, iu Comox Distrtct( Lot BS,
Rupert District, in tho Province 01
British Columbia, for the sale of Beer
by the glass or hy the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated this 9th day of March, 1925.
A.  A. GIBBENS,
11-14 Applicant.
Mountain Goat—Northern and easr-r
ern districts, yeptember 1 to Decern-
ber 15, except in port of eastern dis-
tHct south of main line of C.P.R., j
where season is September 15 to De-,
eeraber 16 j western district, except1
Vancouver Island, September 12 to j
November 30.
Bear—Except   white   or   Kermodei,
northern district, September 1, 1925, j
to June 30, 1926; eastern district Sep-1
tember IB  to June 30;  western di3-:
trfct,  except  Vancouver   Island  September 1  to June 15;  Vancouver  Island, November 1 to May 31; trapping
of bear is any part of the province is ,
prohibited,
Deer -Mule, White Tail and Coat/
males only, northern and eastern dis- j
tricto, except White Tails in North
and South Okanagan and Similkameon
and Grand Forks, Greenwood west of
Midway Mou.it a ins summit, September 15 to December 16; western district except Queen Charlotte Islands
and Saanich, September IU to No-
ivember 30; Highland District. Van*
j couver Island. September \'l lo September 30.
Fur-Bearing Animals * - Northern
district, November 15, 1925, to April
eastern district, closed for all fur-
boarinj; animals; western district, except muskrats on Vancouver Islam!
and beaver, December 1 to March 31;
beaver in Prince Rupert, Skeena and
Mackenzie districts, December 1 to
March 31.
Ducks- -Except Wood and Eider but
Including Wilson Snipe, Coots, Black-
Breasted and Golden Plover, Greater
nnd Lesser Yellowlegs, northern and
eastern districts September 15 to December 31; western district north of
52nd parallel, September 15 jo December 31; western district south of 52,
Jctoher 15 to January 31.
Geese and Brant—Northern and
eastern districts, September 15 to December 31; western district north of
52 September 15 to December 31; west
ern district south of 52, November 1
to February 15. .
MARY PICKFORD WEARS
NEARLY TON OF CLOTHES
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application far Bet'r
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 27th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being pari of the
building situate on the West side oi
the Island Highway, at Merville.
Comox District. County of Nanaimo.
Province of British Columbia, upon
the lands described as subdivision oi
Lots 27 aud 42. being part of Block 20,
Map No. 2270, Victoria Land Registration District, in the Province ol
British Columbia, for the sale of Beei
by the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption On the premises.
Dated this 2Cth dav of February.
1925.
R. H. SHAW.
9-12. Applica it
"The Most of the Beat for tha Least"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR REST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
PHONE 11
■ *B.x*r^.--.3r:
^£
CUMBERLAND
IE-
NOTICE
"The  JiaTlguhle   Water's   Protection
Act" lt.S.<. Clinpter 115
The Royston Lumber Company Limited hereby gives Notice tliat it hns
under Section 7 of tlie Bald Act deposited with the .Minister of Publlc
Works at Ottawa and in the Oilice ot
the Registrar of Titles at the City oi
Victoria, in the Province of British
Columbia, a description of the site and
plans of its proposed wharf, booming-
grounds, piles and works nppurtri,
ant thereto to he constructed on the
site known as Lot 161, Nanaimo Dis
trict and which site is situate in front
of the Marine Drive which lies between high tide mark nnd tlie North
Easterly boundary of Blocks "('", "1)',
and "K' of Section 4 in Nelson 10;-
trlct Province of llritish Columbln,
Plan 1478.
AND TAKE NOTIOH that alter the
expiration of one month from the dale
of the first publication of this Notice
the Royston Lumber Company Limited will under Section 7 of the said
Act apply to the .Minister of Public
Works nt his oilice nt the City of Ottawa for approval of the snld sin-
and plans and for leave to construct
thc said Wharf and lo drive, place
and erect the said idles and works ap.
purtenaut thereto.
DATED at Cumberland, B.C., thi
2Cth day of February, A.D., 1086,
TIIE ROYSTON LUMBER CO.  LTD
Per tl. K, lYhlyaina.
9-12 Managing Director.
NAVIGABLE WATERS PROTECTION
ACT It. S. ('. CHAPTER 115
Wood and English, Limited, hereby
give notice that they have, under section 7 of the said Act, deposited with
the Minister of Public Works at Ottawa, and In the oilice of the District
Registrar of the Land Registry District o( Victoria at Victoria, U.C, a
description of the site and the plans
of the Mill. Log Booming Grounds and
Docks proposed* to he built in He-
West Arm of Beaver Cove in front
of Lots 116, liW2 and 1093.
And take notice that after the expiration of one month front the date
of the first publication of this notice,
Wood and English Limited will under
section 7 of lite said Act, apply to the
Minister of Public Works nt his office
In the City of Ottawa, for approval of
the said site and plans, and for leave
to construct the said Mill. Log Booming Grounds and Docks.
