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The Islander Mar 11, 1916

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Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 50     THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1916.      Subscription price, $1.50 per year
VERDUN OFFENSIVE CHECKED
London, March 6.— "What are
the secret motives, underlying
the German attempt to break
the French line at Verdun in
which the Crown Prince's army
is incurringsuch appalling losses?
Is it financial, in view of the
coming war loan? Is it dynastic?
Or is it intended to influence
doubting neutrals?" asks Lord
Northcliffe In a despatch written
before Verdun and published in
the Times. From evidence of
German deserters it is known
that the attack originally was intended to take place a month or
two hence, when the ground was
dry. The premature caused the
Germans to accelerate their plans.
There were two delays owing to
bad weather and then came the
colossal onslaught of February 21.
The Germans have made good
many of the mistakes we made
at Gallipoli. They announced
that something large was pending
by closing the Swiss frontier.
The French were also fully warned by their own astute intelligence department. Their aeroplanes were not idle and if confirmation was needed it was given
by deserters who, surmising the
horrors that were to come crept
out of the trenches at night, lay
down by the edge of the Meuse
until morning and then gave themselves up, together with information that has since proved to be
accurate,
Things went wrong with the
Germans in other ways. A Zeppelin that was to have blown up
important railway junctions was
brought down at Reviny and, incidentally, the inhabitants of
what remains of that much bombarded town were avenged by
the spectacle of a blazing dirigible crashing to the ground and
hoisting with their own petards
the thirty Huns therein.
It is not necessary to recapitulate that the gigantic effort of
February 21, was frustrated by
the coolness and tenacity of the
French soldiers snd the deadly
curtain of fire of their gunners.
A great deal of calculated nonsense has been sent out in official
communications and dilated upon
by the Berlin newspaper correspondents as to the taking by
storm of the long-dismantled
Fort of Douaumont. Nothing
whatever has been admitted by
A STORM CLOUD IN THE DESERT.
the Germans as to the appalling
price in blood they have paid
since February 21 and are still
paying.
Drop Newspapers Not Bombs
Instead of throwing bombs,
some of the French aviators flying over German territory drop
thousands of leaflets, according
to a German newspaper, telling
the German people that their
hope of victoi y in the war is in
vain. Thousands of toy balloons,
each containing one of these
leaflets, are freed daily when the
wind is favorable to carry them
into the German lines. There is
also being distributed by the air
route copies of a French newspaper, prepared behind the
trenches, giving extracts from
letters found on dead German
soldiers in which the hopelessness
of the German cause is admitted.
This propaganda will, it is hoped
by those back of it, cause discontent and unrest and add to the
discouragement of the German
people.
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be held in the
West Cumberland Band Hall on
Wednesday, April 29th.
Thomas Bickle returned from
a visit to Victoria and Vancouver
on Tuesday.
MOVES FOR PROHIBITION
Ottawa. March 6.—Mr. H. H.
Stevens, M. P., moved in the
House today his resolution seconded by Hon. Chas. Marcil proposing that, owing to the need of the
conservation of the wealth and
resources of the nation at the
present time there - should be
Dominion-wide prohibition. He
said thatjfchere were two aspects,
the moi al and economic. He, did
not intend to deal with the moral
side, but entirely with the economic aspect. He held he need apologize to noman or no member for
introducing the resolution.
When a large portion of the
people of Canada demanded consideration of any problem they
should do so. He was not voici ng
the opinion of a few fanatics, but
the view of thousands of the
sanest men in Canada. If democracy could not deal with a
problem like this, then democracy
would fail.
He quoted statistics to show
the development of the temperance sentiment in Canada.
On Tuesday it is expected that
Sir Wilfrid Laurier's resolution
calling for the appointment of a
committee to enquire into shell
contracts will be taken up, but it
may go over until Thursday.
RESULT OF FUEL OIL IMPORTS
A special meeting of the Council was held on Wednesday evening with His Worship, Mayor
Parnham, in the chair. Aldermen McDonald, Banks, Bate,
Carey and Henderson were present.
Upon calling the meeting to
order the Mayor stated that three
or four families were reported to
be in destitute circumstances
within the city limits to such an
extent that children were being
put to bed without anything to
eat and upon investigation it was
found that three families whose
husbands had left Cumberland
in search of work were without
any fuel or provisions. The Mayor said that he had visited the
places referred to and found
them on the verge of starvation.
