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The Cumberland Islander May 28, 1921

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Array Provincial Library
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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With wblch li eoMolMated the Cumberland Neva.
FORTIETH. YEAR—No. 22.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, MAY 28, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Unveiling Memorial Arch
Witnessed By Thousands
Very Impressive Ceremony Too*.
Place on Empire Day When
Memorial Arch Unveiled
As befitting the great festal day of
the British Empire, on Tuesday last
the Memorial Arch erected to the
memory of those of this district who
paid the supreme sacrifice III the great
war for the great Empire of which
we aro so proud to belong, wns unveiled with tlie ceremony duo Buch an
event.
Arranged ns part of this year's annual celebration, the ceremony was
the first part of the day's programme.
The big parade, which started from
the City Hall, proceeded down Dunsmuir Avenue to the Great War Veterans Hall, where a halt was made
nnd the ceremony duly performed.
Grouped immediately around the beautiful structure were the returned men,
the Mayor of Cumberland and those
taking part In the service, and the
choir of children. Thousands of
people crowded around to see and take
part in thus honoring the, beloved
dead.
His Worship Mayor D. R. MacDonald opened tlie ceremony with the following remarks:
"Lndles and gentlemen, we have
gathered here once more to do honor
to our honorable dead—though dead
they are not forgotten. This beautiful arch and tablets of bronze contain
the names of twenty-eight men, residents of Cumberland and surrounding
district, who made the supreme sacrifice that honor nnd justice might live.
The tablets will now be uncovered and
Capt. Brown will'end the names."
The two large flags which covered
the names of the heroes were then
withdrawn by Mary and Harriet Mc-
Inulty, two surviving daughters of J.
Mclnulty, one of those In whose honor
the monument has been erected. During the unveiling the Bounding ot "The
Last Post" by Mr. Harry Murdoch was
listened to by the large assemblage
with profound  silence.    Capt.  J.  C.
Brown then read  the names  of the
twenty-eight men, as follows:
John Anderson.    J. Milligan.
C. T. Armatrong.   J. Mclnulty.
S. Cameron. J. Mcintosh.
Wm. Campbell.      R. Norman.
S. Connors. A. Pickard.
J. Dempsy. A. Slaughter.
T. Garrlck. J. Spears.
J. M. Gillespie.       Harry Urguhart.
John Glover. D. Waldon.
W. Halcrow. Albert Ward.
A. Haywood. J. Whyte.
Harry Hilller.        B. Williamson.
E. W. Jackson.       William Wright.
T. .Matsumura.       M. Yamada.
A choir of young voices, under the
direction of Mr. Chris. Edwards, then
sang Kipling's famous recessional,
"Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget, lest we forget."
Many Beautiful Wreaths.
Two floral tributes were placed by
the Misses Mary and Harriet McNulty,
who uncovered the names. The Inscription on theBe were, "In loving
memory of our dead daddy, from your
' little girl."
During the unveiling of the names
of the beloved dead, many beautiful
wreaths and floral tributes were placed
about tiie arch, the list of those placing them being:
Grent War Veterans Association.
Courtenay G. W. V. A.
Women's Auxiliary ot G. W. V. A.
Cily of Cumberland.
Cumberland Bonrd of Trade.
Trustees of Scliool Board.
Scliool Teachers of Cumberland.
School Children of Cumberland.
St. George's Presybyterlan Church.
Canadian-Japanese Association.
Cumberland Lodge No. 2(1, A. V. and
A. M.
Knights of Pythias.
Loyal Orange Lodge No. 1676.
Women's Benefit Association of the
Mncnbees.
Ancient Order of Foresters, Court
Bevan, No. 9830.
Union Bay.
Residents of Bevan.
Mrs. R. G. Laver.
Independent Order of Odd Fellows,
No. 11.
Grace Methodist Church.
Fraternal Order of Eagles.
Mayor MacDonald then continued
his address as follows: "If the great
sacrifice which these man have made
will only lead us to see that if we
preserve peace throughout the world
they will not have died in vain. It ls
very right and lilting that a memorial
should be erected to these men who
gave their all In the greatest war ln
history, to preserve the liberties of our
race. This beautiful arch and bronze
tablets will stand here for all time, a
fitting reminder of what they did for
us. It shoull be to all of us a great
Inspiration to apply to the tasks ot
peace the spirit which they displayed
In war."
Other Inspiring Addresses.
Very earnest and inspiring short
addresses were delivered by Capt. J.
C. Brown, Rev. W. Leversedge, Rev.
Jas. Hood and Rev. Thos. Menzles,
M.P.P.
The ceremony was brought to a
close with prayer by Rev. Hood and
the singing of The National Anthem
by the children.
The arch is a 16th century portal,
with an arch opening 10 feet wide and
11 feet high at the apex. The supporting pillan contain recessed panels in
which is space for cast bronze tablets.
Owing to delay in shipping these tablets from Montreal they did not arrive in time and substitutes had to be
used. These bronze tablets will contain the names of the twenty-eight
men in whose honor the arch is erected. The pediment contains three recessed arched panels, the centre one
having the year of erection upon it.
In the centre, betwen two piers, is a
modern sanitary drinking fountain.
From either side of the arch la
arranged a fence composed of short
concrete pillars and heavy chains,
giving a pleasing finish to the arch.
Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction Engineer for the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., designed the memorial and supervised the construction
of it, and to him great credit Is due
for the artistic appearance of the
structure.
OFFICIAL OPENING OF
TENNIS COURT TUESDAY
The tennis players of the pity turned
out In force on May 24th, when play
on'the new wood court waa officially
commenced. From 2 o'clock In the
afternoon until 9 at night the court
was never free from the battle of wits.
The court being much faster than the
grass court rather upset the calculations of the players at the start, but
there was a noticeable settling down
to the new pace, and before the end of
the season the local players bid fair
to equal anything on the Island.
Inter-club matches with Headquarters, Courtenay and Nanaimo are
talked of, and some of the more en-
thuslastic members are already talking ot adding to the city's collection
of silverware ln the shape of the tennis championship for the Island.
At 4 o'clock Mrs. Cooke served tea
to the members (and such a tea); the
unanimous opinion was that it was
well worthy of the occaelon. May
there be more of the same quality.
Fro mevery point of view the day was
a decided success, and tbe court looks
like being one of the most popular
rendezvous ln the city. Missing hus
bands need no longer be sought by tbe
riverside—tennis ls better than fli
ing anytime—maybe.
A general meeting of the Tennis
Club members was held on Monday
evening and a constitution and bylaws
were adopted.
Intending members are reminded
that the secretary will be glad to receive their applications for membership. The court Is finished and now
Is the time to get Into the game.
Brief Meeting
Of City Council
Complaints of Storekeepers Plac
ing Rubbish at Rear of Their
Business Premises.
Th regular fortnightly meeting of
the City Council was held on Monday
night last, all the aldermen being ln
attendance, with Mayor McDonald in
the chair.
The meeting was brief, only routine
business being transacted.
The Board of Health reported complaints being received regarding the
dumping of empty cases, decaying
fruit, etc., at rear of some stores, it
was suggested that prosecutions be
taken against the offenders in order
to stop the nuisance.
The Fourth Street garbage dump
came in for further criticism, It being
an eyesore owing to Indiscriminate
dumping. Small boys with Wheelbarrows dumping cans and refuse are
the main cause of the trouble. The
road Is also reported to be ln bad
shape.
The Board of Works reported work
on the sidewalks on Dunsmuir Avenue
all finished and the pipes laid.
Bills and Accounts.
The following bills and accounts
were read and referred to the Finance
Committee for approval:
C. H. Tarbell ft Son $36.00
Electric Light Co.—
Light and Water     38.00
Repairs      7.90
Evans, Coleman & Evans— -
Cement   343.93
Freight on cement    62.87
Drain Pipes  176.70
Labor 381.04
Enjoyable Smoker
ByOW.V.A.
The members of the G. W. V. A.
held a very enjoyable and successful
smoker ln the Memorial Hall on Saturday night last, a good number being in attendance. Vice-President A.
A. Brown was ln the chair for the occasion. Songs, speeches and recitations -occupied the major part of the
night; liquid and solid refreshments,
as well as smokes, were in abundance.
It is the intention of tbe association to hold another'ot these social
gatherings next month.
The comrades contributing to the
evening's entertainment Included:
J. Walton, song, "Paddy McGinty's
Goat"; song, Jackson's Football Quartette; James Brown, song; T. Jackson,
recitation; J, Walton, song; Com.
Brown, song; Hugh Stubbs, song;
Secretary Fouracre, speech; Geo.
Richardson, song; Wm. Keenan, song;
Jock Clark, song; Jas, Brown, song;
Mr. Court, song; Mr. Johns, song;
Mr. Bridges, song; Geo. Barton, short
stories. Comrade Waddington accompanied the singers.
Special Meeting on Sunday,
A special meeting of the members of
the G. W. V. A. will be held ln the
hall on Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock.
WHIST DRIVE AND
DANCE NEXT FRIDAY
A whist drive and dance will be
held under the auspices of the Ladles'
Auxiliary of tbe G.W.V.A., ln the
Memorial Hall, on Friday, June 3rd.
Whist starts at 8 p.m. sharp and dancing from 10 to 12. Admission 60c, refreshments served. Everybody welcome.
ST. JOHN'S FIRST AID
OFFICIAL BUTTONS HERE
The official button of the Canadian
Collieries St. John's First Aid and
Mine Rescue Association have arrived
and may be obtained on application to
the Secretary or Publicity Agent.
The Northwest Tourist Association
wlll conduct one of the biggest publicity campaigns ever known In America, for the benefit of the Northwest, It
was announced at the meeting of the
directors recently.
FOOTBALL GAME ENDS
IN DRAW AFTER TWO
HOURS' FAST PLAY
Cumberland Juniors and Bevan
Juniors played to a one goal draw after two hours' play at the 24th of May
celebration. The game was stubbornly
contested, some good football being
shown on both sides, and both teams
are a credit to this district for putting
up such an excellent exhlblton. The
game was very clean throughout. In
the first half Bevan Bcored from the
side, with a good shot, the ball striking under the crossbar, and Lewis, the
goalkeeper, was somewhat deceived,
expecting It to go over the bar.
H. Strachan, of the Cumberland
Juniors equalized early in the second
half for his team. Play * was fast
throughout the rest of the game, both
goalkeepers bringing off some good
saves. The final result was a draw,
with one goal each. Twenty minutes'
overtime was played but the score remained the same. The Sports Committee decided the play the competition off at some future date, to be an
nounced later.
These two teams reached the final
when Bevan defeated Union Bay by 2
goals to nil, In a fast game on Saturday last.
Cumberland Juniors defeated the
High School team by one goal to nil
after a half-hour overtime. This was
also a fast and good game.
Mr. James L. Brown, of Bevan,
refereed the games to the satisfaction
of all. Mr. Wm. Walker and J. Smith
were goal umpires.
Prepare For
Taking Census
Enumerators All  Over  Canada
Will Commence Colossal
Task on June 1st
All over Canada, on June 1st next,
enumerators will begin the eolossnl
task of taking (he census. Tho men
who hnve been appointed to superintend the work In various electoral divisions have for some time pnst been
steadily gelling Ihelr organizations
together.
The census In (he Comox Electoral
Dlsrlct will be taken under the supervision of Mr. E. H. Hicks-Bench, and
Ills twenty-eight enumerators aro ns
follows: G. W. Enilnll. F. A. Sills, V.
J. Haycock, J. Crockett, N. D. Dowdall, H. Herd. W. A. Milne, J. W. McKenzie. Sr.. L. Piket, R. Borteaux, C.
Leedam, H. Edwards. W. B. Drinkwater, L. H. Grover, W. A. Edwards,
H. A. Cullon, H. R. Treherne, W. Merrifield. J. Walton, J. West, H. E. Green,
H. R. Sicilian. E. Everett, W. H, Allies,
H. F. Loggie. T. D. Catchpole, J. Jones
and W. G. Smith. Nineteen of tlie
enumerators are returned men, and
all had to pass a strict examination
as an assurance of efficiency.
Some of the enumerators will be
away for weeks, as every little nook
and comer has to be visited, that all
may be enrolled.