Dated at Victoria, B.C.. this third
day of March l!t2a.
WOOD &  ENGLISH,  limited,
11-14 P. C. Green, Agent.
■M
T. Malpass
GENEKAI  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
\SIIES TAKEN  AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS Ol'lt MOTTO
Oil PiiOftfi 15 vision hotel
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
If all the costumes worn by Mary
Pickford in her current United Artist:* j
attraction, "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall," were weighed at once, they '
would "tip the beam" at a quarter of
a ton, according to a letter received
from the Pickford-Fairbankii studios
by the management of the Uo-llo Theatre.
Miss Pickford wore thirteen 6o.-f-
tumes of the Elizabethan period while
making ihe picture, tbe letter stated,
and each dress was heavily beaded
and brocaded, some °f them, requiring
several weighty petticoats besides.
"Imagine a young girl of today being married in a bridal gown which
weighed fifty pounds, Yet the wedding gown worn by Miss Pickford aa
Dorothy Vernon weighed that much.
and she uot only had to don it once,
but several times, and certain of the
scenes had to be taken three, four and
even live times, which required hours
of walking and standing."
The principals of the cast-, not couiit
ing -Miss Pickford, had ninety change
of costume, tbe total weight of which
was a ton and a half!
All told, 1,000 costumes were used
in this picture, which takes into account the garbs of peasants, ladies-
in-waiting, couriers, soldiers, court
attaches, servants, etc. The combined weight ot all the costumes U
estimated hy Mitchell Leisen who designed them, to be more than seventeen tons.
"Dorothy Vcriion of Haddon Hall"
will be shown at the llo-Ilo Theatre
tonight and tomorrow night. it Ifl
not only rated as Miss Pickford's best
effort, but is perhaps the best costume picture of its kind ever made.
aia/> i^snrr^m^srn f> *
I Will Call
at your house in time to take you to
the train or boat.
Car   For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Hates for Long Trips
I'llO.Ni: ti OI! 22-A8K FOR
Geo.   Mason
3EZ
i
Manns bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc,
Taste Teasing  Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give ii•*. a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
7£
E2E.
——ofli •*r-r**
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND MORI! ISO
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
SUCH  A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your laundry to us.   Our long experience safeguards your interests and guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove it.
Free  Patches   —   Clean Work   —   Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry
PHONE 34 Quick Delivery P.O. Box 894
H
ere an
dTh
ere
Tlie   following  apt comment  on
the careless motorist and his ultimate fate comes from the Boston
Transcript:
"If a freight train at a crossing
"Hits an auto fair and square
"There's the freight train—Where'i
the  auto?
''fecho answers 'Where?'"
Trees at the rate of 20,000 a day
have been planted by farmers in
Western Canada during the last 26*
yer .a, according to a report of the
Federal Department of Agriculture.
A total of 150,000 nno young trees,
the report shows, has been distributed to farmers in that section in
X905.
Canada has entered into negotiations with Germany for a trade
agreement which will give her the
benefit of the most favored nations
agreement. Exports to that country very nearly doubled during 1924
and at the close of the year Germany was practically in the position of being Canada's third best
customer.
A co-operative «hipment of poultry to New York City, encouraged
and handled by the Dominion Poultry Service, Alberta branch,
brought good results. The shipment consisted of two refrigerator
carloads of turkeys and the shippers received 25 cents a pound for
their birds, the New York selling
price being 41 cents a sound.
Among the interesting books of
the season is "Canada's Great Highway; from the First Stake to the
Last Spike," by J. H. E. Secretan,
C.E., (published by Thorburn and
Abbott, Ottawa). Dealing with the
early history of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the volume contains
racy reminiscences of life in construction days as experienced by
the author, who was a member of
thc company's engineering staff.
That the Land of Evangeline
(Nova Scotia) now ships over 2,-
(100 000 bushels of apples abroad
annually was the recent statement
nf F. G. .1. C'omeau, general freight
and passenger agent, Dominion Atlantic Railway. A number of British apple growers and buyers are
at present putting large tracts oi
land under fruit. With the apple
growing industry increasing from
year to year, at the rate of two to
three hundred per cent per decade,
only twenty per cent of the orchard
land available In the province it
yet under fruit.
Perhaps the most remarkable,
certainly the first aerial stowaway
in history was discovered by Pilot
Caldwell of the Laurentlde Air Service, operating in the neighborhood
of the Rouyn gold-fields, the other
day. Caldwell, on rising for a long
flight, found his machine so badly
balanced as to be almost unman-
agable. Cigarette butts and other
clues led to the uncovering of the
extra weight, which turned out to
be a miner. As the man had taken
this cheap but decidedly dangerous
way of reaching civilization in order to see his sick wife, he was not
detained or punished.
