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The Cumberland Islander May 29, 1925

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 THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER 4-
With which Is consolidated Uie Cumberland News.
pro*.
iXc/o-^
lattV'ffl/Wa—
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY. MAY 29, 1925.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Locals Won First
Start In New League
By "Uno"
Displaying what was undoubtedly their most brilliant fielding exhibition, combined with a timely single by Jim McKay, were
the main reasons why Cumberland defeated Powell River at that!
city in the second game of the C.P.C. League opening.    The most i
unfortunate feature attending the game was the fact that it last-1
ed but five innings in order to allow the visiting teams time to,
catch the Charmer on its return trip to Union Bay.    But while it |
was just a brief display it was as full of thrills as a circus monkey j
is of tricks, and the 500 fans present got full value for their money
"Peanuts" Robertson started in the box for Cumberland but |
was nervous and manager Plump showed good judgment when he
signalled Dave Hunden in from center field in the third. After
that the landscape brightened up considerably for Cumberland.
The papermakers too soon got their hurling staff into difficulties
and big "Heavy" Carivean was chased to the showers after Cumberland had taxed him for five hits in two innings. Then little
Willie Gallagher, Powell River Indian, gave a war whoop and hurled the remainder of the game after having already disposed of
Courtenay to the tune of 2-0.	
Popular Local Girl
Goes To Seattle
Bannerman To James To Plump
Heft, slugger supreme of the
mainlanders, was the leading sticker
of the day, connecting for a double
and two singles In tree trips to the
pan. Dave Richards followed on tits
heels and grabbed two singles ln two
trips up. The fielding feature was
provided in the last ot the fifth frame
with Heft on base and one man out.
J. Gallagher cracked the ball to Ban- j C.P.C. League takes place on Sunday
nerman and the Cumberland infiel 1 j when the old rivals, the coal-diggers
cut oil the rally In great style—Ban-  and the milk-men. resume their feud
BASEBALL
GAME HERE
SUNDAY
The first Island game of the new
nerman to James to Plump. Manager Plump and Bannerman likewise
provided a thrill In the first of the
fifth when with Toots on second anil
Danny on first they worked a double
steal which helped bring Danny In
with the winning run.
Bases Loaded—None (lut
In the first Cumberland went out In
quick order. Powell River threatened right from the start. llaslam
singled and went to second on a passed ball while in the meantime Sliun-
erman got a walk. Heft singled, filling the bases. "Peanuts" fanned A.
Gallagher. The entire infield meanwhile crowded in for a possible play
at the plate. It came when Al. Han-
Ben lnfielded to Bannerman who cut
Haslam off at the plate. Dave Hunden handled a high fly to center for
the last out of the inning. Cumberland rapped out two singles In the
second but got nothing from them,
and "Peanuts" fanned the three outs
In Powell River's turn at the bat.
Cumberland got two men on in the
first of the third but they were not
dangerous and did not score. Powell
River came in and drew first blood.
Shunerman doubled and was scored
by Heft, who followed suit. Toots
then replaced Robertson for Hunden
and that promptly ended the threatened attack of the papermen.
"Ilea-.*," Yanked
Cumberland retaliated in the first
of the fourth. With two out. Marocchi reached first on Sellman's error and went to second on Richard'.;
single. Dave Hunden brought the
town baker home with a double and
"Muggins" tore around to third. It
was at this stage of the game that
"Heavy" Carivean was chased to the
showers tn favor of Gallagher, who
stopped the rally by whiffing Roberl-
son. Although "Riley" Isued two
passes by hitting J. Gallagher and S.
Hansen, he fanned two others and
spoiled any chance of a score In the.
fourth  frame.
It waB In the fifth Inning the Charmer blew Its deadly fifteen minute
warning, and it was in this frame that
each team staged a last minute rally
and supplied the real final punch to
the game.