Each enumerator Is sworn to observe the utmost secrecy. The main
forms to be filled out are certainly of
the Doomsday Book character. In
the census of population there are 36
main questions and in the census of
agriculture there are 65 main questions, each with subdivisions.
It is hoped the publlc will heartily
co-operate witli the enumerators and
give them as little trouble as possible,
and also help in getting the census
completed early as possible.
Soccer Officials
Are Suspended
Charged With Unbecoming Conduct on Occasion of Match
Against Cumberland.
VANCOUVER.—Football circles arc
all agog following the sensational suspension of officials of the St. Andrews
club of Vancouver by the B. C. P.
F. A. council at their meeting on Monday evening. It Is not generally
known that when the final of the McBride Shield game was ready to
start at the Athletic Park a few weeks
ago, the officials of the St. Andrews
club demanded a meeting with the
Provincial Association officials before
they would put their team ou the field,
the appearance of thc Cumberland
team on the field breaking an argument the Saints' management had then
started with President Russell.
Considering their actions unbecoming conduct, the governing body sum
moiied the team's management before
them, exonerating Big Jim Wilson,
the Held captain, but requiring an
apology from President Harry McDonald and Secretary Gus Wilson,
which, not being forthcoming, a "sine
die" suspension has been placed upon
them until It does. Manager Dave
Borland, not being presenl, will be re
quired to meet the governing officials
at an Immediate date on the same
topic. The point of dispute is the
manner in which thc gate receipts
were haldled, the local team object
Ing to thc procedure, to all of which
the governing body had no objections
to their protesting, but not in the man
ner and at the time and place Hie
Saints' nianugcment did.
WHITE LAUNDRY
OPENED AT COURTENAY
Those peoplo who prefer to send
their washing to a modern, sanitary
and up-to-date laundry can now have
their desire gratllcd. as Messrs. Suth
erland and Ewart have opened up such
a concern at Courtenay. They have
Installed modern, elcclrlcally-driven
machinery and undertake to give entire satisfaction at moderate prices.
The new flrm intend to call at Cumberland on Mondays for laundry,
which will be returned the following
Saturday. Phone 127 Courtenay and
ask the driver to call, or send a post
card.
100,000 INDIANS IN CANADA
Acordlng lo the recently Issued report of the Department of Indian
Affairs, the Indians In Canada mini
her 100,706. There are more Indians
in Ontario than in any other province,
namely 26,411. llritish Columbia has
the second largest Indian population,
25,694.
Best Empire Celebration
in History of the District
Crowning of Margaret Johnson of Union Bay, as "May Queen
for 1921" Chief Event of Highly Successful Celebration-
Splendid Weather Big Factor in Day's Enjoyment—.School
Children Had One of Happiest Days of Their Lives.
Of all the many Empire Day celebrations which have taken place in
Cumberland, tbat held on Tuesday last
Is said by old-timers to have been tho
most successful and enjoyable of nil.
Favored with line weather all day—
though rain threatened In the morning
hut passed off -Ihe day was filled with
ceremonies uml sports to delight the
hearts of thc children, which reached
Its climax at night on the Athletic
Grounds, when the Japanese fireworks
were displayed. The laughter and
cheers of the little ones as the multicolored rockets with their balloons,
stars and snake-likje appendages
spread over tlie grounds, was worth
going far lo hear. As the balloons
and other pieces descended the kiddies
rueed over tiie field seeking to get
portions of them, lilllng the air with
their shouts and laughter.
Altogether II was a day that will be
remembered for a long lime to come
by the young folks as well us the
"grown-up children."
A special train arrived from Union
Bay and way points about 9.30, with a
large crowd of pleasure-seekers, on
board.
Tiie May Queen-elect and her attendants came up from Union Bay, ns
more befitting royalty, in the Royal
Chariot, accompanied by several cars
containing the maypole dancers. Those
arrived shortly before 10, and Immediately were the contre of interest, the
purple and gold chariot nnd its pretty
occupants made a magnificent show.
The coach was elaborately decorated
with the royal colors and reflected
great credit on those who undertook
the work. Tho Royal coachman In
his quaint English livery was very
imposing and stately.
But the most attractive and Interesting person in tho whole parade was
Queen Margaret, who looked partlcu
larly charming In a gown of white
silk, and a cloak of while velvet
trimmed with a large white fur; she
wore a picture hat of white lace ami
georgette. Thc Queen assumed a
very majestic air, yet never once forgot to cheer her many admirers with
her smile—and she has n very sweet
smile indeed.
Her Maids of Honor were very
prettily dressed in pale yellow silk
and picture hots, and looked extremely
sweet. The Page Boys were adorned
in purple velvet trimmed with gold,
forming the royal colors.
Following the arrival of thc royal
party, the parade was soou formed at
the City Hall and proceeded down
Dunsmuir Avenue, the band playing
"The Maple Leaf Forever." The order
of procession was:
Order of Parade:
Two members of the R.N.W.M.P. ns
marshals; a Canadian flag carried by
Allisler MacKinnon; live gir's in na*
tlonal dress; War Veterans;'Mayor and
Aldermen; City Band; Queen Margaret and attendants; Queen Grace of
Bevan and attendants; Maypole
Dancers; School Children, all carrying flugs; Royal Candy Co. float, representing a launch; Fire Brigade; Decorated Autos nml Bicycles.
The live girls dressed In national
costumes made a very effective showing in the parade. They were: Olive
Richardson, "Britannia"! Mary Davis,
"Canada"; Martha Boydn, "U.S. A.,"
and Edna Bennle, "France."
Parade Prize Winners.
Prize winners in Die parade were:
Best Decorated Float—Royal Candy
Company. This was in the form of a
launch, the "Royul Candy Co.," and
deserves special mention, much time
nnd thought hclng devoted to making
It a very attractive float.
Best Decorated Car—II. Auchlnvole.
Best Decorated Bicycle — Cecil
Fraser.
Best National Costume—Mary Davis,
representing "Canada."
Best Comic Group — "Tho Junk
Dealers." John Picketti, Jim Bevis and
Herble Gibson.
Best Comic Character—"A Dam
Fool." Lome Fraser.
Hall nt Memorial Hull for Inrelllng
Ceremony.
Arriving at the O. W. V. A. Hall a
halt was made, when the unveiling
ceremony of tho Memorial Arch was
performed. Tills is reported In another column.
CORONATION CEREMONY
This concluded the parade reformed
and proceeded along Fifth Street,
Wludeinere Avenue, down First Street
and up Dunsmuir Avenue to the Athletic Grounds, where the coronation
ceremony was duly performed, A
throne hail been erected In Ihe contre
of Ihe grounds, near the Maypole ring,
around which all Ihe school children
gathered. Miss Grace Tyson, of Bevan.
who lasl year had Ihe honor of being
crowned Queen, took her seat, surrounded by her Maids of Honor. The
Queen looked very pretty in a gown
of white silk.
In a nice little speech Queen Grace
performed the coronation duties and
proclaimed Miss Margaret Johnston
May Queen for 1021. Queen Margaret
and her suite then ascended tho
throne and was duly proclaimed as
Queen.
Mayor MacDonald announced that
Queen Margaret had been crowned
May Queen for 11121, and thai the people of Union Bay deserved great
credit for the happy results. He then
called for three cheers and a tiger,
which was responded to heartily hy
the crowd present.
Some lime was spent by a battery of
persons Willi cameras taking pictures
of the different groups.
Mny Queen nnd Attendants.
Tho names the Queen and her attendants follow:
MAY QUEEN—Margaret Johnson.
MAIDS OF HONOR—Edith Humphrey and Kathleen Good.
PAGES—Willie McKay and Howard
Humphrey.
QUEEN'S HERALD—Charlie Fraser.
ATTENDANTS—Greta Kay, Janet
Marshall, Kathleen Muir, Winnie Bow-
den, Evn Baldwin, Kathleen Haggart.
MAYPOLE DANCERS—Edna Humphrey. Laura Brown, Doris Shuttle-
worth, Dora Good, Ellen Magnono,
Annie McKay, Minnie Mugford, Louise
Bowdcn, Edna Bell, Phyllis Street.
Chrlstino Pollock, Margaret McNally,
Eileen Brodor, Clara Cave, Edna Nicoil
and Lyla NIcoll.
.Queen firacp and Party.
Queen Grace uml party, of Bevan,
were trained by .Mrs. James Bums.
The names of (hose taking part in this
year's festivities were:
QUEEN OF 1920—Grace* Tyson.
PAGES—Charlie Quinn and Clarence Quinn.
TRAIN-BEAREns — Isabelle Herd
and Netty Robertson.
MAIDS OF HONOR—Ella Burns,
Katie Robertson. Carrie Buchanan,
Nellie Cameron and Gertie Carter.
.Maypole Daiiren.
The Maypole dancers then took
their places, and to Ihe accompaniment of music supplied by the City
Band danced (he Maypole dances very
gracefully, showing the results of
good training. Hearty applause from
1 throngs greeted the conclusion
of the dances.
Much credit is duo lo Mrs. A. Aueh-
iitvole and the Indies who assisted her
for tlie very able manner in which the
children bad been taught their purls.
The people of Union Hay and the
(Continued on Page Five)
FOUR TEAMS ENTER
FOR CONNAUGHT CUP
Four British Columbia teams have
ontered as Connaught Cup cballengors,
and Cumberland will have lo fighl for
their right as champions to that honor.
Tlie teams which have entered arc
Cumberland United, Nanaimo and
Ladysmith. and Wallaces' oi* Vancouver. Cumberland has taken the measure of all these teams Ibis season
nnd should have no difficulty in qualifying for tho trip East.
Local fans have blub hopes of Retting the Scottish team to play a match
here. Tbey are coming lo Nanaimo
to play an all-star team from thc Upper Island league on Monday, June
20. As champions of u. C. thc Cumberland United are entitled to a game
on local grounds, and with that iirm
conviction ihe local .representatives
will strain every elfort to secure tho
match.
Crop prospects were never brighter
In thc Okanagan than this year. It
Is predicted that aheul 6000 eni'H will
lio required to handle Uie harvest, Tws
Tlie   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
May 28, 192i.
T. E. BAT-B
Phone 31
P. 0. Box 279
TENDERS
Tenders will be received up to noon
the 1st duy uf June, 1921, for the
erection of a Residence on Dunsmuir
Avenue, Cumberland, B. C, for Mr.
Edward W. Bickle. Plans and specifications may he procured at the office
of The Islander Printers and Publishers.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EDWARD W.  BICKLE.
May 12, 1921.
British Columbia must become an
export province. It has the natural
resources to make it a great producing and exporting province; hut how
can its manufacturers and farmers
attain that strength and solidarity to
enable them to compete abroad, if the
consuming public at their doors do
not buy their products?
ADMINISTRATOR'S  NOTICE
.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Letters of Administration to the Ea
tate of David Rogers, late of Cumber
laud, who died on the 28th day of
March, 1921, intestate, have been
granted out of the Supreme Court to
David Rogers and Bessie Rosa, both of
anaimo.
All persons having claims against
the said estate are required to forward
particulars of same duly verified to
the Administrators or to the undersigned on or before the 5th day of
June, 1921, after which date the Administrators will proceed to administer the Estate according to law, having regard to sucii claims of which
they shall then have received notice.
Dated at Nanaimo, B. C, this 5th
day of May, 1921.
C. IL BEEVOR-POTTS,
Commercial St., Nanaimo.
Solicitor for David Rogers and  Mrs.
Bessie Ross, the Administrators.
4-23
McLauglilin
Sane progress, both in engineering and body design,
won the unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
Thus the Master Six is better known and more widely
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for the
Master-Six a fixed value that makes its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK,  WILLEMAR & WAIN
Phone 25 COURTENAY, B. C.     P. 0. Box 153
YOUR DUTY TO YOURSELF IS TO SAVE
The man -with a Savings Account need never
worry over the future.
Saving, backed by determination, is one of
the most satisfying habits to acquire.
A Savings Department at every branch of
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
P. A. McCarthy, Manager Cumberland Branch
CITY COLLECTIONS
FOR CELEBRATION
The following sums were collected
by Messrs. J. Walton and B. W. Bickle
for the Empire Day Celebration:
Canadian Collieries  IDunsmuir)
Limited  $50.01.