Job
Printing
-of the
Better Kind
Obtainable at the office)
of the
Cumberland
Islander
Phone 35
Job Printing that won't stick is
not worth any more than that
kind of a friend. FRIDAY,   MAftCH   27,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN'
f>
MR. H. L. ELLISON
OF MILITARY FAME
IS VISITOR HERE
COURTENAY, March 26.—From the
famous retreat from Mons to duty at
Chenack during the Greco-Turkish
war that followed the Great War, is
the military record ot Mr. H. U Ellison who has Just arrived in Courtenay. Mr. Ellison is a brother of
the well known gun maker Mr. E. T.
Ellison of Union Street, and he arrived in town from Gosport, England on
COURTENAY PERSONALS
Mr. Thomas Menzie was ln the City
on Saturday for the purpose of investigating certain applications for
relief.
* *   *
Mr. M. B. Tribe was a business visitor to Vancouver during the week, re
turning Thursday.
* •   » *"
Mr. John T. McCay, supervisor ol
the Dominion Lite Assurance Co.,
spent several days in the district
during the  past  week.       Mr.    Mc-
The 'Grantham Anglican Ladles'
Guild served a silver tea at the home
of Mrs. R. E, Ault on Wednesday
last. There was a fair attendance
and a neat sum was realized as a uc-
■iult of this occasion.
Saturday, coming over  the road  byC8>r "™ accompanied by Mr. Samue,
McMurty.     Both these gentlemen are
.rom  Oxbow,  Sask.,  and  while  here
motor from Nanaimo.
Mr. Ellison comes of a family with
a considerable military record. lu
those first terrible da.a of Augu.tt
1914, he was on his way to Mons and
took part ln the historical retreat
from the Belgian town under Gen.
Sir Smith Dorrlen. At this time he
was with the 19th Brigade of the
Royal Field Artillery. With this
unit he saw continuous lighting up
and down the line between Belgium
and Italy until he was severely wound
ed at the second battle of Ypres. After
this he obtained a commission ln the
Royal Air Force with which branch
of the service he remained until the
Armistice, whon he transferred back
to his old battery in the Royal Field
Artillery and went on active service
to Mesopotamia where he was In the
fighting at Iraak. From Mesopotamia he went to India as a telephonic
construction engineer with the Imperial Army, In Burma. At the outbreak of hostilities between Turkey
and Greece, he was again transferred
back to his old battery in the R.F.A.
which waH then at Cairo and proceeded Immediately to Constantinople,
landing there on Christmas Day, 1922.
The British troops at Chenack were
used largely for police duty between
the GreekB and Turks to prevent
fighting, and were assisted in this
duty by ships of the British Navy.
Mr. Ellison returned home to England some twelve months ago and has
now come to B.C. with the intention
of settling here. He is at present
staying with his brother on the Lake
Trail Road.
CAMPBELL LAKE
TRAPPER IS FINED
500.00 AND COSTS
COURTENAY, March 24.—Two of
tbe Provincial game wardens made a
considerable haul this week when
they caught W. Sutherland a trapper,
ln the Upper Campbell Lake district
north of here, in possession of twenty
beaver skins. The game wardens,
Messrs Ronald Stewart and B. Marshall had been working on the case
during the past week with the result
that on Monday evening the trapper
walked Into the arms ot the game
guardians carrying three of the pelts.
The other seventeen skins were carefully concealed, buried in a box.
Before Magistrate Walker of Quathiaski Cove, Sutherland was fined five
hundred dollars and costs; and In audition to this, all the beaver skins
were confiscated. The roads ln the
Upper Campbell Lake district arc
under two feet of snow and it will be
three weeks before these roads are
passable according to the game wardens who have just returned.
P. J. O'LEARY IS DEAD
COURTENAY, March 25—Mr. W.
H. Wilson of Courtenay Avenue, has
Just received word from the Peace
River country of the death of Mr. P,
J. O'Leary which took place after a
short UlneBs. Mr. O'Leary was wos
commonly known as "Pat" was woll
acquainted In Cumberland. He led
the coal town for the Peace River district last winter.
•yw 'AVJi3IHA09
•pn shoiow ONiAM-naa
•suue-i uo 00'00i$ 'sid<\
-qnus lauqej) jo ies 9}3idtuoD
pus aixn uB^s-jona q-jiM pe^tj
'ednqs pooS tiweai ui eutfua pus
-juiBd 'saapuaj 'sea;**, 'aiiua-jsioii
-dn 'UBpas aopnx pjoj J-36I '^D
PUBJI pUODaS POOJ) B 10} *)95*[.tBUI
an,} ut 3JB noA" ji SuipBaj it-jom
}i puy n!M noX dn Ausa iqSu 9q;
■
3a«h noA M0N
visited  Mr.  Frank  Stevenson  at hit,
silver fox farm at Grantham.
* •   »
Mrs. Theed Pearse has returned
from California where she has been
spending the winter months. *
* *   *
Mr. John Anderson, the Vancouver
manager of the Commercial Union
Assurance Co., Ltd., was In town renewing business acquaintances.
* *   *
Mr. Geo. W. Edwards of the Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd., was a business visitor to Victoria, returning on
Friday.
* *   *
Mr. Stephen Jones spent several
days in Courtenay in connection with
Masonic activities and returned to
Victorln on Friday.