Cumberland looked disappointing
when Amos Farmer fanned. Plump
was hit by Mr. Gallagher In a moment
of misdirected enorgy. Bannerman
came up to receive the same dose, fori
Ing Plump to second. The pair took
chances to grab the bacon and worked a dou'.le steal before the amazed
paper-makers realized what had hap-
pened. Tucker James did the unusual thing by whiffing at three good
ones, but McKay came through with
a timely single, bringing home Plump
and Bannerman. Jim went to second
on a passed ball, stole third but Marocchi was evidently thinking about
the doughnut factory at home and
promptly fanned for third out.
Ton Late
Heft started    things    for    Powell
River with a single and went to second on a passed ball.     The next up
(Continued  on   Page  Two)
on the Recreation Grounds hero.
Plump's pets are in good condition
and ure confident of annexing tho
points from the Courtenay boys. The
game is scheduled to start at 3:00
p.m.
Alex Denholme, energetic secretary
of the Cumberland Club, is endeavoring to Introduce a little novelty Into
this, the first home game, and will
probably have some prominent business men of the city as pitcher, batter and catcher, when the first ball
Is thrown. Don't miss the game
anyway; be on hand early and get a
good neat In the grand-stand.
"SINGLE WIVES" SHOWS
HOW 10 BE HAPPY
ALTHOUGH MARRIED
What of the woman whose hur>-
bnnil 1ms decided that he need no
longer court her?
This Is the intriguing theme of the
First National production, "Single
Wives." which comes to the Ilo-llo
Theolre, Friday and Saturday, June
5 and 6. In which Corlnne Griffith and
Milton Sills are co-featured for the
first time on the screen.
Earl Hudson, the author has delved Into the innermost recesses of thy
human heart and taken trom it a
story of its aches and desires; he has
made a subtle etching of a modern
matrimonial tangle; he has painted
a portarlt of wedded folk that is said
to be of wide appeal and true to latter-day life.
In the story of "Single Wives," the
author has shown how a normal
couple, loving each other and living
a quite life, may, through the agency
of trifling Incidents, drift apart—perhaps to the danger point.
Betty Jordan—played by Corlnne
Griffith—yearns for the little, thought
ful acts that her husband. Perry,
seems to overlook. When he presents her with a pearl necklace on
their wedding anniversary he unwittingly hurts her to the quick by his
lack nf enthusiasm or romanticism.
When another man appears on the
horizon and he gives her more attention than she receives from her
husband she finds herself drifting
away from her fireside. Her own
mother, nt the same time faces the
same situation. How the triangles arc
finally solved makes the unfolding o(
"Single  Wives"  an  absorbing story.
In addition to Corlnne Griffith and
Milton Sills, the cast boasts of very
prominent screen names, Including
Kathlyn Williams. Lou Tellegen,
Henry 11. Walthall, Phyllis Haver,
Phillips Smalley, Jere Austin. John
Patrick and others.
On Friday evening last, at. their
home on Derwent and Third, Mrs. D.
Stevenson and daughter Jessie gave
a handkerchief shower in honor of
Miss Irene Bateman, popular Cumberland girl who left on Wednesday
for Seattle. A very pleasant evening
was spent in music and games, and
dainty refreshments were served.
Those present were Mrs. D. W. Stevenson, Mrs. R. A. Robertson, Mrs.
Matt Stewart, Mrs. John Bond, Mrs.
J. H. Robertson, Mrs. C. Hitchens,
Mrs. H. Peters, Miss E. Horbury, Miss
A. Haywood. Miss D. Wilson, Miss H.
Mounce, Miss H. Lockhart. and Miss
E. C. Henderson.
Clubs Mnke Presentation
On Tuesday evening Miss Bateman
was also the recipient of two pieces
ot ivory from the members of the
"Willing Workers" Club, the "Four
Square" Club and the pupils of the
Methodist Church Sunday School. The
presentation, which took place In the
church, was made by Mr. Alex Henderson. Miss Bateman expressed hsr
thanks in a neat reply.
Miss Bateman leaves a host ot
friends in Cumberland who are extremely sorry at her leaving the city,
but who wish her every success.
