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The Cumberland Islander Jul 26, 1924

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
nit
Provincl»i
Library
Janl|.3
.Villi which l» consolidate, the (luuberUwd Sows.
FORTY-THIRD   YEAR—No. 30.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SATURDAY, JULY '?ii, 11124
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Leaves The Island Picnic Huge Success
LOCAL TEAM BATTLING AT WINNIPEG FOR DOMINION SOCCER HONORS ARE DEFEATED.    CUP NOW HELD BY NANAIMO WILL GO BACK EAST.
ANNUAL EVENT AT ROYSTON ATTRACTS  LARGE  CROWD—CLOSE   CONTEST  WITNESSED IN HIGH JUMP AND TUG OF WAR.
HOPE OF B.C. ELIMINATED
IN SECOND GAME PLAYED
TUESDAY AT WINNIPEG
Cumberland United, the hope of B.C. in the Connaught Cup
series, went down to defeat in their two games with United Weston, Manitoba's representatives, by a total of two goals to nil.
The teams battled to a scoreless draw in the first game after Cumberland had three parts of the play, being unable to score however.
Tuesday's game, the second one, was real cup-tie football and
hard and close checking was in evidence. Both of Weston's goals
went lo Slidders, the centre forward, who headed in two pretty
crosses from either wing. Blair played a wonderful game but
had no chance for these two.
The fault with the B.C. team lies in the fact that they refused to shoot from far out, being content to try to work through
thc opposing d.i'ense I'or close-up shots. Weston's backs were
too strong for them and it was mainly this reason that put the
team into the finals. The goalie Derby, had far more shots to
handle than did Blair but he stopped everything in a clean-cut
manner, Had Cumberland used their frequent openings to advantage it would have been a different story. Weston's halfbacks were ever in the game, giving Cumberland no chance to
settle into their favorite short-passing game. Conti was the star
of both games and with Milligan and Bannerman were the best
players on the field. Monohan and Brake also shone in the second game.
As a result, United Weston and Montreal Explosives will fight
out for the right to be called the "Champions of Canada," and for
the possession of the Connaught Cup.
On the way back to B.C., Cumberland played a benefit gam.
with Calgary Hillhursts, in aid of those players that were injured
when the latter team visited the coast two weeks ago. Cumberland ran out easy winners by a score of 6 to 0.
Comox News
Tho Tuk "B.C. Boy." Captain Hicks.
took a boom ol' logs oul for .Major
Hilton.
Chief of Police Shlrass of Nanalmn,
wus n visitor lo Coniox Ibis week.
Alt. Dendofl' of Nanaimo. visited
Coniox on business.
Bob Trant was a visitor in Coniox
on .Monday.
Jack Spurrier and wife of Vancouver, wbo have been visiting Como/.
left for home on Monday.
J. C. Seott and wife, of Vlclorln.
are visiting Mrs. C. C. Piercy.
C. A. Vaughan, of Vancouver, was
in town this week on business.
NOTICE
All  persons  having claims  against
' the Cumberland United Football Club
will please hand the same into Robert
Strachan on or before lhe lllst .Inly.
11124.
Miss Jean' Potter left for Vancouver this morning, after visiting wilh
her parents, Mr. and .Mrs. James Potter for a few days.
SUCCESSFUL AT
PIANOFORTE EXAMS,
Locals Weakened- Council Wishes      PRESENT POLICY TO BE
Farmers Win, 8-3!    Success To Clerk'      MAINTAINED STATES
By  the irony of fate, in  its most
critical   Upper   [Bland   League  game
At (he regular session of the City
Council on  Monday  evening.  Manual I
Training in  our Public  Schools  was
The ques-
THE GENERAL SUPT.
here last Sunday, Cumberland had to | g|Veil „ six m0„tns' nolst.    Tue nUe8- The Seventh Annual Picnic of the Employees of the Comox
Held its weakest team of tbe year and i tion was introduced two weeks ago by , Mines of the Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)  Ltd., was held at
without the services of Messrs. Plump.  tne Parent-Teachers Association ami |
The following pupils presumed by
Mrs. Oliver lor pianoforte examinations of the Associated Board of London, Hng., were successful: Primary, Corn Cliffe; Elemetary, Josephine
Welsh, Margaret Sutherland; Lower,
Elizabeth Ball.
The following are Mrs. W. Hudson's
pupils; Elementary—Mary Sweeney,
Norman Frelone.
PLEASE RETURN
Will the lady who took a brown
coat by mistake from Ihe last dance
nt Royston Tennis Court return same
and get her own In exchange. Phone
Courtenay SDL. 30.1 D»™  Richards made three
Conti, Bannerman and James went
down to defeat 8-8, Tbe latter was
suspended for his rumpus at Courtenay two weeks ago and mournfully
viewed the proceedings from lhe
bench.
itli'd Fighting
That the best team won there Is no
question—but lt was a mere resemblance of the Cumberland team that
has whipped our farming neighbors
in four consecutive games earlier iu
the season. And be it also said that
the locals bitterly contested every Inning against superior odds and lt was
not the one-sided battle It might have
been. It is worthy of note that this
was Dave Richard's ninth consecutive
game without a passed ball charged.
"Lefty" Barkhouse hurled nice ball
for his teammates while on tbe other
hand our "Red" Mclntyre was a shade
under his usual standard, allowing a
high-water mark of twelve safeties.
Hunden led the slugging parade with
four singles In four attempts. Jack
Downey had hard luck In not being
credited with two home runs. On
tho lirst occasion he overstepped Ilrst
and was out, not even being credited
with a base hit. Again in the eighth
he knocked the apple out of tbe lot
nnd again Jim McKay jumped tbe
fence, returned the ball and held
Downey at third. According to the
rules he should have been allowed
to score. Halley. Dixon and Bob
Robertson hooked a triple apiece
while Dave Richards and Beattie both
got doubles.
One Apiece In Third
Neither team scored until the third
frame. Cummings reached (Irst on
Mclntyre's error and advanced to
third on Rab Robertson's single. .Millard fanned. Dixon then went out.
Marocchi to Farmer, Cummings scoring on the .elder's choice. Downey
flew out to McKay for third out.
Cumberland retaliated with a run
too. Bob Robertson slashed out a
triple and Mclntyre's single scored
him. Red was caught stealing second and "Peanuts' Robertson and
out    i'l
the Council, after careful consldera-
i tlon, decided tbat they  were unable
(to finance the scheme during the year
1924 and suggested thnt Ihe Board of
School 'trustees -take  lhe matter up
Royston Beach on Saturday. The weather was delightful and
the annual festivities were on a greater scale this year than ever
before. The Special train of fifteen cars that left Cumberland
at 8 o'clock in the morning, carried a jolly crowd to the strains of
the Cumberland City Band. All automobiles were forced into
m the early pan or 182.1, place tho I commission for the water front. Another train left Union Bay
item In their estimates.    The Coufi-. early in the morning for Roystoll| providing transportation for all
oil would then make provision tor the , ,  ,. .     ,      ,. ,,    , ,. ,. ,.       ,.      .
additional expenditure. 'employees and inends ot that portion ot the district and when
The half-yearly report of the med- noon came tne cnwd at the beach was estimated at 3,500.
ical health officer, Dr. K. R, Hicks, The children, as usual had a great time and a ret'reshemem
was mid hy the city clerk.    The re-1 stand with a staff of twenty-five attendants was erected for their
port in part said that during the past I
.six  moot lis   several  complaints  had
been  made to  me ahout the sewage '
system on the lower part of Derwent
Avenue.     Kesidents state that during I
the heavy rains the sewers overflow i
anil  deposit sewage at    the    various
sewer openings in ihat locality. Then
when the water reeeeils this sewage
Is left, produces an odor, ami is therefore a menace lo lhe health of that locality.     This ahould he remedied at
once, I
This report was received and or-
deied to he filed for further reference.
Aid, John Potter, chairman of the
Hoard of Works explained lo the
Hoard   of   Health   the   cause   of   the
wilh the result that all manholes over-
How and deposit the tilth at tho doors
of the returned soldiers, tie further
remarked:   "You   will   remember two
Mr. .). K. Hough of Patterson, N.J.,
was a visitor to Cumherland on Friday. Mr. Hough was formerly on
lhe mechanical staff of the "Islander"
where he worked for three years.
Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Brown returned to Cumberland Wednesday
evening.
Miss Nellie Potter Becomes
Bride Of Mr. William Treloar
A pretty July wedding took place
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. .lames
Potter, of this city, ou Monday. 21st,
at 9 a.m., when their youngest daughter, Nellie, became the bride of Mr.
William   Treloar,   also   or   this   city.
Thc bride looked very charming In
a beautiful gown of crep-de-chene
with plush cont and hat to match.
Miss Fannie Strachan assisted the
bride while Mr. Robert Rider Patterson of Nanaimo, a very close friend
of the groom, assisted hlm during Uie
service. itev. James Hood, pastor of
St. George's Presbyterian Church, tied
the nuptial knot.
After the wedding breakfast, tlle
happy couple left for Tacoma. Wash.,
where they will make their home.
VICTORIA MINISTER
TO PREACH SUNDAY
The Itev. Mr. Baker, of Victoria,
father-in-law of ihe Hev. Mr. Butler,
pastor of Grace Methodist Church,
wlll preach iu St. George's Presbyterian Church on Sunday, July 27, al
the morning service, 11 a.m. The
pastor will preach in the evening.
NEAR FATALITY AT
GARTLEY'S BEACH
While swimming at Gartley's Heacli
on Tuesday night, Georgi lirown,
son of Mr. and .Mrs. W. M. Ilrnwn of
Cumberland, had a very narrow escape from drowning. lu comapny
with several girls and boys young
lirown was swimming nud dlviug olf
the big rait until It became dusk,
when they all headed for shore. The
others, on reaching shore, looked
buck and saw George struggling about
half-way In, he having found the instance too great and became exhausted. Help was called nnd Iwo parties
set nut In boats for hlm, while Miss
Etta Hood plunged In with all her
clothes on. Miss Hood reached the
drowning boy al lhe same time Mr.
George Tarbell arrived In the boat.
I The latter succeeded In pulling hlm
Into his boat and Immediately took
hlm ashore where It was some lime
before young George enme around.
Dr. MacNaughton was called bul
happily his services were not needed
ns George completely recovered before he arrived.
short order. Robertson retired from
the game with a bad knee, Cullen lak-
lng his place.
In the fourth and fifth Courtenay
piled up more runs while Cumberland
went scoreless. The sixth gave one
run to the locals however. Cullen,
first up, fanned. Richards went out.