The Council granted the families
temporary relief, as provided by
the Provincial Government in
the past, and instructed the City
clerk to take the matter up with
Mr. M. Manson, M. P. P.
This is a case where Fuel oil
deprived the children of their
bread and the wealthy corporations send the money earned in
British Columbia to California
for Fuel oil, displacing hundreds
of thousands of tons of coal, compelling the coal miner to seek
work elsewhere and to leave his
wife and family in a coal mining
centre to starve until the hand
of charity extends relief. The
destitute cases that the City Council dealt with on Wednesday are
only a few of the many that are
brought about by the wholesale
importation of California Fuel
oil imported into this province
duty free until recently, when
the Federal authorities granted
the coal industry protection to
the extent of half a cent a gallon.
This is absolutely inadequate,
and Unless the Dominion Government comes to the rescue of the
coal industry by imposing at
least an import duty of one cent
per gallon on Fuel oil starvation
will prevail in the coal mining
centre and the coal industry of
this province ruined.
Henry Devlin, Inspector
Mines, arrived on Saturday
his usual monthly inspection
the local mines.
of
on
of
The annnal Masquerade Ball
under the auspices of the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Brigade
will be held in the Ilo Ilo Hall on
St. Patrick's day, March 17th. TWO
THE ISLAM >EK,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
r .■ .. —
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
.Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, MARCH 11th, 1916.
WHITEFIELD was once
preaching in Boston, on the wonders of creation, providence, and
redemption, when a violent tempest of thunder and lightning
came on. In the midst of the
sermon it attained to so alarming
a height that the congregation
sat in almost breathless awe.
The preacher closed his note book,
and, stepping into one of the
wings of the desk, fell on his
knees, and with much feeling and
fine taste repeated:—
*' 'Hark ! the Eternal rends the sky!
A mighty voice before Him goes—
A voice of music to His friends,
But threating thunder to His foes:
Come, children, to your Father's arms;
Hide in the chambers of My grace,
Till the fierce storm be overblown,
And My avenging fury cease.'
Let us devotely sing, to the
praise and glory of God. this
hymn: Old Hundred." The
whole congregation rose, and
poured forth the sacred song, in
which they were nobly accompanied by the organ, in a style of
pious grandeur and heartfelt
devotion that was probably never
surpassed. By the time the hymn
was finished the storm was hushed, and the sun, bursting forth,
showed through the windows, to
the enraptured assembly.amagni
ficent and brilliant arch of peace.
The preacher resumed the desk
and his discourse, with this apposite quotation:-"Look upon the
rainbow; praise Him that made
it. It compasseth the heaven
about with a glorious circle"; and
the hands of the Most High have
bended it." The remainder of
the service was calculated to sustain thrt elevated feeling which
had been produced; and the benediction, with which the good
man dismissed the flock, was universally received with streaming
eyes, and hearts overflowing with
tenderness and gratitude.
&&m
SPRING OPENING
Ladies9 Department:
MILLINERY
Newest Eastern Creations in Ladies Model and ready-to-
wear Hats, Flowers, Ribbons and Wreaths.
READY-TO-WEAR GOODS In Middies, Blouses, Pique and Duck Skirts,
House Dresses. Misses and Childrens Pinafores, Muslins
and Cambric Underwear.
WASH GOODS   Crepes, Fancy Muslin, Piques, Ducks, Galateas, Garbar-
dines, Prints, Printed Voiles, Zephyr Ginghams.
CORSETS   New Models in c/c A La Grace Corsets.
Mens Department:
HATS and CAPS Newest American Styles in Mens Soft and Hard Felt
Hats in all the leading Shades. New Shapes in Mens Motor
and Golf Tweed Caps.
NECKWEAR
SHOES
SHIRTS
CLOTHING
Newest Novelties in Mens Flowing End, Derby and Batwing.
Ties. See our Window for Specials in St. Patrick's Day
Neckwear.
'The Best Good
Newest Spring Lasts in Invictus Shoes.
Shoe for Men.''
W.G. & R. Shirts in Silk Mixtures, Black and White Stripes,
also the County Club Shirt with large open neck.
Spring Samples of Campbells Made-to-Measure Clothing in
all the newest weaves and shades, now being shown.
It is so easy to criticise one's
neighbor who has gone wrong in
morals, or made failure in business, and so hard to give nredit
for the effect of influences impelling him to disaster, over
which he has no control, that
our criticism of others is often
very uncharitable. Men often say
how good they would have been,
or what they would have accomplished had they been in the
other man's place. They do not
stop to ask why the fellow that
was in the other shoes did not
succeed. If they did they would
often find the man who went
wrong, or who failed, was entitled to great credit for standing
up so bravely under forces and
burdens that might easily have
overthrown his accusers. Sometimes the man who fails is a
greater hero than another one
who wins.
