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The Cumberland Islander Jul 19, 1924

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Array THE .CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
&
With which is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-THIRD   YEAR—No.  29.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBIA SATURDAY, JULY  19, 1924
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
CUMBERLAND TEAM NOW AT THE 'PEG
LOCAL SOCCER PLAYERS UNDER W. WALKER AFTER DOMINION HONORS
CALGARY PLAYERS
INJURED IN GAMES
PLAYED WITH LOCALS
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
WILL NOW TAKE IN
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
FARMERS WIN FIRST
GAME FROM LOCALS
BY SCORE OF 4 -2
At the last meeting ol the Hoard bt
Management ot the Cumberland Literary   and   Athletic   Association,   the
Catching the local tossers Inst Sunday in au Upper Island League game
i Board considered the question of ad-i wilh  c'0,m  "ml  Bannerman  out  of
! milting   tbe   public   at   large   to   thc | their  line-up, taking   advantage    by
The Cumberland United Soccer team left Cumberland on | membership of the association, whicli | trotting out their strongest line-up
Tuesday morning last for Winnipeg, where they will be representatives of this province in the Dominion .Soccer championship, tho
semi-finals of which take place today (Saturday) and Monday.
The team, in charge of Bill Walker, and Marry Jackson as trainer
were in the highest spirits when they left Cumberland and gave a
solemn promise that their very best efforts would be devoted to
bringing the coveted silverware to Cumberland.
up until tho present time has been I of the year, failure ot the locals to
confined solely to the employees of j htt ,„ p|ncne8| aM tr|mme(1 off by ,„.
the Canadian  Collieries   (Dunsmuir) | weirdest Imaginable decision! by Um-
The two games played with the Calgary Hillhursts last week
end were marred by a chapter of accidents to some of the Prairie
players.     R. Stephen, the full back, had his arm fractured in the
Limited.
I plre P. Fletcher, aided Courtenay to
Appreciating the fact that tiie club j wh,p Cumberland at the rate of 4 - 2
has for the past three aud a half courtenay tried four consecutive times
years been for employees only, thc t0 panhandle the same dose to Cum-
Board teels that due to so many men , berian_ hut succeeded for the lirst
other than employees expressing a de-1 time last Sunday
sire to become ...embers of the asso- Featuring the game was the near
elation. It would be perfectly in order , ,.,ot  staged  In  the  last  half  of  the
  t0, (,,(,l0|)t ""    a880clate    membership i eighth inning.   Judging by his recent
practice game at Revelstoke on the way out and played with that' T .*? 1"'"V"U' "" admittll1g ! performances, Pat. Fletcher has about
member in a plaster cast. Nesbitt had two ribs broken in the ! Z To,Z"t^n up ' '" T" ."T" '° """'"^ 8e,"°r
Nanaimo game and watched Saturday's game from the side lines, with the ___._£___?!'of the Canadian : £_?ZrTlIT. "i on ZT 1
Within fifteen minutes of the start of the game on Saturday, Mor- '■ Collieries (Dunsmuir, Limited, and DMnity ufter hls John Henry H™
ris, playing at left half collided with Monahan, the former's left llley are »"tfectly in accord, provided ( qUGe,- decisions told on the c'umber-
shinbone being broken. He was carried off the field and ao- thttt certi,i" re8trlctl°ns l,e made to i ialld DOy8 and the last straw came
peared no more. '     '"'evail' wh!°h wl" inclu(le lhe rol"lw-1 when be called what appeared a raw
ing, no associate member will be en-1 decislou  In the eighth when  Beattle
Cumberland won the toss in Saturday's game and decided to t,tlecl .t0 llol<1 an}' nffll'e' or lle on "">• | seemed an easy out, Richards to
Piny with the sun at their backs. v i through the defence, striking the post !(:omraiUees' or llilve a ™te In any of | jaraes, ••Tllcker" hoisted his glove at
series of attacks on the Calgary goal Bttwtrt „ tne „lhcl. „,,„ ,,,„„„,, t^^i^Z^^T f T* ™\FM^ a"" star'«' « *• ™'i to
brought out  the  sterling    work    - | sociatlon,  and  that  the  membership ! express  himself to   Pat..      At  least
Stephen, Crook and Wilson, who re
pulsed the Cumberland forwards time
and time again.     Bannerman dropped
a nice cross to Oraham, who drove the
ball well over the bar.     The prairie
forwards  then  carried  the    ball    to
Blair's end by a series of short passes and came within an ace of scoring,
lllalr on one occasion being forced to
leave his goal and race for the ball,;
clearing danger in  the nick,of time.1
Graham at the other end drove a hard
one at Wilson, the goalie bringing off ■
a miraculous save. The Calgary goalie
a few minutes later again came out i
of a determined attack by taking a
risky chance at kicking the pig-skin
out instead of gathering it.     Again
shortly after he brought off two magnificent saves, the large crowd pres-
ent giving him a great hand when he '
stopped drives from both Turner ami
Oraham after beautiful crosses from ;
Deluce.     As  half  time    approached
Calgary  forwards  made a  desperate
effort  to score,  Ackroyd  slopping  a
couple of dangerous rushes.     Wlike-
lyn forced a corner.     Bradford took
the kick and the ball swerved between ;
the posts, but ns it bad not touched
a player on  its  (light, the goal was |
not allowed.
Second Hall'
Shortly after the resumption of play
Deluce made a great run up tlio wing
finishing up with u bard drive on goal
which Wilson saved in masterly style,
a few minutes later Turner missed an
open goal. The local forwards continued their attack, Deluce crossing
beautifully, Turner heading over the
bar. From the resulting goal kick,
the Cumberland forwards obtained
possession and bore down on Wilson
The goalie was in a tight position
when he tumbled the ball from
header by Turner.
Turner made for
forced to throw the ball, lie was loudly applauded for his timely clearance,
Tho Cumberland centre forward
had Die best, chance of the day shortly
after. He beat Crooks and wltll Wilson coining out, he drove the hall
over tlle bar with no one In the not,
Deluce took a corner kick shortly
after and  duplicated  Bradford's  feat
w_JtTtatotT_3_lr  '"ti!" Tn,\T ^"T  "" d0l'arS  '*"' CTe,'!'^'>'-other side fights broke out when
, required to pay. was well in the lead.     Those were
The account ol   the game in  last      In order for non-employees to be-j the   less  redeeming  features  of  the
Sunday's Sun is well worth reading—  come associate  members  it  will  be  game,
as  u  juke.      Tlle  Sun's  joke smith ! necessary for them to submit an ap-
must have been looking at the game \ plication to the secretary, who will,] "Bed" and "Bill" are (5ood
through smoked glasses, or through ; over the signature of the president, j Both pitchers handled themselves
a knot hole in the fence. Whilst i, : issue a temporary permit, which will \ admirably throughout the game dis-
is admitted the game was not a thrill- entitle lhe holder lo all the prlytl- playing Bood control and headwork
ing one to watch, it certainly did nol ! egos of the association, until such the whole proving a fine pitchers bat-
call for the remarks of the Sun's re- time us the application Is submitted tie Big "Bill" Boyd whiffed thir
porter. He admits that the Calgary to the board at a regular meeting, teen men and allowed equally us
defence played magnificently and tlmt ! where on approval by the board the ] manv. nit8 as youthful "Red" Mclll-
the work of WIlso,, ln goal was n re- applicant will become au associate tyre of Cumberland Seven hits were'
velatlon   to   Coast   Funs.      There   Is   member in proper order. j garnerod   off  eaob   plt<,her       youn_
The secretory would like to advise | Anlos  Farmer  after    blngllng    one
that applications will be received any | 0„ance redeemed himself with a nifty
COMMITTEE HAS LEFT
NOTHING UNDONE FOR
PICNICKERS' COMFORT
only one answer to that. The magnificent work of the Cumberland forwards and the great pressure which
they brought to hear on WUhou
brought out the best there was in him.
Wilson is well known In Cumberland,
having played a season here and earned a name of being one of the best
goalkeepers ever associated with the
local team. Th locals on Staurday
last, according to the Sun, could not
have beaten a learn of schoolboys, yet
the work of the Calgary defence was
u revelation.
We wonder if the artistic trimming
administered to the Vancouver Elks at
Nanaimo hy the Cumberland learn is
still troubling our friend on the Sun.
If some of these sport writers would
report (he game as Ihey are*actually
played and not as they (the writers)
think they should he played, the sport I
loving public would be better served,
Hill Walker Worried
time after the present dale.
Itosul. to bo announced at Picnic
The half time and full time result
of todays' game at Winnipeg will be
announced from the platform at the
the picnic grounds as soon as thev
aro received.
catch Utter iu the game, Johnny Marocchi too scooped up a couple of well
handled infield chances. Batting honors go to Rob. Robertson and Halley Dixon while Johnny Marocchi and
Dave Richards each came out of the
battle scarred field with batting averages of .500 apiece. The two lat-
(Continued on Page Eight)
ABSENTEE VOTE COUNT
WILL BE COMPLETED TODAY
Kill  Walker was worried    suit'    on
Tuesday evening in Vancouver. Stewart, Brake and Blair were out visiting
some of their friends in the terminal
Both Oraham and | c^y  Hml  ('IoHe t0 train  time these
Wiknn   who   wns   three  had  nol   reported.      Bill could i""  '7  '"."	
wiison   wno   ".is ( |that (()t]|1 Mmv sl),n,|s: yeg) 1{)
048,
Latest reports from returning ofii-iJ.  D. MacLean, Liberal, 1,149;  John
cers   throughout   the   Province   plaoo   McRae, Cons., 767; J. S. Pagan, pro-
today (Friday) as the date when tho   vjnciai  501
final outcome of the  Provincial poll ,
will he Known. GonBe8' BC' July 15-Final cou'«
.Mr.  T.  H.  Carey,  returning officer j(or Tne Islands electoral district: C.
for Cumberland has completed his ab-1 Peck, Conservative, ,183; 11. B. Jack-
sentee count which resulted as follows: Harrison 102; Clayton 68;
Duncan it"; making respective totals
of 1261, 7911 and 810. With 2811 absentee voles for heer and 112 agalnsl
not eat Ills dinner I'm' thinking shout j
tlietn.     However, all's well that ends
well.     The hoys all made tlle train I.I
nice time and  the  last  seen o(  Mill
was on the steps of the private car
with a smile that surely said. "Why
certainly wo will bring back the Con-
naught Cup."     Here's hoping Bill,
Those   making   the   journey   are:
by netting the ball, but the point was I Blair, Stewart, Ackroyd, Conti, Mono-
disallowed.     In the last few minutes! halt, Brake, Bannerman, Oraham, De-
both tennis came close to making a j luce, Turner, Milligan, Plump, Mort-1 pr. M. Raynor (Lib)
102
no,
Vlclorln to Dale
Tiie returning officer announce,
the following revised figures for victoria as recounted:
Josliun   lliuclicliffc,  (Con)     6883 I
Reginald Huyward (Co..)   5861
II. I). Twigg (Con)   64811
A.   Lyons   (Con)     4618
Elected
score, Bannerman driving   the   bull' imcr, Hitchens, Wulker and Jackson.
i_i_i______ii__i_ij__r[__^
SP1UNKLING NOTICE 1
ts
Hours for Sprinkling and Irrigating purposes are
Morning 7 to 8 a.m.
Night  7 to 9 p.m.
Watering Sidewalks, Streets Etc, must be discontinued
Elective July Gth, 1924.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
a _,
  3941
Hon. John Oliver (Lib)   3826
S. J. Drake (Lib)    3346
J. B. Clearihue (Lib)   3311
E. S. Woodward  (Prov)  23r,r>
A. E. Todd  (Prov)    2262
A. G. Smith (Prov)   2072
A. Wright (Prov)   1921
C. R. North (Ind)  1663
Mrs. Graves (Lab)   Hill
J.  H. Hawthoruthwalte  (Lab)....   761)
W. E. Pierce (Lab)     721
On the basis of figures compiled so
a,; far it looks strongly ns if the Mayor
i wlll nose Canon Hinchcliffc out of thc
Q j lirst place when the absentee ballots
Hi are counted.
Un-Country Finals
Mcrritt,   B.C.   Ju.lv   16.—Thc   total
vote ln Yale Provincial riding:  Hon.
son, Lib., 542; J. W. Mcintosh, Prov.,
581. Beer plebiscite count not completed.
Ladysmith, B.C., July 15.—Results
It. Cowtchnn-Newcaslle lu the filial
count give Davie, Conservative, 1,296:
Duncan, Prov., 870; Guthrie, Lab.,
1,18.1 Walkem, Lib., 738; spoiled, 87.
The beer plebiscite showed: Yob,
2,222; no, 1,422; spoiled, 144.
Port Alberni, July 15.—Final figures
In the Provincial election here are:
Burde, Ind.-Llb., 828; McNaughton,
Prov., i82; Johnston, Con., 339.
Anyox, B. C, July 16.—Final Provincial election figures In Atlin riding, where the race was very close,
njake no change in the standing of
the parties. The results are:Kergln,
Lib., 463; Armour, Prov., 380; Conway, Con., 353. Beer: Yes, 714; no,
467.
Nanaimo, July 15.—Nanaimo provincial riding final: Hon. William
Sloan, Lib., 1,612; W. A. Prltchard.
Soc, 1,083; F. A. Busby, Con., 642; A.
M. Whiteside, Prov., 141; For beer,
2,068; against, 1,375.
Fort George, which was In tbe
doubtful column, has returned H. O.
Perry, Liberal, by the following vote:
H. G. Perry, Liberal, 1,079; F. P. Burden, Con., 1,028; J. A. Shearer, Prov.,
206.