Cummings to Dixon. Hunden singled and advanced to second when
Barkhouse hit Marocchi. Rab Robertson bungled McKays chance, allowing Hunden to score, Harrison was
nn Infield victim for third out.
Over the Fence
lu the seventh the visitors scored
one run. Dixon went out. Marocchi
to Farmer. Downey drove over the
left-field fence but .McKay retrieved
111 time to hold him at third. Harris
scored Downey on a fielder's choice.
Hunden to Farmer. Beattie and A.
Robertson singled and Barkhouse
Whiffed at three for third out. Again
III the eighth Courtenay scored two
runs and Cumberland one. Rah Rob-
(Cnntlniipil on Pago 7)
use alone the Canadian Collieries having provided and distributed
among the kiddies two hundred and fifty gallons of Ice Cream,
eight hundred cones, two hundr.d and fifty dozen bottles of soft
drinks, twenty-five boxes of oranges and two thousand sacks of
peanuts.
A complete list of sports and successful competitors appears
on page three. The grounds were in excellent shape, prepared
at the expense of the Company, including shoot the shutes, merry-
go-round and swings of every description. The Tug of War
caused no simall amount of excitement, two teams from No. 4 and
two teams from No. 5 competing, with the result that No. 4 Mine
li team won out.
The President of the Picnic Committee, Mr. Edward Hughes,
delivered his usual address at noon and said it was very gratifying to see all the Employees united together for the Seventh
trouble. He said that our fore faith- time> Peasant relations with employee and employer, peaceful sur-
ers Installed a twelve-inch pipe in roundings and read a telegram from Lieut. Col. Charles VV. Villiers
take away the sewage of two twelve-1 the General Manager of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
inch pipes and one eight-Inch pipe, (expressing his sincere regret at not being able to attend the Seventh Annual Picnic, then called upon Thomas Graham, the General
Superintendent, who is always on hand to give the employees',,
their wives and children a word of cheer. Mr. Graham in step-
weeks ago when Manunl Training was j ping out from among the crowd, said he was sorry that the Gen-
IntroUuced, i mentioned the question oral Manager was unable to attend and assured his large audience
of sewage." and stated that it would that the change in management would not effect the policy of the
be to the advantage of the city I,, look Cornpany puniUed during the paxt seven years He took j , j„
afler the health of the children first   ._....       ._  ,       . .   . ,       " , , , ,     .
and then spend what money they may the leelin* that existed between employer and employee during
have on Manual Training. Health that Pc'nocl a™ ™ay lt long continue. He spoke very feelingly of"
comes first, repeated the chairman of the late James M. Savage a very familiar figure in and around the
(he Board of Works. grounds at the Annual Picnic aud then entered into the sport of
The Mayor said, "Yes, we most <io the day with the crowd acting as starter for the committee in
.something with the sewers during "ie I (.harp-o
coming month," and requested the
Hoard of Works to ascertain the cost
of laying a 24-inch pipe to take away
the surplus :;cwage. The Hoard of
Works will measure it up and estimate the cost at $2000.00.
The amendment to the early closing
_3y-law was read a Ilrst, second and
third time and laid over for two weeks
to be reconsidered and finally adopted.
Section- D is amended striking out
the words (J p.m. and substituting
5.30 p.m.
Section E is amended striking out
the words 8 p.m. and substituting
10 p.m.
The passing of this amendment will
allow all stores to remain open until
10 o'clock on Saturday evenings.
The Board of Health reported one
case of chicken pox and were instructed to renovate the Isolation Hospital.
H. J. Selfe was appointed auditor
fur the year 1924 at a cost of $50.00.
He will audit the City hooks at once.
Mr. A. ,1 .Merry is leaving on Saturday
The City Clerk attended his last Council meeting on Monday, when His
Worship the Mayor and Aldermen expressed every satisfaction at the services rendered hy Mr. Merry and wished him every success in Ids new occupation in Australia. W. H. Cope
will take on the duties of Chief of
Police and City Clerk ou Monday next.
DEATH CALLSMr.A.H.McCALLUM
The death occurred on Tuesday,
July 22, at the home of Mrs. John
Itruce. of Archibald H. McCallum, a I
native of Ontario and nged US years.
Kor the past few years tiie deceased
man has been a resident of Cumber-
laud where lie was very well known.
The funeral, which was to have
taken place on Thursday, was held
over until today to allow Mr. McCal-
lum's nephew of Hrlnce Albert to attend. It will be held from the residence of Mrs. Bruce to the Presbyterian Cemetery, Sandwlck, at 1.80
this afternoon, Saturday, Hev. W. Leversedge. of Cumberland, officiating.
Friends nnd acquaintances are kindly Invited to attend.
Mr. and Mrs. George .Merrilleld. accompanied by Mrs. Pollock, of Nanaimo, motored to Cumherland cm
Wednesday on a visit to Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Merrifield.
• *   *
Miss Muriel Knott of Victoria, Is a
guesl of tbe Misses McFadyen nl Roy-
Beach,
* *   *
William    Horwood   of   Revelslolco
spent the last few days as lhe guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Horwood.
...
Mrs. Fred Hell and daughtor of Nanaimo arrived on Saturday and are
staying with Mrs. Horwood.
Correspondence
Editor Cumherland Islander,
Cumherland, B.C.
Dear Sir; —
1 am directed by the Board of Management of the Cumberland General
Hospital to ask you in your next issue to acknowledge the receipt of a
donation tn the funds of the Hospital
of $2iUf> lielng half of the nett proceeds of a dance held at Royston on
June 21, 1924, hy the KmpJoyees of
the Canadian Robert Dollar Co. Ltd.,
aud to express the sincere thanks of
Ihe Board for tliis kindly assistance,
which is very greatly appreciated.
Trusting you will he aide to oblige
us in this matter. I am.
Yours very truly,
T. Mordy, Secretary.
Courtenay, B.C., July IS, 1921.
! Editor Cumberland Islander,
|    Cumberland, B.C.
Dear Sir; —
In connection with the report of the
freight lost by Chow Lee. published In
- your last issue: To avoid any misunderstanding,   I   would  like  it clearly
understood that The Vancouver-Coun-
enay    Transportation    Co.    did    not
handle  this   shipment.      Any  freight
for Cumherland, unless otherwise ordered,  is  taken   to our    large    new
freight shed, and kept in absolute security, until handed over to the Consignee, or bis responsible agent.
Yours truly,
Charles Slmms, Agent.
Combined Choral Societies Visit
Denman; Successful Concert Given
The combined members of tho
Courtonay aud Cumberland Choral
Societies, to the number of tin. visited Deninan Island on Wednesday
evening, where they staged an excellent concert. A large anil appreciative audience attended nnd wns loud
In Its praise of tiie society, whicli under the able leadership nf Mr. C. W.
Slllence, is becoming very well known
In Island music circles. A number
of part songs were rendered and several solos by Miss Jessie Macllonald.
Miss Kale Weldon, A. It. Stacey and
It. Splttal of Cumberland and Mrs.
Hughes of Courlenay.     Mr. and Mra.
.Mclntyre. nlso of Courtenay. wet \
ireinely pleasing In ihelr duet.
FAMOUS HAND WILL
VISIT CUMHERLAND
The Nanaimo Silver Comet Hand.
British Columbia's Champion Hand,
will visit Cumberland also during
their tour of Die Upper-Island, They
will lie here on Sunday, August 3rd,
ami will give a llrst-class concert on
tiie Recreation Oround ni ?, o'clock
sharp.     Don't miss this.
NEGOTIATING TOR
HEBRIDES FISHERMEN
VICTORIA, July 25,   An agreement
Afler the concert the Denman Is-i under which fishermen trom the He-
landers held a dance bin the Visiting brides Islands wlll conic lo Un coast
choristers were unable to remain for I of _, ,. pnibably will bo complotod
It, They returned to Union Hay In I In lhe nenr future, according lo Hon,
three launches specially hired for Hie : j  p  Pattullo, minister of lands, who
-1 has negotiations under way.      v.
ihelr
i  hours Of
occasion, aud motored to
spectlve homes In the earl
Thursday morning,
While on lhe Island lhe society wa
provided  wilh  a    bounteous    supper
' during an Interval, aud with a feast
i of cherries supplied by Mr. Keliey,
one of Ihe best known farmers on the
island Hev W, Leveriodgc, ol Cumberland, made an excellent chairman
throughout the evening.
_J PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 20, 19a.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKl-E
Sidelights on a Great Industry
Heavy Tax Burden
On Wood Products
SATURDAY, JULY 26. 1924
THE WAY YOU LOOK AT IT
Have you ever noticed the sneer
that sometimes passes over the
countenance of a resident citizen
when he persues his weekly newspaper? He comments on the laeit
of news ,of the proper arrangement of
the matter that does appear in Its
columns, and at last he lays it down.
saying, "Oh, well, there's nothing in
it."
But let that same man locate somewhere else—iu a city, If you please,
Let him read the big dailies, the various periodicals of excellent worth,
and the best, literature extant. Fie
will become weary of it. all. and then
you see him grasp the little sheet tbat
comes to him from liis old home town.
He holds it tight, he smiles, he reads
the same article twice and thrice, he
reads all the local news, then the advertisements, he wants to see the
name of those he knows in pirnt.
After he has read and re-read all
there is in it, he folds It up tenderly
and puts it either in his pocket or
some place where he can again find
it for another reading before the next
issue is due. If he misses one copy,
the next mail will carry the Inquiry
to the country editor why this is thus
or so. "Don't fail to send me a copy
of last week's issue." is often underscored. Then don't complain about
your home paper; encourage it all
you can; subscribe for it; give us all
the interesting items of news you may
know, and always speak a kind word
for the paper that tries lo do the best
it can.     Don't scorn it-
TAXES ON STANDING TIM
BER  INCREASE  EIGHTFOLD IN 20 YEARS
Operating End of the Industry
Also   Contributes   Increasing
Millions in Support of
Community
KEEP THIS IN MINI)
When you get a little gloomy about
business, just recall how one of the
directors of a big business turned the
tide of thoughts by asking another director this question: "Can you tell
bow far a dog can run in the woods?"
The young director appeared disgusted with such a question, and he
answered abruptly: "He can run into
the woods as far as be likes."
"No." said the older director,
"when he has run into the woods halt-
way, he is then running out of the
woods."
And this is exactly what  we business men are doing today—we are on [
the last lap of a long and lonely trail j
out of the woods, and if this is not en-
couraglng enough, bring on a better
illustration.