The grandest luxury God ever
gave man is health. He who trades
that off for all the palaces of the
earth is cheated. Many have
envied Napoleon, but he would
gladly have given all his honors
to have been freed from the gout.
A dinner of herbs tastes better
the appetite sharpened on a woodman's axe or a scythe, than
wealthy indigestion experiences
seated at a table covered with
venison and all the luxuries of
the season. With good health
we can sleep sweetly on a straw
mattress, while fashionable invalids get but little rest on a
couch of eagle's down. Let us
remember Paul's advice to the
Hebrews and if we have health
in all other respect "Be content
with such things as ye have."
It has been said that from the
same materials one builds palaces,
another hovels; one warehouses,
another villas; bricks and mortar
are mortar and bricks until the
architect makes them something
else. The block of granite which
was an obstacle in the path of
the weak becomes a stepping
stone in the pathway of the resolute. The difficulties which dishearten one man only stiffen the
sinews of another, who looks on
them as a sort of mental springboard by which to vault across
the gulf of failure on to the sure,
solid ground of full success.
That injunction to love your
neighbor as yourself, means the
neighbor in trouble as well as
the other who has a big autmo-
bile.
	
■ J'HE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
PROVINCE HAS VAST
RESOURCES OF COAL
Address by Mr. James Ashworth onCoal
Mining, in which He Shows that the
Duty on Fuel Oil is Inadequate
to Protect the Coal Industry.
€
in verv^ many rases there is very
Mr. James Ashworth, consulting mining engineer, at the last
regular monthly meeting of the
Vancouver Exhibition Association
directors, delivered an interesting
address on coal mining, coal products, the use of oil in British
Columbia and its effect on coal
mining, and a few remarks on
iron in this province. Mr. Ashworth said:
"In response to our president's
request to give you a paper on
mining I have prepared a few
notes. Within the last few weeks
around the city there have been
several lectures and address on
the general subject but practically
the whole of them have had more
particular reference to the metalliferous mines, smelters and
refineries. In this paper I propose to refer particularly to coal
mining and to give a few notes
on present day 'wild cat" company promotions.       - -■• - -
"There is really very little interest taken in coal mining in this
city, excepting when the weather
gets cold, and the price and supply of domestic fuel comes right
home to every householder who
wishes to have a warm house.
Some of those people who ran
short of fuel during the   last
month were compelled to come in
contact with what is known as
run of mine, and in that way got
a practical realization of what
the term means.    Run of mine
is really the product of the mine
as loaded by the miner and sometimes supplied to manufactories
and railway companies.   To make
this product marketable it had to
be passed over screens where it
spread out and the dirt and rock
picked out of it, and also graded
into the sizes required by the
purchasers, thus it becomes graded down to lump coal, cobbles,
large nuts, small nuts, peas and
slack—in addition to this part of
the product is washed and we
have washed huts, etc.   In some]
cases when the coal is suitable
for coking the small is washed
before going into the coke oven.
All the seams of coal which are
worked are not puitable for coke
making and in this district only
the Cumberland coals are being
made into coke at Union Bay.
The market demand for small
coal is as a rule insufficient to
take the whole of the production
and therefore many tons have to
be put on the dump, and it is
partly due to this fact, and heavy
transport costs, that the price of
lump coal appears to be out of all
proportion to the price paid to
the miner and operator.
"British Columbia is crowded
with coalfields, but their development into profitable collieries has
been hindered by a great number
of causes.   One of these causes is
the advent of fuel oil.    There
was a time not long ago when the
railways of the province were using only coal in their locomotives,
and   the   government  revenue
therefrom was increasing, the demand for coal was yearly bringing
new blood and miner's families
into the province, but within the
last twelve months we have had
to   see   Hundreds   out-of-work
miners returning to Great Britain
to take the places of miners who
have joined the Allied  forces.
Nol only have the railways been
burning oil but a large number
of steamers have also discarded
coal and displaced it with fuel oil.
There cannot be a doubt but this
latter change was to some extent
due to the change of ownership
of the Dunsmuir collieries and
the strike of coal miners on Vancouver Island.     The writer proposed to refer particularly to the
introduction of fuel oil from California and Peru, free from duty
to which he had always been opposed, but since   he  collected
some of his data the government
has proposed to impose a tax of
one half per gallon on this oil.