Union Breweries   25.On
Cumberland Electric Light Co  25.00
Water Works Co  25.00
Ilo-llo Theatre   20.00
Union  Hotel   20.00
Kelly A. Scott   15.00
Royal Candy Co  15.00
Cumberland Hotel   10.00
King Oeurge Hotel  10.00
Waverley Hotel   10.00
Campbell  Bros  10.00
R. G. Laver   10.00
C. H. Tarbell * Son   10.00
Ralph E, Frost  10.00
Dr. O. K. MacNaughton   10.00
J. Sutherland, value  10.00
O. W. Clinton   10.00
O. A. Fletcher .Music Co. Ltd    6;00
Veudotne Hotel     5,uu
Eagle Hotel     5.00
W*. Gordon. Cornet* Store      5.00
Wm. Henderson     6.00
P.   Wllcock       6.00
Tommy Nakanishi (value)     6.oo
in*. E. II. Hicks     5.00
li. Campbell     5.ou
Canadian Hank of Commerce    5.oo
Royal Bank of Canada    5.00
Mumford & Walton     6.00
T. D. McLean (valuo)     5.on
.1. II. Halliday     5.0i
P. Partridge    5.oi
B. & B. Grocery    5.0'
T. Rickson     5.00
Cavin's Shoe Store     6.00
T. E. Bate (value)     5.00
W. W. Willard tvalue)     3.00
Dr. 11. P. Christie     3.00
Alex.   Maxwell       3.00
A. MacKinnon     2.50
Watanabe     2.60
J. H. Cameron     2t.00
J.  Fraser     2*00
V. Nakayama     2.00
L. Stevens   2.00
S.  Davis .._    2.00
Vendome Cafe     2.00
.1. W. Cooke    2.00
P. Monte     2.00
\ isitor     1.00
L. R. McDonald     1.00
Cumberland Tailors     1.00
MADE-IN-B.C. WEEK
The date of "Made-in-B.C. Week"
has been set to commence Monday.
June 20. During the six days, It the
plans of the Campaign Committee
mature successfully, every retail merchant in British Columbia will feature
tho products of the province. Boards
of Trade will he asked to assist in the
campaign, and all citizens of the pro
vince will be asked to give preference
to the goods that they themselves pro
duce.
YOUR TEETH
DO IT IN TIME
By Rea Proctor McGee, M.D., D.D.S.
Editor of "Oral Hygiene."
IE the ordinary processes of nature
were never interfered with, it would
not be necessary to extract the temporary teeth. They would extract
themselves at the proper time. Normally roots are absorbed at the time
comes tor the eruption of the permanent teeth and the crown, or business
end of tlie tooth, is left hanging to
the gum. Some day a little extra
pressure removes tlie baby tooth and
in its place there is the tip of the
cusp of the permanent tooth that
follows. If this natural system were
always followed, a great deal of
trouble would be avoided. Unfortunately, many causes operate to interfere with nature's perfect plan.
it ilie permanent tooth does not
come directly under the temporary
tooth, the ^absorption of the root will
either be incomplete or it will fail
to absorb at all. Sometimes long
slivers of tbe temporary tootli roots
are left and when the crown comes off
or an attempt Is made to extract,
these root pieces are left to wedge in
the process between the permanent
teeth. This condition always results
in inflammation, sometimes causes
serious abscesses, and often interferes with tho effort of the permanent
tooth to take its proper place in the
arch.
Pieces of the roots of temporary
teeth should never be left In the
mouth.
Temporary teeth that are abscessed
should always be removed regardless
of the age of the child. When these
teeth are lost before the time for their
permanent successor to take their
place, a retaining appliance must be
made to hold the space so that the
permanent tooth will not come in the
wrong place. In nearly every case it
is safe to give nitrous-oxide-oxygen
as an aesthetic for children. Never
allow a child to suffer any pain if
you can avoid it. Either a local or
a general anaesthetic should always
be given.
Copyright, by Rea Proctor McGee.
Deposit Your Savings
Regularity in depositing in our Savings Bank, even
in small sums, will make your balance increase surprisingly.   For example:
End End End
Deposits of: 1st Vr.       2ml Yr.        MirYr.
$ 1.00 Weekly       $ 52.69        $106.95 $162.84
10.00 Monthly       121.65 246.92 375.98
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND PROVE IT
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
SPLENDID PROGRESS
IN AMBULANCE WORK
St. John's Ambulance Association Examinations Reveal
High Proficiency.
Why
"Auto-Shoes" ?
We figure that any automobile casing has
a right to be called a "tire"—whether
it's good, bad or indifferent. And we agree
with the opinion that an exceptionally
good casing deserves a distinctive name.
AmesHolden'Auto-Shoes"aremiles better
in performance than ordinary tires. That
has been proved to our satisfaction. So
we think it's a good idea to identify such
unusual mileage givers by an easy-td-
remember name—"Auto-Shoes."
The main purpose of the name is.to help you to
Bt cheaper mileage. The guarantee behind Ames
olden "Auto-Shoes" insures that you get it. If
necessity for adjustment should ever arise you
will find that you will get satisfaction without
trouble or red tape.
They are the principal advantages that go with
the name Ames Holden" Auto-Shoes." Drop in and
let us show you the tires themselves.
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2080 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
BREAD
The one food that all the
people want all the time.
Plain and wholesome — substantial and nourishing—
Give it the first place on your
table.
No other food has the same
food value.
Ours is a really delicious loaf.
Bread is your Be.st Food—Eat
more of it.
Eat
GOOD   BREAD
"The Bread That $uilcls"
A Good Bakery
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
lUinsniiiir Avenue     •     Ciiiiilirrliin-I
Examinations In connection with St.
John's Ambulance Association was
held on Friday last. May 20, Dr. E. R.
Hicks being the examining officer.
The examinations showed that all
the candidates had made splendid
progress. Mr. A. J. Taylor won the
Canadian Collieries' gold medal for
highest general proficiency In the
third year, with Mr. L. Francescini
close runner up. Mr. C. Nash won the
Canadian Collieries' gold medal for
proficiency In the lirst year.
The following Is the standing of the
successful candidates:
1. A. J. Taylor, medallion.
2. L. Francesclnl, medallion.
.1. R. Reid, voucher.
4. Jonathon Taylor, medallion.
5. C. Nash, certificate.
6. J. H. Boffy, voucher.
7. J. Lockhart, voucher.
8. C. Hyland, certificate.
The good showing of these candidates will no doubt encourage the
Cumberland First Aid Association to
make this district second to none in
this particular work.
Great credit is due Dr. G. K. MacNaughton for the very able manner ln
which he delivered the lectures.
SMOKERS! PREVENT FIRES!
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 60
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Yeal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have yon tried onr Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef? It is delicious.
Don't drop FIRE when you smoke
in the woods, nor throw it out along
tho road.   Keep the forests!
Mutches, pipe coals, clgur stubs and
cigarette ends start ninny forests fires.
BE CAREFUL! Don't start a lire In
the wooiIb when you begin or end
your smoke. Be sure your match,
iigarette"or pipe is out.
Cord and Fabric Tirea In all Standard Sizes
Cumberland
Motor Works
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water ^Uife* Pure
Cascade Beer
The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
YOUR CO-OPERATION in order to
keep down forest fires is asked. Break
your match in two. Knock out your
pipe ashes into your hand. Don't drop
a burning cigarette.
FOREST FIRES cost millions a
year.   Don't start one.
Contending that the development of
legitimate business will be interfered
with if the procedure of licensing merchants is adopted by the government,
the Retail Merchants' Association of
Canada (Vancouver Branch) at a
meeting last week decided to pay particular attention to all legislative discussions on the subject. It was
pointed out that If this act were taken
by the government in the case of coal
dealers It would also become operative in the case of other merchants in
time. .   ..
Ready To Help a Man With
His Business
With trade reviving, every reliance may be placed on the
telephone, which is such a principal factor in Industrial development. British Columbia is particularly fortunate in that telephone lines radiate from the principal cities to all points, bo
that instant means of communication are always available.
The duplicate submarine between Point Grey and Nanaimo
was laid this month, doubling the facilities for telephoning
between the Mainland and Vancouver Island. New long distance
lines have been built on Vancouver Island and throughout the
lower Fraser Valley, both north and south of the river. Very
few applications are unfilled because ot lack of facilities, so
that the telephone, always taken for granted, will not fall you.
British Columbia Telephone Co. <jjo
May 28, ML
THfi ctJMBiiiitLAND IsLANBfiR
Three
Here's  What  Private Car
Owners Say:—
"The set "f Dunlop Cord Tires, 86 x
4)6—two Trnctlon nnd (wo lttbbed—bare
given   entire   sntlnfiu'tloti.    I   hare  run
tUeiu  tlnuoualy  on my Cadillac car,
ami Imvo taken n trip from Winnipeg to
Toronto nnd return, and they have now
covered In the nt'fghborliood of xo.ooo
miii'H nnd are utill in good --shape."—
A. C, Turner, Winnipeg, Man.
"Would Boy I have been using your
Traction Treads un both my big seven-
liassenger Steam "White" cars, and on
my Notional nnd flat Gasoline cars, and
must mi.*. I'vi' done some fearful travel-
liii),'. over is.immi mliftt, and no rim cuts so
far, and l believe they'll gu 18,000 miles
wore,"—M. N. Lennlng, Esk Uank. Sask.
"1 mny sny tlint I have had four
Dunlop Cord Tires on my car, which
have gone approximately 22,000 miles,
mill I may state that I am Just putting
on four more V.2 x 3',-j, (Straight Wall)
Cord Tirea of your make."—A. J. Barr,
Ottawa, Ont.
Here's What Truck Owners
Say;—
"My lirst set of Dunlop Traction Tread
Cord Tiros, size 85 x 4)6, bought In June,
1P10, have been" used continually on a
Studebaker truck, and have run ls.000
miles. They are siill lu good condition.
Bel ii K perfectly satisfied with the service
received from Dun lops, nil my ears are
imw equipped with Dunlop Cords."—
Forbes tbe Mover, Hamilton, Ont.
"A ol x *,■{■, Dunlop Traction Tread
Fabric Tire which I have equipped on
■'lie of my Ford delivery trucks, used for
general cartage work. Is now completing
its third consecutive season and has
novel- vet been off the rim. During this
time Mie ear baa mink' many hard trips,
Including ii tin nr twenty five trips to
Flflttsburg, N.V.. and ono trip to New
Viirk City, us well ns several trips Into
Ontario anil other points, which necessitated encountering roods of all description*. The total mileage, I estimate, la
well over 20,000."— H, Clark, Montreal,
Que.
"The tire which I brought back to be
r" trended ran 23,000 miles. We used It
on the back wheels of our Studebaker
(ruck for the lirst 1,200 miles. This tiro
wn« nol changed for nine months, and
during that time needed practically no
tilr, whit li speaks well for your tubes.
I ennimt speak too highly of Dunlop
Tiros for Mie delivery business. We de-
liver for thirty stores, and each of our
cars covers nbout fifty miles a day, and
lui-. to keep run ning tit I the time."—
The Independent Messenger, Parcel and
Store Delivery Co.,  Ltd., Calgary,  Alta.
Dunlop Tires, Both Cord and Fabric Construction,
are Giving Phenomenal Results.
Big Tire Mileage is here to stay. Just as we predicted in 1912 that the Anti-Skid Tire
would become standard, so we now predict that Big Tire Mileage will be among the things
every motorist will consistently expect from now on.
The tire manufacturer who has to apologize for "short life" in his product will be automatically eliminated. Cord Tire construction made possible the coming of a tire that refuses
to quit until many thousands of miles have been clicked off. The Cord Tire is now universally accepted as the master choice. x
And Dunlop Cord Tire is now the most popular. "Dunlop" is at top form, but don't
forget that while we are turning out Cord Tires — "Traction" or "Ribbed" — which seem
almost uncanny in their ruggedness, that a great number of motorists still use Fabric Tires.
These motorists wanted more mileage than Fabric Tires were usually expected to give. That
set us thinking. We wondered why certain Cord Tire principles could not be applied to
Fabric Tires.