;     The    forest   industries    of    British
j Columbia contribute more to the up-
j keep   of   the   Province   than   all   the
j other industrial groups put  together.
|    The 11. C. timborholders during the
j last fifteen years have paid into the
Provincial  treasury,  in  the shape of
royalties  and   rentals,  the  enormous
sum of $.u,oi)u.ooo. or approximately
one-fourth   of   the   total   revenue   of
British Columbia for that period.
The timberbolders" direct pay men's
towards the running expenses of the
Province iu 1923 were more than four
times greater than they were in 1901,
and almost twice as great as in 1915.
In twenty years the receipts from
B. C. limber-owners bave risen from
j $455, ) to ?3,6OO.OO0.
Many Forms of Taxation
; Again the operating end of the industry,   represented   by' the   loggers
| and manufacturers of wood products,
pays annually several millions of dollars in income lax and other form ot*
Dominion.   Provincial   and   Municipal
! taxation. Heavy customs duties on
equipment, workmen's compensation,
und other direct imposts also enter
into the cost of manufacture of a
product, the price of which Is not arbitrarily lixed by the producer but by
the actual consumer iu a highly competitive market.
Embarking in the lumber industry
entails a big initial outlay and the
menace'of over taxation is even now
actually diverting the entry of fresh
capital from British Columbia's basic
industry.
This series of articles communicated by tbe Timber Industries
Council   of   British   Columbia.
NEWS OF DENMAN ISLAND
Last Friday morning Mr. William
Baikie was hurriedly taken to Cumberland and operated on by Doctors
MacNaughton and Hicks for a very
bad case of appendicitis. His numerous friends will be glad to hear be
is doing fairly well. Mrs. Baikie
is remaining with her husband.
Mr. Wallace Baikie visited his father on Saturday and paid the Island a
visit.
Mrs. Kosa Goodall from Alberni.
has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Edward Graham and has now returned
home after a very pleasant holiday.
Miss  Vera Graham  accompanied  her
aunt and  will stay a  few days  with
relatives.
Friday evening the football players
gave a jolly dance in the old hall.
Mr. Walter Chudy furnished the music Refreshments were abundant
and all had a splendid time. Pro-
I ceeds will be donated to the football
I club.
On Sunday evening Itev. W. Leversedge officiated at St.Saviour's Church
preaching a very impressive and
forceful sermon. The sacred edifice
was filled to capacity. Miss May
Pickles presided at the organ.
Mrs. Leversedge and daughter Lily,
are guests of Mrs. Bell-Irving.
Another popular young lady is to
join the united state in the near future. Cupid is certainly kept busy
this season.
Mr. and Mrs. Caesar Scott of Powell
Kiver, paid a visit to the former's
parents on Sunday aud remained until
Monday.
Mrs. Pickles, Mrs. .1 .Woods, Miss
Pickles and Miss Meadows recently
spent the day in Courtenay and returned on the cream boat, "Garry
Point"
•i3_fi_!J_M9I3i5raJ9J@f3ii
Corsets
Long
Brassieres
Corselettes
_pU__Bii_eM£^^
Special Showing
French Lingerie
_n__i_[_i_i_n__i__i_n__^
Silk Camisoles
Underskirts
Princess Slips
Bloomers
Step-ins
Chemise
Silk
Undervests
Athletic Girdles 1
Corsets for Stout Women
We   take   particular   care   with   the   fitting
Corsets for stout and medium stout women.
We carry in stock a complete range of the famous
I
1
'ia__i_________i_____ra____i_____al
1
of
Venus Silk
Hosiery
Mercury Silk
Hosiery
Corsets
which are especially suitable to these types of
figures. They combine real support with perfect
comfort. There is no undue pressure at any part
and the figure is held and retained gracefully.
C/C a la Grace Corsets are admirably made.
Materials and workmanship are of the finest,
and they are Rustproof.
j!_|_|j__t_H__[_|_[_|_|_I_^
Phone 19
Cumberland
_E|_l__J_KJ__U_l__J_fi__KIEI_^^
Miss  Phyllis Street  I
ing.
Mr. Thomas Picket has been elected
school trustee in place of Mrs. W.
Baikie whose term has expired.
away visit-j Mrs. Nello and Nan and Frank Nello.
of Powell iver, are guests of Mr. and ;
Mrs. John Kelsey. R
Mr. James Swan paid a Hying visit i
to Courtenay.
m
|    Week-End Specials
H Bathing Caps, about three dozen, to clear, each ... 20c.
=_ All bathing suits specially priced to clear.
H| Ladies' Canvas Suits, new stock, reg. $13.50.    Specially
g priced  $2.03
Bj Ladies' Rubber Soled, 2 strap Slippers, reg. $2.50.
§j Special  $1.95
Uf Ladies' Oxfords, Canvas and Rubber Soles, reg. $2.75
_H Special $2.15
H All lines of Canvas Shoes, specially priced this week
H end.     It will pay you to get our prices before buying.
Hj The balance of our stock of picnic baskets at half price.
J Sea Grass Chairs and Rockers, a new lot just received
_g and at new low prices.
A. McKinnon
E
Comox Tailors
LAWKS' AMI GENTLEMAN'S
TAILORING
GUT VOIR SPUING SLIT
All  our work NOW Courtenay, B.C.
Guaranteed 'Phone 14
I
or Sale by Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
Take Your Choice—
They're Both Good!
Both from B. C.'s most hygienic, up-to-date
brewery, where purity and perfect brewing
produce the best beer possible.
U. B.C. Beer
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
ffi
ilfuke use "/' our fvee home deliver}/
service     Why not ovdev u case'/
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
I'll is advertisement is not published or tllsplityed by lhc I,
'nnirnl Board or by the Rnvernmenl nl' British Columbia
1
AUCTION   SALES
TODAY, SATI'IIIIAV, JULY _(l--For Mr. A. J. Merry, Dunsmuir
Ave., Cumberland, The whole of his Household Furniture and
effects, including Ford Touring Car, 11(22 model, In good condition.     Sale at 2 o'clock.     Terms Cash.     No Reserves.
MONDAY NEXT, JULY .8—For Mrs. Willis, at The Willis Hotel,
Union Bay, Household Furniture and effects. The complete
furnishings of 8 bedrooms, 2 dining room suites, lounges, etc.
Particulars, see posters.     Sale at 2 o'clock.     Terms Cash.
WEDNESDAY NEXT, JULY 110—For Mr. Wilfrid Ogllvie, who
Is leaving for England, at his residence, The Maples. All that
building and premises now used as an Ice Cream Parlor, and
known as Tiie Maples, Royston, and which will be sold, together
with fixtures and fittings, as a going concern. This property
has a frontage nf 75 feet to the Island Highway and extends back
205 feet. The building comprises a seven-room house with side
verandas 37'xl4', and front verandah 3tl'x8' and is an Ideal position either us business premises or private residence. Sale at
2.311 o'clock p.m. Furlher particulars In posters or from tho
Auctioneer.
Q. J. HARDY
PHONE 111 COUBTWAY
L__a SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1924
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
fib
______
SECURITY AND
SAFETY
Secure—Because the business is carefully and economically managed. The average rate of interest
earned on its securities last year was 7.09 percent.
Safe—Because during the past 35 years Surplus and
Reserves have been increasing. The Company that
pays large dividends to its policyholders is:
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
"Dominion Policies for people of    the Dominion"
__-rri-TiT_:_>--a_Ei____;_>-_ii ■-__■—_Jk-_—
3=
as
Dr. Tai Kuzuhara
DENTIST
WILLARD BLOCK CUMBERLAND, B. C.
TELEPHONE  1«
List of Winners at the Picnic, Saturdayi
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
HEATS         POULTRY         FISH
    AND VEGETABLES   	
Telephone 143 P. 0. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
Boys' Race, 6 years, 50 yards—Milsuo 1; W. Westlield 2; A. Bonora 3.
Girls' Race, 6 years, 50 yards—Mis-
aka 1; I. Hunter 2; L. Waterfield 3.
Boys' Race, 8 years, 50 yards—E.
Carrlgan 1; Unclaimed 2; W. Combs S.
Girls' Race, 8 years, 50 yards—M.'
Westlield 1; Teruko Doi 2; F. Morgan
3.
Boys' Race, 10 years, 50 yards—F.
Cawdell 1; J. Wilson 2; H. Westfleld
3.
Girls' Race, 10 years, 50 yards—M.
Pa.rtridge 1; A. Gear 2; A. McKlnnon
3.
Boys' Race, 12 years, 75 yards—F.
Cawdell 1; E. Boffy 2; J. Davis 3.
Girls' Race, 12 years, 75 yards—A.
Walker 1; B. Westfleld 2; E. Davis 3.
Boys' Race, 15 years, 75 yards—J. i
Perez 1; H. Watson 2; L. Dando 3.
Girls' Race, 16 years, 75 yards—E.
Cawdell 1; E. Davis 2; G. Perez 3.
Boys' Tilting the Bucket—J. Frelonl i
and T. Combs 1; S. Stanaway and .1.
Strachan 2.
Girls' Egg and Spoon Race, 15 years •
—E. Cawdell 1; Jean Smith 2; M.
Hunt 3.
Boys' Sack Race, 12 years—A. Mc-1
Donald 1; P. Cawdell 2; F. Adamson |
3.
Girls' Shoe Scramble Race, 12 years
—A. Walker 1; E. Davis 2; N. Allan 3
Boys' Three Legged Race, 14 years
—Hayashl and Nabus 1; Leslie Dando and H, Watson 2; Tadoa Doi and
II. Westfleld 3 .
Girls' Relay Itace, three girls to the
team, 14 years—E. Davis, G. Perez
and E. Cawdell 1; E. Humphrey, C.
McKay and D! Humphrey 2; E. Hunt,
M. Hunt and A. Walker 3.
Boys' Pillow Fight, 15 years—'1'.
Yamamala 1; W, Smith 2.
Quoiting Competition, Scotch style,
18 yards—W. Herd 1; J. Williams 2.
Quoiting Competition, English style
11 yards—Alex Welch 1; Bobble
Brown 2.
First   Aid    Contest,    Ladies—Mrs.
Hudson and team 1;  Mrs. Davis and
I team 2.
Forcimer Cup Competition—Jonty
I Taylor and team 1; W. Beveridge and
I team 2.
| First Aid Contest, Gents—W. Beveridge and team 1; Jonty Taylov and
team 2.
Girls' Potato Race, 15 years—E.
Davis 1; A. Walker 2; M. Hunt 3.
Boys' Cracker Eating Contest, 10
years-Ladao Doi 1; H. Westfleld 2;
Dick Ray 3.