This cannot fail to give great
satisfaction to the coal mining
and other taxpayers of this'prov-
ince.   Every ton of coal replaced
by oil means a loss of revenue to
the extent of 10 cents per ton,
whereas the oil was admitted free
from duty and was mainly of advantage to the railway companies.
It has been said that the object
of the oil consumption on the
railways was due to the government anxiety to preseve the forests from devastating fires, but
little valuable merchantable t'ra-
ber alongside the railways. We
cannot expect that the tax on fuel
oil will cause any immediate result in an increased demand for
coal, but there will be the satisfaction in knowing that the imported oil will add to this country's revenue what is tantamount
to about 70cents per ton of the
displaced coal, if the barrel is taken to be 40 gallons.
In 1910 5.000,000  gallons of
fuel oil were used in British Columbia, and in 1914 this had increased to 110,500,000 gallons.
In the same period of time the
ontputof coal decreased 1,000,000
tons, also in the same period of
time the men employed in and
about the collieries decreased two
thousand.      In 1910 the relative
percentage of coal used to fuel
oil was 99 to one, and in 1911 it
was as 98 to two, 1912 it was as
95 to 5, and in 1913 it was as 83
to 17, and in 1914 it was as 76 to
24, and although the official figures for 1915 are not yet made
public there cannot be a doubt
but that they have altered in a
similar ratio.     To further show
the great influence which oil has
exerted on the mining department and the revenues of British Columbia it must be seriously
noted that the royalty paid by
coal decreased from $315,220 in
1910 to $218,216 in 1914.    I may
say that in 1910, $100,000 less
was paid in royalties than in 1904.
Very successful   experiments
have been made in the use of
pulverized coal, that is, coal dust
for smelting ores and also for
firing locomotive boilers on the
railways, and therefore it is anticipated by those who are interested in coal that this class of
fuel will in time replace oil on the
railways and steamers, and in
that way consume that part of
the   output   of   our   collieries
which is the most difficult to dispose of, viz., the small coal.    At
the present time we know of very
few coalfields in British Columbia
which produce a suitable coal for
making good metallurgical coke,
the nearest one to the coast being
the Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir) at Cumberland, which last
year produced over 9,000 tons of
coke, the other one is the Crow's
Nest Pass Coal Company's field
at Fernie. which produced last
year 248,424 tons of coke. Bituminous coal, which it is believed
v ill produce a good metallurgical
coke, is to be found in the Nicola
valley. Coalmont and at Seaton
and Bowron River on the Grand
Trunk Pacific, and also on the
Nort hThompson above Kamloops.
There is a certain demand fer
coke on the Pacific Coast at the
present time and if more smelters
erected it is important that
are    ^^	
reasonably cheap fuel should be
procurable.
A great deal has been written
and  talked   about   by-products
from coal, and there cannot be
a doubt but that enormous values in   by-products  have been
thrown away into the atmosphere
especially in the Crow's Nest Pass
At one time it was thought by
smelters that the coke from a
by-product oven was not so good
as that from the bee hive oven,
but that fad has pratically disappeared. Several times within the
last 10 years the adoption of byproduct ovens   by the Crow's
Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited has been debated, and on the
latest occasion it is rumored that
their installation has been postponed because of the possibility
of the smelters replacing coke
by the powdered coal.   Another
reason given  was the possible
difficulty of disposing of the byproducts, sulphate of amonia and
tar in particular.   There is also
a large volume of gas which is
neither used nor convertible and
therefore it would appear that
large   batteries  of   by-product
ovens ought to be in the neighborhood of large cities, and if
possible close to the coast   This
at once suggests that the small
coal from the collieries should be
brought down to the suburbs of
this city, say, some convenient
place on the Fraser River,  and
the gas sold to New Westminster
and Vancouver.   The coke could
then be shipped by water to the
Pacific Coast smelters and the
tar and sulphate of amonia to
wherever  required.   The art of
coking is sufficiently well understood nowadays that by varying
the heat different   by-products
can be produced, thus it is asserted that about $45 worth of oil
and spirit can be obtained from
one ton of certain coals.
The coalfields of British Columbia are of enormous extent and
the writer is of the opinion that
they ought to receive more attention than they have heretofore
received. Our capitalization has
seriously hindered the financial
success of some of them, yet it
is evident to those who look at
all closely into past history that
very profitable results are possible, and that within the next
few years we shall see a great
expansion in coal mining especially along the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, where great developments in metal mining are now
in progress.