* *   *
Mr. J. W. McQuillan of Sandwick
had the misfortune to severely cut hu
right hand last Saturday, when he
fell on his axe. He was brought In
to town where Dr. T. H. Butters dress
ed the laceration.
LAKE TRAIL
PROPERTY
CHANGES HANDS
Mr. W. J. Montgomery of the Prairie Provinces has purchased through
Mr. F. R. F. Biscoe, a five-acre block
on the Lake Trail Road near No. 8
mine. Mr. Montgomery intends to
clear this piece of property, build and
make his home In this district.
RUN AWAY TEAM IS
CHECKED AFTER SPRINT
COURTENAY, March 21—A run
away team belonging to a Japanese
named Cato caused some excitement
ln the city on Saturday afternoon.
One of the horses became scared
at a new power street grader at work
on Union Street causing the team to
bolt. They were drawing a wagon
loaded with hay. The driver a Jap,
fell oft* the load but retained his hold
of the reins and was dragged for
about thirty feet along the road and
appeared to be badly bruised and
scratched. The run away horses
headed down the hill past 'he post
ofllce and turned the corner along the
McCallum Road. Right in front of
Leighton's Blacksmith Shop the tongue of the wagon struck a telephone
pole fair ln the middle and burled itself into the cedar pole. So great
was the force of the Impact that the
cross arm at the top was broken, and
the wires severed. The harness was
demolished and the wagon reach brok
en but the team seemed little wor-ie
for their escapade.
PRICES OBTAINED
AT AUCTION SALES
ARE IMPROVING
COURTENAY, March 26.—Better
prices are now being obtained at thc
auction sales which are being con-
Incted In the district at the present
time. The sale held for Mr. Geo. W.
1'iii'iibull and others on Wednesday,
md conducted by Mr. E. Felix Thomas
was well attended and good prices
joth for the livestock and household
'urnlture were realized. The disposal sale of Mr. Geo. Blgelow's register-
ad Jersey cows at Sandwick, by
Messrs Hardy & Pearce was also an
Indication that the dairy cow Is again
coming Into Its own. Prices ranged
from sixty to eighty dollars and In
one instance over a hundred dollars
was paid.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
LOGGING CARS JUMP
TRACK AT UNION ST.
COURTENAY, March 24— Traffic on
the Comox Logging railway was held
up for a while on Tuesday morning
by the derailment of several cars of
logs. The mishap occured close to
the point where the company's line
crosses Union Street. Fortunately
the train was only proceeding at a
very moderate rate of speed at tha
Mme. Most of the logs were displaced from the cars that left the
rack, but the line was soon cleared
ind traffic resumed.
VEW WATER SERVICE
BETWEEN VICTORIA AND
COURTENAY PROPOSED
SOCIAL EVENING AT
GRANTHAM SCHOOL
COURTENAY, March 23.-The whilt
drive and  dance nt Grantham held
in the Community Hall was well at- i
tended.      The  winners  from  among j
some sixty players were as follows:
Ladles'   first   Miss   Hannam;   second
Mrs. Alex Duncan;  consolation MIsh J
Kathleen Clifford.     Gentlemen's first
Mr, II. Chllds; second Mr. I. Pickering
booby    Mr.  Herbert    Bridges.      De-
llghtful refreshments  and an enjoy- j
able dance followed the card party.    I
A scow and tug service between
.'ictorla and Courtenay calling at
ther points on Vancouver Island
•hich would open up new markets for
sland farmers has been receiving thc
consideration of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce, C. P. W. Schwengers, president, reported at the meeting of the directors of the Victoria
Chamber of Commerce Thursday.
Mr. Edwards of the Edwards Lumber Company met the transportation
committee of the Chamber, Mr.
Schwengers reported to see If some
arrangements could be made to establish a better steamship service between Courtenay and Victoria.
From Vancouver
For the last three years a scow towed by a tug operating from Vancouver has been cutting the steamship
rates. The advantage is that It can
be towed up the Comox River to
Courtenay wharf. A second scow is
to be put on the run and will make
other ports of call at a reduction of
II on C.P.R. rates. The scow will
call at Chemainus, Ladysmith and
other points. It appears that a fleet
will be established to call at Island
points.
YlrtorM'ouiieiuiy
Mr. Edwards consulted with the
committee on the advisability of establishing a service from Courtenay
to Victoria. It would not only help
Victoria to secure up-Island business
but would open up new markets for
the farmer In addition to the markets he now hnd l„ Vancouver. Mr.
Edwards will take up the matter with
people In Courtenay who own a tugboat and see If he can get n scow to
put Into the servlci. Further Information Is expected from him within a few weeks.
Southern Alberta is to have another addition to its growing list of
titled ranchers, according to report.
The Due de Nemours, a descendant
of Louis Phillipe of France, it is stated, is sailing in April to visit Lord
and Lady Rodney, who have a
ranch at Fort Saskatchewan, and,
later, to acquire a homestead near
the establishment of the Prince of
Wales.