The big event of the season takes place today (Saturday) at
Royston, when the Seventh Annual Picnic of the Employees of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited will be held. Providing
good weather prevails the event will be one of the best yet, all the
various officers and committees having gone to considerable
trouble and expense to get everything in the best of order. Everyone will find that nothing has been overlooked for their comfort
and convenience. Credit for a successful day, which it is bound
to be unless marred by weather conditions, belongs wholly with
the Picnic Committee and especially with Mr. Charles O'Brien who
has worked indefatigably night and day to insure it being a day of
days. Here's hoping Jupiter Pluvius doesn't interfere with the
Secretary's good work.
A feature of the program will be a display of daylight fireworks which will be of great interest to the children in particular
and to the grown-ups in general. These will be set olf at intervals of twenty minutes throughout the day.
For boys 16 years and under a special 100-yd. dash has been
arranged with the McLennan-McFeeley Cup as trophy. This
event is open only to hoys whose parents are employees of the Company
and to become the property of any
one boy it must be won by him two
years in succession. Besides the cup
there is a Orst prize ot $5.00 value
and a second prize of $2.50. Similarly in the First Aid event there Is a
first prize ot $50.00 and second of
$25.00 in addition to the Forcinie.
Cup.
Competitors in all events must bc
on hand at the time stated on the program, otherwise the committee in
charge may find it necessary to cancel the event.
Following is a list of the different
officials and committees:
Starters—Thos. Oraham, Dr. G. K.
MacNaughton, E. H. Devlin.
Judges of Sports—A. Auchlnvole.
Dan Morgan, Sandy Walker, A. S.
Jones, J. Sutherland, H. Waterfield.
C. J. Parnham, A. R. Stacey.
Judge of Quoiting—Dave Wilson.
Refreshment Committee—T' W.
Scott, Chairman, J. Vernon Jones, J
S. Williams, William Devoy. E. J.
Grelg, W. Weir, S. Cameron. T. Eccleston Wm. Thomas, Jno. Horbury.
Jack Bennie, Chas. Walker, Joe. Taylor, Wm. Beveridge, A. W. Watson, A.
Jones, Watkln Williams, Joe. Derby
sbire, Victor Freloni, R. Robertson.
Sam Jones, E. Mugford. A. It. Nunns,
Jno. Potter, Andy Thomson. Robert
Strachan, S. Robertson, Fred Hutchinson, J. Hatch Tim Wulker, Sid.
Hunt, A. J. Taylor, D. Gordon, Sid
Horwood, Wm. Herd, Jack Smith, E.
Gomm.
The committee wlll be divided Into
four (4) shifts nine (9) men to a shift,
and it is intended to run the Childrens
Refreshment Booth one hour then
close for one hour, and so on until all
refreshments ore dispensed.
The above arrangements will permit members of this Committee to
have a little time to themselves during the day.-T. W, Scott, Chairman,
Programme Committee—E. H. Devlin, J. Gear, Jas. L. Brown. Pete
Heed, Robert C, Walker.
Sports Committee—Tom Illnlr. Hob
ble Brown, Preston Bruce, A. II. Kay,
11. Bernstein. Jonathan Taylor, John
D. Davis.
Grounds Committee-Andrew Pollock, S. Fraser, A. Kyle, C. Held, I'.
Harris, W. Wilson, K. Campbell. Arthur Lee, Arch. Lorhnrt, Jnck Smith,
D. Campbell, B. Geary.
Transportation Committee—II I..
Bates, H. Buchenon, Jno. Slant,  W.
Weir,  A.   H.   Kny,  Joe  Horbury,   M.
McAdara, A. Mathieson.
Reception Committee—D. II. MacDonald, Thomas Graham, Chas. Graham.
Life Saving Committee—Jas. W.
Tremlett, II. Aitken, W, Taylor, J.
Stevenson, J. Weir, J. Robertson, W.
Treloar, Alf. McNIven.
Executive—Hon. President, Col. C.
W. Villlers; Hon. Vice-President,
Thos. Graham; President, Ed. Hughes
Vice-President, George O'Brien; Secretary, Chas. O'Brien; Treasurer, E.
D. Pickard; Director of Ceremonies.
Chas. Graham; Chairman Reception
Committee, D. lt. MacDbnald; Chairman Refreshment Committee, T. W.
Scott; Chairman Transportation Committee, H. L. Bates; Chairman Sports
Committee, Tom Blair; Chairman
Program Committee, H. Devlin; Chair
man Grounds Committee, Andrew Pollock; Chairman Life Saving Committee, Jas. W. Tremlett; Judges, (First
Aid), Dr. MacNaughton, Dr. Hicks. Dr.
Butters.
In order to round off a good day
Mr. Joseph Idiens is holding a big
dance In the open air Tennis Court
adjacent to the picnic Held. Everyone will be there. Music will he supplied hy Moody's Orchestra with Mr.
Charlie Cawdell. of Cumberland, at
the piano.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Commencing Wednesday, July 1.3,
Miss i.onald will do all kinds of
ladies' and children's hair cutting, also Holi f'urlinp and Facials, at hsr
home iu the New Townsite. Weekdays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Salurdays
t.80 p.m, to s p.m.     Phone 177.
(Jirls!      Keep your hair in trim!
WOULD CHANGE
DEATH SENTENCE TO
LIFE IMPRISONMENT
A petition is being circulated
throughout Nanaimo, and lias nit-cade
been largely signed, to lie forwarded
to tbe Department of Justice, asking
Hint the sentence or Alfred Corbell
be changed trom hanging to life Imprisonment, Corbett was convicted
here at tin; Spring Assizes of having
murdered Ills wife ill Courtenny. ami
was sentenced to be hanged. The
jury. In returning a sentence of
guilty. Included a recommendation of
mercy.
|(a_Bi_Bj_B/_ei_M_ei_i_i_i_i_i__j__j_a_^
SPECIAL WIRE ON SOCCER GAME
We are endeavoring to make arrangements whereby we will bc able to give to the Soccer fans of Cumberland, a short outline of the Connaught Cup game being played in Winnipeg today. If it is at all possible,
short bulletin will be posted at The Islander OHice
about S.30 p.m.
itlWWIPfl-IPISMfWW^ PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1924
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
__W__x
_U__uKe>
SATURDAY, JULY  19,  1924
WHO KNOWS?
He sat by the window every day.
No one knew what be thought tor he
had never spoken a word. He bad
n sad, far-away expression In his
deep gray eyes. "Little old man."
the boys called blm as tbey pased bis
window bent ou their boyish games.
Ile sal there lu the morning. At noon
they drew the shade lo shut out the
glare. There he sal ill Illc shadow.
At night, when the crickets chirped,
he sat at the window until someone
came and helped him to hed. Sitting
always, but always smiling. Then,
one day, the boys missed lilni from
Hie window. The news spread tliat
Jlmmle was worse.
As the boys drew nearer tbey hushed their bolsterousness, Up-toeing
past the window. Even "Big Bill,"
as they called him, the wisest, roughest lad In the gang, made an effort to
walk silently Uiat only resulted In
strange acrobatic teeterlngs. Al
night the family drew near the bed
one by one and bid goodnight to the
smiling one. He lay and smiled- ,
smiled when the twinges of pain racked the warped and twisted body; fell
warm and soft on the skeleton bands
that lay so helpless on the counter- j
pane; smiled until the sorrowing
faces around him gained a plaintive
shadow of the smile that (blended
with the pain and mellowed and re-
fined it.
At last the doctor, stroking his
chin and molding with professional
adoptners lhe sob tbat pressed his utterance .nto a poor contempt of a
cough, turned silently away. The
end was at hand. One by one they
gathered around tbe bedside. The
smile wns very faint, and only rested
in the line lines about the pinched
lips and drooping eyelids. Faintly
it flickered. It was almost gone.
Then it grew—grew as the tinge ol
sunlight edges the deeper blue of a
summer morning; grew until the thin
face seemed lighting from within and
the sunken eyes grew round and full
—grew until it filled the faces of the
weeping watchers and sparkled there
like sunlight on the dew. Tbe eyes
wandered lovingly over each face,
then far away through the open window, over the swaying treetops—past
the low-hanging clouds. The lips
moved, painfully at first, then, with a
burst like the breaking of tlio sun
through a cloud, tbey spoke one word:
"Mother!"
Anil Jlmmle, lhe crippled mute,
passed wilh the warning of tliat smile I
into the sunlight of the summer land.
but It's because they quit work at 5
p.m. and don't go home until 2 a.m.
It's the interval that kills. Work
gives an appetite for meals; it lends
solidity to the slumbers, it gives the
appreciation of holidays.
There are men who do not work,
but the world is not proud of them.
It. does not even know their names,
nobody likes them, nobody hates them,
the great busy world don't even know
they are here. So lind out what you
want to do, take off your hat and
make a dust in the world. The busier you are tbe less deviltry you will
be apt to get into, the sweeter will be
your sleep, the brighter and happier
your holidays and the better you will
be satisfied.
SIR HENRY THORNTON
SPEAKS ON FINANCE
that the winning of the war was easier than the winning of peace, and
problems that followed are very difficult of solution.
"The safety of civilization rests in
the hands of Great Britain and the
United States. War is the only
game I know where both sides lose.
When our two countries join hands
for tbe prevention of wars, there
shall be no more."
Sidelights on a Great Industry
PASTE THIS IN YOUR HAT
And then remember, you have to
work, whether you handle a pick or
a pen. :i wheelbarrow or a set of
hooks, ring nn auction bell or write
lunny things, you must work. II
you look around you. you will see
Ihat. the men wlio are most able to
live the rest of their lives without
work are the men that work the
hardest. Do nol be afraid of killing yourself with work. It is beyond your power to do that. Men
cannot work tbat hard o\\ the sunny
side of thirty,    They die Bometlmes,
In addressing the thirty-first annual convention of the New Vork
state Bankers' Association held last
week iu .Montreal, Sir Henry Thornton, president of the Canadian National Kail ways, placed before I be
gathering the line Investment values
of the great natural resources of the
Dominion, whtcb lie stated had hardly been scratched. The economic situation ttf the L'nited States and Canada demanded that these natural resources of Canada he developed along
sound and practical lines, aud lie
urged lhe Hankers, as counsellors of
those who had money to invest, to
educate their clients to the benefits lo
be derived from investments in the
vast mineral and other natural resources of the Dominion. The speaker said in part;
"Despite the fact that much publicity has gone forth, much has yet lo
he accomplished to apprise Americans
that the time is more opportune than
ever for those from the United States
to make investments here. We have
more coal in Canada than you have
in the l'nited States; we have nature!
resources and mineral deposits whose
surfaces have not been scratched and
with lands sparsely populated, it is
up to you bankers to educate your
clients of the benefits to he derived
right here that Canada will so grow
and blossom forth that she will stand
out as one of the greatest of all countries,
"Bankers are playing a big part in
tbe affairs of the world today and it
may be truthfully said that no body
of men iu the universe of finance has
done so much to alleviate distress of
nations, governments and peoples as
have the bankers of the United States.
Financial crises which have struck
panic into the hearts of mankind have
been faced hy L'nited States hankers
with that show of 'front' that char
acterized the soldier when he went
'over tbe top' during (lie World War
And yet. there are no decorations tor
such services as I Ills class of servant has rendered. Rather did theso
men appear satisfied with having dona
a deed well and having done that duty
which their position gave them the
power to accomplish.
"Hememhering the position now
held by the United States, it must be
plain to the government of thnt country to tbe south that she cannot divorce herself! from world affairs, and,
if she is to continue to occupy tin.
place In the limelight that her deeds
have entitled her to, she must take
greater interest in international affairs. Civilization has passed through
the greatest crisis in the history of
the world; there are many wounds
yet raw, hut unless these are bound
UP and friends hi pa renewed, there
are grave dangers that further complications will ensue.    Il almost seems
Millions  Spent
On  Markets
MAINTENANCE   OF   SALES
FORCES A HEAVY CHARGE
ON FOREST PRODUCTS
INDUSTRIES
Every British Columbian's Duty
to Render Assistance to the
Lumber Industry
Every man aud woman in British
Columbia should endeavor to realize
what tho lumber industries mean to
the community tbey live in and should
constitute themselves active boosters
of B.C. forest products.
This is one of the readiest ways in
which they can help the industry thnt
has put this province on the map and
is busily engaged in keeping it there.
Xo merchandise, however unique,
can sell itself these days of substitutes and keen competition. The
searching task of finding steady
markets for their products is perhaps
the most important the lumberman of
this province is up against.
.Hnrkel   Kxpanslon
The maintainance of costly sales
forces and far-reaching market extension organizations is a very heavy
charge amounting to millions yearly
on tbe lumber and allied industries of
Britisli Columbia.
.New markets must be found and
old ones preserved. Agents nt homo
and abroad must be employed in
keeping open the channels along
which B.C. wood products are distributed to consumers in every part
of the world.
In exchange for these millions of
dollars spent in tbe marketing of cur
forest products the people of Britisli
Columbia receive what really amounts
to  their principal means  of support.
Every British Columbian should
therefore ask himself or herself how
best they can help out tbe industry
that means so much to them.
SUMMER WASH FABRICS
Anderson's Zephyr Ginghams
These are pretty Cheeked and Plaid Ginghams of best quality, absolutely fast colors,
new patterns
CHAMBRAYS AND CREPES
Fancy French Ratines   -   Georgette Waists
Plain and Novelty Voiles and Ratines in various designs
Week-End Specials
Bathing Caps, about three dozen, to clear, each . 20c.
All bathing suits specially priced to clear.
Ladies' Canvas Suits, new stock, reg. $3.50.     Specially
priced  ••••  $2.95
Ladies'  Rubber Soled, 2 strap Slippers, reg. $2.50.