Opening Dance At
Royston Successful
The opening dance at the Royston
Imperial   Pavilion  on   Monday   night
was ait ended  bj   about five hundred
people who came from all  over the:
district for the lirst turn on the floor
of what undoubtedly is the best ap- j
pointed open-air pavilion  on  the island.     The floor had been specially
prepared by an electric sanding and
polishing machine and was ull that a :
dancer could desire.    Moody's eight-
piece orchestra was stationed on an
elevated platform out of the way of.
the dancers and gave excellent service.     The big hall had been decorated   with   yellow   broom   and   while
dogwoud  while the Union  Jack flew
on the big flag staff outside.
The next dance at tlle Pavilion will.
be held on Wednesday. June 3rd.
Don't forget the dance at the Royston Imperial Pavilion on Wednesday
June 3rd. Moody's 8-piece orchestra
Dancing 9-2
MAN LOSES LIFE WHEN
CAR GOES INTO RIVER
FERNIE,    B, c—Advices     reached
here of a motor accident just east ot;
Michel,   in   which   it   is   feared   that j
Dennis Flenimlng, a traveler, lost his j
life..     From the meagre information
available   It  appears   that  Flemmlng
was riding in a roadster driven by n
Mr. Wood, of Michael, and that another man was seated on Fleinming's
lap.
The car had left Michael and pro-'
ceeded eastward about a hundred
yards wheu the car went over the
bank and tumbled Into Michel Creek
I Tlie rear end of the car was submerged and the men were thrown ou; \
tt the seal. When Wood picked him !
self up,' Clemming was missing.
Straight Right To
Jaw; Morris Out
Another milestone on the road to boxing fame was passed by
Koy Cliffe, champion light-heavj weight of liritish Columbia and
idol ot the Comox District right fans, when ho suddenly and decisively put a check on the fistic ambitions of one Al. Morris of
Everett, Washington. Morris brought from the American side a
formidable record, that of never having been knocked down, let
alone knocked out, but never mon* can he claim such distinction.
A hard right to the jaw in the closing seconds of the seventh
round tells thy whole story for when the crowd had recovered
from its surprise referee Harry Jackson had finished counting a
needless ten seconds over Morris' limp form, or rather his feet,
they being thc only part inside tlie roped square. Morris put up
a game light throughout the seven rounds of the scheduled eight
round bout, but his class is plainly not that of Cliffe's, even for
his ten pounds advantage in weight.
i'avilion I.s Crowded
Joe ldiens' new Imperial Pavilion at Royston, where the fight
was held, was crowded with thi' twelve or fifteen hundred fans
from all over the Island who came to see the local boy in action,
and to note for themselves the great improvement which it was
:   said  lie had  made.     They were not
TENNIS TEAMS
NO MATCH FOR
PORT ALBERNI
Port   Players   Take   10   of   II
Matches Played—Cumberland
Teams Lacked Practice
PLANS WELL ADVANCED
FOR SCHOOL FIELD DAY
Arrangements have been about com
pleted for the holding of Che big
school Held day in Cumberland next
Wednesday, June 3rd and the only
thing left to be hoped for is that the
weather man will be kind to the officials In charge of this, the biggest
event of the kind ever held on Vancouver Island.
Great interest has been manifested
by the scholars in all the schools,
comprising Inspectorate Number 3.
which Includes all the territory from
Campbell River In the north to Nanaimo in the south. In addition to
the donations already publicly acknowledge the following have been
received:
Canadian Collieries    $50
Cumberland City Council $50
Courtenay May Day Committee $1">
Molkln-Pearson Co. (Nanaimo) Cup
Elimination contents have been held
at tbe different schools alld the best
athletes in each place chosen so that
competition promises to be exceptionally keen. For the benefit of visiting children hot liquid refreshments
will be provided at the old band hall
near the football field, where the
sports are to take place, the first
event being called for eleven o'clock
promptly. The visitors are requested to bring their lunches, but those
not caring to do so may purchase coffee, sandwiches, ice-cream, etc.. from
the refreshment booth which will lie
run on the Held l,y the Ladies' Auxiliary of I'e Anglican Church
The program will be begun by
Mayor Charles Parnham who will deliver an address of welcome and the
prizes will be presented by Col. Villiers, manager of the Canadian Collieries Company.