We experimented and were amazed at the find. It
was that we could at one sweep add 20'A- more mileage
to Dunlop Fabric Tires and make them last longer than
Fabric Tires were ever known to last. Result: Dunlop
"Cord"-buiIt Fabric Tires are giving some other makes
of Cord Tires a run for their money at, of course, much
lower first costs.
Dunlop Cord Tires are outdistancing any other Cord Tire made, no matter at what
price the tire sells. The stories told here prove all we claim. We have hundreds more like
them. Note the remarkable distances covered and the splendid average for all parts of
Canada on all makes of cars.
Here's What Dealers
Say:—
"Ptirltiff Ihe nn-t nelson wo llavo
man*/ sets qf Dunlop Fiilirk* nml
Tires as equipment ou nur enrs.   nn
iierlt'iirp, lins been extrempli' sntlsfni
There   Imve   been   no   complaints
any snuri'e.   on (he other liaiijl. >.iir
turners frequently remarkeil on thu
results and  i'U mileage obtained
Dunlop Tires.    We nre expecting I.
your   make   as   equipment   <>r>   u   i
greater seulo during th mlng sea
—The Crnmptou Car Compnu)*) Liu
Toronto. Ont.
"We have found the Dunlop Cords glr-
Jng wonderful servtre iiimI riirinluK up
me mileage recordB, especially on enrs
subject to overloading nnd hard usage.
We have many sstlnneil customers who
will use nothing hut Dlinlon Traction or
Ribbed Cord Tirea."-It. F.. McMorran,
Victoria. B.C.
"We can conscientiously recommend
Puntop Traction Treads tn nil our <-u-
Jornflrs, as both we on.I tbey honestly
believe that no other tire ou tbo market
is giving liko service nml mileage, All-
Justmeiils nskeil fur during th" post
eighteen months have been practical!**
nil. while the mileage hns been excop-
tlonally high for this part of I lie  I-
try.    Wo   have  tried   thorn   out   iigulnst
opposition   makes   and   the   result   hns
flways been tn fnvnr of 'linnlop.'"—
largett's Motors, Limited, Mls<b.ii City.
B.C.
Here's   What  Livery   and
Bus-line People Say:—
Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co.,
Head Office and Factories: Toronto. Branches in Leading Cities.
DUNLOP Double-Life, High-Mileage Cord
and Fabric Tires
SAVE YOU MONEY
"Wo aro today sending j-"i n 82 x -'t'j
Dunlop* Ribbed Cord Tire iimi wo havo
inst taken off a Dodgo TourltiK Cur,
Diving run over 83,841 ml lea, according
to otir records. \Ve coutmler thi* ••
might? One record, nnd, in rnct. I* hotter
service thou wo have been able i" w?< uro
from uny other mnko of tire." tCiuureaa
Auto uinl Taxi Co., Victoria, B.C.
"Vnu cannot lictp being Interested In
hoiirlug of the long nillongo 1 received
from ii Iiiiiiltip :i7 .« 5 Traction Trend
Cord Casing. The lira referred to l nul
on the rt'Br of one »f my I'ncknrd enra
around November 1st. 1D10, After ritn
ning H.noo mi if. on the rear, I clinuged
It nml ion It <>ii tin' front. It delivered
ih.wmi mllfft mi the front wheel, making
a total of ■»■.»■■■■ ■nil"', all told, and It
whs only ii abort while ago that li; use-
ftilncHH i-mli-il. I jl in nl'ol t» R«y, mis-
Melted, thnt the nvernge mllenge of all
Dunlop Tirea has been nround ii.mhi to
is.oon mi.i Kin-Mi mile*, by which you enn
Bee tbey bara proved eminently Hntlwfiic*.
tory."—tbo I'a*-kard Motor Livery, Toronto, out.
"I have boon using Dunlop Cord Tirea
for Ho* lust fourteen nmntbi*, ami hnro
flhiiut tweuty seven hiiiilop :(.*■ k ;. nnd
37 i B In uae "ii my Cudlllnc cnr*. fn city
tin.i country livery Inislness,    i  have na
yet to have ono nol Hid 111] up, S< im- are
hill I riiuiiliiK aii<l have gi.nt' gff.OCU ml I en,
nn*l I I ink fur a f< w tl, usnttd uillea
more."- Maple Leaf Auto Livery, VVlnnl-
peg,   Man
«-*w*w*rw,
Correspondence
SIMMY PISHING AMI 8H00TIN0
Editor islander.—It has boon stated
to me that thero is being circulated in
somo parts ot the province a petition
to protest to the government against
the alleged action ot tho Lord's Day
Alliance of Canada In seeking for
legislation prohibiting lishing for
sport on Sunday,
Anyone who understands the work
of the Alliance knows that it is not
its policy to Interfere wilh the use of
Sunday either for religion or for recreation, its efforts being confined to
guarding Sunday as a free day—free
from the commercial and Industrial
employments of the other days of the
week, and free to use as a man's conscience directs. The Alliance has not
and docs not propose to initiate legislation In the matter of Sunday Ashing,
newspaper reports to the contrary
notwithstanding.
Witli relation to Sunday shooting,
It is well known that the Alliance
discussed with the government of
Britisli Columbia the matter of granting to municipalities the power to deal
with, and If need' be to prohibit, the
discharging of firearms on Sunday
where it has become a nuisance, as
In tho more populous rural parts of
the country, and we have been informed by the government that this
has been done.
The Alliance does not propose any
further  action  upon  this  matter  so
far as the government ls concerned,
but is calling the attention of municipalities, and especially those from
which complaints have come as to this
disturbance of Sunday quiet, to the
provision made by the government by
which they may deal with the matter.
Yours very truly,
CHAS. H. HUESTIS,
Secretary for British Columbia.
Vancouver, May 6, 1921.
BUILDING  OF  B. C,  UNIVERSITY
MUST BE PROCEEDED WITH.
Editor Islander.—As you know,
when the University was first planned
It was decided that the buildings
should be situated at Point Grey.
Work of a permanent nature was actually commenced on one large building, but when this building was about
half completed the war came on, and
nothing further has been done at the
site except in regard to certain agricultural experimental work, and in
planting the Botanical Gardens. The
money spent in the partially completed building has up to this time
brough no return. Meanwhile the University has beon "carrying on" In
various buildings of every shape and
size ln the city of Vancouver. The 962
students who attended during the
session just closed have been crowded
into any space that could be made
available and both students and instructors have been sadly hampered
in their work, to such an extent that
some lecturers, for lack of space, have
been compelled to divide their classes
Into five or six groups, with the consequent waste of time and energy.
And now tho University is faced Willi
the fact that, though there ls not room
for the 962 students who attended last
session, some 1280 students are expected to seek admission In the full
of 1921. The result is that somo 318
students must be refused admission
and the question Is, who shall these
318 students be? This is a PROVINCIAL University and In all fairness
Its doors ought to be open to EVEKY
young man and women In British Columbia, but under present conditions
about one-fourth of the cnndldiites
will be turned away, and, moreover,
faith cannot be kept with the present
students who were promised special
courses when they entered the University.
It Is too late now to remedy the evil
this year, but it Ib feared that unless
the government Is pressed Into action
at once the situation next year will be
considerably worse. Thc plea of the
government ls that money Is scarce
and rates of Interest high. This Is
conceded, and our committee therefore has endeavored, with the best
assistance available to formulate a
plan that Is reasonable from the
standpoint of expenditure, and yel
that wlll result ln the housing of Ihe
University at its permanent site- It
is scarcely arguable that money should
be spent elsewhere than at the permanent site. Our plan, therefore, Is
that the government proceed at once
to complete the permanent building
now partially constructed; construct
a permanent building no larger al
present than Is necessary to house the
valuable library of about 86,000
volumes; erect temporary wooden
buildings sufficient to carry on tho remainder of the I'nlversiily worlt; und
later construct a permanent building
to be used as a Women's Dormitory,
We arc Informed by tlie architects
that these wooden buildings would last
about thirty years, and that the whole
of tlle work outlined above would involve an expenditure of about $1,250,-
(100 between this lime and the fall of
1922, when It Is hoped these buildings
would be complete ami ready for occupation. Tlie original plans called for
an expenditure of several times tills
amount so that our scheme Is extremely modest and yet reasonably
efficient.
Wc propose that the government
spend about $100,000 a month during
this year and next until somo sucli
plan has been carried out, and we bespeak your assistance in that behalf,
We arc sorry to take up so much of
your time and space, but as a Community Service Club, wc believe that
this is the most Important problem
before the province today, and that is
our excuse, If any excuse be necessary.
We do not fool it necessary to argue
as to the vnlue of a Provincial University, but give below some facts
which may be of Interest to your
readers:
Students 19211-21 —
Prom Vancouver   679
From Immediate vicinity   129
Prom other points In II. C.  Ul!'
Prom outside B.C     15
962
Prizes and scholarships awarded each
year  $4000
Graduates in May. 11121—
llacht'lors In Arts, Science and
Agriculture  -  110
.Masters in Arts and Science      3
113
Standing among Universities of Canada in number of students iu Alts
and   Science—second  only   to   Toronto.
Ilcrlianliini, 10.lino specimens.
Botanical Gardens, 5 acres.
Extension  Work—During the session
just closed, members   of tlie   faculty
have delivered  lectures   In  various
towns   and   cities   throughout   the
province to the number of 1U5, local
committees being called on only for
tlie expense of providing halls.
Scholarship to High School Students—
To the   students   with  the  highest
provincial    standing    In    Junior
Matriculation, $150.
To tlie student In eacli of the six
districts Into which the province
is divided, with the highest standing in bis district, $100.
Yours sincerely,
K1WAN1S CLUli OP VANCOIIVEK.
Harry Nobbs,  Secretary.
ASTHMA
USE
RAZ-MAH
HO Smokiii   No Spraying   No Snuff
Just Swallow a Capsule
RAZ-MAH Im Guaranteed
to restore normal breathing, stop mucus
InflMrlnn in tbo bronchial tubes, give
oaf nights of qniet sleep; contains no
hak'uformlng drug. 11,00 at jsar drug-
fist's. Trial Free at our agencies orwnto
Templttons,   1*2 King W.,   Tuionlo.
Sold by
R. E. FROST
Cumberland
Wood of the mangrove, tree Is rol
proof.
Wood" for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Thos. H. Carey
PIRK AMI I.IPE  INSURANCE
Cumin1'laud, 11. C,
J Pour
TBE   CtJMBEqjLAftD   ISLANflER
May 28, 1921..
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland,
B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager aud Publisher.
BEN H. QOWE.N Editor.
SATURDAY, MAY 28, 1921.
KNOWLEDGE OF EMl'IRE MAKES BETTER
CITIZENS
It is well that thc boys and girls, the high school and
university students are tu lie encouraged, by prizes for
essays, in the study of "The British Empire."
"Empire Day" is getting to mean more than a holiday,
more even than a celebration associated with memories of
"Victoria the Great nnd Uood." It is felt that not only
should children be trained in knowledge and appreciation
of what "Empire" stands for. but thnt children of a larger
growth may well pause to consider the vastnoss of tlle
British Empire, its development, tho stupendous task
Which devolves upon its governing bodies und tiie duties
and responsibilities of its citizens.
The development of the various portions of the llritish
Empire hns been regarded as episodes grouping themselves
round the central drama of domestic history. Tills view
has been natural, but it needs supplemental teaching.
"What do they know of England who only England know*;"
asks Kipling—and a similar question might bo asked of
the people of any, and every, component part of tho great
British Empire.
The gigantic Increase of the area, population and prosperity of the Empire was tiie most noticeable feature of
Victoria's glorious reign. Children, alld not only children
but their parents, need to learn tliat tlie wonderful growth
ls still going on witli ever-increasing momentum and tliat
a citizen or "The Empire on which the Sun never Sets"
must keep awake and alert to tlie needs and the duties of
a Briton.
James Bryce declared that people who are considered
well educated know much less than they should know of
the history of their country
The young people who study history will learn tliat the
annals of the Empire aro full ot romantic interest, and If
adults will share and direct those studios they will gain
a deeper and more intelligent appreciation of what has
been achieved by those who have gone before, and be
stimulated to make tlie best of a glorious heritage.