Special.J $1.»5
Ladies' Oxfords, Canvas and Rubber Soles, reg. $2.75
Special •■•■  $2-15
All lines of Canvas Shoes, specially priced this week
end. it will pay you to get our prices before buying.
The balance of our stock of picnic baskets at half price.
Sea Grass Chairs and Rockers, a new lot just received
and at new low prices.
A. McKinnon
GENTS' DEPARTMENT
Broadcloth Shirts-
Men's English Broadcloth Shirts, in white, Cream and Pearl; also in Novelty stripes.
Extra Special Value, each  $4.50
Silk and Silk and Wool Socks-
Men's Silk and Silk and Wool Hose; also Fine Cashmere Heather Shades.
Special Value per pair, $1.25 and   $1.50
Straw Hats—
Men's Straw Hats, in Boater shape, in plain and rough straws
Special Values $2.50 and  $2.00
Oxfords—
Men's Tan Calf Oxfords, with Crepe Rubber Soles
Special Values per pair   $7.50
Outing Pants—
Men's Grey and Cream Flannel Pants; also White Duck Pants at Popular prices.
Men's Suits—
Special Value in Men's Tailored Suits, in light and dark Tweeds, Brown and Navy,
Worsteds and Serges, from $22.50 to  $35.00
Sport Shirts, Invisible Suspenders, Wash Ties, Lanky Bill and Silk Knitted Ties, Tennis
Shoes, Men's and Boys' Wool and Cotton Bathing Suits.
Grocery Department
g_ Golden Shred Marmalade, l's Jars  _      M
§= Robertson's Orange Jelly, l's jars       «lll
___ Empress Raspberry, Strawberry and Black
_H        Currant Jam, l's jars       -15
= Squirrel Peanut Butter, _V_'s tins      .110
= Llbbys Corn Beef, l's tins, 1, for      M
H| Clark's Roast Beef, l's tins  It's
m       3 tins tor   #1.1X1
_= Clark's Corn Beef, l's tins     M
=        3 tins for   HU.WI
Sesqui Matches, pkts	
Para wax, pkts	
Crystal White Soap, 7 bars	
Eels Naptha Soap, cartons 	
Palm Olive Soap, 6 cakes 	
Eagle Lobster, %'s, II tins 	
Howals Sour Mixed Pickles, large botlle
Bulk Cocoa, Special per lb	
Dromedary  Dales, pkts.'	
Neptune Sardines, I! tins 	
.10
.20
M
_><*>
.9.1
.10
.10
_H>
This series of articles communicated by the Timber Industries
Council   of   British   Columbia.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite   Ilo-llo   Theatre
(lUMBEKLAND,   B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practical Barber, anil Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
T.WHERW
NKMUSOTANNER
w,vl5gfi,.r\.Ac?i
i^m
^
y®\
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Op-
tician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1,30 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
LUNCH TONGUE — MEAT LOAF — BAKED HAM — BOILED HAM
CANTALOUPES — BANANAS — CHERRIES — PLUMS — PEACHES — ORANGES — ORAPE FRUIT
CUCUMBERS — GREEN ONIONS — GREEN PEAS — TOMATOES - GREEN CABBAGE
I Campbell's
A. A. Brown
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please  leave  yoor orders  at  office,
Mrs. King's Stationer) Store
I'lione .'»«.
SKIIVICE 18 OUR MOTTO
Or Phone lii Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland I
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
HI             A signal shows on the switchboard, a telephone §|
jg number is asked for, and a wire highway is created =j
HI over which two persons may send their words and Uf
== thoughts, one to the other.    Thousands of these mes- H
s§ sages pass over the wires of the B.C. Telephone Com- H
=| pany in a day. |§
HI             The telephone operator cannot follow her work _§
=1 to its results, but she can appreciate its importance. S
HI In her keeping is part of a great mechanism of inter- =
== communication, but those whom she serves and the g
== benefits of her service remain unknown.     Each sum- js
g_ mons for her co-operation is of equal urgency, for each H=
B helps to further the progress of the community and the __|
§= province. =§
jj BRITISH   COLUMBIA   TELEPHONE  COMPANY B
BiiiiniiiiitiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiinHiiiininmiiiiiiiimii inntiiitimMiiiiiiiMiJiindniNJiiiiiiiiiiiiHfHiNiiS SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1924
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE(
BIG GAME LAWS
ARE DRAFTED
TAXES ARE FAIR
VICTORIA, B. C, July 18.—Special
care has been taken by the government of the Game Conservation Board
in the drafting ot the big game laws
for the 1924 season. Within a few
weeks these regulations will be posted all over the province. There has
ben a tendency to tightening up, so
that the wonderful game resources of
B. C. may be conserved, and
at the same time the hunter is given
every opportunity to secure a good
bag.
VICTORIA, B. C, July 18.—Despite
the keenest criticism of taxation methods in this province, It is shown conclusively that the levies imposed at
present are as fair as can be expected.
A conference on general taxation was
held recently between Premier Oriver,
Hon. John Hart, minister of Finance
and provincial assessors. After going into matters thoroughly the Premier said he was satisfied that the assessors had their work well in hand.
Furthermore, he could not sec where
the present plan ot assessments could
be modified downward.
SECURES HIGH PRICE
FOR B. C. BONDS
VICTORIA, B.C., July 18.—The
wails of the oppressed are music to
the Devil's ear, 'tis said, and the pessimist has had his innings for sorae
time in thlB province. Opposition
candidates at the last election tolu all
who would listen to them that the
province was hopelessly in debt and
that Its credit was shattered.
However, now along comes Hon.
John Hart with the sale ot {6,000,000
of British Columbia's bonds ,at the
best price Becured  by any province
ln Canada for over ten years. The
finance minister sold $3,000,000 worth
of bonds, four and a half per cent,
securities, for a price which will cost
tbe province only 4.G0. Another %'i-
000,000 has been placed, twenty-live
year securities, to cost Ave and one-
eighth per cent. Even the Dominion
Government has not been able to secure such a good price for bonds sold
this year.
WINNIPEG LADS TO TOUR
In addition to Lieut. Eustace Brock,
Winnipeg will be represented by three
other members of the Royal Canadian
Naval Reserve in the tour through the
Panama Canal this summer, They
are Sydney Scott, A. A. Macdonald and
A. A. Campbell. Only one other olllce of the naval reserve o[ Canada
will be with the louring squadron,
Lieut. H. A. Morrison, of St. John,
N.B., and the total number of enlisted men called is 44.
GIVES ADVICE
TO YOUNG MEN
VICTORIA, B. 0„ July IS.—In a
spirited address here, Hon. T. I).
Pattullo, minister of lands, maintained thnt Britisli Columbia was the 11 ti—
IT HAS TAKEN US FIVE  YEARS TO GET READY TO TELL YOU THIS  STORY
^
SEDAN-$1,390
TOURING-$915
CANADA'S  LOWEST PRICED
TOURING CAR
With Sliding Gear Transmission
OF the five touring cars formerly priced at or
under $710, all but two HAVE GONE UP.
Overland prices have NOT gone up. Overland
now is the lowest priced touring car in Canada with
modern sliding gear transmission.
Overland Sales Increased 177 Per Cent. Last Year
the greatest rate of increase of any maker building
over 100,000 cars. Sales last May were the largest
of any May in Overland history. This tremendous
volume has enabled Overland to keep its price at $710
while other cars have been going upward.
The Overland price now is ONLY $180 above the
CHEAPEST TOURING CAR having demountable rims
and starter. At Overland's amazingly low price you
get
23 Big Car Quality Advantages
Body Entirely of Steel.
Permanent finish of hard baked enamel.
Overland patented Triplex Springs—they give a spring
base 30 inches longer than any car of equal length.
Electric Starter.
Foot Accelerator control. >
Exclusively equipped with Timken and New Departure
bearings in front and rear axles—Overland uses the
most expensive bearings more lavishly than any other
car in proportion to price.
Speedometer as Standard Equipment.
Curtains and curtain rods OPENING WITH DOORS.
Axle shaft of Molybdenum steel, l'/_ inches in diameter
nearly 50 per cent, heavier than on any car near its
price.
Quiet Spiral bevel drive and ring gears.
The only contracting and expanding brakes on any car
at or below Overland's price and 25 per cent more
braking surface in proportion to car weight.
Service Records Positively Prove
Overland Most Economical
of all Cars
No car in the world equals Overland's low gasoline
economy.    No car costs so little for upkeep.
In power, Overland excels all cars in its price class.
The more you study Overland, the more completely
you will be convinced that it is the LOWEST-COST
CAR in the world to own and operate.
Bring your wife in to try it out and she will tell you
it's the EASIEST CAR TO HANDLE that she EVER
DROVE.
Come in:   Let us explain the Overland easy payment
plan.    Look over an Overland to-day.
Anybody can Afford an Overland on Our Astonishingly Easy Terms
A QUALITY CLOSED CAR
at only $235 more thon the touring Car-
Canada's Lowest Priced Closed Car with
doors front and rear
Sparks Co. (Courtenay) Ltd.
WILLYS-OVERLAND MOTOR CARS
WILLARD STORAGE BATTERIES
Phone 99 Courtenay Phone 99
__n__Ei_i_rai_M__H_si_rai^^ 5
est place on earth for young men.
ile urged more young men to leave
(he cities and do a little pioneering,
claiming that in this way many who
otherwise would still be working for
wages twenty years hence could accomplish big things lor themselves.
The minister said there was room for
thousands of prospectors. If he were
a young man, he said, nothing would
suit him better than to tie up to an
experienced prospector and hit for
the hills.
The lumbering industry held good
openings for tiie young man who
would go Into the woods and learn
the business thoroughly; he could
own a mill of his own in due time.
"Fishermen operating out of Prince
Unpen arc getting rich," said Hon.
.Mr. Pattullo, "Anil there is room for
lots more. Working on lhe land today ls a picnic compared with the day
of the pioneer.
SWISS GUIDES FOR JASPER
Two Swiss Alpine climbers have arrived at Jasper Park Lodge to aot as
guides to the tourists who want to
sec the sights of the Rookies In Jasper National Park and .Mount Kobson
Park, Tbey arc Alfred Stretch and
Hans Kolilcr, both horn mountaineers
and are engaged by the Canadian National Railways.
KECOKD PLANT SHIPMENT
The largest shipment   of   bedding
plants in the history of the west wns
bandied last, week by tho Canadian
National Railways from St. Boniface
to Brandon, .Man. The shipment was
made up of 80,000 tomato and dower
plants and occupied an entire car.
SINCLAIR LEWIS
EN ROUTE NORTH
Sinclair Lewis, the noted author is
spending a few days iu "Winnipeg this
week onroute to the wilds ot Northern Manitoba, where he hoped to regain his mental poise following a long
grind ou his latest novel. Through
tho Winnipeg Hoard of Trade, .Mr.
Lewis has arranged an itinerary that
will cover 1S.O00 miles of north country, much of it by canoe.
FLOUR TO HONG KONG
The lirst entire shipment of Canadian Hour has arrived in Hong Kong,
according to advices received by a
western milling company. The shipment, which constitutes an innovation In the history of trade, contained
7,000 tons of Hour nnd was shipped
from Port Colborne, Out., making tho
trip to Hong Kong from Baltimore,
via tlio Panama Canal, in 55 days.
RADIO ASSISTS
IMMIGRANTS
Radio has already proved a valuable help to the Immigration authorities in placing immigrants on thc
land. The Winnipeg offices recently
wired Information to Saskatoon announcing the arrival of farm laborers seeking work. This wus broadcasted all over Saskatchewan and
Within twenty-four hours applications
for workers were pouring in to the
authorities. The experiment waa
such a decided success that it is probable thc radio will he utilized extensively in the future in tbe placing
of men on the farms. About live
farmers in ten, It is estimated, have
radio receiving sets.
WOULD TRAVEL
BY l)0(i TRAIN
Two young women of Oayuga, New
York, are anxious to take a trip by
dog train next winter and have written the Winnipeg Hoard of Trade concerning (lie possibilities nf arranging
such u journey In Manitoba.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
UNION   HOTEL
CIWIIKIILANII, II. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
26   rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
I'or reservations Phone 15.
lt. YATES, Manager.
m PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 1(1. 10.4
The Mercantile Store Co.
'PHONE 133
I CUMBERLAND, B.C.
(G. H. WYCHERLEY)
"The General Store With A General Purpose'
P.O. BOX 100
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
l_Bi_____a__iai
lg_______j___j__j__H_li_^^ I
£"VA'l^|«—X |      O Our prices are on the "Skid Way" and
\J\I fs+/%p\ I IJ •    you w*" S'10W S000' Judgment by buy-
ing your Holiday Goods at
THE MERCANTILE STORE CO.
Cumberland's Most Progressive Departmental Store
Ladies' Hose
Ladies!
We have Holeproof Hosiery
in the following colors:—
Log Cabin, Rose, Beige,
Brown, Sage Grey and
Black.
$2.00
Per Pair.
I
i
1
We have some very pretty Crinkle Crepe Night Dresses in various colors. We have sold nearly 500 yards
of Ratine—A few pieces left.