The Nova Scotia Technical College assays under direction of the
Dominion Council of Scientific Research indicate Nova Scotia oil
shales to be the richest in the world,
giving fifty gallons of high-grade
paraffin to a ton of shale. One
hundred million tons of the shale
are readily accessible, and vast oil
Industries similar to those of Colorado and the Western States might
well come into being in this province.
municipal Inspector, to Nanaimo, who j
spent an afternoon investigatnig, and
expressed  the  opinion  that  the   olty
clerk's figures were correct.
Mr.  Harrison  then ordered a  consultation between  .Mr. Kldd and  tiie '
government Inspector, and the former
would not admit ll">t his firm's orig- '
inal report was in error, or that the '
city clerk's  findings  were  correct.
The question still stands, "are the
sinking funds short or not?'' and according to Mayor Harrison thc citizens want the answer beyond the
shadow of a doubt. He said lie was
arranging for another audit by an expert accountant skilled in municipal
affairs.—Vancouver Province .
!lfeSAYS
fTHERL ARE
SO MANY
j FARMERS IN
l CONGRESS
[NOW THAT
.THE FORM
JOF ADDRESS
fOUGHTTOBE
..CHANGED
Ito'hfy:
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
"I find general business conditions quiet but improving throughout Canada and undoubtedly the
increase in the price of farm products will prove very encouraging
to the west," said Grant Hall, vice-
president of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, on his return from a recent tour of the Dominion, "Large
orders for hardware shipped over
our lines of late to the west indicate that the crop money is now
beginning to circulate more readily,
which in its turn is a mark of the
farmer's confidence in the country."
The Canadian Pacific Railway
has appointed P. A. Cox. general
resent, to be assistant Oriental manager, at Shanghai, and E. F. L.
Sturdce, acting general passenger
agent for the Orient, to be genera!
passenger agent for the Orient, with
headquarters at Hongkong. Leo
Solloway, recently appointed asiatic
freight, agent, with offices at Montreal, and supervision over Oriental
and Australasian traffic via Pacific
ports, has the distinction of being
the youngest official in the Canadian Pacific Service. He was born
in Vancouver, in If95, and has been
in the steamship freight service 14
years.
(8
CWNwwc) ^raini^stcm
"Did you notice that insolent conductor looking at you as if you hadn't
paid your fare?"
"Yes, and did you notice me looking nt him as If I had?"
NANAIMO DOUBTFUL
IF SURPLUS IS REAL
NANAIMO, March 25.—Whether or
not there Is a surplus or deficit in the
sinking fund of the city of Nanaimo
remains undetermined at the present
time, according to reports presented
to the City Council, one showing a
surplus and another a deficit, while
the total amount In the sinking fund
tallied in each instance. The question
arose out of an expert audit ordered
by the 1924 council which was carried
out by Messrs Bnwden, Kldd & Co.,
expert accountants, whose findings declared thc sinking fund to be short;
f2r>.703.4S. This firm stated that the I
sinking fund required a total of $852,-
851.47.
City Clerk Harold Hackwood made
out a complete schedule of the city's
sinking fund account, placing the
amount required at $270,380.46 and tho
amount In the sinking fund as $326,-
948.05, making n surplus of $56,567.59
The vast difference In tho findings
wns too much for Mayor Harrison, and
he   brought   ,Mr.   Baird,    government
THE BEST VALUES
ON THE MARKET BAR NONE
STAR REGULAR TOURING   $935.00
STAR SPECIAL TOURING, fully equipped in every way,
full balloon tires, disc wheels, etc., etc.,  $1175.00
STAR SPECIAL COUPE fully equipped  in  every  way,
full balloon tires, disc wheels, etc., etc., $1325.00
DURANT TOURING fully equipped  in every way, full
balloon tires, disc wheels  $1550.00
ESSEX COACH $1595.00       HUDSON COACH $2395.00
Phone for Demonstration 182
Bell-Irving Motors, Limited
Agents for PHILCO DIAMOND GRID BATTERIES
3S
CHEER  UP!
buy soMEandram & Henderson 's
PAINTS, VARNISHES, ETC.
AND MAKE A BRIGHTER CITY
—SOLD BY—
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
P.O. Box 62 COUR'I ENAY 'Phone 17
33
ft
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery
In our Whole Wheat Bread we claim we are offer-
ing to the community the most health -giving and nu-
tritous loaf manufactured in B. ('. today Our quality
goods bear the full meaning of the word Purity and
in the near future we hope to place on the market a
purer loaf of white bread than lias yet been offered to
the citizens of British Columbia.
The cost of production will be greater, but the
price will remain unchanged.