It Is hard for a busy man to devote the tired leavings
of his hard-wrought day to the study of imperial facts and
problems. But think! When the Briton marks his ballot
paper he has "a say" In tlie government, the well-being—
or the reverse—of millions of his fellow creatures. The
whole universe is bound together. Nothing can happen
In one place without affecting "The Empire." "When you
pluck a flower you disturb the stars," says a philosopher.
Y'ou must learn something of the Empire to be a good
citizen of the smallest Canadian town.
Why has the study of Empire history been so neglected?
Because the Greens and the Pnrknians have been few.
Few have been the artists in ink who have been able to
conjure up the doing of great deeds, the heroisms and
the martyrdoms that have made Empire history. Teach
your children of the breaking down of old things and the
building up of new. Bring the events of past history
before them. Show them that "The History of Empire"
ls the story ot ourselves end our brothers.
The Empire is ONE. No man can live to himself alone;
nor can a country. The wool crop fails in Australia, the
Manchester cloth worker earns less wages. The grain
crop is short In Canada, then the dear ones we know in
England find food scarce and expensive. The interests of
one part of tlle Empire are bound up with the interests of
the rest. ,
There is room in the British breast   for   the   largest
patriotism. We love our own Province, our own town, our
hamlet, our home. This is patriotism, but a larger patriotism is needed. We must have a patriotism founded on a
knowledge of each other. We must have that knowledge
of and affection for the Empire as a whole which will
confuse the strife makers and give joy to the peace-loving
mass of mankind.
The expansion of the Empire has been an expansion of
population, trade, wealth, resources; more than an expansion of territory. We do not need an expansion of territory
in the lands under the Union Jack, there is ample scope
and verge enough for many more millions and for centuries
to come. We Heed an expansion only ol* our knowledge, a
deepening and widening of the patriotic spirit. Every year
that tiie Empire holds together It grows stronger.
Parents, tench your children that and you will teach
them a lesson of loyally to tho Empire—and to themselves.
Time will bring a belter understanding of all difficult
questions. Knowledge will make Britons realize that they
aro bound together by history, literature, art, and mutual
Interests. Estrangements are based on Ignorance of our
common possessions aiid common aspirations. Thero wlll
lie a great and glorious future for the British Empire when
tbe people of that Empire realize what it is aud bow It Is
tlie duty of tlie humblest Briton to maintain his share In
its work. Its integrity and Its glory.—Vancouver Sun.
THE CITIZENS OF NO MAN'S LAND
Why Is it tliat. although we settle down
And live the lives we lived, a strange unrest,
A something, haunts us as we work or play.—
A restlessness too vague to be expressed?
Is it that we who, out there, walked witli Death
And knew the fellowship of Fear nnd Pain,
Are citizens of Xo .Man's Land,
And never shall we be as we wore again?
To those of us who played the Game out there,
And saw bravo men, who failed to win, lose all
Where Fate was dealer, Life and Deatli the stakes,
Shall oilier games forevermore seem small?
'Tls true that home is dear, that love is sweet,
And pleasant nre our friends to be among,
Y'et something lacks, to us from No Man's Land-
Is it tliat no one here can speak our tongue?
We can not tell them what befell us there,
Por well we know they could nol understand,
So eacli sits quiet, by his own hearth fire,
And sees therein the sights of No Man's Land!
We have a secret way to judge of men—
It ls a way we learned to judge out there.
But what, or how we learned it. none can tell—
It ls a secret that we can not share!
See this rich fool, here, fling his new-got gold
While waiters fawn and how and watch his hand!
Here he is king, but wc look on and smile-
Gold could not buy your way In No Man's Land!
And this smooth orator who thrills the throng *
Witli tales of noble deeds iu No Man's Land.
If he had seen, as we saw, brave men die,
He'd have no rhetoric at his command,
They feel our strangeness, too—those at our side
Who chatter of tlie things of every day;
They mark our silences, our strange reserve,
"Ah, he is changed!" they shake their heads and say.
They say the dead return not, but I think
We know, who have come back from No Man's Land
How ghosts must feel, to walk familiar ways,
And yet find no one out there to understand!
Roselle Mercier Montgomery in N. Y. Times.
Special Display of
5ilk Dresses
PLAID and SERGE SKIRTS
•===  "     '   ' 	
THrect from the Mathers
LADIES' SILK, SERGE and TRICOTINE
DRESSES IN NEWEST CREATIONS
LADIES' SILK, PLAID AND SERGE
SKIRTS
A large variety of the newest styles in
all sizes. These goods are marked at the
lowest possible prices.
NEWEST CREATIONS IN LADIES'
TRICOLETTE SKIRTS AND BLOUSES
In Black, Sand, American Beauty,
White and Brown.
SPECIAL VALUE IN LADIES'
TRICOLETTE UNDERSKIRTS
In White, Pink and Black.
Campbell's   -    Cumberland
It Is poor economy to cut down on schools and use tlie
money later on jails and reformatories.
The Island of Y'ap has an area of eight square miles.  In
case of war the.navy could send a steam-shovel to take it.
^ EXCITING BASEBALL
GAME ON TUESDAY
|    F. AIKAWA   |
| Boat Builder ana1 General |
| Carpenter • |
1  Boats built to order.    All sizes 1
I of Boats for Sale |
1  F. AIKAWA     -    Royston Rd. m
Cumberland Intermediates Met
No. 1 Intermediates, Trimming Them 12 Runs to 4
llllllili
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| New Cars for Old |
jj      Make that Car look lifa a new one H
| Phone 135 Courtenay |
= AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE M
m K. P. Auto Painting Co. |
H ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY J
■        ALL WORK GUARANTEED        B
Not the least Interesting part of the
various competitions on Empire Day
was the baseball game, when the Cumberland Intermediates held up their
reputation by defeating No. <1 Intermediates by a score of 12 runs to 1.
No. 4 were lirst up to. bat and tallied
one run. Then came Cumberland Intermediates, who scored two runs in
the last part of tho lirst innings. They
kept adding to their lead as the game
carried on.
Miller pitched lirst ball for No. 4;
in three innings seven runs were collected off him. Then 1). Hunden was
warmed up and pitched the remainder
of the game, keeping the Cumborland
bunch down to another live runs.
Bonnie pitched in great form for
the Cumberland l's, only allowing No.
4 to get four runs. He pitched the
whole game, and was well supported
hy both tlie outfield and Infield. The
winners played a very steady ginia,
with only a few minor errors. No, 4'K
play wus rather loose at times, and
they made a number ot errors.
.Many of the spectators got more fun
listening to the rooting Of the "fans"
"bugs" and "nuts" than out of the actual playing.
The line-up of the tennis were as
follows.
I). Richard  catcher M. Mitchell.
J. Uennle pitcher A. Miller.
A. Parmer 1st base J. Hudook.
it. ltnbertsou....2iid base D. Hunden.
■I. Clark short stop ti. Hunden.
A. Sonmiervillc..;ird base Vi. Glover.
V, Dalby left lield....D. Stevenson.
A. Winningham....c. f It. fiennie
M. Stewart right Held S. Little.
C. Graham reserve M. Damonte.
Umpires: Jack Davis and "Mush"
Aitken.
$122.50 COLLECTED FOR
CHINA FAMINE FUND
On Monday last Hev. Jas. Hood and
Mr. A. C. Colman made another canvass of Chinatown on behalf of the
China Famine Fund, when the sum of
$122.60 wns collected. This money
has been forwarded to Mr. D. A.
Campbell, manager of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce at Toronto, who
handles the fund at headquarters.
|   The Studebaker   ]
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THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks Motors
LIMITED
m     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.
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lillllllllllill
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May 28f 19^1.
THE   CUMBERLAND   iSLANDEH
Five
FRESH  LOCAL
DAIRY BUTTER
Churned   Twice Weekly
45c. lb.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
Illllllllllllllllllli
CHUM'S SHOES
FOR CHILDREN
m  All Sizes.
All Kinds
w      These are without
|       doubt the   Best
1 CHILDREN'S
| SHOES
| on the market
| Cavin's
1 Cash Shoe Store
H    Remember that we have a device for every foot trouble
n
1.11
Best Empire Celebration
in History of the District
(Continued from Page One)
children taking part are to be heartily
congratulated on the splendid manner in which th ewhole affair was carried out. Mrs. Hooper has the credit
of dressing Queen Margaret, while
Mrs. Muir attended to the Maids of
Honor and Pages.
Following the coronation and dances
the royal parties adjourned to the
beautiful grounds of Beaufort House,
where luncheon was partaken of and
many more photos secured.
RESULTS OF SPORTS
The long programme of sports was
then proceeded with, the various
events having large entries, in fact in
some of thc boys' and girls' races there
seemed to be swarms of children, accounted for, mainly, no doubt, by the
fact that each entrant received ten
cents.
Each child taking part in the procession also received a card entitling
the holder to 15 cents' worth of refreshments.
Single Ladles' Race—Martha Doyd,
1; K. Brown, 2.
Ladles' Nall-DrlvIng Contest—Mrs.
F. Slaughter, 1; Mrs. A. Rowan, 2.
Girls' Potato Race—P. Cloutlce, 1;
B. Dowling, 2; E. Hunt, 3.
Girls' Relay Race — Martha Boyd,
Mary Davis and Jos. Bono, 1; Madge
Fouracre, F. Strachan and K. Bono,
2; Jl. Jones, M. Ritchie and Prlscilla
Cloutler, 3.
Girls' Skipping Race—L. Bogo, 1;
P. Cloutler, 2; D. Waterfleld, 3.
Girls' Hopping Race—Martha Boyd,
1; Mary Davis, 2. N
Boys' Race, 6 years and under—E.
Francesclnl, 1; J. Wylle, 2; H. Herd, 3.
Boys' Race, 8 years and under—F.
Bolletlno, 1; R. Cozier, 2; H. West-
Held, 3.
Boys' Race, 10 years and under—J.
Stanoway, 1; D. Adamson, 2; S. Stano-
way, 3.
Boys' Race, 12 years and under—
J. Picketti, 1; W. Pierce, 2; J. Stanoway, 3.
Boys' Race, 15 years and under—
T. Johnston,, 1; R. Pollock, 2; W.
Marshall, \
Boys' Obstacle Race, 15 years and
under—D. Partridge, 1; D. Sutherland,
2; W. Thompson, 3.
Boys' Sack Race, 12 years and under—C. Davis, 1; V. Nell, 2; H. Gibson, 3.
Boys' Three-Legged Race—H. Gibson and J. Picketti, 1; D. Partridge
and W. Marshall, 2; V. Nell and T.
Bradley, 3.
Boys' Pillow Fight, 15 years and
under—Chris, Reid, 1; H. Pierce, 2.
Boys' Cracker-Eating Contest —H.
Pierce, 1; D. Takahashl, 2; H. Takahashl, 3.
Boys' Wheelbarrow Race—W. Pierce
and H. Wayne, 1; V. Dowling and S.
Dowling, 2.
Japanese Obstacle Race—Y. Takahashl, 1; K. Dol, 2; R. Mouuwaka, 3.
Chinese Obstacle Race—Gin King.
1; Tai On, 2; Jung Doug, 3.
Boys' Bicycle' Race, 14 years and
under—T. Abe, 1; T. McLean, 2; Wm.
Fraser, 3.
Boys' Bicycle Race, 17 years and
under—T. Maruya, 1; C. Reid, 2; T.
Yamada, 3.
BoyB' Race, 440 Yards, 15 years and
under—T. Johnstone, 1; R. Pollock, 2.
Chinese Race, 440 yards—Yip Bo, 1;
Tai On, 2.
Japanese Race, 440 yards—T. Kajiyama, 1; K. Kajiyama, 2.
Single Ladles' Race—Martha Boyd,
1; Euphemla Brown, 2.
Married Ladles' Race (under 30)—
Mrs. King, 1; Mrs. F. Slaughter, 2.
Married Ladies' Race (over 30)—
Mrs. Conrad, 1; Mrs. Derbyshire, 2.
Committeemen's Race ,100 Yards—
P. Reid, 1; H. Waterfleld, 2.
Ilio yards dash—J. Fouracre, lj J.
Wllcock, 2.
Bandsmen's Race, 100 yards—F.
Potter, 1; L. Moody, 2.
One Mile Race—J. Fouracre, 1; T.
Johnston, 2.