JUST ARRIVED—Ladies' Felt Hats for
early fall, each  •—	
$2.75
Little Girls' Dresses
Pretty Print Dresses for Little Girls, from
$1.95
EXTRA SPECIAL
Saturday and Monday
Mercantile Best Tea, Reg. 60c 50
Ridgway's 5 o'clock Tea, 3-lb tin  $2.75
Sugar, 20 lbs  $1.90
Flour, all grades, 49's  $2.00
Orange Marmalade 75
Fancy Biscuits, per lb 40
Kippered Salmon, 3 for 25
Crab, '.'s 45
Lobster, '/l's  ■-'■• 3"
Lobster, l/_'s  55
Chicken Haddie ., 30
Durkee's Salad Dressing •■•■ 50
Blue Bonnet Salad Dressing 20
Holsum Mixed Pickles 40
Oranges, 3, 4 and 5 dozen for _ $1.00
Bananas, per lb 15
|_e__Hi__l_n______l_Eli__^^
-SPECIAL-
_____-___-___-_B--___--H-^HHI^^iB
In Men's Underwear
Summer weight—Regular $2
Garment $1,50 Garment
Men's, Women's and Children's
Shoes and Straw Hats
l
I
i
Gent's Brown Calf Blucher Shoes, No. 1 Stock.     Tho
same in Black Calf. Per pair  $G.75
Men's Mine Shoes.     Per pair   ..... $3.75
Leckies Mine Shoes, Per pair from $5.73
Gent's Brown Calf Shoes.    Per pair $4.95
Men's All Leather Shoes, no toe cap, in   Black   and
Brown.    Per pair $3.95
Ladies' White Canvas Shoes, with Leather Soles $1.95
Just the Shoe for the Picnic.
Children's Running Shoes, from  95c.
Ladies' Patent One Strap Shoe. A very smart shoo.
Per pair $1.73
Hollywood Sandals, to clear, Per pair $4.95
Ladies' House Slippers, One Strap. Per pair $1.85
Children's Patent Leather Sandals, Per pair from $1.05
Girls' Straw Hats 20c.
Ladies' Sun Hats, from  50c.
Men's Straw Hats, from 65c.
_i__ii__ii_i
We shall close our store on Saturday, July 19, from
12 noon to 4 o'clock*
PICNIC SPECIAL
LADIES' SILK FIBRE HOSE
45c PER PAIR
Saturday closing is very inconvenient
to our large circle of customers at any
time, but in hot weather it is almost
impossible to keep produce fresh over
the two days.
We wish you all a Good and Merry Time
E_k
PICNIC BASKETS
ALL SIZES
AT HALF PRICE
-_t_i_i_|[__i__i_i_i_i_im
The   Mercantile   Store   Company
CUMBERLAND
JL_«^^ lESIBISIB^^
____ SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1024.
.HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
ia_i_Gj_i_Ei_^i_^i__ja_i_i_€_^^
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
__Bj__a_fi_g|j____a_|_^^
WEATHER MAN WAS
EXTREMELY UNKIND
TO ELKS LODGE
COURTENAY,—The weather mail
was extremely unkind to the Elks
Lodge committee that had arranged
for the holding of a flag day at Courlenay last Wednesday.     Certainly tho
man who wrote "It Ain't Goln' To
Rain No More" missed his guess by a
wide margin.
Somewhat disappointed at not being
able to hold the sports outdoors, tin
Brother Bills were not discouraged
and pulled oil a program moulding
tug of war, pillow fighting and races.
Each kiddle was given a Hag, a bal-
Illlllllllllli
■111
1   McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
|| The White Store The White Bakery
JH How to live a hundred years—Bury the Pepper dish
B and the Vinegar bottle and eat McBryde's 100 per cent
H Whole Wheat Bread
§§ Always a nice selection of cakes to choose from, which
HI you know.
H Not How Cheap—But How Good
H First Cl.ss Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
11 guarantees the quality
H| The Holding-on-to Quality Store
H THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
I
Must Be Sold
CLOSING OUT SALE
 EVERYTHING LESS THAN COST	
Records, Edison or Columbia, each  50c.
Gramophone Needles, per pkts of 100  10c.
MUSIC, DANCE FOLIOS, TUTORS, ETC., STRINOS, VIOLIN,
GUITAR, BANJO, ETC AND ALL OTHER
MUSIC ACCESSORIES
1)01,1,8, TOYS AMI SINimV GOODS
W. EMERIC
Courtenay Music Store
Opposite Presbyterian Church
Comox Tailors
I..UIIKS' AND GENTLEMAN'S
TAILORING
GET YOUR SWUNG SUIT
All our work NOW Courtenay, B.C.
Guaranteed 'Phone 14
loon and live tickets for which they
secured Ice cream, soda water, oranges and candy. Mr. Harry Bramley delivered a patriotic address on
"The Flag" after which "O Canada"
and "God Save The King" were sung.
The afternoon's enjoyment wis
brought to a close by an impromptu
dance in the Agricultural Hall, the
music for which was provided by
Moody's Orchestra.
COLLISION WITH
LOGGING TRAIN
COURTENAY BUSINESS
CHANGES HANDS
COURTENAY,—A business change
of interest is the retirement of Mr. W.
Emeric from the stationery and music
store that he has occupied in tho
Masonic Block for the past year and
a half. The premises will be taken
over by Mrs. E. M. E. Johnston, who
comes here trom Stettler, Alberta, and
who will carry a,stock of ladies' dry
goods, clothing, etc. She will be
ready for business on August 1st.
COURTENAY,—On Monday afternoon at the intersection of the Union
Bay Road and the Bloedel, Wesh &
Stewart Logging Railway, an accident that might easily bave had more
serious consequences occurred when
a motor car driven by Mr. Olson, who
was accompanied by his wife, was In
collision with the logging train.
Slight damage was done to the car
but the occupants were unharmed.
Mr. G. C. Rochfort has purchased
the G. R. Bates property at Kye Bay
and will make his home In this district. He is accompanied by Mrs.
Rochfort and comes from Alberta.
Mjmh. rnaataa
,__■_■ iH|f__-lj
'^tiSaStmZSS^
',VM!558_^T£&^!_,,,,*'
■Cnl_M_rto.IIMN_i_i_.CHH_>
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND ■ •  B. C.
TOURING SCOUTS
ARE WELCOMED BY
COURTENAY TROOP
COURTENAY,—On Saturday last
about three o'clock the members of
the Victoria Troop, Boy Scouts, wlio
are touring the Island, arrived at
Courtenay, being welcomed here by
the members of the Courtenay Troop
who were encamped at the Agricultural Grounds. There were thirteen
in the party, Including H. T. Ravenhill, district Scoutmaster and Scoutmaster Dodds, of Epplng, England.
In the evening the boys made a camp
fire round which they gathered and
listened to and took part in a very
interesting program of camp songs,
recitations and a boxing match between scouts Fred Duncan and Tom
Waldon. It was for three rounds
but at the conclusion of the bout it
was necessary to ask the boys to go
another round. Duncan was awarded
the decision. After this several of
the local scouts were presented with
proficiency certificates and badges,
that they had earned during the past
few months. Mr. Ravenhill delivered an address of encouragment to
the boys, telling of the benefits to be
derived from the Scout movement.
The Rev. Mr. Leversedge, Scoutmast
er at Cumberland, then announced an
open air church service on Sunday
for the boys; this to he held al Royston Tennis Courts.
The boys from Victoria who have
made a tour of the Island arc .conts
Crawford, A. V. Stark, B. Tolin, !'.
Dutton, It. White, E. Deans, S, Archi-
bold, W. Dixon, E. Douglas, F, Walsh,
and S. MacDonald. They left for the
south on Sunday.
GIRL GUIDES IN
CAMP AT KYE BAY
COURTENAY/—A company of 30
members of the Courtenay Troop Qlii
Guides nre at present under canvas
at Kye Bay, under the charge of then
captain, Mrs. Meredith and Lieut
Peggy Forrest Owners of motot
cars were generous enough to transport the girls to the bay and their
tents and other equipment was taken
out by motor truck.
On visitor's days many of the parents go to the camp where they are
treated royally by the girls who invariably have refreshments handy. A
great deal of the success of this camp
is due to the efforts of the live secretary, Mrs. L. S. Cokely, who Is working energetically on behalf ol' tin
troop.
Since going to the seashore the
guides have been instrumental In ex-
| tingulshlng several fires that had ben
j left smouldering by careless campers.
Swimming tests were held a few days
ago and several proficiency badges
have been awarded as a result. Another feature Is the course of lectures
on first aid being delivered by Dr.
Bates, of Chesterfield School, North
Vancouver, who with a number of his
scholars is camped nearby, Thi
Vancouver visitors too, are having a
great time. The camp will likely
break up and the girls return homo
very soon.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS.
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONF"? !mU Ca"8: 184X Court<ma>'
IOffice: 159 Cumberland
ment for the average man and for the
floor boy,
I believe in Canadian institutions
and their perpetuity.
i believe In the ability of Canadian
citizenship to right every wrong, punish the guilty and reward the honest.
1 believe In that sanity of the Canadian man and the Canadian woman,
whicli prompts them to sweep out the
house instead of burning It down to
gel rid of the dirt.
H
ere an
dTn
ere
Although it i. only 18 years ago
that Alberta became a province, it.
population has increased fourfold,
while the grain yield has increased
twentyfold. Even at the present low
prices, the total agricultural products of Alberta in 1928 were worth
$2.3,000,000.
Reports concerning the apple
crop in the Annapolis Valley show
that the entire crop, including the
estimated local consumption, was
1,816,000 barrels. It is reported
that 70,000 apple trees and 3,000
plum trees will be set out in the
valley  this spring.
Tho railways of Canada up to
the end of last April earned J6.000,-
000 more than they did for the
corresponding period in 1923. This
favorable result is due entirely to
the fact that the people have been
doine; more business. All authorities are agreed that such a condition  means  growing trade.
AUTO ACCIDENT HAD
SERIOUS RESULTS
COURTENAY,~Last Saturday aboul
noon an accident that has had serious consequences occurred near
Camp Three of the Comox Logging &
Railway Company. Mr. and .Mrs
Merle Halllday and two children,
Mrs. Cartwrlght, of Merrltt who was
a visitor at the Halllday home, and
Mr. Victor Halllday were the occupants of a motor car that was wrecked and burned in a collision with the
logging train of the company. Thu
children were thrown free from tlio
wreck and received minor Injuries,
.Mrs. Cartwrlght wus the most severely injured, being terribly burned on
the back and injured otherwise. She
has been lying at tbe Comox Hospital
since the regrettable accident In a
critical condition. Mr. Merle Halllday and Mrs. Halllday were also sov-
erely bruised and injured. Mr, VI
tor Halliday, who wus driving the car
at the time was burned about tlio
head and bruised somewhat. Inn Im
been able to be aboul during the
week. The car was completely di •
stroyed.
Nearly 68,000 bushels of high
class seed were handled at the Alberta government seed-cleaning
plant during the past season. A
total of 22,823 bushels of Marquis wheat seed was handled,
3,160 bushels of ruby wheat, 23,073
bushels of Victory oats, 17,862
bushels uf Banner oats, and 684
bushels of Bark's Barley.
Three prizes for anglers at the
bungalow camps on French River,
Nipigon River, and the Lake of the
Woods, have been offered to Canadian fishermen hy the Canadian
Pacific Railway. The trophies are
silver replicas of the bass and the
trout, and a wonderful reproduction
of the head of a fighting mus-
calonge.
A CANADIAN CREED
I believe In Canada!
I believe In Canadian opportunity
I believe this country Is the greatest place In the world to make a living, make a life, start n career, and
accumulate a competence.
I believe It has  the Ideal  govern-
THE
Piket Electric
RANGES       —       WASHERS       —       PLATES
TABLE STOVES     —     CURLING IRONS
WIRING      —      TOASTERS      —      HEATERS
LAMPS     —     FANS     —     IRONS
— PERCOLATORS —
TENTS     —     AWNINGS     —     FLIES
FISHING TACKLE — SPORTING GOODS
— GUNS AND AMMUNITION —
Telephone 164 Courtenay
s.
WE BUILD   WE REPAIR
In fact we do any kind of work, and furnish any kind of material used in
a building of any description.
FOR SUGGESTIONS OR ESTIMATES
SEE
Edwards and Orr
PRACTICAL BUILDERS, SELLING BUILDING MATERIAL
Union Bay Road
Phone 17
OPPOSITE CORFIELD MOTORS
Courtenay
P. O. Box fi_
I AM YOUR TOWN
Make of me whal you will 1 shall
reflect yun as clearly ns a mirror
throws back a candle beam.
ll I am pleasing to thc eyo of the
stranger within my gates; If I am
such a .-Ight as, having seen me, be
will remember me nil bis days as a
thing of beauty, credit is yours.
Ambition and opportunity call some
of my sons and daughters to high
tasks anil mighty privileges, to my
greater honor and to my good—re-
pule In far places, but It Is not chiefly
theso who are my strength. My
strength is In those who remain, who
are contenl wltll whal 1 can offer
them, and with what Ihey can offer
me. ll wbb tlio greatest of all llom-
nns who said: "Metier to be Ilrst In a
little Iberian village than be second
in Rome,"
[ am more than wood and brick and
stone mure even than llesb and
blood I am the composite soul nf all
wbo call me Home.
1 am your town.
fl£
Among tho speakers to address
the great convention of the Associated Advertising- Clubs of the
World at London, England, to be
hold .July 14-17, will be E. W.
Beatty, K.C., Chairman and President of the Canadian Pacific Railway,. Air. Beatty will speak on
July 17, and has chosen as his
theme "Building an Empire with
Advertising."
Canada's national wealth in 1921
was $__2,195,0UUtUOO, according to
a report just issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. In
the tabulation, agricultural wealth
comes first with $7.!iS2f871,126,
nearly 36 per cent of the total and
about $1I0H per head of population. The Western provinces lead,
the Yukon topping the list with
$4,058, The first in absolute
wealth was Ontario, to which it
credited the sum of $7,358,000,000,
or thirty-three per cent of the Dominion total.
Shipping in and out of the port
of Vancouver, B.C., for the calendar year 1928, showed an increase
in all departments, according to the
annual report of the Board of Harbor Commissioners. Over $133,-
000,000 worth of goods were exported, an increase of $30,000,000
over the value of the 1922 exports,
while the imports totalled $224,-
000,000, an increase of $13,000,000
over the 11*22 figures. Vessels
numbering 19,606, representing a
total of M,-I27,683 net tons, entered and left the port in 1U23, an
increase over 1922 of 2,069 ships
and 793,289 tons. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1924
PREVENT FOREST FIRES-IT  PAYS.