Girl's Rope Skipping Contest, 10
years—N. Walker 1; A. McKinnon 2;
JI. Partridge 3.
Boys' Race, 8 years, 50 yards—E.
Carrlgan 1; J. Bannerman 2; T. Fraser .
Girls' Race, 8 years, 50 yards—M.
Westlield 1; L. Picketti 2; T. Kadan 3.
Boys' Human Wheelbarrow Race,
10 years—J. Watson and E. Carrlgan
1; Ladao Doi and J. Combs 2.
Girls' Potato Race, 10 years—I..
Picketti 1; M. Partridge 2; A. McKlnnon 3.
Hoys' Itace, 100 yards, 16 years, McLennan and M .Feeley Cup—G. Kee-
nau 1; H. Watson 2.
Boys' 100-yards Dash. 15 years—'I.
Watson 1; R. King 2; Nabau 3.
Boys' Race, 7 years, 50 yards—Ml-
tao 1; Graham 2; B. Nicholas 3.
Girls' Race, 7 years, 50 yards—M.
Westfleld 1; W. Thomson 2; Jean
Quinn 3.
Boys' Spring Board High Jump—
H. Watso„ 1; S. Williams 2.
Bosche Competition—L. Scavarda );
Andrew Bogo 2.
Single Ladies' Race, 75 yards—Edna Cawdell 1; Gladys Perez 2.
100-yards Dash, Juniors, 18 years—
W. Marshall 1; R. Pollock 2.
Married Ladies' Race, 75 yards- -
Mrs D. Bannerman 1; Mrs. King 2.
First Pull Tug of War, 4A team vs.
4 B team—41) team 1; 5A team vs.
5B team—5A team 1.
Old Man's Race, 50 yards—Enoch
J. Boffy 1; Jno. Gloyer 2.
Chinese Race, 440 yards—Willie
Parhon 1; Mah Fong 2.
Running High Jump—W. Auchlnvole 1; Tom Graham 2.
Putting 16-pound Shot—Jim Boyd
1; J. W. Tremlett 2.
Place Kick—Tom Brown 1; R.
Brown 2.
Running Hop, Skip and Jump—W.
Marshall 1;   W. Auchlvole 2.
Japanese Race, 440 yards—K. Mo-
tomachl 1; G. Salayama 2.
Tilting the Bucket—J. Strachan and
S. Satwaway 1; J. Frelonl and T
Combs 2.
E. O.  HAUKEDAL
DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC
Now Established in
WILLARD BLOCK, CUMBERLAND
OFFICE  HOURS
10 - 11.30 6 - 7.;
A.M P-M.
■Illllllllllll
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
DOUGHNUTS
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices —Lemon Custards — Lemon Pies
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18 Cumberland.
Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
The   Famous   McClary
Electric Range
Protected Elements    —    Indicating Lamps
—Reciprocating Switches—
Seamless, easily cleaned ovens
To cook electrically with one of these ranges
IS CHEAPER
than using coal.
No soot, no ashes, no hot kitchens.
25 per cent, saved on your meat bill owing to
non-shrinkage.
Everything in favor of the busy housewife.
Let us show you.
Fans        —        Washing Machines        —       Irons
Vacuum Cleaners        —        Toasters
Grills        —        Etc.
Everyappliance sold by us of the best make only and
we   are   HERE   TO   MAKE   IT   RIGHT   should
you be in any way, shape or form disappointed.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
440 yards Race—Walter Taylor 1;
W. Auchlnvole 2.
Returned Soldiers' Race, 100 yards
—Tucker James 1;  T .Campbell 2.
Married Ladies' Nail-Driving Contest—Mrs. Foley 1; Unclaimed 2.
100-yard Dash, Open Handicap-
Walter Taylor 1; W. Marshall 2.
Chinese Tug of War, 7 men to the
side—No. 4 team won.
Japanese Tug of War, 7 men to the
side—No. 4 team won.
Ladles' Needle Threading Contest-
Mrs. King 1; Mrs. Foley 2.
Bandsman Race, 100 yards, Handicap—A. Gomm 1; Sam Davis 2.
Chinese Race, 22 yards—Mah Chung
1; Mah Hong 2.
880 yards Race—Walter Taylor 1;
Tom Graham 2.
Committeemen's Race, 100 yards-
Pete Reed 1; Dan Morgan 2.
Juniors' IS years, 880 yards—No
Entries,
Weight Lifting Contest—R, Brown
and C. Brown tied, lifting 516 pounds.
Bapco Cup Race, 100 yards dash for
Employees only—Watler Taylor 1;
C. Graham 2.
Final of the Tug ot War—No. 4B
team 1; No. 5A team 2.
Grand Raffle
Following is a list of the numbers
drawn on July 19th at the picnic
grounds Royston:
1900, 100, 1743, 1376, 1827, 1052, 560.
630, 1260, 1363, 1834, 122, 584, 1929,
581, 834, 802, 1780, 563, 1545, 622,
822, 324, 65, 1597, 768, 2000, 1463,
1026, 1336, 132, 160, 118, 994.
All persons having claims against
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., Employees' Picnic Committee
are requested to band same to the
Secretary, Mr. Chas. O'Brien, not later
than Thursday, July 31st.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
In the August issue of Rod am!
Gun in Canada every sportsman will
find something to his liking. Besides
the regular departments there is an
unusually interesting story, "Hunting
for Pre-Historic Game Through the
Bad Lands of the Red Deer River," by
Lillian Sanders. The fisherman will
eagerly read "With the Angler in
August" by Robert Page Lincoln in
his monthly "Fishing Notes." Frank
Morris has written a fascinating account of an exploring trip through a
famous vacation ground entitled "The
Heart of Timagarai." "Migration
Route Hawks and Owls" by Bonny-
castle Dale and "The Full-Webbed
Swimmers" by J. W. Winson will hold
tha attention of all those interested in
our feathered friends. The other
regular department and several interesting stories complete the various
features of this issue.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite   Ilo.Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical  Barber, and  Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
J'
SPRINKLING NOTICE
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
lllllillllllllll  illllllllllll
PHONE Lid
Hours for Sprinkling and Irrigating purposes are
Morning 7 to 8 a.m.
Night 7 to 9 p.m.
Watering Sidewalks, Streets Etc, must be discontinued
Effective July Gth, 1924.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
TAKE NOTICE
That after this date any person or
persons caught defacing, damaging,
destroying or removing any of the
fixtures, fences, etc., at the Recreation Grounds, Cumberland, or In or
around the building known as the
Band Hall, will be prosecuted to the
fullest extent of the law.
Canadian  Collerles   (D)   Limited.
June 20, 1924. ill.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
_<1  rooms,  electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
It. YATES, Manager.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road, Courtenay
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
KOI) R.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.
PHONE ..IS      VICTORIA, at.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing:    •     donning    ■     Repairs
Telephone 1.     -     P. O. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, a V.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
DR.   R.   B.   DIER  AND   DR.
W  .BRUCE   GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor. of  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Car  For  Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   25
Prom 11 p.m. to' 9 a.m.   22
Ask for Geo. Mason.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Olllce .6.0 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MBRRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
J. SUTHERLAND
--Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, a C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Genu'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop iu and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent lu Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Onr   Work   and   Service
Will Please Yon : :     : :
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.       -       l'li„n, MO.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders tt
Tommy's Hardware Store THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1924
The Mercantile Store Co.
'PHONE 133
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
(G. H. WYCHERLEY)
"The General Store With A General Purpose"
P.O. Drawer 100
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
__J_|_l_Bl_KI_l_[_EI_ISf_ISJ_[_i!J^^ bH_ISI__I____i_i_i__l_ra _l_WJ_rai_Kl_@l_EI_GH__!_I_l_EI_^
SPECIALS FOR SATURDAY
PAY DAY:
July 26th and Monday, July 28th
Shoe Prices Shot Dow
We have some wonderful values in our Shoe Department of Summer Foot-Wear: We would much rather sell at cost than carry
over to next year.   Here are a few REAL BARGAINS.
Sr_________u________|__ar___U____BIr_J__mr__aii_Jr_J^^
SS
Ladies' and Girls'
Slippers and Oxfords
Black and White, one strap Slipper, Medium Heel, Regular Price
p.oo. <j»i rA
Clearing Price   «P-I- OM
White Canvas Oxfords, with
Brown Trimming, Regular price
$2.50 d»1   PA
Clearance Price   tpJL.tJFVF
Girls' White Canvas Strap Pivmp, Leather Sole and low
heel.     Regular price $2.50 (PI   PA
Clearance Price  tPl.tJU
Boys' Canvas Shoes
Men's White Canvas
Shoes and Oxfords
Boys' Brown Canvas Shoes, Leather Counters, Toe
Caps and Soles,
Exceptional Value at	
Men's Yachting Oxfords, Regular price
$2.75. Clearance Price
$1.85
$1.50
Men's Canvas, Balmoral Shoes, Regular Price $2.75
Clearance Price 	
$1.50 fl
.Men's White Sporting Oxfords, Regular Price $2.50
Clearance
Price	
$1.75
Men's Brown Canvas Shoes, Leather Counters, Toe
Caps and Soles, (PO /?P
Exceptional Value	
Men's White Sporting Bal
moral Shoes, Regular price $2.75
Clearance Price 	
$1.50
LADIES' PATENT LEATHER SANDALS, SPECIAL VALUE AT $2.35
BHiaMaiBjSEjSEE0aSjaEi__j_M_i__i_iEi_^
Young Man,
are you getting married?
Do like others, come
to the MERCANTILE
We can supply you
with all necessary
equipment — A nice
pair of Brown Oxfords — Smart Suit
of Clothes — Stetson
Hat — Pretty Tie —
Silk Shirt — Etc.
To be dressed in
MERCANTILE Clothing is a good omen for
the future.
We can also fit out the
Bride - to - be, with
Silks, Satins and everything necessary for
the auspicious occasion.
SATURDAY ONLY
We have just received a large
shipment of the Derby Shoes.
Before buying a pair of Men's
Dress Shoes, see our Tony Red
Blucher. Ask for the Dope Last.
In this stock of Derby Shoes we
have an extra wide fitting Box
Calf Shoe. Ask for the Army
Last. A young Man's Tony Red
Balmoral-a most stylish shoe.
Ask for the Raleigh Last.