Boys' Relay Race, 75 yards, 3 to a
team—T. Johnston's team, 1; J. McNeill's team, 2; H. Gibson's team, 3.
Returned  Soldiers' Race—W.  Bowman, 1; L. Moody and H. Boffy, tied
for second place.
Harry ^tichlnvole Jiet With Acldont.
Tiie only accident marring the day's
pleasure was when Harry Auchlnvole,
who was n contestant in tlie high jump,
slipped und sustained a fracture of
two bones In bis wrist.
ilnllilnj Dances,
To wind up the day, two dances
were held, a big dance In the Ilo-llo
Hall, at which a very large number
of happy folks attended, where dancing was kept up until a late hour.
In the G. W. V. A. Hall the City
Band anil Women's Auxiliary of the
G.W.V.A. combined in putting on a
dance, a large number being present
at this place also, a jolly time being
had by those participating.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Get a Kodak and  keep a picture
•story. Frost's for Kodaks.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays In the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, at 7 p.m.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; P.
Myers, Secretary; Frank Slaughter.
Treasurer.
The Kelowna Board of Trade has
reported the fact that there are thou
sands of tons of onions in that'district
going to waste because the people of
the coast have shown a preference for
the imported product.
We sell Genuine
Ford Parts at
prices set by the
Company.   Our
labor charges
also are set.
You know the
cost before you
buy Ford Service
A word of praise is duo to those
who, in spite of opposition, devoted
their time and energy to carrying the
celebration to a .successful and happy
conclusion. Especially doos thin apply to Mayor MacDonald, for his unbounded optimism was mainly responsible for tiie results achieved. All
the officials worked hard for the day's
success, and their reward undoubtedly
is the fact that everyone had a good
time.
HIGHLAND DANCERS
SPECIAL FEATURE
The group of Highland dancers and
piper from Vancouver were greatly
appreciated at the Empire celebration.
Highland dancers were Miss Nicol,
Mr. Nicol and Miss Peggie Home, the
juvenile dancer. Piper, Mr. A. Mc-
Indewar.
They danced several times throughout the day and were greatly applauded, these dances being somewhat of a
novelty in this district, more especially
the Juvenile dancer, who is only eight
years of age. She ls very accomplished in the art, aud delighted tho
audience.
Mr. Nicol and Miss Nicol both performed magnificently. We are Informed that Miss Nicol won the majority of gold medals in tlie competitions of the Caledonian games at Vancouver last August, and we don't wonder al II, judging by the splendid exhibition displayed on Tuesday. She
Is a teacher of the art, and has a class
of about fifty pupils at present Iu
Vancouver.
Tiie following is the programme ns
carried out:
Highland Fling—Miss Nicol, Miss
Peggie Home and Mr. Nicol.
Highland Fling—MIbs Peggy Home.
Sword  Dance—Miss  Peggie  Home.
Sailor's Hornpipe—.Mr. Nicol.
Irish Jig—.Miss Nicol.
Skipping .Rope  Dance—Miss  Nicol.
Sword  Dance—Miss  Peggie  Home
Highland Fling—Miss Nicol, Miss
Peggie Home and Mr. Nicol.
Mr. Mclndewar's playing of the
bagpipes was greatly appreciated in
the parade and with tlie dancers.
Should Miss Nicol consider coming
to this district to teach the art of step
dancing we feel sure she would meet
with success, as there are many children who would take advantage of the
opportunity to learn from so graceful
a teacher.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
E. C. EMDE
Ford Dealer
COURTENAY, B. C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Soeclaltj.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
Thqy work
naturally
andfonn
no hatit
©
They-work
naturally
and, form
nolhabit**
They work
naturally
and, form
no:habit~»
Frost's Burdock
and  Sarsparilla
A GREAT SPRING  BLOOD PURIFIER
For Skin Affections, Scorfula, Pimples, Boils 01* Ulcers
it cannot be surpassed.
Now is the time to get the system in condition to
withstand the hot weather.
$1.25 per bottle
Frost's Pharmacy
« THE REXALL STORE
LUMBER
SHINGLES
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We have just installed a large
Dry Kiln and are now in a position to supply complete house
bills.
.Send us your specifications
and we will give you a close
Figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
HELP YOURELF
Extension of oxlHting industries,
establishment nf now Industries, and
Increased population, all binge on the
success of the "Made-in-B.C." movement "Help Yourself" Ik ono of the
mottoes adopted by tbe Made-ln-B.C,
Campaign Committee, and lu. thoso
\n\t\ words hns been summed up nil
thore la to the Made-in-RC. idea. But
tho more lime, tho more study, and
tho moro support given to thc Idea,
tho moro there is to it for every person in British Columbia.
A bird dog that "points" lish is
owned, ii is said, by an old prospector
living in the Black Mills, S, D. Tho
dog was trained on grouse and quail
but works equally well on trout When
the old man goes fishing with tbe dog
ho stands in tho background while the
dog carefully works the hank of the
stream. Suddenly tbe dog conies to a
point. Tin- old man carefully drops
tiis baited hook lit the spot indicated
ami a strike Invariably results. Tho
animal has in yer been known to fail,
and has pointed trout weighing less
than u pound. Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
May 28, iwli.
MAKE YOURSELF
COMFORTABLE!
SEAGRASS FURNITURE
LARGE ARM CHAIRS
at	
LARGE ARM ROCKERS
at	
$11.50
$12.00
Round and Oblong Tables
$10.50 and $11.50  each
We Invite Your Inspection of Our Lines of
Beds, Springs and Mattresses
IRON AND BRASS BEDS—A full range of prices up
to $50.00 each.
WOVEN WIRE AND COIL SPRINGS.
SANITARY FELT MATTRESSES
at 	
OSTERMOOR AND RESTMORE
MATTRESSES at	
$16.00
$25.00
SEE OUR NEW LINES
OF   WALLPAPERS
R. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
WHEN YOU WANT A SATISFYING, HEALTHY
DRINK, ORDER
SILVER
SPRING
BEER
I
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS AND BARS
WILLIAM DOUGLAS, Distributing Agent.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open liny und Night.
PRESERVING EGGS
DR.
R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office
WILLARD BLOCK
l'hoiie 116
Cumberland, B.
C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary.Public
CUMBERLAND ■ ■  B. C.
Through Service to Europe or Eastern Canada on
"The Continental Limited"
Leaving Vancouver Daily at 7.45 p.m.
Compartment Observation Curs, Standard and Tourist Sleepers
Alternate Route via Grand Trunk Pacific Steamships
to Prince Rupert and Rail Line
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
For full Information apply lo
E. W. BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland
Canadian National Railwaqs
Eggs should be preserved some time
during April, .May or June, when the
production is greatest and tho price
lowest. Eggs preserved in waterglass
can be kept for as long as 12 months,
and are practically as good as fresh
eggs for cooking purposes. The commercial waterglass solution may be
obtained at any drug store or grocer's.
Waterglass in the form of a powder
is also on the market now. It Is dissolved in a definite quantity of water
and for this reason is more reliable
than the commercial solution, which
varies in concentration.
if the commercial waterglass solution is used, mix one and one-half
quarts with IS quarts of water which
has beeu boiled and allowed to cool.
Stir tile mixture well. Tliis quantily
is sufficient to pack '10 dozen eggs.
Put tbe eggs In a crock and pour the
solution over, being sure that every
egg is thoroughly immersed. If you
have nut the whole quantity of eggs
on hand nt the beginning, put what
yeu have In ibe solution and add more
as you get them. Cover the crock to
proven evaporation and keep it in a
cool place.
Preserve only fresh eggs; stale eggs
will not keep in any preservative. Do
not preserve dirty eggs, or eggs tliat
have been washed. Dirty eggs will become tainted in flavor and washed
eggs will not keep because the protective gelatinous covering ou the
outside of the shell has been removed
by tiie washing. Do not leave eggs in
the preservative longer than one year,
and do not use tlie same preservative
liquid more than one year. Use spring
eggs If possible! they keep better than
summer eggs which have usually been
exposed to more or less heat before
packing.
NEW B. C. FOWL
Frank T. Thompson, of Midway, D.
C, Is the originator or what be claims
Is an entirely new type of fowl. He
calls It the "Red, White and Blue,"
and from tlie description furnished by
liim tlie new bird apparently comes
honestly by the title. The males are
crimson on the backs, blue on tbe
breast and white and blue in the tail.
The liens are blue, overlaid with
wheat color, with blue and gold backs.
The new fowl arc wonderfully beautiful fowl and are now running true to
type. Tbey are a medium size bird.
The owner says nothing as to tlie laying qualities of tbe new breed.
WANT DUTY OF 12 CENTS
PER DOZEN ON EGGS
The serious inroads made on the
Canadian egg market by the importation of Chinese eggs has resulted in
definite action by tlie B. C. Poultry
men's Co-operative Exchange, and in
letters to the Minister of Agriculture
and other prominent members of the
Federal House, the association is ask
Ing that a duty of at least 12 cents pel
dozen be placed on eggs in the shell
imported into Canada.
A resolution passed by the association and forwarded to tho minister
calls attention to the serious menace
the enormous importation of Oriental
eggs Is to the industry, which Is becoming one of tbe must important agricultural enterprises in tbe province
and urges that steps must bo taken
for its protection.
Under normal conditions, the poul
tryinen say that It is impossible to
produce eggs in Britisli Columbia at
less than 30 cents per dozen. Tlie
statement is made that Chinese eggs
are produced at six to seven cents,
and the assertion Is that it is absolutely essential that a duty of at least
12 cents per dozen on shell eggs, and
a heavy ad valorem duly on frozen
and dried eggs be at once levied, if
this foreign competitor Is lo be placed
on anything like a par with the B, C.
producers.
The B. C. Poultrymen's Association,
through whom vigorous action may
be expected, represents 200 producers,
und are at present marketing the
product of not less than 60,000 liens.
The membership includes some of tbe
largest producers lu the province.
THE
RED CROSS
Its Peace Time Work
"Peace hath her victories.
No less renowned than War."
—Milton
The peace time problems and work of the Red
Cross are greater by far than all that confronted
its organization, all that it accomplished during
the war. In British Columbia today the necessity of this work, which the Society is pledged
to carry on, is obvious.
Red Cross ™JJ™M
Public Health ^crTSE
"njii'Mc-ne He   health   nurses
liuia-cs {or Mrvice in the
rural districts and far-flung pioneer sections of
this Province is a work which is now actively
occupying the attention of the Society. Towards
this end, arrangements were concluded with the
authorities oi the University of British Columbia
whereby a Red Cross Chair of Public Health is
now established and being maintained. The
course is a Post Graduate one, and the Society
hu appropriated a sum of Fifteen Thousand
Dollars towards defraying the expense. Already
ten of these nurses are placed and being maintained. In time it ia hoped that each centre will
be able to support its own nurse, and thus
extend the service without added expenditure.
Emergency
Service
In sudden disaster by
fire, flood, wreck, on land
or sea, who will help—
who will pay? Here the
and fllltfit-B Red Cross does not tem-
ana umiiw por,» bm proce(,ds at
once to the scene with doctors, nurses, workers,
food, clothing, tents, blankets, and whatever
else will tend to mitigate and relieve suffering
and distress. Disaster may not overtake your
town, village or district for years, yet it may
happen tomorrow, and THE RED CROSS
WILL BE THERE.
WANTED - $1.00
from every man and woman in British
Columbia as enrollment fee in the B. C.
Division of the Canadian Red Cross
Society.
Junior Membership $0.25
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE JUNE 6 TO 11
Mail your Enrollment Pee to your Local Branch or the
CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY
BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION
626 Pender Street West Vancouver, B. C.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SKKVICE, MATERIAL
AM) WORKMANSHIP
fICARAM'EED
RUBBER  HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
LATEST IN BATHTUBS
Tho newest style bath tub which is
especially designed for Huts, is provided nt one end with a ledge on
which the bathers may sit down, while
In the tub—half of tho tub being twice
as deep us the other linlf.and Ibe total
length only forty-four Inches. Thus
the tub occupies a minimum of space.