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
**=■■
•£•
29
■* — ■!"
ft
DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR VALUE
t^Otd/   "Roadster
AT
$629.00
MAKES A CAR POSSIBLE FOR EVERYONE
OR CLOSED CAR COMPORT
Coupe
AT ONLY
TERMS TO SUIT ALL
$840
Corfleld Motors, Limited
FORI) DEALER
Phone 16 Courtenay PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   MARCH   27,   1926
The
Newer
Things In
Furnishings-
WHAT a fine selection is here! Our
Spring Showing
embraces the collar-attached Shirts, collar-to-match
Shirts and neck band styles'
in stripes
fects.
and figured ef-
$1,95   to   $1.50
AT
Sutherlands
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Mrs. Qeorge Richardson has been
spending tlu* past few days ln Courtenay, the guest of Mr. and MrR. Robt.
Hornal.
Social and Personal
Cream   ot  l.illies   for  tender   skin.
Lang s Drug Store.
.   n   #
Mr.  Alex  Denholme    returned    on
Tuesday   from   Vancouver   where   he
has been residing for the past month.
*   *   *
Mr. Edward W. Bickle left ou Tuesday morning's train on a business trip
to Vancouver.
a   t.   .
Preserve that youthful  complexion
.vith Lang's Cream of Llllles.
Mr. II. II Murray Wl
Nanaimo Saturday last,
Sunday evening.
s a vlstor to
returning on
SURPRISE SOCIAL
HELD IN HONOR OF
MISS D. FRELONE
RESIDENCE COMPLETELY
DESTROYED BY FIRE
COURTENAY, .March 26.—The residence of Mr. Oeorge Every- Clayton
at Little Itlver, was completely destroyed by fire today. Tho cause of
the lire is not known and only a few
of the contents were saved. Mr.
Clayton's house was probably one of
thc best in tiie Little River district
and wns ideally situated close to the
sea. I| is understood tbat the property was  insured.
CHURCH NOTICE
('race Methodist Church—7:00 p.m.,
special evangelistic service by Rev.
Dr. .1. I). Smith, who will give an address on the "Triumphs of the Gospel
In New York City." Miss E, Henderson will also render a solo, "My
Task." and there will lie a bright
song service.     Everybody welcome.
A jolly surprise party was arranged
at tbe home of Mr. and Mrs. Victor
Frelone, Allan Avenue, on Wednesday
evening by some ot the friends of
their daughter, Miss Dellna, in whose
honor the party was held. About
thirty-three young folk were present,
the evening being pleasantly passed
In curds, music and games, one of the
latter being a novel guessing contest
which was won by Miss Pearl Hunden
and Mr. Jimmy Walker. Much Interest was aroused in this game as
answers to the questions were given
out by means of various pieces on the
piano. Dainty refreshments were
served by Mrs. Frelone, Mrs. Aspesy,
and Mrs. Hatfield, tlie latter also presiding at tbe piano.
Those present were Misses Iris
Treen. Pearl Hunden, Dolenla Wilson,
Nellie Taylor, Hazel Leighton, Vivian Aspesy, Annie Brown, Charlotte
Carey, Ellen Hunden, Harriet Gomm.
Nettie Robertson, Jean Hatfield, Josie
Balagno. Dellna Frelone, and Messrs
W. Whyte, It. Bennle, Donald Watson,
J. Jones, Harold Banks, Howard
Carey, Harold Leighton, James Walker, George Robertson, H. Murray and
Arthur Boyd.
('Aim OF THANKS
Mrs. John Baird and Family take
ibis opportunity of thanking all those
friends who, by their sympathy and
ready help, did so much to lighten tbe
hour when a loving husband and devoted father passed to bis rest.
EASTER   EGGS
NOVELTIES, ETC.
PLACE YOUR ORDERS FOR
EASTER EGGS
AND SPECIAL BASKETS WITH US EARLY,
WHILE OUR ASSORTMENT IS COMPLETE
Names put on Chocolate Eggs FREE
25c.
PER DOZ.
FRESH CUT LOCAL
Daffodils
25c.
PER DOZ.
Lang's
Drug Store
I used Lang's Cream
of Lilies this morn-
• ning, did you?
-THE REXALL KODAK STORE-
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S'
Mr, J. Vernon-Jones was a visitor]
to Southern Island points at the weak |
end. returning on Sunday evening.      j
* *   *
Cream of Lillles whitens the skin.
Lang's Drug Store.
* .   *
BORN—To Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McLean, of Courtenay, on Tuesday,
March 24, a daughter.
* •   *
Mr. Charles Graham made a business trip to Vancouver on Wednesday
morning,    returning    tho    following
(.'Veiling.
* *    .
Mr. Frank Slaughter loft for Vancouver on Thursday morning where
he Will reside in future.
SPECIAL MUSIC
FOR MARY PICKFORD
PICTURE TONIGHT
in connection with Mary
Pickford's starring vehicle
"Dorothy Vernon of Haddon
Hall," which is being shown at
the Ilo-llo Theatre tonight and
tomorrow night, the manage-"
ment lias arranged for special
music to accompany the picture. This production ls doubtless Miss Pickford's greatest
triumph and admirers of "America's sweetheart" would be
well advised to attend.