Ladies' Dresses, Jumpers, Jabots,
Cuffs and Collar Sets
Ladies' Check Voile Dresses,
in Pink, Blue, Sand and
Green, pretty designs. Each
$9.50
Ladies'   Jabots,    each   from
$1.95    T0    $3.90
Ladies' Cuff and Collar Sets,
Each from
50c    T0    $1.50
Large assortment of Ladies'
Silk Jumpers, up from
$6.50
Ladies' Early Fall Felt Hats,
up from
$1.65
Here is a Natty Shoe for a Dressy
person, Brown Calf Blucher, medium
toe, with Rubber Heel, Per pair
 SPECIAL	
In Miner's Shoes, with nails
For Saturday Only
All Solid  Leather
All Solid Leather Work Shoe, no toe
cap, Special Value, per pair
For Saturday Only
$6.75
$3.75
$3.95
The  Mercantile   Store   Company
The Most Progressive Store On The Island
mt!tm&!Mmmi!!!i!&!zai&l SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1924
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PREVENT FOREST FIRES-IT PAYS.
nl
SOCCER ASSOCIATION
MAKES   CHANGES   IN
INTERNATIONAL RULES
Several changes were made in the
laws of soccer at a recent meeting of
the International Football Association
Board, according to reports reaching
Mr. John Muter of Vancouver.
No drastic alterations were made to
the offside rule hut it was decided to
add a footnote to the effect that "It
Is not a breach of the law for a player
to be tn an offside position but only
when In that position he interferes
with an opponent or with the play. If
the player who is in an offside position advances towards an opponent or
the ball and in so doing causes the
play to be affected, he should be
penalized."
Two decisions were made regarding
the corner kick. Law 10, which states
that when a free kick has been awarded, the kicker's opponents shall not
approach within ten yards of the ball
until the kick is taken, will not tn '
future apply to the corner kick. Law
11 was altered to read that "a goal
may be scored from a corner kick or
from a free kick which is awarded
because of any Infringement of Law
9, but not from any other free kick."
"Under Law 9 players ure penalized
for dangerous play, hands, holding,
pushing, violent or dangerous charging and charging from behind.
The present decision of the International Board respecting Law 13
(duties and powers of referee) will be
substituted  by the following:   "If In
This way clever
women resist the years
The simplest beauty secret known—
but the most effective
the opinion of the referee, a player
has been seriously Injured, the game
shall be stopped, the player at once
removed from the field of play and
the game resumed. If a player is
slightly injured the game shall not be
stopped until the ball has ceased to
be in play."
i "What were you and Mr. Smith
talking about in the parlor?" demanded Miss Blushes' mother.
"Oh, we were discussing our kith
and kin," replied the young lady.
"Yeth, you wath," Interposed her
little sister. Mr. Thmith asked you
for a kith, and you said 'you kin.'"
|piraa3i_i5!jg!_[s[_____[_^
Buy At Home Campaign
At the request of The Islander, Mr. T. K. Kelly,
nationally recognized as an authority on advertising
and selling, prepared the following article as a suggestion to the business men of Cumberland on how to
stimulate business. The Islander believes Mr. Kelly's
suggestions to be of great value and urges their careful consideration by every business man in Cumberland
Every day you see women well
along in years, who still retain
the charm of youthful, lovely
skin. They are not unusually fortunate— just clever enough to
resist tiie years I
They know and follow a simple
method, which you may employ
as successfully as they do. This
tells you how.
Authorities advise this
Cleanse the skin regularly, au-
Madt> in
Catitidu
thorities say, to keep your complexion lovely, radiant, youthful.
Hut beware of harsh cleansing
methods. Tliey injure skin.
Wash thoroughly with
Palmolive Soap—each night before retiring. Rub the creamy,
foamy lather well into the tiny
pores. Rinse — and repeat the
washing. Then rinse again.
Then—if skin is dry—apply a
little cold cream.   That is
Skin so cared for is not
injured  by  cosmetics,   by
wind and sun, or by dirt.
The simple, correct way
You cannot find a more effective beauty treatment. Because
Palmolive Soap is blended of
rare palm and olive oils—famous
for mild but thorough cleansing
qualities since the days of Cleopatra. And it is inexpensive.
Be sure you get Palmolive Soap
—which is never sol. unwrapped.
All dealers have it. Then try this
method. Watch the improvement in your skin.
It is very economical. So let
Palmolive do for your whole
body what it does for the face.
Volume and
efficiency
produce 25c
quality far
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF
CANADA, LIMITED
Winnipeg Toronto Montreal
Palm and olive oih—nothine else—give
Nature's green color to Palmolive soap.
m
I wonder if we recall the  resolutions we made in January 1924?     It
seems this last year, more than ever,
| that promises with some people are
like flic crusts—easily broken.
About every organization in Janu-
I ary 1924 firmly resolved to make this
| year better than 1923 and one of the
chief reasons why many firms have
I failed   to   keep   these  promises   they
: made to themselves Is because they
have sold themselves on the Idea that
it cannot be done.
Business these next few months Is
going to be no better than during the
past few months If we do not use better methods,.If we do not eliminate
the Idea that there ls no money in our
district, and tliat people are not In a
buying mood .
Step into your bank today and find
out their daily clearances. Step into
the postollico or express company and
find out how much money ls being
sent out of town. You'll find thnt
there is just as much business tapping
at your door today as there ever was.
But, are you doing as much to get
that business as you should be in
keeping wth business conditions today?
There nre thousands and thousands
of men  and women employed today,
Whss
to
Jasper National Park
$40,25
Edmonton and Calgary
s|45.00
$13.00 extra for routing via Prince Rupert to cover meals
nnd berth on steamer.
also to
Eastern Canada
CENTRAL AND EASTERN STATES
Particulars on application
— EDWARD W. BICKLE ~  AflKNT   ~~
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Ranadian National Railways!
P. P. HARRISON
Barrisler and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - •  B. C.
VRML
Keeps EYES   i
Clear, Bright and Beautiful I
Writ* Mutlne Co. ,Chl«to, for EreCm Book [
_Ei_i_n__n___i_n_a_ii__i_^^
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
The Last Word in Motor
Car Value
The selling price of any automobile
is based on the cost of material, production, distribution and overhead.
Large volume of sales greatly reduces
all these costs.
Chevrolet now occupies first place in
sales of fully equipped quality automobiles.
Therefore it has been possible for
Chevrolet to establish the lowest price
in the world for a quality automobile.
Also Chevrolet is the lowest of any
car in cost of operation.
Seeing is believing—see the Superior
models in our showroom. C1„,
Ask as about the GMAC Deferred Payment Pisa
Blunt & Ewart, Limited
Courtenay, B.C.
, from coast to coast, by Arms selling
' direct to the consumer. Tbey are
. taking the trade right from under the
1 eyes of the retail merchant in their
j immediate vicinity, and takng it from
j where the retail merchants expect
| biggest business. Still, retailers in
i some districts do not wake up—they
I have a fair day .Monday, Tuesday Is
! dull, Weduesday about the same,
j Thursday no better, Friday some
, trade, and Saturday they are busy,
What is to prevent a store employ-
J ing say four clerks from sending two
I or three clerks out to visit families
! in their Immediate district, putting in
j full working hours, doing this Tues-
i day, Wednesday and Thursday?
The  retailer  in  having his  clerks
call upon the people at  their homes
; will have a better entree than the un-
: known   solicitor   who   is   calling   at
these homes selling merchandise.
People in a merchant's district
don't know what kind of linns these
unknown solicitors represent—they
Jon't know whether they are reputable or not, but they do know the
local merchant ,his store, and his
stock. They know they can depend
on the right kind of merchandise at
his store because he Is part of the
community, he is a citizen In the district the same as they are, and certainly he would not defraud them h>
selling inferior merchandise ut hold
up prices the same as many of these
fly-by-night concerns are doing.
There is not a wholesale house or
nianufaclurer in existence who will
not give you specials for leaders that
will enable you to combat the prices
j and values that the bell-ringers are
Offering to the retail trade.
Some merchants will say, "My
clerks will not do that—they have too
much pride." Clerks of that caliber
must eliminate their pride If they're
going to retain their positions—In
fact, no man should have any pride
until he is a millionaire, and when
he's a millionaire he doesn't need to
have any pride, because a millionaire
in overalls ls regarded just as highly
as he is when he wears a dress suit.
Uvery clerk employed should lie
thoroughly sold on his job—he should
hnve faith in his employer, in his
stock, the store, the values given to
such an extent that he would he glad
and willing to go out and tell his
neighbors about it.
I suggested this plan to a merchant
one day a short time ago, and his re
ply was, "It's a good plan alright,
hut it won't work in my territory."
That's one of the chief obstacles that
a lot of retailors place before themselves. They get the idea that their
trade is different, their town is dliT-
erent, and from the way they talk,
you might think they were doing business ou a small island thousands of
miles  trom civilization.
As a matter of fact, if you look at
the situation right square In the face
It simmers down to the point that tho
trade lu I'odunk Is about the same ns
the trade ln New York City. People
everywhere are about the snme, they
think the same things, nnd act aboul
alike. Whether your trade Is made
up or city folks, or of farmers, It
doesn't make any difference. Good
merchandise offered at attractive
prices will be a business getter—particularly when Ihat merchandise Is
demonstrated to then) right ln their
own homes, where there wlll be nothing much to distract their attention.
The farming population is made up of
kindly, genial men and women, who
will bc glad to have a visit from a
merchant or n merchant's representative Introducing his merchandise.
There Is hardly u merchant In business today who has not got an automobile und be certainly can afford tu
spend some time each week out in the
country with two of his clerks, supplying merchandise to the people lu
tho outlying districts.     A shoe deal
er, for example, should present not
only some of his newest styles and
latest numbers, but he should have a
top-notch leader, selected probably
from some style needed stimulating.
This would be an effective way to
avoid the loss that comes from slow
selling depreciated  merchandise.
Just as soon as a merchant starts
to figure that Ills expenses are Just
as high, aud go on just as steadily
during the dull days as during hi.
days, then he is going to get busy and
inject some ideas into his business
that will make dull business a thing
of the past. The time ls pasl ami
never will return when we can work
only half time .
I would tell salespeople in the store,
who might object to such work, thut
It was up to them to make the business a paying proposition for me or
they would have to expect less remuneration. I would give them to
understand what they would get paid
for their services to me depended upon what those services produced.
Besides helping to combat the menace of the bell-ringer, selling more
merchandise immediately, and affording effective means of selling slow
moving lines, this plan of canvassing
gives a merchant a good method of
getting closer to his customers. Few
of us realize how many customers we
lose through being too distant, and
through not being in close touch with
them .
Retain the friendship of old customers by all means, aud good efficient
work in canvassing is a splendid way
nf accomplishing this. A well trained efficient salesman or a saleswoman
can be un invaluable missionary in
behalf of your store out among the
trade.