APRIL IMMIGRATION
1 FIGURES INCREASED
When you do a thing,
DO IT WELL!
Round off a good day after the Picnic
at Royston. by attending the
BIG OPEN AIR
DANCE
SATURDAY, JULY 19th.
Royston Tennis
Court
Gents $1.00 - Ladies 25c.
I  cMoodys Orchestra in attendance
U (Cawdell of Cumberland al the Piano)
Jam Special
i During the month ot April 19,330
j immigrants entered Canada, as com-
| pared with 950 in April, 1923, according to figures received by the Can-
■ uilian Notional Hallways from the de-
j pnrtment ol' immigration. 01 these
j admitted, 9,410 were British, 1.S3S
' were from the United States, and
S.HS2 were from other countries.
FISH HATCHERY RECORD
The Kenora Ilsh hatchery has made
nnother very creditable record during the season for hatching whitellsh,
producing a total of 85,000,000. Of
these 83,000,000 were deposited in thc
Lake of the Woods and the 2,000,000
in Eagle Lake. In addition, 125,000
salmon trout were hatched and placed
in Clearwater Day and Whitellsh Bay.
"THE FIRST 100.000"
Hi     IMMIGRATION RECORD
Seven families just arrived in tlio
j Dominion, nppear to have established
I a record in immigration with 11
! adults aud 54 children, the hitter
' ranging from 23 to l'/2 years of age.
H     COAL LOCATIONS SOLD
Many   coal   mine   locations   In  the
1 province of Alberta* have lately beeu '
' bought  up by  British  interests, who
j have had their agent louring the coal
fields of the province recently.
There are upwards of 100,000 people |
in Canada actively engaged in con-
verting the products of the forest lu- j
to wealth in some form or other and
with the families they represent this
means thnt more than half a million
people in the Dominion are dependent
nn the forest for their living.
Tiie value of the manufactured pulp
and paper products alone is $250,000.-
000 per year.     The pulp and paper
j companies employ 33,000 men in the ,
| mills and  pay them each year $40,-
; 000,000 in wogeB.     The value of luiu-
j ber,   lath   and   shingles   produced   in
{ Canada   In   one  year  Is  $150,000,000. -
' If the question had been put to you
j would  you  have  figured much, more i
than n quarter of this?     When you '
■ reckon that the lumber industry prop-
er has an invested capital of $250,00,-
i "00 employing 55,000 men and paying
them   $60,000,000   wages,   here   you
have  a   forest business thnt  reaches
the stupendous distribution In Canada
| of $500,000,000 a year.     The secur- i
lty i'or this annual income is neither ,
mines nor wheat fields nor fisheries,'
hut thc only one of the family of re-
' sources   that   is   inllainable,   viz.   the
forest.
SECOND TOUR OF
TREE PLANTING CAR
Hi    20,500 WORKERS ADDED
Considerable improvement in em-
i ployment was indicated in reports
; from employers to the dominion bur-
| enu of statistics at the beginning of
i May, when some 20,500 workers were
added to the staffs of the reporting
firms.
The tree planting car of the Cnn-
i adian Forestry association is to make
I another tour of the prairie provinces
j this year, according to an announcement  by officials of the association.
Equipped to demonstrate   the   value
and necessity of tree planting in the
west,  the  "school  on    wheels'    wlll
i start on its second tour of the prairie
some time in July.
APRICOTS
FOR PRESERVING ARE
NOW READY! !
Ir  ==
Comox Strawberry
Jam
High grade Comox Valley berries plus pure sugar and made under
perfect sanitary conditions.    For sale at all local grocers at
85c per 41b. Tin
To those who have used this delicious jam this advertisement may
have no appeal, except so far as the price is concerned, but if you
are one of the unfortunates who have not as yet partaken of this
delectable local food product, you would be wise to try a sample
tin.
Every tin carries our own guarantee as to quality.
(Jet the habit of using local produce on every opportunity. You
not only get the best products on the market but you help keep
your money in local circulation.
REMEMBER-
It's Guaranteed
Place your order
as soon as possible
with your grocer. |
—*—*—_•—
Price will be reasonable.
Do not delay!     Season for this
fruit is very short.
HI
Ms
to
Jasper National Park
$.0.26
Edmonton and Calgary
lf'45.00
$13.00 extra for routing via Prince Rupert to cover meals
and berth on steamer.
also to
Eastern Canada
CENTRAL AND EASTERN STATES
Particulars on application
EDWARD W. BICKLE    A«EXT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
H,
ere an
dTH
ere
In response to the appeal of th*
University of Bishop's College, Len-
noxville, Que., for $600,000, to meet
present needs, the Canadian Pacific
Railway has supported the plea by
subscribing 1(15,000 to the fund.
Canada will soon be the mecca of
many moving picture directors, according to Herbert Brenon, producer
for Thomas Meighan, who recently
arrived at Banff to film the big outdoor scenes for James Oliver Cur-
wood's "The Alaskan."
The fish catch of the world approximates $1,000,000,000 a year in
its cost to the consumer, of which
$780,000,000, goes to those who harvest it, statistics furnished by the
United States Fish Commission declare.
The value of the tourist; traffic
to Canada is proved by figures supplied by the Parks Department of
the Dominion Government, which
show that the enormous sum of
$130,000,000 was spent by tourists
in this country in 1923. This represents the Dominion's fourth largest source of foreign cash income,
On ner arrival at Quebec, June
14, the Canadian Pacific steamship
"Empress of France" broke the record for the fastest time made between that port and Southampton,
England, from which she sailed,
having maintained an average speed
of over IU knots. This vessel also
holds the record for the run between
Quebec and Liverpool.
Arrangements for the Pageant of
Empire, to be held at the British
Empire Exhibition July 21-August
30, are now rapidly completing.
Episodes showing the history of
Canada and the other Dominions as
well as of the Mother Country from
the earliest times to the present day
are being organized with the assistance of prominent residents of the
Dominion  now   in London.
Hon. J. E. Perrault, Minister of
Colonization, Mine;, and Fisheries
for the Province of Quebec, on his
return from a recent extensive trip
to tbe Temiscaming district of that
province, stated that there were
over 2,000 prospectors exploring the
gold-fields of Quebec and at least
a million dollars would be expended
in development work in the region
during the course of the season.
According to figures prepared by
the freight department of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the export
grain movement via Vancouver
reached a total of 48,971,1)30 bushels
on May 31, 1924, compared with a
total of 17,387,715 bushels as on
May 31, 1923. In each instance the
figures cover the crop year commencing September 1st. The increase is therefore 31,584,216
bushels or 181.6 per cent.
Enthusiastic    celebrations    took
Slace at Vancouver and Victoria,
LO., when the special service squadron of the Koyal Navy, headed by
H.M.S. Hood, the largest warship
in the world and flagship of th
squadron, visited those places recently. The squadron is expected
on the Atlantic seaboard in August, when efforts will be made by
Canadians on that coast to outdo
the Pacific cities in the warmth of
the welcome chey extend. The anticipations are that thousands of
visitors will gather at Quebec and
elsewhere to demonstrate their affection for the officers and men of
the fleet.
"You may say that Canada is becoming more nnd more interesting
to Englishmen and before long additional English capital will be used
here in the development of industries. I am very optimistic and I
believe that we are now progressing towards an era of unprecedented
prosperity. What we need more
than all now is the immigration of
good men who will become an asset
to this country," declared Sir John
Aird, President of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, on his return
from Europe recently aboard tha
Canadian Pacific steamship "Empress of Prance."
"BOOSTERETTES"
Alongside a huge restaurant In a
southern city is u little Chinese Chop
Suey Joint. When the "big" pluco
erected a giant electric sign "We Never Close"—Ihe Chinaman put out a
card reading, "Me wukee too."
Little Bobby came crying Into the
house, rubbing the places where he
hod been butted by a pet sheep.
"But what did you do," his mother
demanded, "when the sheep knocked
you down?"
"I didn't do nothln'," Bobby declared, protestlngly. "I was gettln' up
all the lime."
One of our friends hands us thin
clipping, and says that the letter
caused considerable merriment ln the
office of a corn syrup company recently. It was evidently written by someone In need of assistance in more ways
than one:
"I am writing to tell you that your
corn syrup Is no good, whatever. I
have already eaten ten cans of your
corn syrup and it has not helped my
corns one bit!" ft*
SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1924
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
-7R _7PP ^c tna' bottte-
"m\.EjVj See coupon below.
Canada's Worst Advertisement   j   Huge Silver Nugget
To Have
Beautiful Hair
Shampoo this way
Women who command attention and admiration have pretty hair. Hair with softness, and silken sheen.
Such hair is within thc power of every girl
and woman to possess.
We are offering you a test of the shampoo
which specialists on hair treatment recom- _______________i____________
mend, lt will bring out new beauty in your fluffy, pliant—with thc rich gleam of natural
hair. color.
Without perfect"cleanliness of hair and Today, in Palmolive Shampoo, you have
scalp, no hair can he really lovely.  Do not olive oil in its perfect form for the hair.
use shampoo which leaves'the hair dry and Dainty, pleasing—riot oily. And economical.
brittle, dull or lifeless. Millions of women have  found new hair-
c. ...       ,.       ., .   , beauty through it.
Shampoo containing olive oil is best, au- ' °    .        ,
thorities say. '   " can 'cst ''' 'll home at our expense.
',,.,, Simply send the coupon for a 15c trial-size
It cleanses each hair, clear down to the    •
tiny scalp pores.
Yet mildly, so that your hair is left soft,
bottle, free.
PALMOLIVE SHAMPOO
Made in Canada
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
Toronto, Ont.
15c TRIAL BOTTLE FREE
Fill in and post to The Palmolive Co. of Canada, Limited, Toronto, Ont.
Address..
City  Province	
By ROBSO.N BLACK
.Manager Canadian Forestry Assoc
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. .1. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 13-1M Conrtenay Exchange
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL   DELIVERY
I    -
Delivered to All I'ai Is of District.
Coal, IVnod aud Goods of Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE
1       PETER McNIVEN
H ...TRUCK AND  GENERAL DELIVERY.
HI      Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
HI At Reasonable Prices.
jj     PETER McNIVEN—CUMHERLAND PHONE ISO
J^iiiitiiijiiiiiUiiifiitiiiiifimiiiiinififfiiifEEiiiiiiiiiifijJimffiiHiiiiHiiiiiitfi
53
TELEPHONE
SYNOPSIS OF
LAND ACT .UIENDMENTS
For Sale by Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
Take Yotar Choice—
They're Both Good!
Both from B. C.'s most hygienic, up-to-date
brewery, where purity and perfect brewing
produce the best beer possible.
U.B.€.Beer
Make use of our free home delivery
service     HViy not ordev a ease?
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the]
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
rjtF-E.Hi'TXOJSS
Vacant, unreserved. surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years'of age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ia
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
hy addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e, carrying over 5,01)11 hoard
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to he addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, iu which the laud applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must he occupied for
live years and improvements made
to value of JIO per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
Lhe Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
l«uiid."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lauds, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is $"j
per acre, nnd second-class (grazing)
land J2.5G per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No, 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown  Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding  .» acres,
may be purchased or leased, tho con
ditions       including       payment      of
.turn page.
JMMIKNTKA.* LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may he leased as liomesiles.
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected iu the (irst year, title being
obtainable after residence and improvement conditions aro fulfilled
and land has been surveyed,
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes ureas not exceeding 040 acres
may bo leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing penults are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
The worst adviretisement for the
business sagacity of Canadians is the
record of forest tires. What's tho
use of begging immigrants to throw
in their lot with us, if we are such
wretched housekeepers as to turn five
million acres of timberland into charcoal and firewood as we did during
the summer of l!)23? Every immigrant on the farm is a prodigious
user of forest materials. In fact
three-fourths of the timber cut m
America is taken for farm purposes.
If we outlaw the forest we outlaw
the farm, a procedure tliat has taken
place already in scores of Canadian
districts. Seventy per cent of the
farmers of Quebec get a substantial
part of their livelihood from work in
the woods. The length of life we
guarantee to our forest estate is precisely the measure of the life of agriculture In Quebec, New Brunswick,
and considerable portion of Ontario
and  British Columbia.
The public is absolute arbiter of tho
Forest. Whether we shall sweep
downhill lo bankruptcy or make the
Forest redeem our war debt and put
us on the highroad to prosperity depends on the deliberate decision of
the thousands of Canadians wbo, for
work or play, enter tbe woods and
leave a path of red flame behin I
l.bem. Fire is the one abomination
of the woods. It is the killer of industry, the exiler of workmen. Its
ravages make the devastation of axemen seem paltry. It lays low ten
trees to the axemen's one. It destroys not alone the tree but the soil
and postpones for half a century the
ability of an area to grow more trees
of the kind we want.
Holding Population
Our public leaders are talking of
population these days from the single
point of view of vacant farm lands.
The population problem does not end
there. Eighty per cent of our habitable area in Canada is non-agr.cultural. If forest Industries do not
find a living there, that eighty percent remains a Xo-Man's-Land forever. No other lure exists but tbe
lure of standing timber. Furthermore, the farmer's working plant is
derived from the forest and bis production costs rise with lumber costs
and lumber costs always carry au unseen percentage for forest (ires. The
late Sir Edmund Walker said shortly
before his death that the greatest
menace to the business future of
Canada was tbe prevalence of fore^l
fires and Sir Clifford Sil'ton has since
declared tbat if tbe present rate uf
forest destruction continues we cannot avoid a heavy loss of population
along with thc industries aud municipalities subsisting upon forest manufactures.