YOUNG FOLK HELD
SURPRISE PARTY
A surprise party was held on Monday evening at th0 home of Mr. and
Mrs. George Johnson of tho New
Townsite, in honor of their youngest
daughter, Jean, about twenty of the
hitter's girl and boy friends being
present to spend a merry evening in
songs and playing games, and listening to the radio. About 10 o'clock
('electable refreshments were served
b..* Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. J. Hunden i
and one hour later the party ended,
much against the wishes of the young
folk, all of whom expressed them- j
selves as having had an exceeding- ]
ly pleasant time.
SURPRISE PARTY
NO TRUTH IN RUMOR
A pleasant surprise was In store for
Miss Jean Smith on Saturday evening last when some twenty boy and
Rumors have been rife in the city
lately concerning the appearance of
another "wild man," but investigation   girl friends unexpectedly dropped lu I
by responsible authorities has proved   at tbe home of her parents to spend
that the story Is nothing more than   a Jolly evening In song singing and
the product of someone's Imagination i Paying games.     Those present wcre j
Probably this "someone" saw one of j the Misses May Hughes, Evelyn Carey,
our   football  players   out   doing   bis   Jessie Grant,    Beryl Hudson,    Sadie j
roadwork  in  the  early  evening  and   "rown, May Taylor, Ella Henderson, I
naturally came to the conclusion that Edna Gear, Mae Brown, Edith O'Brien
lt was a wild man doing his stuff in
Extra Specials for the
Week - End
8-lb. boxes Fancy Sodas, each , $1.25
McCormick's Jersey Cream Sodas, 2 pkts for 55c.
Fancy English Mixed Biscuits 35c. 3 lbs. for $1.00
Chrisp Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for   55c.
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for 45c.
CANNED VEGETABLES
Corn, Peas and Totnatoes, 4 tins for 85c.
King Oscar Sardines, 5 tins for 95c.
Kippered Snacks, 4 tins for   25c.
Kippered Herring, 3 tins for 25c.
Beach Eakins Prune or Plum Jam, 4-lb. tins 85c.
Malkins Best Marmalade, 4-lb. tins 85c.
Local Fresh Eggs "Extras", 3 dozen for $1.00
White Wonder Soap, 7 bars for   55e.
SEED POTATOES
Early Rose, per lb. 5c. Netted Gems, per lb. 5c.
FLU, STOCK OF VEGETABLE AMI I*'LOWER SEEDS
ONION SETS, ETC
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN SEASON
Head   Lettuce,   Cauliflower,   Cabbage,   Onions,   Carrots,   Beets,
Parsnips and Sweet Potatoes, etc.
Eating and Cooking Apples, Oranges, Lemons, Florida Grape
Fruit, and Bananas.
Matt Brown's Grocery
PHONE 38
i.'r^.~-^:*t^t>j,.gTBC^;x.*j^gr:ifJe>
•M^S^
wm—a—a.
->jj
■rj^-j^g-^r-agsg-il^ar
Mary Walker and Masters John Rlch-
hls birthday suit.
ANNUAL MEETING
OF TENNIS CLUB
NEXT WEDNESDAY
The annual meeting of the Cumberland Tennis Club wlll be held In
the Council Chambers on Wednesday.
April 1st, at 7:30 p.m. Everyone Interested In tennis is asked to attend.
ardson, George Brown, Hawthorne
Graham, Tom Graham, Ernie MacDonald, Andrew Brown, Gordon
Walker, Dave Robertson and Willie
Smith. Dainty refreshments were
served by Mrs. Smith, assisted by several of the girls.
DONT FORGET THE
AUCTION SALE
of household furniture and effects on
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, AT 1 O'CLOCK
At Mrs. Seaborne's, Arden, on Cumberland Road,
I'/** miles from Courtenay
HARDY AND PEARCE
Auctioneers Courtenay, B.C.
■5-	
1
IMPROVEMENT EFFECTED
ON MAIN CITY STREETS
COURTENAY. — Considerable Improvement has been effected to the
main business section of Union Street
during the past week. Tho new
power grader, a very efficient looking machine in charge of Mr. H. E.
Haas was lirst put over the down
town sections ot the streets with a result that the surface was very much
less undulating than before. After
this a certain amount of soil was incorporated with the gravel which was
already on the road; and some of
the coarser gravel was taken off. A
power roller war, then employed and
the street now bus a very good appearance. Nothing but a hard surfaced road can, however, be expected
to stnnd up under the amount of traffic that now makes use of tbe city
streets.
Struck Wealth of Gas by Accident
'•RIDIN' PRETTY"
SHOWS DESMOND
IN CHOICE ROLE
"Rldln' Pretty," a Universal picture
with  William   Desmond  ns  the  star;
will be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre
on   Wednesday  aud   Thursday.   April
1 and 2 and will bring with it a lot
Of laughs.     A lot of tense moments
and several big thrills.     This latest
vehicle  for  Universale  favorite  star j
of Western stories Is a comedy drama,
and Is one of the best pictures scon I
In a long lime, us It has a variety- j
appeal tbat will furnish Interest tor
almost any screen fan, no matter what
manner of entertainment is preferred.