If the trade ls slow in coming to
your store, bring your store to tha
trade. If merchants will follow out
this plan and hack lt up with some
good, hard hitting advertising they
will have no need to complain about
poor business. Business iu about
any line is about what you make it,
whether it be a retail store, a bank,
or a brokerage business.
But, the merchant wbo is befogged with the idea that business is
bad that no effort can make it better
will have to get rid of this Idea as his
Ilrst move for better business.
There's nothing in the present business situation that warrants such an
attitude. Yet. for some reason or
other ,n great many business men
seem to expect that British Columbia
should enter Into another period resembling war properlty. But. regardless of that sort of reasoning, or
rather lack of reasoning, there has
been nothing at any time to indicate
that money will ever roll up hill again.
Many business men appear to have
an idea that they should get rich ov.r
night—that's au idea that stiil persists, handed down to us from the
gun powder era. We may as well
make up our mind that the world Is
not going to pay us a bonus, even
though wc all think we're entitled to
It.
As to this business situation, we
must admit that business does not
come ns easily now as it did in 1913
and 1920, but what of it? The work
that is required to make your business show a profit is nothing, absolutely nothing, compared with the
thrill that conies lu knowing that your
business is progressing, aud knowing
that you're making a success.
And In considering such plans for
Increasing your business as this Idea
nf canvassing out through the trade,
or any other idea that has the elements of practical business sense, do
not lie too easily discouraged. Remember, Ihat a great deal you hear
a limit business is mere propngnnda.
I know of one Instance where a
merchant had quite a successful sale,
and shortly after it was completed a
competitor happened ti) drop into his
store. He inquired how the sale had
terminated,
The merchant who had thc salo
stated that It was very had, he had not
made expenses. He declared that
everything had been done that It wus
possible to do. but that there was no
money in the country as far as ho
could figure ft out.
The visiting merchant went on his
way. and stopped in to see another
merchant, and he related all about
the unsuccessful sale held by merchant No. 1.
"Why, that's strange. I hnve it
from good authority that he sold a
great deal of goods and made a pretty fair profit on the sale." said the
third merchant. So in discussing this
case the two merchants finally saw
through the game of tin, merchant
crying hard times, He wanted them
to think that he hud made no money,
(Continued on Back Page) THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1924
Muddy Creek Bottom Becomes Beauty Spot
32nd  ANNUAL REPORT MEDICAL AND ACCIDENT FUND
An object lesBon In reclamation is B.C. Before lithe site was developed city over which the tide water from tbe
provided by the present Canadian Na- the location was known as False Creek, bay backed. It Is now one of the beauty
tlonal station grounds at Vancouver,   a muddy stream In the centre of the   spots of the City of the Lions.
Jam Special
To the Chairman, Executive Cotu-
miitee and Members of tbe Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited Medical and Accident Fund.
I beg to submit the Annual Report
of receipts and expenditures for the
year ending June 30th, 1924, showing
a balance on hand of $5,032.08
an increase of 1,760,20
from the balance of 1923.
During  the  past  thirty-two  years,
the fund has been in existence there
has been collected the sum
of {421,669.67
mil expended 416.527.90
_____as«._^'_3_-__?_._^i:_rc'rir's;.';:_T;.
Comox Strawberry
Jam
High grade Comox Valley berries plus pure sugar and made under
perfect sanitary conditions.    For sale at all local grocers at
85c per 41b. Tin
To those who have used this delicious jam this advertisement may
have no appeal, except so far as the price is concerned, but if you
are one of the unfortunates who have not as yet partaken of this
delectable local food product, you would be wise to try a sample
tin.
Every tin carries our own guarantee as to quality.
Get the habit of using local produce on every opportunity. You
not only get the best products on the market but you help keep
your money in local circulation.
REMEMBER-
It's Guaranteed
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
_
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
leaving a balance on hand     J6.032.68
medical staff
Our Senior Medical officer. Dr.
Seorge K. MacNaughton, assisted by
Dr, K. It. Hicks. The services rendered by these two medical men during
the past twelve months were very
satisfactory.
Alexandra  Ward
In connection with this ward ihere
has been no complaints of any description, neither have we made any
repairs.
Cemetery
During the past year we made a
general cleaning up of all the roads
in anil around the cemetery and lor
your information, may say, that the
preseni fences are in need of repairs
and ln the very near future it will be
necessary to build a new fence.
Our agreement with the Directors
of the Cumberland General Hospital
continues to be very satisfactory and
every obligation with ttie above institution was paid when due. Through
careful administration of the Receipts
our finances are in a very healthy
condition as we show a much larger
balance on hand than last year. This
is due lo close supervision on cuses
applying for the treatment of Specialists. You will note there is a
difference in this connection of nearly
$1,41)0.01) between the expenditure of
1923 and that, of 1924; also we did not
have the extra expenditure of renovating the Surgery.
Thanking you for the courtesies extended to me during my term of office,
1 beg to submit the Annual Report for
ihe liscal year ending Juno 30th, 1924.
JAMES DICK, Secretary
Summary 1923-24 Receipts
June 10th to July 1st, 1923—
Payroll Collections  I
July 1st to Aug. nth, 1923—
Payroll Collections 	
Sale of Plots 	
Aug. (ith to Sep. 1st, 1023—
Payroll Collections 	
Sale of Plots 	
Sep. 2nd to Sep. 29th, 1923—
Payroll Collections 	
Sale of Plots 	
Sep. 30th lo Oct. 27th, 1923—
Payroll Collections  	
Oct. 2Sth to Nov. 24th, 1923—
Payroll Collections     1.785.78
H.C. Gov't, Refund—Burial
E.  Colman           25.09
Nov. 25th to Dec. 22nd, 1923—
Payroll Collections     1.S47.03
Dec. 23rd to Jan. 19th, 1024—
Payroll Collections     1,806.74
Cumberland   Hos.   Refund
Burial  E.  Colman            37.50
Jan. 20th to Feb. 16th.li)24—
Payroll Collections     1,964.21
Feb. 17th to Mar. loth, 192.—
Payroll Collections     2.038.36
Mar. 16th to Apr. .2th, 1924—
Payroll Collections     2,098.46
Apr. 13th to May 10th, 1924—
Payroll Collections     2,102.95
May Uth to June 7th, 1924—
Payroll Collections     2,158.69
Sale of Plots         10.00
Car Hire, Union Bay   15.00
Sept.  1923—Secretary's  Salary' 15.00
Cumberland  Islander, printing     74.95
Car Hire, Union Bay   6.00
Oct. 1923—Secretary's Salary... 15.00
Nov. 1923—Secretory's Salary.. 15.00
Cumberland &  Union Water
Works     4.50
T. E. Banks, Funeral Fees... 100.00
Car Hire, Union Bay   10.00
Dec. 1923—Car Hire, Union Bay 5.00
Secretary's Salary   15.00
J. Sutherland, surgery blinds 17.95
Jan.  1924—Secretary's  Salary.. 15.00
Cumberland  Islander    52.50
Car Hire Union Bay   5.00
Feb.  1924—Secretary's  Salary.. 15.00
Car Hire, Union Bay   5.00
Cumberland &  Union Water
Works     4.50
Mar. 1924—Secretary's Salary.. 15.00
Car Hire, Union Bay  5.00
Apr.  1924—Secretary's Salary.. 15.00
May, 1924—Secretary's Salary. 15.00
Cumberland &  Union  Water
Works     4.50
Car Hire, Union Bay   10.00
June. 1924—Secretary's Salary 15.00
TOTAL     $540.70
Attendance Allowances to
Board Members
July, 1923   $ 20.00
August, 1923   38.00
September, 1923    18.00
October, 1923   18.00
November, 1923   16.00
December, 1923   18.00
January,   1924     12.00
February,   1924     14.00
March,  1924    12.00
April,  1924     10.00
May,  1924    16.00
June. 1924   12.00
SYNOPSIS »F
UNDACTVXNTS
1.032.20
1,674.84
1,669.40
15.0 1
1.708.1)9
1,744.97
TOTAL     $204.00
Special Nursing
Sep. 1923—Mrs. B. Whyley $   6.00
Jan. 1921—Miss A. E. Armstrong 66.00
Mar. 1924—Mrs. D. Stewart... 28.00
Apr. 1924- Miss A. E. Armstrong   12.00
TOTAL    $112.00
Hospital Nursing
Oct.  1923—St.  Joseph's  Hos  $32.75
June,  1924—Vancouver  General
Hospital   24.85
■ TOTAL    $57.60
Specialists' Fees
July, 1923—Dr. W. A. Whitelaw* 25.00
Dr.   R.   E.   McKechnie  5.00
Aug. 1923—Dr.  It.  B. Boucher 70.00
Dr. R. E. McKechnie   150.00
Sep. 1923—Dr. R. B. Boucher.... 5.00
Oct. 1923—Dr. R. E. McKechnie 5.00
Nov. 1923—Dr. II. W. Riggs .... 115.00
Dr. W. A. Whitelaw   25.00
Dr. H. E. McKechnie   10.00
Jan.  1924—E.  Mutter  15.00
J. Mutter   25.00
Mar. 1924—Dr. W. A. Whitelaw 30.00
Apr. 1924—Dr. C. H. Freeman 15.0U
June,    1924—Drs.     Gillies    &
PltK-EJU'TlOiNS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of ago,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
aud improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Laud," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which In not timberland. l.e, carrying over 5,noo board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range,
Applications for pre-emptions, are
to be uddressed to the Land Commissioner ot tho Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made ou printed
forms, copies ot whicli can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must lie occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing nnd cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information sea
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications aro received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given in Bulletin
No. 10. Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may lie purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stunipage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres,  may  be  leased  as  homesites,
conditional upun a   dwelling   being
erected in the Ilrst yeur, title being
obtainable   afler   residence   and   improvement    conditions    are    fulfilled
and loud has been surveyed,
LEASES
For   grazing   and   industrial   purposes ureus not exceeding 640 acres
mny  he  leased by  one  person  or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner, Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave  your  orders at  olllce,
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
Phone 66.
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
e$
I
Or Phone 15 Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND  TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
jls A signal shows on the switchboard, a telephone
= number is asked for, and a wire highway is created
==; over which two persons may send their words and
B thoughts, one to the other.    Thousands of these mes-
m sagos pass over the wires of the B.C. Telephone Coni-
m pany in a day.
H The telephone operator cannot follow her work
H to its results, but she can appreciate its importance.
1| In her keeping is part of a great mechanism of inter-
§H communication, but those whom she serves and th.