"Before concluding  a   word
may be said about iron.   Iron in FOL
TH   ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
various forms, particularly as
magnetite, is found in great profusion in British Columbia and
various reasons have been given
why iron ore has not been mined
and smelted in this province, and
why it has not become a prominent industry. One of these reasons is said to have been that fuel
is too dear. In this regard the
writer is rather optimistic that
suitable coal will be found within easy reach of the Skeena River and the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway. Thus ores can be brought
either by railway of by water
transportation and smelted into
pig iron and converted into steel
and in*o iron bars and shipped to
any part of the coast or abroad.
"The writer does not propose
to make any further remarks in
reference to metalliferous mining except to remark that the
-chief mines and the smelters are
in a most prosperous condition
and that last year six companies
paid in dividends over $1,500,000
and that there is every prospect
of much larger dividends in 1916.
"In conclusion it would appear
good policy on the part of the
British Columbia government in
conjunction with the Dominion
government to restrict as far as
practicable the export of our
crude products, and that only refined metals be permitted to be
sold out of the country as is now
the law in Australia.
ILO ILO ITEMS.
THE BROKEN COIN.
Episode No. Seventeen--"The Castaways."
Episode No. Eighteen--"The Underground
City."
Episode No. Nineteen-"The Sacred Fire."
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas."
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Rescue."
Episode No.  Twenty*two*-"An American
Queen,"
Basketball.
Woman Volunteers as Chauffer
St. John, N. B., March 6.-
Miss Lois Grimmer, daughter of
Hon. W. C. H. Grimmer, judge
of the supreme court of New
Burnswick, has voluntered for
overseas service as a chauffeur.
She signed the official application
forms, which were forwarded to
Ottawa, and is awaiting a reply.
Miss Grimmer can handle a car
like a professional.
The Canadian Collieries Office
team once more took the Cumberland Fireman into camp on
Wednesday night, when they
trimmed Charlie Grant's Porteges
by a score of 36 to 15.
The company team were without the services of W. Hancock,
which broke upjtheir combination
considerably. R. Robertson substituted for the speedy forward
and played well.
Frank Slaughter was the star
of the evening for the losers, and
if the Firemen could muster together four more players of his
calibre they would be a winning
aggregation.
Cyril Baker and Alan Nuns
Nuns were the pick of the company quintette. The teams lined
up as follows: C.C.—C. Baker
and B. Robertson, forwards; J. H
Stevens centre; C. Macintosh and
A. R. Nunns, guards.
Firemen—F. Slaughter and C.
Grant, forwards; E. .Hunden,
centre; Fredrick Dallos' and W.
Spencer, guards.
Frank Dalby referred to the
entire satisfaction of both teams.
CDCBB)C>CSEBDCi><itaB)CiD(S.E)0!>aMK>(iO(aBiaD<3l>flMB><3i)<SiK>CiO
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS
Wnite Heather Strain   (Finest
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pullets for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD,
Box 64. Cumberland,
WERE GERMANY TO WIN.
"We should see a Germany of  triumphant warriors seeking
whom they could devour, looking for""fresh spheres, or shall I say
fresh hemispheres, to conquer"- Lloyd George interviewed.   From
News of the World, London.
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ILO ILO THEATRE
PRO. CHANGED WON., TUES, THUB8, ft SAT.
TONIGHT    17TH. EPISODE
"The Broken Coin"
MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
 -'   ;      i—..—.... —-. i        -,„- — ,, .    m
EVERY TUESDAY, One Number
- of the -
"BLACK BOX"
Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
BROADWAY FEATURES
Every Thursday.
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The Long Distance Telephone Saves Trips.
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THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday* evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor!
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Services for 1st Sunday in Lent.
8.30 a. m. Holy Communion.
11 a.m. Litany and Holy Eucharist.
Service of Intercession on Ash
Wednesday at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
To Investigate Cost Shipped Coal
Aid. Gale, Hamilton and Marshall of Vancouver will form a
committee to enquire into the
cost of shipped coal to Vancouver
This was the decision of the relief and industrial committee at a
meeting held in Vancouver on
Monday afternoon. The question
was brought up by the Aid. Gale
who suggssted that the committee
be appointed to enquire into the
facts regarding the cost of coal
with a view to the establishments
of a municipal coal plant.