Who   Owns   The   Forests.'
The people of Canada own 85 per
cent of the forest  lands and at  the
same time are wiping off the ledger
of national assets more than live million   acres   of   forest   lands   a   year.
: This is a day of rising forest values.
j when every district    that   possessed
| forests will pull to itself new indus-
, tries, new population, based entirely
. upon the world scarcity of timber sup-
: plies,
A hundred years ago a forest fire
| was   perhaps   excusable  but  in   1924
; the  humanest  conflagration   is   little
short of treason.     Hundreds of good
! fellows   who   would   co/isider   tbetn-
1 selves blacklisted    forever    if    they
burnt down the Methodist Church on
Main  Street have  yet  to  experienc"
' the first twinge of conscience svhen
their campfire or cigarette sets ablaze
■ a township of century-old spruce or
! pine.
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AMI RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
_tOl'«IINUT,S
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices —Lemon Custards — Lemon Pies
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18 Cumberland.
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
A silver nuggel weighing Iwo ami
one-half tons, from Northern Ontario, the largest ever taken from a stiver mine, is proving a magnet to
thousands of visitors to the Canadian
pavilion at the British Empire Exhibition.
Coal Discovery
A scam of lignite coal la feet in
thickness bas been found on the farm
Of .1. A. Mitchell, a couple of miles
from tbe town of Lawson on tbe
Moose Jaw-Hiverhurst branch of the
Canadian National Railways. \v. n.
Hastings, mining engineer of the department of industries, Saskatchewan,
who has made au examination of the
deposit, states that the coal appears
to he a good average grade of lignite.
At the point where the coal was tapped In the process of sinking a well
tbe over-burden is only 14 feet. Mr.
Hastings recommends tliat the government undertake to do a limited
amount of drilling in the area, sufficient to determine if tiie seam has
any considerable lateral extent and
also to ascertain if there are deeper
and harder seams below the one in
question. The Canadian National
Railway passes close to the ideality
where the coal was found.
if tliis coal proves to be as good a
quality as thought, a mining industry
will undoubtedly be developed at
Lawson, owing to the proximity of
such good markets as the cities of
Moose Jaw and Reglna, also other
towns in that part of Saskatchewan,
to say nothing of tbe demand there
would be from the farming communities in tbat well settled section of tbe
province. Ki>erhurst is (Jo miles
north of Moose Jaw aud this Is tbe
furthest north that sucb a large scam
of coal has yet been found in the settled areas of Saskatchewan.
9,000 Canadians Return
Evidence that many Canadian are
returning from the United States is
shown by statistics now being compiled by the Department of Immigration
and Colonization, the total for the lust,
two mouths being nearly 9,000. In
April returns from 148 out of 171
points along the international boundary at which there are Canadian immigration inspectors, showed that
.,084 Canadian citizens returned to
their own country. In May the number at 198 ports was 4,S3f», with 42
ports still to be heard from. These
ligures do not include Canadians who
have been in the United States for a
shorter period than six months.
There is no uncertainty about
5_
@.adiaN (Big)'
WHISKY
Thc age is guaranteed by the Dominion
Government.
Observe its Stamp over the capsule
We guarantee that these whiskies have
been   matured in  oak casks  in Rack
Warehouses for the period indicated by
that Stamp.
Read the label on the bottle
Your purchase is made from the Gov'
ernment Store, which is a guarantee
that you get what you demand.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited
WAUERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Distillers of Fine
Whisf(ics since 1858
Montreal, Que. London, Eng. New York. U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed hy the Liquor
Control Hoard or by the Government of Itriiish Columbia,   \V-«
Grain Statistics
A line of cars 1,282 miles in length
if placed end on end, and reaching
from Winnipeg almost to Kamloops,
or, in the other direction, to within
90 miles nf Montreal, is represented
in the total movement of western
grain over Canadian National Kail-
ways since the opening of tho grain
season to midnight of June 12. During that period 15:1,1)87 cars of grain,
containing 206,681,000 bushels, were
loaded ou western lines of that system, of which 16,423 cars were delivered to Vancouver. To move tho
total loadings in tin-car trains, which
is the average haul daring tho grain
rush, 2,r>t>_. trains, each approximate-
j ly half a mile in length, would be
needed, and of this number 274 loads
Would tie delivered to the western
port.
Plenty Of Money Can
Be Secured For Mines
Tliat  Canada  could   readily   secure
in  London, England, ail the capital
required for tin- development of her
mineral resources, provided Ihose interested iu mining properties could
j show the investor mineral deposits
worthy of development, was tbe statement mads by Sir William Maxwell,
K.It.K.. iu an address al Tbe I'as.
Mail., a few days ago. Sir William.
prominent English mine owner and
writer, was on his first, visit to the
Herb Lake gold camp, during his tour
of Canada over   Canadian    National
u
m
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 21 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1024
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
FARMERS WIN FIRST
GAME FROM LOCALS—4-2
(Continued From Page One)
Union Bay Road.  Courtenay
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Heating Engineer
see
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 157, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR   NEEDS   WILL  RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE  ATTENTION
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C, B.A.
ARCHITECT
mill H.C. Permanent Lonn Bid;.
PHONE Sllll      VICTORIA, B.C.
ter were just about the pick of the en-
. tire local crew.
I'uininings Scores First
Courtenay scored in the first inning
Cummings laid one down good for a
single, Mclntyre fielded it too late and
whaled it by Ilrst. Rob. Robertson's
single scored Cummings from second
base. Bob went down to second unmolested and advanced to third on
Millards single. Bob fooled around
third too much and lie looked out via
Richards to Marocchi and back to
Richards. Dixon and Beattie followed for easy second and third outs.
Both teams landed men on bases ill
the second inning but failed to score
and in the third frame with two men
out, Cumberland tied the score. Hunden singled and was lucky to have
pilfered second base. When .lames
singled. Hunden scored. James stole
second base and was nipped in the
act of stealing third base for the third
out of the inning. In the fourth
canto each team got a man nn bnse
but failed to score.
"Ollie" Smacks Double
Cumberland jumped in the lead in
this inning starting things with ono
man out. Harrison doubled and advanced lo third on a passed ball by
Downey. Plump cracked a fly out to
Beattie in centre. The latter registered about his second error of the
season when he dropped, allowing
Harrison to canter home. Plump
died on second after stealing that
bag, as James and Hunden went out
In quick succession.
Iu the sixth inning Cumberland
would sure have scored with their
regular line-up. Marocchi and Richards, lirst men up, each singled only
to be followed by McKay, who poked
out a fielder's choice, who in turn was
followed by Mclntyre and Farmer
who both fanned.
Both teams were out in 1, 2, 3 order
In the seventh stanza,
i    Cumberland should also have scored
in this frame,     James and Marocchi
i were both issued free passes by Boyd
i Richards sacrificed.   Failure to hit in
' pinches by .McKay and Mclntyre who
fanned, dimmed the locals hopes.
"(lu My Left W_ Hare—"
Things all went to pieces in the
, last of the eighth for Cumberland,
Mclntyre weakened, Umpire Fletcher
weakened even more so, and then en-
furiated, "Tucker" James wouldn't
stand for that. Thus went thc gay
parade.
Cummings  walked    advancing    to
third base on Rob. Robertson's single.
. James    mishandled    Millard's    clout.
! Cummings    and    Robertson    scored.
James  played   for  the  latter  at  the
I plate   hut   was   too   late.      Richards
! kept his head however, whipped tbe
| hall back to James and cut off .Millard
trying to make second base.     Witn
I one   man   Dixon    doubled.      Beattie
poked one out, the play was made to
cut Dixon oil' at home plate, too late
however, and for the second occasion
in the wild hectics of that frantic
stanza cool headed Dave Richards
whipped the ball with a perfect peg
to James to cut off Beattie who was
in the meantime frantically heading
for second base.
Umpire Fletcher anticipating a play
tit the plate was closer to the home
plate by far than second base, he then
saw the play at second that looked au
easy out, hesitating a moment and
yelled "safe!" Tucker driven to
frenzy by the decision started the fire
works. The next two men Downey
and Harris were easy outs.
Mo Hull} in Ninth
Things almost looked like a rally
for Cumberland in the ninth, but no
one hit In the pinch. Plump smack
ed out a double and stole third with
two men o.t. R. Robertson tanned
for the third out.
Hox Scare
Cumberland Alt it H PO A E
Plump, lb     4   0   19   0   0
Hunden,  ss       4    110   10
James, 2b     3   0   13   0   1
.Marocchi, 3b     2   0   113   0
Richards,  c      2   0   1   7   3   a
McKay,  cf      4   0   110   0
.Mclntyre, p     3   0   0   0   0    1
Farmer, cf     4   0   0   3   0   1
Harrison, rf     4   1    1   0   0   o
•Robertson,  rf      10   0   0   0   0
Totals     31   2   7 24 13   3
*Robertson relieved Harrison.
Courtenny
AB R H PO A E
Cummings, ss     2
R. Robertson, 2b....   3
2   1110
12   0   0   0
Millard, If     3   0   10   0   0
Dixon, lb     4   1   2
0   0
Beattie, cf   3
Downey, c   4
Harris, 3b    3
A. Robertson, rf .... 3
0 110
0 0 14   2
0 0   2   4
0 0   0   0
Boyd, p
3    0   0    0   4    0
Totals     28   4   7 27 11    2
Summary
Earned runs, Cumberland 1, Courtenay 2; Two-base hits, Harrison and
Dixon; Stolen bases. Plump, Hunden,
James and'Richards; Sacrifice hits,
Plump, Richards (2), lt. Robertson
nnd Beattie; Struck out, by Boyd, 13,
by Mclntyre 5; Hit by pitcher, Marocchi (2), by Boyd. Harris by Mclntyre; Bases on balls off Boyd 1, off
Mclntyre 3; Passed balls, Downey 3;
Left on bases, Cumberland It, Courtenay 5 J  Umpire P. Fletcher.
Scare by Innings
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Cumberland 0 0 10 1 0 0 0 0—2
Courtenay 10 0 0 0 0 0 3 x—1
ROYAL CANDY
MEDAL AVERAGES
[pjg3Hi?B|^P[HH^M_ieMI^
THE KEY TO WEALTH
m
I   S
RIGHT        BUYING
WE ARE OUT TALKED OFTEN—OUT DONE NEVER.
WE HIRE NO HELP, OUR EXPENSES ARE SMALL.THEREFORE WE CAN AFFORD TO SELL YOU
SHOES CHEAPER THAN THE OTHER FELLOW CAN.
ENOUGH SAID! AFTER ALL IT IS PRICES THAT TELL THE TALE AND QUALITIES THAT MAKE
THE SALE.
WE INVITE YOU TO COMPARE THE FOLLOWING PRICES—THEN IF YOUR POCKETBOOK IS YOUR
GUIDE, WE KNOW YOU WILL BUY YOUR SHOE REQUIREMENTS FROM US
FOR    THE    PICNIC,    SATURDAY
THIS IS OUR LAST CHANCE TO CLEAR OUR TENNIS LINES AND ALL WE ASK IS OUR MONEY
BACK ANI) ON SOME LINES WE ARE WILLING TO TAKE A LOSS.
Compare These Prices
FIT WELL — FEEL WELL — LOOK WELL, WELL WORTH THE PRICE — WELL MADE.
| [jj2|g____|_|_a___J|_EI__J_ra
Children's Black Tennis Oxfords
sizes 5 to 10V_ QP_r»
Special  I/t/C
5ajj3HOTj_Hi_a_iBi_!aai_iffl^^
Children's   Black  Tennis  Bals,
sizes 5 to 101,. QP_/»
Special  XJO\,
^jgi__f_r_r_^_i_Ei_rai_Ei__isi_rai_iacMisisi
Youths' Black Tennis Oxfords,
sizes 11 to 13 (I»i   1 r
Special    tP_L.lt)
a_Ei_Ei_Ei_EfaaisiaaMEMi_^i_iai_rai_EEi
Boys'   Black   Tennis   Oxfords,
sizes 1 to 5 fl»1   Of
Special    «P_L.£tl
These   are   Fleet   Foot   Brand
Boots all of 1st quality.
Ladies!
GOOD NEWS OF GOOD
GOODS
Prices of Powerful Popularity
Two full lines of Ladies' Black and Brown
Vici  Kid, One-Strap, Two Button Slippers,
with a nice Medium Heel.
SPECIAL «bd.t/5
PER PAIR
We have just received these two lines and
you will have to hurry to get your size, as
we have put a price on them that's sure to
move them.
Don't waste your money; appreciate its full value by buying
these:—
Boys' Brown Canvas Running
Shoes—Life Buoy Brand—New
stock—1st quality—at the following prices:—
Brown Canvas Bals, with patch
on   the   ankle,   sizes   1   to   5,
Special
Per pair 	
i__i_r__Mi__j_i_i_i_i_i_i__j_Ei_ra/_Bi__isJ_i
ajftt
Same in Youths' Sizes, 11 to T3,
Special
Per pair 	
_^jj___a____^_3f_EM_^_^l_r_^l_^i_SI_fi_
Same in Children's Sizes 5 to 10,
Special
Per pair 	
$1.50
_|_U_______________1J
J*M
es, 11 to T3,
$1.25
_j_M__c_M_Mj_yaj
iizes 5 to 10,
$1.15
% Two full lines of Girls' White High Cut Tennis Shoes
I with Rubber Heels, sizes 8 to 2 (PI   AA
1 Special Per pair  «PJ..VV
1 _^_~_i_li__aMM_Mera^^
I The balance of our Girls'  One-Strap  Rubber Soled
I Slippers ^1   IF.