FOREST FIRES
In 1911) there were 1313 (Ires in tlie
Dominion forest reserves. Of 341 the
cause was unknown. Campers and
travellers caused 152 fires; settlers,
23S; railways, 41S; lightning, S7; lumbering, 27; incendiary, 22; brush disposal oilier than by sealers, 23; others.
35. The railways caused 32 per cent,
of all the forest reserve fires.
S   DAVIS  DAun,muir
.J.     MJrs. v lkJf    Avenue
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of the Oreat War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in the Memorial
Hall.
illinium
Acreage for Sale
G'4 acres of Land for sale,
2]/|, acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
VVM.MERHIPIELP,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. C
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
Klrst Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
m
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P.O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount ot water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should tbe offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent ot the law.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially Invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; A. Q.
Jones, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Ill
NOTICE
May 25, 1921. I]
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops =
installed must be in conduit with externally operated 9
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance =
with Underwriters' Regulations. . m
This applies to meter loops moved from one location m
to another in the same building. jsj
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with thc =
Rules and Regulations of tho Inspector of Electrical =
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National s
Electric Code. g
Any person moving meters belonging to thia Com- §|
pany, altering, disconnecting or connecting service 3
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law. *S=
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain 5
sockets and switches are required in certain locations, =n
and new installations will not bo connected without =
them.   Old installations in which brass or other metal §1
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this g|
date will be disconnected.  And further be warned that p|
the secondary circuits on the distribution   system  of |s|
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge §=
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets -a
and switches are used when same are within reach of §|
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will =**§
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such m
fittings ai*e used. ||
Our authority for above regulations is written in- 3
structions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity, |p
which instructions may be seen at our offlce by inter- |i
ested parties. =
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00 May 28, 1921.
TUB CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
Music and Photoplays
D. W, GRIFFITH'S.LATEST
SENSATION HERE SOON
"The Love Flower" is Heralded
Everywhere as a Creation
of Exquisite Beauty
The master screen craftsman, David
Wark Grlfllth, producer of the screen's
greatest sensations, creator of the
most advanced innovations In motion
picture productions, finder and developer of the world's greatest screen
stars, has produced another wonderful production, "The Lovo Flower,"
which Is being heralded everywhere
as a creation of exquisite beauty,
haunting charm and spirited drama.
This wonderful picture ls coming to
the Ilo-llo on Saturday, Muy 38.
Words of the most superlative degree and descriptions of the moBt
laudatory nature have not been found
to express In adequate terms this
wonderful picture play of love aud
adventure such as only a Griffith, a
master, may reveal In all Its beauty,
strength and excitement. Critics
have pronounced it one of the most
remarkable productions that has ever
come from this master hand.
PEARL WHITE COMING
IN "THE WHITE MOLL'
A Stirring Story of a Big City's
Underworld, Where Human
Life Is Valued at Little
A rare treat is promised for ardent
followers of the silent drama. Pearl
White, a star whose admirers are
numbered by many millions in all
parts of the world, Is coming to the
Ilo-llo Theatre next Wednesday in a
special William Fox production, "The
White Moll," from the pen of Frank L.
Packard, famous author of "The
Miracle Man."
Beautiful, thrilling and intensely
appealing is the way this amazing
photodrama is described In advance
reports. The scenes are laid In the
underworld of the big city, where
gunmen and crooks In general ply
their trndes of robbery and murder.
The story revolves around Rhoda, a
former crook, who, having reformed
In a miruculous way, enters upon
settlement work In the slums. Her
kindness and helpfulness among the
poor and the criminal have earned for
her the title- ot the White Moll.
When the White Moll starts to reclaim "The Sparrow," a notroious
safe-cracker just released from prison,
she incurs the enmity of "The Dangler," leader of the gangsters. Then
follows thnt part of the story In which
one of the most powerful themes ever
shown on the screen is brought out—
sensation following sensation with
lightning speed.
RUTH ROLLAND
In a Western Serial Sensation in
Fifteen Episodes
"RUTH OF THE ROCKIES"
"Ruth of the Rockies," which ls
Ruth Roland's newest Pathe serial, Is
announced as a forthcoming attraction at the Ilo-llo Theatre, commencing on Wednesday, when the first episode of this latest achievement in the
art of the photoplay serial Is to be
shown. There will be an episode each
week until the fifteen thrilling and
sensational parts are completed.
The action in Miss Roland's latest
play Is laid ln a Westorn setting and
revolves about the exciting adventures
of a girl, transplanted from Broadway
to the great western plains.
It tells the story of a girl employed
in a Broadway restaurant who accidentally becomes the possessor of a
trunk which later is discovered to
contain valuable diamonds smuggled
into the country.
Owing to her fearlessness and quick
wit the girl is hired by a detective
tracking down this gang of international smugglers and is sent to a
western boom town where the action
takes place. She ls followed by the
members of the Inner Circle gang to
whom tbe trunk originally belonged.
The girl is likewise the possessor of
a Jade Ring which Is mysteriously
connected with her birth. An Unknown endeavors to force her to marry
him but she refuses. Through the entire story there exists a mysterious
aviator who comes to her rescue and
protects her on many occasions. The
solving of this double mystery forms
one of the most exciting serial tales
that has ever been presented for popular consumption.
TIN PAN ALLEY SCENE
OF RAY-FAIR PICTURE
MARY PICKFORD APPEARS
NEXT WEEK IN "SUDS"
A Production Wonderfully Appealing and Effective in its
Lovable Simplicity.
Having won the hearts of the world
and established herself as the greatest exponent of child characters on
the screen, the ever versatile Mary
Pickford will be seen on Saturday of
nexi week at the Ilo-llo Theatre In
"Suds," a United Artists photoplay of
an entirely different nature to anything In which she has heretofore appeared.
The theme of "Suds" Is based on
Maude Adam's famous play " 'Op 0'
Me Thums."
The story has to do with the affairs
ot Amanda Afflick, a pug-nosed
homely little slavey in a French laundry In the slums of the English city.
Amanda is the most woebegone character imaginable and as the other girls
In the laundry have their sweethearts,
aud no man has ever deigned to notice
the little slavey, she weaves a wonderful romance for her own benefit aud
the benefit of the girls in tbe laundry,
about the owner of a shirt which had
been left to be washed some months
before the story opens.
A group of film men have acquired
tbe production right of every kind to
"Ben Hur," founded on the notable
novel of Gen. Lew Wallace. Included
In the transaction are the motion picture rights, for which alone the price
ls to be $1,000,000.
At present there is a duty of three
cents per foot on all films coming into
Canada from the United States, and
two cents per foot for films from England, hut a movement ls on foot to
abolish the duty on British dims.
Tin Pan Alley, the name given to a
street block where the New York music
publishers made their headquarters,
Is the scene ot a William Fox photoplay by the same name which will be
shown at tbe Ilo-llo Theatre on Friday night next.
A clean, bright, entertaining photoplay, strong ln human interest, is "Tin
Pan Alley." This Is a snappy title for
a beautiful picturization of the spirit
of the home and what it means in
human lives. The story on which the
picture Is founded is by William C.
Lengel, and recently made a big hit
In one of the magaziues. It tells of
the struggles of a youth to make a
success musically, of how he finds the
true source of inspiration in a place
most unexpected—to him—and thus
learns the difference between the sham
and the real in life.
The stars are Albert Ray and Elinor
Fair, who do excellent work, and are
supported by a good cast.
The famous shoes of Charlie Chaplin, which nre insured for $50,000
against fire, theft, loss or "damage,"
cost about $3, and have been worn by
Charlie since bis first appearance be-
fore the camera. They are size fourteen.
As a result of a canvass made by
the George Loane Tucker's Los Angeles studios, of the moving picture
theatres of America, it is learned that
nearly 20,000 American picture houses
have exhibited "The Miracle Man." To
be exact, Just 19,287 in the United
States, 679 ln Canada and 19,287 in the
United States ran the photoplay,
which it is now estimated haB made
profits of (2,475,000.
It seems hardly creditable that a
woman could read love letters from
other women to her husband. But
Dorothy Davenport reads Wallace
Reid's with perfect calm and a good
deal of amusement. It has always
been she who has taken the greater
interest in these notes from girl admirers; it has been she who has
watched their number Increasing as
tbe star's popularity has grown by
leapa and bounds; it has been she, too,
who has seen that all the little heartsick flappers who want letters and
photos from their idol get them by
return.
George Bernard Shaw once said of
William S. Hart, the promoter of
western pictures, "He has the strongest face of anybody playing for the
dims," though of that same feature
Hart, .when offered his first engagement, said, "What, with a face like
this?"
The boy stood on the bridge of a
steamship beside the captain on
starry night. It suddenly grew necessary for the captain to go below, and
he said to the boy; "Here, take the
wheel and I'll be back in a few
minutes. Steer by that star and you
will be all right."
The boy began to steer the boat and
Boon got her out of her course. The
star now appeared astern instead of
ahead. He shouted down to the skipper: "Hi, skipper, come up and find
me another star, I've passed that
one."
m
High Quality '
Goods at Lower
Prices1
DECKAJULIE TEA, per lb  65c
MALKIN'S BEST TEA, per lb 60c
NABOB TEA, per lb 55c
GREAT WEST TEA, Red Label, per lb 55c
BRAID'S IDEAL TEA, 2^-lb. pkts $1.00
PURITY FLOUR, per sack $2.90
SNOWFLAKE PASTRY FLOUR, per sack 65c
20-LB. SACK SUGAR $2.60
CHRISTIE'S SODAS, per tin 70c
FELS NAPTHA SOAP, per carton $1.00
P. & G. WHITE NAPTHA SOAP 12 cakes $1.10
COMOX BUTTER 2 lbs. for $1.05
We Sell for Less
The Corner Store
WM. GORDON
Phone 133
"Say, dearies," questioned Heiolse
of the restaurant, "what's your name?"
'Marilynne Montsevern," answered
the new waitress.
"Ye-ah—I know! But what was it
when you was poor but honest?"
HIS BROTHER DIED
150 YEARS PREVIOUSLY
It Is reported from Brussels that an
applicant for poor relief stated tbat
his only brother died one hundred and
twenty-five years ago, and tbat, although the statement was at first disbelieved, it turned out to be true.
A still more extraordinary lapse of
time between the birth ot two brotbers
is recorded by a well-known lawyer
ot the early nineteenth century. One
of the witnesses in a probate action
In which the lawyer held a brief was
asked whether he had any brothers or
sisters. "My only brother," he replied
"died one hundred and fifty years
ago."
A murmur of incredulity ran through
the court, yet documentary evidence
was produced to confirm the old man's
Btatement. His father had married at
the age of nineteen, and by his wife
had a son who died in infancy. He
married again at the age of seventy-
live and had another son, the witness,
who was ninety-six yearB when he
gave his evidence.
"Why the furtive look?"
"I'm carrying home a package of
wet goods bought from a reliable
bootlegger," said Mr" Jagsby.
"Then what are you afraid of?"
"Oh, nothing, nothing. But, confound the luck, everybody who walks
behind me seems to be wearing rubber heels."
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, May 28th
David Wark Griffith
presents
The Love Flower
Of all the loves, which is the greatest in your mind? Some people say the greatest
love is that of a mother for her son. Others believe it is the love of a father for his
daughter. Still others contend that the love of a bachelor for his pipe or his dog, or
the child for her puppet dolls, the maiden aunt for her parrot, the miser for his money
—are greater than all other loves. Greater love hath no man, it once was said, than
that one man should be willing to give his life for his brother.
Which do you believe is the greatest love? See "The Love Flower," the D. W. Griffith
sensational United Artists production, in which a daughter is willing to murder a man
to save hei father and also give her life, too.   Do you know of a greater love?
Monday, May 30th
WALLACE  REID
— IN —
I       DOUBLE SPEED        I
1  Beats " EXCUSE MY DUST " for thrills and stunts   I
Wednesday, June 1st
PEARL WHITE
— IN —
The White Moll
A colossal super crook drama with an amazing spiritual twist. The story
of a girl who fought hor way back against tremendous odds. Sounds the
uttermost depths of the human emotions.
THE MOST DRAMATIC EXPOSITION OF LIFE IN THE UNDERWORLD EVER VISUALIZED ON THE SCREEN.