This however was opposed by
Aid. Mcintosh who moved an
amendment to effect that the
committee should acquire into
the cost of coal, laid down in
Vancouver. The amendment
carried.
Vancouver is to have a "clean
up week" when the residents
and business men will get out in
the back yards and alleyways and
remove the tins cans, scraps and
other debris which has accumulated during the winter months.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
I Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
-CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
DUNSMUIR  AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
For Sale CheAp—A McClary's
"Kitchener" stove, in good
condition. «., Apply Leslie J.
Aston, Shoemaker, Cumberland.
Notice is hereby given that, thirty days
after date hereof, applicatiun will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the transfer of the licence for
the sale of liquor by retail in and upon
the premises known as the Union Hotel,
situate at West Cumberand, British Columbia, from J. N. McLeod to William
Jones, of Cumberland, British Columbia.
Dated this~19th. day of February, A. D.
1916.
J. N. McLeod, Holder of Licence.
William Jones, Applicant for Transfer.
FOUND—In a starving condition, on Canadian Collieries railway between two trestles at
Happy Valley, one bay mare with
black points, small white star on
forehead. Owner can have the
same by paying expenses.
J.S, DAVIS, Union Bay.
Girl Guides.
The Girl Guides meet every
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Patrol Leaders and Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Books, Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsmuir Ave.,
Cumberland, B.C.
Tungsten Lamps   Electrical Fixtures
Nitro Lamps
Wire
Appliances
Batteries
Submit us your wiring requirements and let us give you an
estimate. Work guaranteed and
prices reasonable.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. B«x 279
Phone 31 SIX
SLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
tt-pl
NOW S'
Do not throw this a 5
-the most impor
nouncement isstiil u
Do you realize what
means to you? 1 It 1
that you will always
that neat, clean-cut, v
groomed effect. 1 Y<
clothes will always look a;
if they had just come from
the tailor's, spic and span,
neat, refined and giving the
impression of prosperity
and business power.
Remember I call for and
deliver the goods.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
dome
,*ctHC
ection of cakes, pies and
all pastry made daily.
,    sh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
1
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Uedei8un, Proprietor
Estimate* and I)e«igns furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI   I EOS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining lights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
toriea and in a portion cf the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at mi annual rental of
tl an acre. Not more than 2,600 acre*
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or lo«;al subdivision*
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaut himself.
Eaoh application must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if the
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of live cento per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag righto are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the ooal mining
righto only, but th* lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface righto may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at tlie rate of
flO.OOanaore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or t*  any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
Is
T.
1915.
READ   UP
1         STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon,
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri.
Sat,
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35    3.35
11                                 w
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
PM.
2.00
A.M.
10.30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M,
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
250
11:00
730
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3,55
8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3,50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
| 3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45    2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11.20
7:50
3.30 j
6.30 ]
3.30
6.30
3.30
3,30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8.-00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY THE  ISLANJJEK, 0Uvli3l!.i{LAiND.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ass't General Manager
CANNIBALS ARE HERE t
TURKS FEARED MAORIS
CAPITAL, {15,000,000    RESERVE FORD, $13,500*000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
9MM
Wallp
-, ****. Af.cl IBeauty may be o'nly skin deep;
'<*|JCI 5   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKINNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
l1.1        J"
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A^beer you|can't help liking—so
mild, so^pure, so very gocd.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener BrewingjCo., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
***
■HMMMfea
as
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED ?,4 YEARS.]
Strange  War  Dance  at  Gallipot,   by
Highly Educated Sona of Chivalrous Cannibals
An officer of the New Zealand contingent writes: "At Galllpoli a group
of men were sitting round the entrance to a dug-out. In their midst
squatted a Greek interpreter translating into very bad English some
of the news contained in a copy of
the Constantinople newspaper Tanin.
The article said: "Information Ib still
lacking as to the composition of the
enemy's forces, but it appears from
Indications received from Europe that
they must consist chiefly of black
men from Africa and Auntralia. Thus
the Straits for the flrst time in history have had to endure attac.: by
cannibals." No wonder the listening
Australians and New Zealanders laughed uproariously. The British force at
Galllpoli had been strengthened by
the arrival of the Maori contingent,
direct descendants of most chivalrous
and warlike ancestors, to whom the
poaka-roa, or "long pig," as a human
joint was termed, was a much esteemed delicacy. Nowadays the Maori, instead of fattening his slaves, spends
his time, if he is ambitious, ln getting his M-A. degree or in passing
his accountancy examinations.