Those who maintain tliat being
natural Is one of the greatest histrionic arts will find material to bol-1
ster up this contention, for certain
parts of the picture nre "stolon" by j
two or three cowboys who never havo
acted and never wlll "act."
Heretofore  their  efforts  In   behalf
Of motion picture art have hcen con- j
lined to desperate riding for tbey are
real cowboys and are members of Uni-
versal's famous Ranch Riders.     One
Is  forced  to  the  conviction   that In
"RidhV  Pretty"   these  men  hnd  for-!
gotten that such a thing as a camera |
was   ln   existence,  for  they  behaved j
just as men might in real life ln slm- j
liar circumstances.
But to explain; "Rldln' Pretty" Is
a story of six cowboys who lind them-!
selves iu n big city (San Francisco)
Where one of them, the character personated by Desmond Is the heir to a ;
fortune left him by bis uncle with the
provision that he spend a year in his
uncle's mansion, provided with ser-
] vnnts and tbe like. It Is In this
mansion that the cowboys Hnd themselves early In the story.
IN AND AROUND MEDtCINK HAT. Second Blteel «
rntlllna* company*! elevator ind tht Canadian Pacific nridft
Tha Inaert >• a pholuiraph laker, of Ih. Ilia Chief natural it>-
well al Mtdlcln. Hal. Jul, J6lh. lilt. Ther. waa a do rd In
preaaura of SHO Iba. and an oprn (low of 3,901.1110 cutile leal pal
day. an equivalent lo 151 ton. of coal.
JUST thirty-nine years ago. in July. 1HS&. to be
exact, a small crew of men in the service of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, unluaded a portable
water-well drilling machine at a point near where
what is now the village of Allison, Alberta, thirty-
five miles west of Medicine Hat, on the main line of
the company. The crew had been sent to thia spot
to drill for water and set to work. Little did these
men realize that they were about to make a find that
was to be thc beginning of a wide-spread industry
Perhaps they were disappointed when, instead of the
water they were seeking, gas appeared in their well
but if they could have looked into the future they
•would have seen Ihat this first gas well was to be
t**.ie cause of the expenditure of millions of dollars.
the employment, directly and indirectly, of thuusands
of men, and the opening up of an enormous area
stietching from the Peace River in thc north to the
international boundary in the suuih and from the
Rocky Mountains in the west to the Alberta*
Saskatchewan line in the east
So much interest waa ImmedtaU'l) aroused over
the discovery of natural gas in this well that others
■were drilled in Medicine Hat hut the resu'ls were
not gratifying until the year IRP0, when gas was discovered in considerable quantity while drilling was
being conducted in ru-arcn of coal and it was then
found that il could he obtained in commercial quantities in what is now known as the Medicine Hat
sand, at a depth of about one thousand feet In
1908 the first deep well was -unk and a splendid
flow of gas was encountered, fium which the city of
Medicine Hat has enjoyed the b. nefits of natural
gas up to the present time, with the further prospect
of a long-continued supply.
After this the Canadian  I'a.'itic Railway Jrulea
a number of wells for its own use. and other concern
entered the field    The wells at Pincher Creek were
drilled for oil. which was produced tor a Mint,, •*■»•
tn Insignificant quantities being also encountered, but
theie anil many other wells resulted in disappointment to their promoters. There were times that tht
heartaches and the tragedies and tlle losses far exceeded the successes and the gains, but this did not
deter the men who wcre willing to stake their all on
whet they had undertaken to do, and it is to their
determined efforts that the later development! of
petroleum and natural gas are due.
The next gas field ol importance to be developed
was the Bow Island field, on which work was begun
in 1908, un the south bank uf the South Saskatchewan
River on the Crow's Nest branch of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, lt was in this field that Canada'i
largest gas well vas drilled, producing, when completed, approximately thirty million cubic feet of
gas per day, and it was on the strength of this development that the enormous sixteen-inch pipe line,
one hundred and seventy-five miles in length, wai
financed and built in order to supply the towns en
route. Other fields have been opened, among them
that known as the Foremost field, located on Etzikom
Coulee. In 1914, the first well was drilled here in
search of oil, and at a depth of about two thousand
feet, gas in very large quantities was found. Recently another well has been completed in this field,
which is now producing over seventeen million cubic
ft et of gas per day and is one of the largest gas
wells in Canada, giving to the towns and villages
along this route an almost unlimited supply of gas.
As many as three hundred wells have been drilled in
Alberta up to the present time in various sections
of the province Not all have been productive, of
course, some having to be abandoned on account of
drilling difficulties, while others did not yield the
fluid sought, or did so in such small quantities as
not to be worth the expense of further development,
and so were abandoned for more productive fields.
The possession of this natural resource to the
|nuple ot Alberta is of enormous value nnd its importance cannot be exaggerated. It bas played a big
part in the past and will play a big part in the
future in the development of the province. It remains for the people themselves to see to it that It is
properly used ind conserved for posterity—Western
Story Magazine.
J >

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