Tensely human and vividly emotional. Tells the story of a great redemption
A brand new Serial in 15 episodes starts today
RUTH of the ROCKIES
— STARRING —
RUTH   ROLAND
"Ruth of the Rockies" is a western serial of sensational adventure going
from Broadway to the plains. A fifteen-episode drama, set in the perilous
surroundings of cavernous ravines, yawning chasms and high mountain
peaks! A plot where tlie quick wit of a woman, her horsemanship ability
and her quickness on the trigger makes her a worthy opponent for the
strongest of men.
Clothes that would challenge the creations of a New York modiste art-
contrasted with soft sombrero and red bandana of the west!
A bristling western action serial! Thrilling sensational entertainment 1
A romance that palpitates the heart 1.
Jj      §
Friday, June 3rd
Tin Pan Alley
With ALBERT RAY and ELINOR FAIR
A musical duct in pictures. A beautiful story in which a youth finds in the heart
of a girl the spirit of home that inspires his bc9t work. Which proves that home is nol
in four walls, but in   human   hearts.    A wholesome comedy seasoned with pathos.
ii I —■■■■—— —■**■• —
Saturday, June 4th
MARY PICKFORD
— IN
Fully 15,000 persons are burned to =
death annually. jnili
SUDS
Mary Pickford in the characterization of a little cockney laundry drudge in "Suds"
builds the loveliest dream castles out of soap suds. It is one of the rare productions
that goes straight to the heart and awakens all sorts of human sympathy—strong and
moving—and with that measure of humor and pathos that is Inseparable from its
realism.   From the Charles Frohman production, " 'Op O' Me Thumb." Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
May 28, 1921.
Ladies', Men's, Girls', Boys'
and Children's Hosiery
LADIES' SILK HOSE—Venus make, one of the choicest lines of Hose on the market; a
beautiful quality of silk. Price, $2.00 a pair. Colors of Black, White; Paddy, Navy,
Pink, Sand, Grey, Blue, Nigger Brown and Cordovan.
MONARCH KNIT OPEN-WORK SILK HOSE—In colors of Black, Navy, Cordovan and
Grey.   Price $2.30 a pair.   Just the name "Monarch" is sufficient guarantee of quality.
LADIES' SILK ART HOSE—In most of the wanted shades, at $1.25 pair.
LADIES' LISLE HOSE—A really good quality at 75c and 90c pair.
LADIES' WHITE LISLE HOSE—Mercerized; extra special quality; 95c pair.
CHILD'S SOX—In shades of Pink and Blue; sizes 4U. to 7; 35c pair; 3 pairs for $1.00.
CHILD'S CUTIE SOX—With or without striped tops; sizes 4'/2 to 7.   Price 45c pair.
CHILD'S VERY FINE MERCERIZED SOX—White with colored tops.   Price 65c pair.
CHILDREN'S FINE MERCERIZED HOSE—Sizes 5 to 9, in Black and Brown. Prices
65c to 95c pair.   Guaranteed to give good wear.
BOYS' HOSE—Cotton rib, the kind that wear well; it pays to get quality. SOc to 75c pair.
BOYS' LARGE SIZE KNICKER HOSE—Splendid line for the boys who play football.
Sizes 8i/j to 10.   Price 60c pair.   Rare value.
MEN'S WORKING SOX—35c pair or 3 pairs for $1.00.
MEN'S FINE CASHMERE HOSE—English make; one of the finest lines we have seen,
and the price is only $1.00 a pair.   Try one.
MEN'S FINE LISLE HOSE—A really superior quality, in Black and Brown; all sizes.
Price 75c a pair.
MEN'S HOLEPROOF SILK HOSE—In Brown and Grey only.   Price $1.25 a pair.
THE STORE FOR QUALITY HOSIERY
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
1
lllllfii
Opening   Announcement |
Courtenay
White Laundry
Sutherland & Ewart announce that they have opened
up at Courtenay a modern Laundry, equipped with the
most up-to-date sanitary, electrically-driven machinery    j
and undertake to give satisfaction with all laundry    j
entrusted to them, j
Reasonable Prices
PHONE 127 COURTENAY
for driver to call for a trial order.
LAUNDRY CALLED FOR ON MONDAYS AND
DELIVERED FOLLOWING SATURDAY.
It Is Just As Easy
to own a genuine
" Ye Olde Firme"
Heintzman & Co. Piano
as it is to own one of inferior quality.
Our  revised   prices  bring  the  Heintzman  Piano
within the reach of all.
Terms can be arranged to suit your convenience.
Write for catalogue and prices. •
Heintzman & Co.
OIDEON HICKS, Manuger—Box 233, Victoria
Nanaimo VICTORIA Cumberland
The "Fish Traiii" which runs daily
from Now Soutli Wales to tlie Ulue
Mountains, Australia, is a passenger
express nnd never carried any fish
freight. This nniuc was given the express because at one time the engine-
driver was named Salmon, the fireman
Herring and the conductor .Mullet,
three well-known lish.
Mining by means ot liquid oxygen
as an explosive has obtained a foot-
b.Qld In the United States.
British Columbia wants more population, but how are wo to get this
here If we do not have the Industries
to support it? More population mens
greater markets for our agricultural
produce and for our manufactured
nrtlcles. Preference for British Columbia goods will solve the problem
quicker than anything else.
African palm oil Is being success^
fully used ns a fuel for internal com*
bustlon engine;:.
Church Notices
HOLT TltlNIir CHUKCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Sunday, May 29, First After Trinity.
11 a.m., Celebration of Holy Communion. Parents and friends of
children specially invited.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School.
7 p.m., Annual Children's Evensong.
ROHAN CATHOLIC tlllltCII.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Second Sunday After Pentecost.
Mass at 11 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Uev. 0. B. Kinney, B.A, FJUi.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
May li)—Flyer and Seow, New West-
minsterf.
May 20—Jessie Mac, coastwise; Anyox, Ocean Falls.
May 21—Dola and Scow, Victoria;
Princess Ena, Alaska.
May 22—Spray aud Scow, Victoria;
Princess Beatrice, Vancouver.
May 23—Joyful, coastwise; Hulk No.
100, Vancouver; Peerless, coastwise;
Kushima .Maru, Japan.
May 25—Newington, coastwise; Active, coastwise; Beatrice, coastwise;
Dauntless, coastwise; Storm King,
coastwise.
CHILDREN'S FANCY
DRESS BALL AT BEVAN
On Saturday night last a Children's
Fancy Dres Hull was held at Bevan,
which proved to be one of the hcHt
ever held fn thai district. The hall
was beautifully decorated tor tlie occasion and presented a gay appearance with the prettily dressed children. The children's programme oc-
cupied-fhc floor from 7 to 10 o'clock,
when tho grown-up spectators took
charge and enjoyed themselves until
a late hour.
A list of prize winners in thc main
events follows:
Best dressed girl—Bertha Mikota.
Best dressed boy—Thomas Robertson.
Best national costume—Sadie Brown.
Best cupid—Douglas Williams.
Best flower girl—Betty Malpass.
Best down—Leland Bannerman.
Best national boy—Robert Bums.
Best three-step—Gertie Cartier and
JiHinic Herd.
Best two-step—Sadie Brown and
Andrew Walker.
Best waltz—Sadie Brown and Isabel
Herd.
Personal Mention
Mrs. Oeorge B. Kinney will not re-
i eive on  Wednesday next, nor again
ihis season.
Mrs. A. It. Nunns left for Victoria
.11 Thursday morning.
Dr. and Mrs. R. P. Christie, accompanied by Mrs. J. Walton, journeyed
to Victoria by motor on Sunday, returning Wednesday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Drader returned
from Victoria Wednesday evening.
Mr. Thomas Oraham, General Superintendent Canadian Collieries tDuns-
muir) Ltd., accompanied by Mrs.
Oraham, returned from Victoria on
Thursday.
Mr. W. S. Wilson spent last weekend in Victoria, returning Wednesday.
Mr. Oeorge O'Brien, Safety Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir..
Ltd., left for Ladysmith Wednesday
morning.
Miss Olive L. Bickle returned from
Victoria Wednesday.
Mr. Dayrell Bates arrived from
Seattle on Wednesday and Is spending a short holiday with relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. Robertson and Mr. R.
Robertson returned from Victoria on
Wednesday.
Miss L. Boden, who has been visiting Miss Annie Carroll In Courtenay,
returned to Vancouver Tuesday mom
ing.
Mr. James L. Brown left for Vancouver Friday morning.
Mr. Charles Oraham, District Superintendent Canadian Collieries (Duns-
mulr) Ltd., left for Nanaimo and Vancouver Friday morning.
Miss Dora Hutchinson returned from
Victoria Wednesday.
Mrs. Charles Graham returned from
Victoria Thursday evening.
Mr. Prttthnrd, the well known Socialist speaker, who has been addressing meetings in the district, left on
Wednesday.
Mrs. McMillan left on Saturday last
for Vancouver to meet Mr, McMillan,
returning to Cumberland Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. David Hunden left on
Wednesday on a trip to Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, to visit Mrs. Hunden's
mother.
Mr. H. Knappett left on Thursday
for Victoria, and expects to remain
there for some months.
Mrs. C. J. Bunbury and daughter
left for Victoria on Monday and will
return on Saturday.
Mr. Mlddleton, provincial architect,
is in town tills week on'business connected with the new scho'o building.
PRIVATE NURSING
MISS M. BOND, R.N., is prepared to
undertake private nursing. Address
P.O. Box 353. Residence, New Town-
site. 4-26
WANTED
CAPABLE GIRL; PLAIN COOKING;
fond of children; sleep in; good
home.   Apply P.O. Box 36.        3-23
FOR SALE
1921 FORD TOURING CAR, SLIGHT-
ly used; owner going East about
June 10th. F. C. Frazee, c-o Cumberland Hotel. 1-21
CHEVROLET CAR, 1918, IN Al CON-
ditlon; thoroughly overhauled; new
battery, spare tire. Price $576. Box
343, Cumberland.
FORD TOURING,*1918; SPARE TIRE
and tubes; Al condition. Price
$450. Apply P.O. Box 343, Cumberland.
1920 MODEL CHEVROLET CAR—In
HrBt-class    condition;    cheap    for
cash.   Apply Box 589, Cumberland.
2-23
FORD CAR, 1919, GOOD CONDITION.
Demountable rims, shock absorbers.
Call and see at Chas. McMillan's,
53, Camp. 3-20
CHEVROLET CAR FOR SALE—1920
model; run only 1500 miles; ls in
splendid condition. Will sell cheap
for quick gale. Apply A. R. Wesley,
R. R. No. 1, Cumberland, B.C.   4-22
CHEVROLET 5-PASSENGER CAR,
1919 mode], in lirst-class condition;
fully equipped, five new tirea, five
spare tubes. Open for inspection to
any mechanic. Price $650 cash.
Apply Ben Evans, Camp, Cumberland. 4-17
LOST
SPIRIT LEVEL, ABOUT 10 INCHES
long; valued as keepsake. $2.00 reward on returning to Islander. 1-22
FOUND
FOUND—A HONORABLE SERVICE
BADGE, No. 23590. Owner can
have same by applying to Islander
Offlce.
Just arrived at the
B. & B. GROCERY
a new line in
Glassware
AND
Crockery
SEE   OUR   WINDOWS
Our Trices are Right
FRESH  FRUIT
Arriving Daily
CHERRIES       STRAWBERRIES       PINEAPPLES
BANANAS    ORANGES    LEMONS    APPLES
GRAPEFRUIT
FRESH VEGETABLES
LETTUCE   TOMATOES   CUCUMBERS   CABBAGE
ASPARAGUS    CARROTS    BEETS    TURNIPS
Our Motto: Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
NOTICE
Having sold our interests in Cumberland,
we wish to make known to our many customers that Miss Graham, who has been in
charge of our office affairs during the past
year, will still retain the offlce at Simon
Leiser & Co.'s during the final straightening
out of our affairs.
So that Bills may be settled as expeditiously
as possible we will appreciate it very much if
all outstanding accounts will be paid at once.
All those having any accounts against
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd., may have them
settled by presenting same to Miss Graham.
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR^ LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
The above Association will meet at 10.30 a.m. on
SUNDAY, JUNE 5th, IN THE FIRST AID HALL
Mr. Charles Graham will read a most important
paper at this meeting.

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