§s benefits of her service remain unknown.     Each sum.
m mons for her co-operation is of equal urgency, for each
= helps to further the progress of the community and the
== province.
| BRITISH   COLUMBIA   TELEPHONE  COMPANY   H
TOTAL
....$24,820.11
Paid Medical Officer
June 101 li In July
7th. 1H23..
$   G44.31
July 8th to Aug.
3rd, 1023 ..
.    (148.51
Aug. 4th to Sep.
1st, 1023 ..
.    047.75
Sep. 2nd to Sep.
Ilth. 1023 .
.    044.20
Sep. 30th to Oct.
27th, 1023.
.    680.17
Oct. 28th to Nov.
_4th, 1023 ..
.     005.85
Nov. 25th to Doc
2nd, 1023 .
.    710.10
Dec. 23rd to Jnn.
10th, 1024.
704.00
Jun. 20th to Feb.
151b, 1024.
.    764.31
Feb. 17th to Mar.
15th, 11124.
..    703.34
Mar. 16th to Apr.
12th, 1024.
..    615.34
Apr. 13th to May
10th, 1024.
.    818.03
May 11th to Jum
7th, 1024.
..    820.11
Gillies
2.60
TOTAL    $617,50
Donations
July. 1023—E. Column  $ 10.00
Dec. 1023—W. Wright   200.00
TOTAL    $210.00
Cumberland Hospital
July, 1023  $ 800.00
August,  1023    800.00
September, 1023   800.00
October,  1023     800.00
November, 1923    800.00
December,  1023     800.00
January, 1024    800.00
February,  1024   800.00
March,  1024    800.00
April. 1024   800.00
May, 1024   800.00
June, 1021   800.00
T.WHERRY
'UUUMRMIST&TANNER
In. tor weto. un oi
« • r k-«i • _ a 11 a n
_«___ «*.
sr.  Ave,,
i. V O. 9
an Pandoi
Victoria,
Ii,ill
■
Repairs to Cemetery
Oct. 1023—P. McNIven  $ 65.00
J. Sharpies     60.00
TOTAL    $125.00
Repairs to Surgery
June, 1924—Canadian  Collieries
(DO Ltd $31.17
TOTAL     $31.17
Miscellaneous Disbursements
July, 1023—Secretary's Solary..$ 16.0)
Car Hire, Union  Buy   10.00
Cumberland   Islander,  printing      11-50
Aug.   1923—Secretary's   Salary 15.00
Cumberland & Union Water
Works   2.00
Mrs.   A.   King,   papers   and
Magazines    18.30
TOTAL    $0,600.00
Disbursements for Medicines
—Medical Fund
July, 1023—Canadian Hospital
Supply  Co $ 25.56
Sept. 1928—R. C. Lang   87.72
Oct. 1923—II. C. Lang   166.02
Nov. 1023—lt. 0, Lang   160.31
Dec.  1023—n.  C.  l.nng  184.27
Jan. 1924—R. O, Lang   166.25
Jan. 1924—It. C, Lang   218.90
Jnn. 1924—R. C. Lang   190.90
Apr. 1024—11. C. Lang  212.07
May, 1024—11, C. Lang   186.40
June, 1024—R. C. Lang   200.00
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered to All Tarts of District.
Conl, Wood and (ioods of Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE
53 TE
TELEPHONE
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
TOTAL    $1,797.36
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
SUMMARY—FINAN
July, 1923—
To  Balance    $ 3,272.48
Collections     24,260.14
Salo ot Cemetery Plots .... 60.00
Interest on  Savings  Acct       70.12
TOTAL
 $27,662.74
Respectfully  submitted:—
JAMES DICK
Secretary.
Approved Finance Committee:—
HENRY WALKER
SIDNEY HUNT
CIAL STATEMENT
Medical Officer  $ 9,434.75
Repairs to Cemetery 	
125.00
517.50
210.00
Attendance     allowance     to
204.00
Repairs to Surgery 	
31.17
Cumberland Hospital 	
0,600.00
Miscellaneous Disbursements
540.70
Disbursements  tor  Medicine
1,797.86
Special Nursing 	
112.00
Hospital Nursing 	
57.60
Balance Current Acct	
2,641.02
Balance Savings Acct	
2,390.711
TOTAL    $27,662.74 THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
r*
:__r_i_i_ia_i3i_[_i'_.i___?i_iM_rai_i_E^
I       ffl   News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
FAREWELL PARTY
TO COMOX GIRLS
COURTENAY.-On Tuesday night
at Coniox about eighty friends of the
Misses Marguerite McLennan and Jessie Morrison attended a party given
in honor of the two young ladles who
are leaving the district to make their
homes at Vancouver. The evening
wns pleasantly passed with dancing
and games and it Is doubtful if the
Comox Community Hull ever held a
more satisfied gathering. A feature
of the evening was the step dancing
of Miss Morrison. The party broke
up in the early hours of Wednesday
morning.
TOURIST TRAFFIC IS
IN FULL SWING
Why  .Not Capitalize  Lure of Coniox
take?
COURTENAY, — Certainly motor
traffic to the district the past week
has given abundant proof that the
touritit season is on. It is safe to
say that for every car tlmt came to
the district last year three have come
this summer—and the traffic has only
begun. Visitors hnve been In the
district from all portions of the American continent, Eastern Canada.
New York, the Southern States, the
Middle West, California. Oregon and
Washington have all been represented in the Influx of visitors.     Many of
I McBRYDE'S  BAKERY 1
H The White Store The White Bakery §§f
H| How to live a hundred years—Bury the Pepper dish f||
HI and the Vinegar bottle and eat McBryde's 100 per cent _=
p Whole Wheat Bread g|
55 Always a nice selection of Cakes to choose from, which 9
55 you know. §g
HI Not How Cheap—But How Good |p
IP First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking ll
Uf guarantees the quality |p
§§§ The Holding-on-to Quality Store fg
11 THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM H
those who have talked about their trip
to tills district have used language
that left the unmistakable impression
that they had had a good time. Fishing at the various lakes has beeu
splendid; salmon trolling in Comox
Bay and Little River has been better
than for years. While all this may
be true, there Is reason to believe that
the people of the district ure missing
a great opportunity in not capitalizing
the lure of Comox Lake more than
tbey do. There, is not the slightest
doubt that this beautiful sheet of
water will give the averuge angler ns
much and perhaps more enjoyment
than any other lake lu the midsection
of Vancouver Island. Fish is what
the sporting tourists nearly all want
und here is a place where he can be
accommodated lo the full. Perhaps
we have been too wont to praise the
beauties and attractions of places
farther away from home, forgetting
entirely about what there Is nearer
at hand. Coniox Lake is an asset
that should be capitalized co-operu-
tively by the citizens of the two towns
of Comox Valley.
COURTENAY TO HAVE
NEW POST-OFFICE
A, IV. Neill and Courtenur Board of
Trade to lie Thanked
For It
THE
Piket Electric
RANGES       —       WASHERS       —       PLATES
TABLE STOVES     —      CURLING IRONS
WIRING      —       TOASTERS       —      HEATERS
LAMPS     —    FANS     —     IRONS
— PERCOLATORS —
TENTS     —     AWNINGS     —     FLIES
FISHING TACKLE — SPORTING GOODS
— GUNS AND AMMUNITION —
Telephone KM Courtenay
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, MOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES
(Night calls: 134X Courtenay
Office: 159 Cumberland
COURTENAY,—Word has been received in this city that the estimates
of the present session at Ottawa have
included n sum of money for the construction of a new post office at the
City of Courtenay.
This will be good news and a most
welcome acknowledgement of the
growing needs of the city that ls the
centre of industry in tbe Comox Valley. .Much of the credit for the acquisition of a new building is due the
member for the riding, Mr. A. W.
Neill, who has labored untiringly in
the Interests of every part of the district. Gratification ls being expressed by the members of the Courtenay-
Comox Boards of Trade for tbey have
have never let the government at Ottawa forget that the new post office
was an absolute necessity.
It will be remembered that a few
years ago Mr. Michael Perez gave to
the government two lots on Isabel
Street, opposite the present Galeiy
theatre and it is upon this property
that the new building will be erected.
It will also be remembered that some
years ago, through the instrumentality of the former member, Mr. Clements, a sum of twenty-five thousand
dollars was set aside for the purpose
for which u grant has now been made.
The war broke out aud in the stress
of hard times the government asked
Courtenalans to be patient. This the
people of Courtenay acquiesced in and
their,patience will now be rewarded
by the erection of a brick building
that Is estimated to cost in the neighborhood of thirty-five thousand dollars. It will be the second brick
structure In the city, the only other
one being owned by the Canadian
Bank of Commerce who erected their
fine brick premises after having been
burned out at the corner of Union
and Judson streets', in 1919, at the
same time that Tarbell's lost their
building. It is extremely gratifying
to look forward from the year 1916
when the business section of Court-
by Are ,to the present time and note
enay was almost completely wiped out
the splendid progress that has been
made. Rehabilitation Is not the
proper term to use here for the city
has long since gone past the stage
of merely rebuilding. The old buildings have all been replaced and manv
others have been added to the business section until today Courtenny
stands as the most prosperous of the
small towns on Vancouver Island.
This result has been achieved by a '
spirit of optimism with which hor I
citizens have gone about the development of the city and Ihe Industries
of the district. In tbe matter of development of public works the city
council from year to year has worked unceasingly, and, aided by the
strength of a live Board of Trade,
comprising members from all parts of
the district, has been the means of
building up a strong community. To
be sure there hnve been Doubting
Thomases, who in the summer time
saw a hard winter ahead and when
winter came saw a bad summer not
far off, but that spirit has gradually
dlsappeored until today Courtenay's
citizens have been ranked ns the most
optimistic on the Island, imbued with
a determination and a spirit that accomplishes things. The future certainly does not look bad—the very
reverse Is the sentiment expressed
everywhere and local soothsayers who
can see Into the coming years have
said that Courtenay and the Comox
Valley arc just at the beginning of
things great.
Mr. F. W. Frith, of Campbell River,
was a visitor to Courtenay on Tuesday.
LOCALS WEAKENED—
FARMERS WIN 8 - 3
(Continued From Page One)
ertson and Dixon for the former and
Richards for the latter being the ones
to cross the plate.
One more wns chalked up by Courtenay In the ninth. With one down
Beattie doubled. A. Robertson flew
out lo Marocchi. Barkhouse singled
scoring Beattle and Cummings was au
easy infield victim for last out.
Todd went in to pinch hit for
Farmer in the ninth. Wltll one down
A. Robertson dropped his fly. "Bill"
stole second and third, but R. Robertson and Mclntyre fanned.