I Special Per pair   tTJA.-LU
1 g_r_r_r_l__]_IH_«^
1 Ladies! Don't wear your good slippers to the Picnic,
1 but buy a pair of Ladies' White One-Strap, Rubber
I Soled and Heeled, Slippers at (PI   CA
1 Special Per pair   tpX.UV
1 Ladies' White Ox lords, with Rubber Soles and Heels,
R-J, $1.50
__(__i(___i___r[_!__r_©_er_H^
Gents! Be sure of your footing, then go ahead. The
early buyer gets the choice. Men's White Canvas
Oxfords with a thick Rubber Sole, sold in all sporting
goods houses at ?.",.")0 a pair (J»rt  fA
Special Per pair   «p__'.t)U
i__fi__i_i_i_f_r_r_i_r_i_'_i^
Men's Brown Canvas Tennis Bals, with Leather Trimmings and ankle patch (Pi (?(?
Special Per pair  *pJL.t)t)
j__^__j_i_i_i_i_Ti__-_i_i_tf_Ma
Same in White
Special Per pair 	
_r_Ei_Eia_n__i_&_i_[_[_^
Men's Gymn Shoes, $3.25 value
Special Per pair 	
$1.75
$2.50
I  „„_|_pppjgwra!j^!agag__H_E^
THE ABOVE PRICES KEEP
PEOPLE COMING IN AND
SHOES GOING OUT
The balance of our stock of Ladies' White Canvas
Leather Soled Strap Slippers and Oxfords
Special Per pair 	
A Saving Worth Making
$1.95
We  have  many  more  Shoe
| Bargains and we invite you lo
look them over.
Smai_|__j_n__||__l_^^
j Cavin's Shoe Store    7   Cumberland
I our MOTTO—No Trouble to Show Shoes—No Shoes to Show Trouble^ What you buy—We stand by.
I
Possession of "Bill' 'Wain's Royal
Candy Medal has reduced Itself to a
| tight between .Messrs Plump, James
and Bannerman as there are only
three more Upper Island League
games to play and it is hardly possible for any of their team mates to
overtake their present high averages.
Plump, James and Mclntyre increased their averages in thc last
three games.- Judging the way
"Tucker" James is pelting the app'c
around the lot lt is just possible thai
he might overtake "Toots" Plumps'
grand average of .500. The club average slipped from .318 to .291 in the
last three games. Here is the averages for the Itoyal Candy Medal:
Name
G AB
Plump,  Henry    0 34
James, Thomas   9 3ti
Bannerman,   Dan   .... 8 33
Hunden,   David     8 23
McKay, James   7 30
Marocchi, John   9 31
Conti, Thomas .... 8 31
Richards,  David    9 33
Harrison, Oliver   9 33
Mclntyre, Fred    6 16
Parmer, Amos   2 (I
Robertson, Robert .... 1 1
Club   9 307
P.C.
.500
.482
.391
.304
.261
.258
.266
.212
,1S2
.167
000
mill
.291
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER,
Pressing    •     Cleaning    •     Repairs
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, 11. 0.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland,  B.C.
DR.   R.   B.   DIER  AND  DR.
•    W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Ofllcc:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   25
From 11 p.m. to   9 a.m.   22
Ask for Geo. Mason.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 26.0 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE
That after this date any person or
persons caught defacing, damaging,
destroying or removing any of the
fixtures, fences, etc., at the Recreation Grounds, Cumberland, or in or
around the building known as the
Band Hall, will be prosecuted to the
fullest extent of the law.
Canadian  Collerles   (D)   Limited.
June 20, 1924. 31.
FARM EXPORTS JUMP
Canadian farm products shipped to
tiie l'nited States during the seven
months ended April totalled $43,-
285,012 as against (32,107,891 during
the corresponding seven months two
years ago.
MINISTER NOW
SLEEPS EASY
His conscience relieved by repentance In Ihe form of sending lo the
Canadian National Railways the fares
for his two boys, whom he had taken
ou a trip some time ago, a Saskatchewan clergyman now sleeps easy. In
his letter to the railway company he
said he did not feel that he could
preach to his congregation until the
debt was cancelled.
FORD MOTOR COMPANY
NEW 15-ACRE PLANT IS
NEARING COMPLETION
Construction of the various units
of the plant of the Ford Motor Company, Limited is Hearing completion
and the units are gradually becoming co-ordinated into the Ford organization.
Visitors almost hourly tour the la-
acre machine shop to see its industrial wonders. The power plant is
receiving attention from combustion
engineers the world over.
The latest unit to be operated is
situated on the splendid dock located
on the Detroit River and can daily be
seen In action. This Is the Mead
Morrison Gantry Crane. It has au
over-all length of 342 feet, of which
.72 feet Is au overhang at the water
side. It Is mounted on rails, paralleling the river side of the dock, and
may be moved on these rails as required. It Is electrically operated.
Coal for feeding the new By-products
Plant and Power House will be received by boat and stored on the dock
which has a capacity of 100,000 tons
of coal piled 30 feet high. This coal
will be unloaded by the Gantry Crane
which runs the full length of thc dock
on rails.
The coal is picked from the boat by
a 5-ton grab bucket and can be either
dropped to the dock storage or em-
tied to a tin-ton auxiliary hopper situated on the rear of leg of the crane.
From this hopper it is fed through a
hinged chute to the track hopper and
after passing through a Williams
Crusher is carried by belt a 900-foot
conveyor tunnel to thc Bunker House
where It is elevated and supplied to
the coke ovens.
Tiie Crane has an unloading capacity of 350 tons per hour and Is able
to unload a 10,000-ton boat in approximately 28 hours.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
VVM.M EKRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co..
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in aud see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advlBe you on any work you wl«h
to bave done.
Our   Work  nnd  Service
Will Please You 11     i i
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.     -      Phone .302 SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1924
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE NINE
rf
Although suffering somewhat, "Sandy
keeps a cheerful countenance and
strictly attends to business.
Mr. W. Wright haa come home from
the woods for some time.
Mr. J. McGee was in the Cumberland Hospital for a tew days and is
now able to work again.
All music lovers on the Island are
anxiously looking forward to a visit
rrom Mr. Slllence and his well trained cholresters, which will, we believe,
take place during this month.
Mr. Roland Aston paid a flying vis-
It here a few days ago.
Mrs. Walker, wife of Rev. A. Walker and small daughter, are guests of
Mrs. Edward Graham,
Miss Molly Beadnell, daughter of
Capt. Beadnell of Comox, is the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Washington Scott.
FORTY BABIES IN FAMILY BOX
ONE hears a lot nowadays about babies travelling long distances unaccompanied. Here are forty bibkw
travelling without nurse or mother and they are all in one box What's more, they are only a day old.
Human babies wouldn't survive, but the sturdy little baby chicks in this photograph are representative of
thousands constantly shipped from hatcheries to farmers all over Canada via Dominion Express in special
boxes which enable them to make the journey in safety and with little discomfort.
NEWS OF DENMAN ISLAND
SECURITY AND
SAFETY
Secilre—Because the business is carefully and economically managed. The average rate of interest
earned on its securities last year was 7.09 percent.
Safe—Because during the past 35 years Surplus and
Reserves have been increasing. The Company that
pays large dividends to its policyholders is:
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
"Dominion Policies for people of the Dominion"
Mr. and Mrs. SInkerson Swan are
visiting the former's sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. H. Plercy.
Mrs. Albert Curtain and small
daughter of Courtenay have been
the guests of Mrs. Millar. They returned home last week after spending
a very pleasant holiday in this sequestered and picturesque isle.
Misses Hopwood and Patterson are
away for the holidays.
Mr. J. Plercy is ln Vancouver seeking health.
Whilst engaged in. butchering, Mr.
A. H. Swan had the misfortune to let
the knife slip and his leg got a bad
cut. Dr. H. Meadows rendered assistance  and  put  in  some  stitches.
Report has it that Miss Hopwood,
bur senior teacher, haa become the
bride of Mr. Caesar Scott. They were
married at Powell River Immediately
after the closing of the public school.
Best wishes to the bridal party. This
4s the fourth teacher in succession
who has come to this place to teach
and married Denman boys. Cupid
has been exceedingly busy the past
few months. Perhaps some have
taken advantage of it being Leap
Year.
The family of Mr. Thomas Piket
has been increased by the addition of
another son. May long life and
blessings attend him.
Comox Electoral District Election
Results In Detail
Following is a detailed list of the
results of all polling stations iu the
Comox Electoral District:
The initials respectively indicate:
Harrison, Duncan, Every-Clayton and
Spoiled Ballots.
Polling  Station
1 Alert Bay 	
2 Bevan   	
3 Bold Point 	
4 Bowser Station
5 Campbell River
6 Coal  Harbour..
7 Comox  Wharf.
COMOX NEWS
Mr. and Mrs. Spurrier of Vancouver
are visiting Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Piercy.
A. B. Ball took In the football
matches at Nanaimo and Vancouver
Jack Haslam has a new motor boat
In the Bay.
The Tyee salmon are in the Bay.
Charlie Harris getting a 40-pounder,
while Jack Spurrier and others have
made good catches.
Dr. Tai Kuzuhara
DENTIST
WILLARD BLOCK CUMBERLAND, B. C.
TELEPHONE IS
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
MEATS         POULTRY          FISH
■    AND VEGETABLES   	
Telephone 143 P. 0. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
E.  0.  HAUKEDAL
DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC
Now Established in
WILLARD BLOCK, CUMBERLAND
OFFICE HOURS
10 • 11.30
A.M.
6 - 7.30
P.M.
The   Famous   McClary
Electric Range
Protected Elements    —    Indicating Lamps
—Reciprocating Switches-
Seamless, easily cleaned ovens
To cook electrically with one of these ranges
IS CHEAPER
than using: coal.
No soot, no ashes, no hot kitchens.
25 per cent, saved on your meat bill owing to
non-shrinkage.
Everything in favor of the busy housewife.
Let us show you.
Fans       —       Washing Maehines       —        Irons
Vacuum Cleaners        —       Toasters
Grills        —        Etc.
Everyappliance sold by us of the best make only and
we   are   HERE   TO   MAKE   IT   RIGHT   should
you be in any way, shape or form disappointed.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
8 Courtenay      162
9 Cumberland  ... 433
10 Denman Island 30
11 Duncan  Bay.... 5
12 Fanny   Bay  3
13 Qranite Bay .... 2
14 Grantham   4
15 Headquarters .. 14
16 Herlot Bay   3
17 Hornby   Island 15
18 Little River  13
19 Malcolm Island 10
20 Manson's Land. 6
21 Merville     14
22 Minto    14
23 Nahwitti  River 0
24 Nimklsh   River 4
25 Okisollo     2
26 Oyster River.... 5
27 Port   Alice  29
28 Port Hardy .... 6
29 Quathlaski   C... 12
30 Read Island .... 2
31 Read Island (S) 0
32 Rock Bay   18
33 Royston      11
34 Sayward     33
35 Shushartie   B... 3
36 Squirrel   Cove.. 3
37 Union Bay   67
38 Whaletown   2
I).
19
9
4
6
3S
II
29
214
54
21
II
1
5
10
14
21
11
1
22 '
30
51
11
1
0
1
2
11
10
34
1
0
10
3
23
(I
8
18
13
C.
IS
45
1S1
all
18
11!
0
21
27
12
11
40
8
ll
29
25
3
7
9
0
8
29
14
1
3
29
22
Beer Results
The   initials   respectively   indicate
Yes, No and Spoiled Ballots.
Polling  Station V.     N.     c
Alert   Bay     13     41
Uevan      51       4
Bold  Point   2       6
Bowser Station   7       5
Campbell  River    72     32
Coal  Harbour   4       l)
Comox  Wharf     57     34
Courtenay     320   211
Cumberland   392   137
Denman Island   45     53
Duncan  Bay  2      5
Fanny   Bay     15       5
Granite Bay   7
Grantham   19
Headquarters     45
Heriot  Bay    22
Hornby   Island    29
Little River   42
.Malcolm  Island    19
Manson's   Landing   .... 20
Merville     08
Minto    31
Nahwitti Itiver   1
Nitupkish River   4
Okisollo     7
Oyster River   0
Port Alice    .'13
Port Hardy   24
Quathlaski  Cove    33
Read  Island    1
Read Island  (S)     II
Rock Bay   37
Royston    	
Sayward   	
Shushartie Bay
Squirrel  Cove ..
L'uiun Bay 	
Whaletown  	
29
43
4
8
85
16
0
12
9
15
11
17
10
19
19
19
0
0
1
1
8
3
35
11
ll
7
14
25
0
7
28
21
1
2
2
1
7
33
21
1
0
0
0
4
2
0
0
2
1068   718
Absentee      193     97
1613
Absentee      289
831 124
112  13
Total   1261 810
725 45
68 19
 | i	
793 041 Total   1902 943 13
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
I
"The Most of the Beat for the Least"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
THE STORE THAT'S ALWAYS BUSY
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND
__BI_«IEMEI_E!ffil_^B^^
NOTICE
Fifty dollars reward will be paid for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or
persons who turned on the water valve at Hamilton
Lake on or about May 17th, 1924, causing loss of water
and damage to property.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
• G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
AUCTION
SALE
CUMBERLAND
G. J. Hardy has received instructions from Mr. A. J.
Merry, who is leaving for Australia, to sell by Auction,
at his Residence, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, at
2 O'CLOCK PROMPT, ON SATURDAY, JULY 26,
tmmsw.'
the whole of his Household Furniture and other effects
including:.—
DINING ROOM—Dining Room Suite in oak; G small
and 1 Arm Chair; 2 Leather Sealed Arm Chairs; Extension Dining Table; Sett Grass Easy Chair; Book
Case; Oak Secretaire Writing Bureau, with pigeon
holes; Extending Drop Couch, with Mattress; 2 Occasional Tables; Congoleum Art Hug 10x12; Window
Blinds and Curtains; Franklin Open Grate; Quantity
of Books; 3 Music Stands; House Plants, Etc.