A Splendid Race
These men who landed at Gaba
Tepe are the first Polynesian troops
to be brought oversea to fight for the
Mother Country, and having the spirit
of their ancestors, do it well. Back
in the Maori wars their forebear warriors were besieged by British troops.
The 65th Regiment, it was, sat down
around the fortress gates and prepared to starve out the men inside the
pah. The hiklte peep, as the Maor.s
called the besieging regiment, ran out
of water first, and the situation was
getting serious when the palisade
gates of the pah opened and a line
of brown figures carrying gourds filled with water approached the British
trenches. Fearing a ruse the colonel
of the 65th ordered his men to stand
to arms, but the chief leading the
water-bearers smiled. He made a
courteous speech, in which he said
naively that both parties hitherto had
been enjoying themselves, and it
would be a pity if so small a matter
as lack of water should put a stop
to what was really a most pleasant
siege. Such a thing was unthinkable.
There was abundance of water in the
pah for both besieged and besiegers.
With further complimentary references he took his leave, and the thirsty hiklte peep watched the brown
backs for a miaut. or two ln ama.^-
ment and then buried their faces in
the cool gourds. The next morning
the pah was empty, and the garrison
had walked out a back way through
what had looked like an impassable
swamp. Only a few old women were
left to shout and make a noise during the night.
While Modems Shivered
Now the Maori fights with us, and
he has exchanged his old Tower musket for the Mark II. Star L. E., with
which he ls a phenomenal shot. The
Maoris started to dig themselves in,
and made their bivouacs ln an old
watercourse on the left flank. Then
the Paksha (white man) General
came along and addressed them, and
afterwards occurred a scoue that has
no counterpart ir the weird and
varied annals of the Dardanelles. Tho
Maoris, privates and officers, lined up.
With protruding tongues and a rhythmical slapping of hands on thighs and
chests, with a deep concerted "a-a-ah,"
ending abruptly, they began the
Maori haka—the war dance. Shrill
and high the leader intoned the solo
parts, and the chorus crashed out.
As the dancers became more animated
the beat of their feet echoed through
the gullies of Gallipoll. The leader
now declaimed fiercely, now his voice
sank to an eerie whisper, still perfectly audible, and as he crouched low
to the ground so the men LMiind him
posed. Suddenly, after a concerted
crash of voices, the chant ended with
,'V
4
a sibilant hiss, a stamp of the right
foot, and the detonation of palms
slapping the hard ground.
A hundred yards away in the Turk-
ish trenches perplexed Moslems listened to this blood-curdling serenade,
and one of them in explanation produced his copy of the Koran. Ominous nods and headshakings followed
its reading. "For the first time in
history the Straits have had to endure attack by cannibals." And the
leader of the haka, a full-blooded
Maori, wrote M.A., LL.D., after his
name, and spoke better English than
many a white man.
STRANGE GOD OF HUNS
Vastly Different Is Anglo-Saxon Conception, Says Writer
Well might the allies despair of winning or justifying their cause if they
were to accept the German Emperor's
belief that God was always on hia
side, says The New York Sun. To
people whose religious feeling is not
militant and whose conception of God
is impersonal the Emperor's conviction, so constantly intimated, thvt the
Almighty is with him and against his
enemies comes as a shock. It seems
insincere and wanting in reverence.
But it is nothing of the kind, as Mr.
Sydney Brooks points out. To the
English and the Germans God. is a
different being. To the English "He
is the Lord God Almighty, a terrific
overshadowing being, feared and revered, and kept ln our private sanctuaries, to be appealed to in moments
of profound grief or emotion, but certainly no companion to our ordinary
thoughts or actions." But, to quote
Mr. Brooks, "the lieber Herr Gott of
the Germans is above all things a
very human comrade, a partaker of
the common round to be recognized
ln whatever is loved or enjoyed. He
Is also an intensely German deity,
peculiarly associated with the German soil, the supreme war lord and
guardian of the German iiosts. The
German heart responds to Him even
when the German intellect refuses to
relax its scepticism and refuses still
more sternly to be caged within tb*
tour walls of any doctrine."
Panama Excavation. J'
The material taken from the Pan*-
ma canal would make a pile htfb«r
than the Woolworth building, ln N*»w
vork. and 850 feet square at th* ********
The nutmeg is the second and Innermost kernel of the fruit of a tropical tree,
•n and Heir of the Village Barber
His first performance.