Box Score
Courtenay AB R H PO A E
Cummings       5   10   2   2   0
R. Robertson     5   1113   1
Millard       3   0   0   0   0   0
Dixon     5   2   2 12   0   0
Downey      5   1   1 10   1   1
Harris       5   12   0   2   0
Beattie     5   2   3   0   0   0
A. Robertson     5   0   2   0   11
Barkhouse       5   0   12   0   0
Cumberland AB R H PO A E
Richards      4   117   2   0
Hunden       4   14   0   4   1
Marocchi        3   0   0   2   8   1
McKay     4   0   0   110
Harrison       4   0   0   0   0   2
Farmer       3   0   0 16   0   1
"Bob" Robertson ....   4   1   1   1   0   t
Mclntyre     4   0   10   4   2
"Nut"   Robertson...   10   0   0   0   0
•Cullen       2   0   0   0   II   0
•Todd     10   0   0   0   0
•Cullen relieved "Peanuts" Robertson.
•Todd batted for Farmer in ninth.
Summary
Three-base hits: Bob Robertson,
Dixon and Downey: Two-base hits:
Beottie and Richards: Sacrifice hits:
Millard; Stolen bases: Harris, Todd
(2); Struck out by Mclntyre 5, by
Barkhouse 11; Hit by pitcher, Marocchi by Barkhouse; Base on balls: oil'
Mclntyre (21, off Barkhouse (lj;
Wild pitches: Mclntyre 1; Passed
balls: Downey; Left on bases: Cumberland 5, Courtenay 10; Earned
runs: Courtenay 5, Cumberland 2;
Umpires:  Zacarelll and Richardson.
IDLE MONEY
There are many who have money that is not working
HOMES
There are also many people needing homes
INVESTMENT
We submit there is no sounder investment than in a
well built permanent horn, economically planned and
kept down to a rock bottom cost.
CONNECT UP
We know how to combine the idle capital with home
building to make it pay both ways.
SEE US AT ONCE
Edwards and Orr
PRACTICAL BUILDERS, SELLING BUILDING
MATERIAL
Union Bay Road, Courtenay
OPPOSITE CORFIELD MOTORS
Phone 17 P. O. Box 62
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
Summer Weather Is Here Now!
DELIGHTFUL OPEN AIR
DANCE
SATURDAY, JULY 26th.
Royston Tennis
Court
cMoodys Orchestra in attendance
(Charlie Cawdell of Cumberland at the Piano) *—*—<
PAGE EIGHT
1'HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 20, ls24
Local Briefs
m    Special Sale of Dresses
Pictorial Review
_5_^«Q_j_ft2[_v_i
fir
■^i'i
1 $ :
Line No. 1— Special sale
nt Ladies' Ratine Dresses,
In six different styles. For
this week we will make
an extra special offer to
clear at *"i.lHI curb. A
real bargain.
Line Xo. 2 -About twenty
Dresses, assorted in Ginghams, smart styles, real
good goods and your
choice al %i.% each.
Line No. 3—House Dresses. About 30 real smart
dresses. Any of these will
make a good useful dress
for either house or oul -
door use and they conn*
in shades of Pink, Fawn,
t line price ifL'-Ti each.
Bungalow Dresses or Coveralls
I, made of a  real good quality
'
TIRED FEET SM'N-IEHITATION. BRUISES
JAHa 10c, . G0_—TUBES SOc—At al! Dr _ Sur.j
lllue, Green and Pale Blue.
Line No. 4 About _u small
lu a goodly assortment nf
Percale. Price $1.85. g
Line No. 5—Children's Dresses, made ill six different styles, a ==
good quality of Gingham, for girls from ii to 11 years. Price $1.-5 =_
Line No. 6—White Dresses for little tots from 1 year to 3 year;. =
just a few left.      Price to clear $1,00. SS
Proven bert
Since 18.'
J. SUTHERLAND
BUY AT HOME CAMPAIGN
(Continued From Page Five)
he wanted thera to be pessimist!,
about business, because it' he had
said, "Business is wonderful, f have
made tine protits, I went way beyond
my fondest expectations ln the amount
of goods sold," tbey naturally would
be inspired likewise, and undoubtedly think, "Well, if he can get sucli
business, I guess 1 can, he's no better merchant than I am.''
So there's always two sides to every story and about 05% of this talk
about there being no money and no
business should be taken with a
grain of salt.
We've got to be more ready in the
future than we have been iu the past,
and take up new promising ideas for
increasing business, simply because
something worked well five, ten or
fifteen years ago is no assurance that
it is equally effective today. A great
many merchants confuse business
principles with business methods—
they are altogether two different
things.
There are a certain number of principles in doing business that remain
the same, regardless of time, place
or conditions, but the methods of doing business «re changing constantly, and we've got to change with
them if we're going to keep nhrensi
of the times.
I have often seen the effects of conservation brought to thc point where
it is mere inaction. There are businesses being conducted today not by
tbe men who are in charge of tlio
store, but by men who founded it, aud
who may have been dead these twenty
five or fifty years. If these same men
wre living today they probably would
be the quickest to change their methods to suit new times, whereas, their
successors hold to them as if they
were something sacred. This again
is simply confusing methods with
principles.
One merchant met my suggestion of
canvassing out among tbe trade with
the statement that they'd beeu established for sixty years and had never
gone out tramping begging for business at the homes of their customers,
and they did not think they had tn
start that now.
Such an attitude is about as senseless as if   tbat   merchant    were   to
'Makes happy,
healthy babies.
KHEE BABY HOOKS
Write tn the Borden Co. Limited,
Vancouver for two' Baby Welfare
Books.
| Miss Isabell Crawford, lately of
I Union Hay. was a successful pupil in
I tbe recent examinations at the Tor-
t onto Conservatory  of    .Music.        She
gained   "highest   honors"  in  singing.
.Miss Crawford's teacliqr is Mrs. Mary
McCoy Jamison, of Victoria.
* *        *
Mr. 11. Price of the Cowichan Lead-
: er   is   taking   a   holiday   tour  of  the
[aland.      He was in the city on Wed-
i ncsday.
* Ki        *
At the drawing of the Gold Watch
h for the benefit   of  Mrs. William   I'oi-
, ter, under the auspices of the Womens
Benefit Association, 200 was the successful winning number.
* *    *
Mr.  nnd  Mrs.   Harry  Wilson  spout
; the week end  with their parents Mr.'
and Mrs. Alex.  Walker.
Mr. George Kmart, of Courtenay, Is '
taking  a   well-earned  holiday,  with
1 friends  in  New   Vork.
* *        He
Mrs. John Orr and two children of!
Ladysmlth have been   visiting   Miss1
! Jessie    Stevenson    during    the    past I
week.     They returned ou Wednesday, j
* *    *
j Mr. David Lockhart, of "Campbell's"
j left on Wednesday morning on a holl-
I day trip to •Vancouver. j
PSE
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician.    Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9 p.m.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON ANI)
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
V   HOTELS AND CAMPS    f
SPECIALLY CATERED TO !
• +
Our Motto:
"QUALITY  AND SERVICE"
FOURACRE—Al the Cumberland Gen
era! Hospital, July 24th, 1024, ti
Mr, and .Mrs. v. \V, Fouracre, :
daughter, •*
LOST—A     GREEN
Chain  car  ring,
gel  reward.
AND     SILVER
Phone  171F and
30.
LOST- ON JULY 10, HITHER AT
Royston Station or left In B. „ N.
Train, [.ally's dust coat with belt.
Reward upon return to Islander
Office. SO.
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
IN  ._K.1IOKI.OI
In loving memory or ISlizahetli 11
llday. beloved wife of William .VI
Hawthorn, who passed away at SI.
Paul's Hospital. Vancouver, on July
22ml, IH23.     Sadly missed.
William   M.   Hawthorn.
122 McLeod Bldg., 6th SI.
.1". New Westminster, lie.
Leave   your   order   for
Preserving
APRICOTS
FINE STOCK OF FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
PLUMS — PEACHES - Al'RICOTS — CHERRIES —AVATER
MELON'S —CANTELOPBS        HONEY  DEW MELONS
BANANAS  —   EATING   APPLES   -   LEMONS
CALIFORNIA   AND   FLORIDA   GRAPE
FRUIT   -   AUSTRALIAN
ALMEIDA GRAPES
NEW SPUDS — CARROTS -- DEBTS -  TURNIPS — GREEN
PEAS   ..  GREEN CAIIBAGE — ONIONS — RHUBARB
CUCUMBERS   -   ETC.
 FOR REAL BARGAINS	
Look over our list of specials for the week which
.i.eans a great saving to you.     Prices and Quality are
what count.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
■J
m
3E
;*■__=
When you are in need of a
Plumbing &  Heating Engineer!
see
RRushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.    i
or
Phone 157. Cumberland, B.C.  I
YOUR   NEEDS   WILL  RECEIVE     |
IMMEDIATE  ATTENTION
slock his store with lhc styles of merchandise in vogue sixty years ago, and
insist thnt Inasmuch as il was the
right thing I'or ihosp limes II is still
the right thing. We must not lose
sight of the fad that methods must
change wilh lhc limes no less thai
Ihe merchandise stock we curry.
m
The coolest spot in   Cumberland is
Lang's Ice Cream Parlor
Come in and try one of our
COOLING DRINKS or DELICIOUS SUNDAES
Week-End Candy
Whole Dates, Walnut stuffed, per lb  75c.
Moirs Olimpic Chocolates, per 1-lb box $1.00
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
39iu..i.n;) )so.ms »MX *.ll 1'UI '*1k«U A'lipin})
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been
at  Mr
been
Ford Cur which  was to have     Mrs. W. T. Clarke anil son, of loco.
auctioned off on Saturday 2lith. arc here on  a  visit  to the  former's
. A. ,1. Merry's auction snle has parents,  .Mr. and  Mrs. Alex.  Walker
withdrawn, being already  soid. of the New Townsite. \
PE
Special In Silk Stockings
All colors and sizes up from 75c.
We specialize in hemstitching and fancy needlework.
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
Mrs.   L.  Francescini
Cumberland
Ford Economy     Economy Ford
Latest appliances for all work
Overhauling Cars
Electrical Starting and Lighting
Batteries
Vulcanizing Tires
Have your coils tested—Don't leave it to chance or luck
Why not let us wash your car?
Do you ever oil your spring?
 • * *	
ECONOMY
—*—t,—*—
Corfield  Motors Limited
FORD DEALER
Phone 46 Courtenay, B.C.

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