HALL—Oak Hall Stand, with .Mirror; Linoleum; 3
Cocoa Door Mats; Window Blinds and Curtains.
KITCHEN—Extension Dining Table; Chairs; 2 Small
Tables; Electric Iron; Window Blinds and Curtains;
Tea Service; Quantity of Glass, China and various
Crockery; Egg Crock; Cake Tins and the usual Cooking and Kitchen Utensils; Wash Tubs, Etc.
BEDROOMS—Two full sized Bedsteads, with Springs
and Mattresses; Pillows; Blankets; Bedspreads; Window Blinds and Curtains; Bureau, with Mirror; Tall
Chest of Drawers, with Mirror; 2 Washstands; Bedroom Crockery; Linoleum, Etc.
MISCELLANEOUS—Quantity of Carpenter's and Mechanic's Tools in good order and condition, including
Bench, Vice, Etc. B Flat Clarinet in case, with Music
Stand. Ford Touring Car, 1922 model, first class condition, self starter, Hassler Shock Absorbers, spare
tyre and accessories, which will be sold absolutely
without reserve. Strong Garden Mose and numerous
sundries.
TERMS CASH. Further particulars may be had
from the Auctioneer.
G. J.  HARDW
Phone 10
Courtenay TEN
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY  111,  1924
New Ratine Dresses
We have just received a shipment of smart Ratine
Dresses, which are on sale now, and comprise most of
lhe wanted colors.
Old Rose Dress .made of a nice quality Ratine, Fawn
Vest, Polo Collar, two pockets, trimmed with Fawn,
three-quarter sleeves.       Price   $6.95
Pink Ratine Dress, trimmed with sand shade on collar and cull's.     Price  $6.95
Mustard Ratine Dress, smart collar, inserted front,
two pockets and belt, trimmed with a suitable shade of
blue. Price   $6.95
Blue Ratine Dress, made in a smart style, with side
pannels of Fawn, trimmed with buttons to match,
round collar, three-quarter sleeves, and the Price is
only  $6.95
White Ratine Dress, trimmed with a becoming shade
of Helio, on collar, cuffs and sleeves, as well as side
pannels of Helio which makes this dress a really smart
one.      Price  $6.95
Lavendar Ratine Dress, made in a becoming style,
trimmed with Fawn Ratine, which makes a very pleasing combination.     Price  $6.95
We have a lot of smart new dresses on view and will
be pleased to have you inspect them at
J. Sutherland
Local Briefs
FOR SALE
FOR   SALE—   A   SNAP-     COTTAGE j
containing two rooms anil pantry,
electric   light,  and   water,   [or   immediate sale.     Price $250 cash. An- j
ply P.O. Drawer 430, Cumberland.29 j
FOR   SALE — EDISON   CYLINDER '
Phonograph and records, cheap for j
cash:   also   quarter  plate   camera.
57.50.     .22 Winchester Rifle, $5.00.
Box 111, Courtenay, B.C. 29.
J   f "->"*s««_l*-
FUR SALE—FINE OLD BASS VIOL.
With bow, spare strings, and gre-n
tailzie cover, $45. Apply Police
Oflice, Cumberland. 29
FOR SALE—FORD TOURING CAR.
1922 model, in first class condition,
sell' starter, new seat covers. Hass-
ler shock absorbers, demountable
rims, spare tyre and aci-esories.
$400. Apply Police Ollice, Cumberland. 29
'Makes happy,
iv bal
STRAYED
From the Cumberland Hotel, one
black nnd white wire haired Fox Terrier pup. Any person harboring this
dog alter the publication of ibis
notice will be prosecuted, -!>
FREE B4BY BOOKS
Write to Tfce !t?rx\?.n C*>-
Limited,        fIIIH-OIIYW  tor
two Baby 'Wetlarc l>ut-k__
TENDERS WANTED
Sealed Tenders will be received by
tiie undersigned, covering additions
and alterations to tbe Masonic Building, Cumberland, B.C., up till Saturday noon, the 28th Inst Blue prints
and specifications covering the work
can be procured from the offices of
the Cumberland Electric Light Co.
The lowest or any tender not. necessarily accepted.
All tenders to be addressed: "Trustees, Cumberland Lodge No, 2ti, A.F.
&  A.M."
(Signed) W. A. Owen,
Architect
July 16th,  1924. 29.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
JAMS JHc. a tilt.- -TUBES Mi.- ■ Al 111 (rial Storll
Fresh and Cured Fish
I     HOTELS AND CAMPS
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
E£
B
Bathing Caps!
18c.
-EACH-
18c
BUY YOURS WHILE THEY LAST
Candy Specials
CHOCOLATE BARS
LIGGETT'S,   IIA.MIII),   SPARKY,   O'HAPPY,   MAPLE   CREAM,
BABE   RUTH
I   FOR ZOC
7 for 25c
Assorted Chocolates. Regular 75c. per Ib.
SPECIAL 4oC PER LB.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Mr, and Mrs. S. Young of Granby
nre visiting .Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GInu
at their summer comp at Royston
Beach.
*    *    *
Miss Edna Bennie, who has heen In
training at the Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, is spending her vacation wi'll
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Bennie,
WEDDING
llroivii . .ojoke
A wedding of much interest to Cumberland and Courtenay residents took
place on Wednesday morning at 9,30
o'clock when Miss Jessie Cooke, eldest daughter of Mr. ana" Mrs. A.
Cooke, of Courtenay, was united in
marriage to .Matthew Brown, eldest
son or Mr. and Mrs. James G. Brown,
of this city. The ceremony, which
took place at the home of the bride's
parents in Courtenay, was performed
hy the Rev. W. T. Beattle, Presbyterian minister of that city; .Miss Piercy
also of Courtenay, ac.ng as bridesmaid and Mr. George Brown supporting his brother as groomsman.
After tho wedding the young couple
left amidst a shower of rice and old
hoots ou a two-week tour of Sound
cities and on their return will take
up their residence in Cumberland
where "Matt" carries ou a successful
grocery business.
Both Courtenay and Cumberland
friends, of whom there ure many,
join in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Brown
the best of success in married life.
PYTHIAN SISTERS
INSTALL OFFICERS
Wednesday, July 16th, was installation night at the local Pythian Sister Lodge. Nearly all the member-
were present to witness the ceremon.i
which was performed by Installing
Ollicer Hannah Watson, assissted by
the Grand Manager, Esther Horbury.
Following is n list of tiie new olli-
cers: P. C. Margaret Westfleld; M. E.
C, Margaret Mitchell; E. S. Marion
Slaughter; B. J., Janet Whyte; Manager, Elizabeth Shearer; M. of R. and
C, Rosa Robertson; M. of P. Emma
Especi; Protector, Ellen Miller:
Guard, Esther Young.
On concluding the evening's business the Sisters adjourned to Wain's
Ice Cream Parlor where coll'ee and
sandwiches were served.
FAMOUS BAND TO
VISIT COURTENAY AND
CAMPBELL RIVER
The Nanaimo Silver Cornet Band
will give concerts and dances at the
above places ou Friday and Saturday.
August 1st and 2nd.
This musical organization is British Columbia's Champion Band ami
should be well worth listening to.
Look out for further announcements.
POPULAR BANK CLERK
LEAVES CUMBERLAND
Mr. .lames Wilcock, the popular
young teller iu the local branch of the
Royal Hank of Canada, has been trans
ferred to the Nanaimo branch and left
for that city on Friday morning, Jim
has been a resident of Cumberland
for several years aud has been working in the "Royal" here ever since he
left High School. Consequetnly hW
numerous friends are exceedingly
sorry to see him go but at the same
lime congratulate him upon liis advancement and wish him the best or
luck  in  his  new environment.
MIKE MANSON LOSES
SEAT TO LIBERAL
McKenzie Hiding is another constituency where tbe absentee voteri
havo changed tbe original decision.
Mike .Manson, Conservative, who originally was leading, has been nosed
ont hy MacKay, Liberal of Ocean
Falls, by the slim margin of seven
votes,      A recount will lie likely.
Saturday being Picnic Day, Lang's
Drug Store will be open from S a.m.
to 1 p.m. and 6.30 in the evening.
* *    *
W. Hassard, of the 1_. C. Telephone
Co., arrived back in Cumberland after
spending a vacation in Vancouver.
* V       *
Mrs. George Lowe and daughter, of
Victoria, have been spending a short
vacation with Mr. and Mrs. T. H.
Mumford at Gartley's Beach. They
returned to Victoria on Wednesday.
* *    •
Mr, Duncan Bennie, an old timer
of this district, spent the past week
with his son, Mr. Jack Bennie.
* *    *
Mr. James Wilcock, of the local
Royal Bank staff, has been transferred to Nanaimo.     He left on Friday.
* *   *
Miss Rice, of Vancouver, is spending a vication with Miss Bella Baird.
* *   *
Mrs. Peter Myers, of Vancouver, is
visiting friends in this city.
* *    *
Miss Beatrice Mitchell is on a vacation which will be spent in Vancouver,
Cowichan Lake and Wickersbam,
Wash,
Mr. Duncan Fraser. of Lang's Drug
Store, is spending his vacation with
his parents in Victoria.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Richards and
family of South Wellington, arrived
on Friday on a visit to Mr. and Mrs.
George Richardson at their summer
home, Royston.
* *    *
Mr. Toombs, of the Columbia Paper
Company, and family, camped at Royston Beach over last week-end.
0        *        *
Mr. Ben H. Gowen, of Vancouver,
spent a few days in the city this week
renewing old acquaintances. Mr.
Gowen, it will be remembered, held a
position with Tbe Islander, two years
ago.
* *    (i
Air. Paolo Monte is visiting old
friends in Cumberland.
* *    *
.Mr.   and   Mrs. Karl     Fletcher,     of
Nanaimo,  spent last     week-end     in
Cumberland.
* *   *
Miss Jessie Smith of Xanaimn, is
spending a few days in the city, the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Merrifield.
* *    *
Leslie Merrifield has accepted a
position with the Canadian Collierhs
(Dunsmuir)  Ltd.
* *    *
Mrs. M. Concenia, of Victoria, 's
visiting Mr. and Mrs. M. Mounce.
* *    *
Bobby Searle, of Union Bay, a pupil
of Miss Ethel M. Fulcher, successfully passed the recent examinations in
the Elementary Division of the Associated Hoard of the Royal College
of Music, London, Eng.
* *    *
James L. Brown left Friday morning for Vancouver to attend the annual meeting or the B.C.F.A.
* «    ?■
Miss Nellie Potter left for Vancouver Friday morning, where she will
visit friends and relatives.
* *    *
Miss L. Robertson bas resigned as
stenographer of the Royal Hank,
Courtenay, and will take up a position with the Mercantile Store Co.,
of this city.
#* *   *
Miss Hilda Watson of Penticton Is
visiting friends and relatives in Cumberland, arriving here last Saturday.
KEEP THE DATE OPEN!
Harmony Rebecca Lodge will hold
a Sale of Work and Afternoon Tea on
September lath.     Particulars later.
SCOUTS ENJOYED
CUMBERLAND VISIT
ANGLICAN CHURCH
SERVICE CHANGED
The service at the Anglican Church
has been changed to Sunday at 11 a.m.
instead or the usual evening service.
This is i'or this Sunday oulv.
LOCAL STUDENTS
PASS MUSIC EXAMS.
The following, pupils of Mrs. L. It.
Finch, successfully passed their examinations under the Associated
Hoard of tbe Royal Academy of Music
and the Royal College of Music. London. England:
Scbool Examination — Elementary
Division. Kathleen O'Brien and Edna
Davis.
Lower  Division—Edith  O'Brien.
Local Centre—Theory of Music,
Ethel M. Fulcher, Union Rny.
Afler a most impressive open-air
service, conducted In' Hcouter the
Rev. W. Leversedge ainl held on the
Royston Tennis Court Sunday afternoon, the Boy Scouts recently on a
tour of the Island by bicycle, rotiirn-
1 ed to Cumberland. Here they spent
a most enjoyable slay, Mr. Allan
Nunns contributing to their visit by
showing them around the local mines
and also by taking them ou a motor
tour through the district. The night
was spent in this city and early Monday morning the troop set out for
Royston.
Owing to the condition of the roads
they remained there until the E. and
N. train arrived which was immediately boarded and the party used that
menus of travel as far as Qualicum
from which place they will finish
their return journey to Victoria by
bicycle.
Scouter the Rev. W. Leversedge,
wishes to thank all those who so
kindly billeted the touring scouts
during their stay iu Cumberland.
3™
Leave   your   order   for
Preserving
APRICOTS
FINE STOCK OF FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
PLUMS — PEACHES — APRICOTS — CHERRIES       WATER
MELONS —CANTELOPES —   HONEY   DEW  MELONS
BANANAS   -   EATING   APPLES  —   LEMONS
CALIFORNIA  ANI)   FLORIDA  (IRAPE ''
FRUIT   —   AUSTRALIAN
AL.MERIA DRAPES
NEW SPUDS — CARROTS — BEETS -- TURNIPS — GREEN
PEAS — GREEN CABBAGE — ONIONS — RHUBARB
CUCUMBERS — ETC.
 FOR REAL BARGAINS	
Look over our list oi' specials  for the week which
means a great saving to you.     Prices and Quality are
what count.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE ANI) QUALITY
PHONE 38
___________
_____
Economy
Buy a Ford Car and
Save
the difference
in Gas and Oil
12,000 Miles
Running Expenses for
2 Years
at
Corfield Motors Limited
FORD DEALER
Courtenay, B.C.
Phone 46

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