Casting the Pearls
A sarcastic lawyer, during the trial
of a case, made use of the expression,
"Cast not your pearls before swine."
Subsequentlj, as he rose to finish the
argument, the judge facetiously remarked:
"Be careful, Mr. S. , not to cast
your pearls before swine."
"Don't be alarmed, your lordship;
I am about to address the jury, not
the Court." EIGHT
THE ISLANDEK. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
FOR SALE-At A. R. Kierstead's
Blacksmith Shop, 5 sets Market
Sleds, $40,00 and up; also auto
wheels repaired.
Miss E. I. Reynolds returned
from Nanaimo on Tuesday.
Fred Bell and Sam Jones left
on Friday morning by the 10.30
train in search of work.
Mrs. Wm. Harrison, eldest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
Frame, left for Seattle on Thursday morning.
A report of the regular meeting of the City Council, held on
Monday will appear in our next
issue.
There was over twelve inches
of snow fell here on Sunday and
Monday followed by two days rain.
Mr. Brandon, of the S. S. Ba-
• roda, was injured on Tuesday
evening by falling into the hatch
of the boat while loading coal at
Union Bay. The injured man
was taken to the Hospital at Cumberland.
Messrs. Hunter & Morton, of
Vancouver, of the firm of Buttar
and Chiene, auditors of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited, arrived on Wednesday
on the regular monthly visit.
Pietro Jionanola, known as
Pete, died at the Union and Comox Hospital on Sunday in his
58th., year. The funeral took
place on Tuesday from the residence of Vincent Picketti to the
Catholic cemetery.
The Ladies Basketball' Club,
entertained their friends at a
social dance in the West Cumberland Band Hall on Friday evening. D. C. Macfarlane acted as
floor manager, and tte famous
Cumberland Symphony Orchestra
supplied the music under the able
leadership of Mr. J. H. McMillan.
Some unknown person appropriated Muggsy's staff to his own
use on Wednesday evening and
Muggsyupon leaving the Band
Hall, was compelled to take the
arm of a faithful friend to guide
him through the snow. The as-
sistence given, the Islander man
understands, was appreciated
and Muggsy treats the man who
stole the stick with silent contempt.
r
* «^N*S*W^>*'%
1ST CANADIAN PIONEERS
A second draft of 100 men is
now being raised in Victoria for
this battalion. Men wishing to
join should apply to Corporal
Hunt, who will be in Cumberland
on March 17th at Cumberland
Hotel. Miners, loggers, engineers, road men, carpenters and
other tradesmen   are   required.
The last draft left for England
within 6 weeks of starting recruiting. It is expected this draft
will be away in about the same
time.
THE   BIG   STORE
NEW SPRING GOODS
Black and White Shepherd Check, so fashionable at pre
sent for dresses, skirts, and children's wear.    Price.. 35c. 21 yard.
Navy Serge for Suitings, 56 to 58 inches wide, a really beautiful
quality at.. $2.25 per yard
Embroidery Linen, "Real Irish«" forfan£yr™drk'at65c*and906c*
Bedford Cord, Beautiful quality, white only, Price 35c. a yard
/ ....
Kiddies' Middy Waists, ioldcofc
Ladies' White Pique Skirts/1" ^J^KS1*at 9
Children's Oliver Twist Suits, %<J^a^a^|7Sc
*
Naineru-klr      The "Allies " line, a very desirable quality, and will    QT|#*
110U15UU&)     make up beautiful.   Prices per yard......... 20c., 25c. and     **9******
I inpno   A f"N nne m navy' r°ya1' P*le 'jlue» Pink» khaki and white.   9f)r
•LalUCIIC,  For dresses, skirts, middies, the best.   Price per yard—     ********
Pongee Silk,   Lroeni?.uality.for.8rmerwear:  35c per yard
PONGEE SILK, good quality, and wide width, at 50c. and 75c. per yard.
R intot PlrifK    A uery Pretty cloth in golden brown and two shades   1-\f)r
M\*****S V/1UU1,   of blue. Ideal for dresses, skirts, and children's wear. Price a yd.   *********
Ribbed Cotton Hose,  For Children and Ladies, suitable for spring
and summer wear, a good hard wearing quality.    Price two pairs for 35c.
DreSS   Goods,   Grey and fawn striped, in new weaves. Per yard  45c
See our leaders in D. & A. Corsets at 95cj[and
$1.00 per pair.
'J        (^^•M'SA^'N/W
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8

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