Names of ofllelals will he found on
the printed programs to be Issued at
the beginning of next week. The
programs will also include the rules
governing the meet.
Big delegations of visitors are expected from Courtenay, Union Bay,
Comox. Merville, Campbell River.
Bevan, Denman Island and other
places beyond the district Immediately adjacent to Cumberland. Tlie
full support ot the citizens of Cumberland is expected and will undoubtedly be extended to the organization
of the big event. The day's amusement will be concluded by a dance
to be held In tho Ilo-llo Theatre,
music to be provided by Plump's orchestra.
COUNCIL DONATES $50.00
TO SPORTS DAY, JUNE 3rd
Don't forget the dance at the Royston Imperial Pavilion on Wednesday!
June 3rd. Moody's 8-plece orchestra
Dancing 9-2
NOTICE
The   Ladles   Aid   of   St. George's
Presbyterian    Church    wlll hold    a
Strawberry    Festival    and Sale   of
Work on Mayor Parnham's Lawn on
Wednesday, June 24ih from three lo
six p.m.
Mr. W. McLellan, Sr., representing
the committee in charge of the school
sports to be held In Cumberland ou
Juno 3rd, was present at the Council
meeting on Tuesday evening for tlie
purpose of UBking financial assistance.
He pointed out that the sum of approximately fifty dollars wus still required to purchase the remaining
cups and medals for the various contests and as the day was essentially
one for the children he hoped the
Council could see Its way clear to
render the necessary aid. Before
leaving, Mr. McLellan brought up the
question of decorating the town for
the occasion with arches on the principal streets but was informed thnt
the frames used on former gala days
were now out of condition and 'tlie
city would be unable to build new
ones.
Alderman Mullen moved that tlie
Bum of fifty dollars be donated by
the Council toward the sports fund.
The motion passed and clerk Cope
was Instructed to Inform the committee to this effect.
The following hills and accoun's
were referred to the finance committee for inspection: Cumberland Electric Co., $46.35; Cumberland Union
Water Works Co., $3.25; Workmen's
Compensation   Board,   $38.80;   C.   II.
Tarbell & Son $2.95; Campbell Bros.
$10.00; Royston Lumber Co,, $2,1";
U. Watanabe (uniform for police
chief), $5(1.00; Hamilton Uniform Cap
Co., $8.00; W. II. Cope (salary) $160;
James Baird (salary) il"'<; E. Hughes
(permit foes) $6.80; Esquimau Nursing Home $43,110; It. J. Selfe, (audll-
or's   fees)   $20,00;   J.   Bartholdl,   2V.
.days work $10.75;  J.  Potter 3/4 day
, work, $3.22;  J.  Boyd  1/2  day  work
$2.15; making a total of $537.83.
Alderman Jeffrey, for the Hoard of
Health,   reported   that   one   case   ol
i scarlet   fever  had   been   admitted   to I
Ihe   Isolation   Hospital    during    tho
week.     The case was from Bevan and
therefore expenses would be paid by
1 the Government. The chairman of |
the water committee reported that the
hydrant on Pendrltli and Fourth had
been repaired and that the pipe to the
old water trough on Third street had
been cut off. Alderman Ledlngham,
chairman of the lire wardens, reported that the chemical truck was in the
garage at the present time undergoing
minor  repairs.
Only four members, enough to constitute a quorum, were present, They
! were: Mayor Parnham, Alderman Jof- ,
j frey, Ledlngham and Mullen, and City j
■ Clerk Cope.
Fully Intent on duplicating their
last year's victory, sixteen of tha
strongest players from the Cumberland Tennis Club paid a visit to Port
Alherni on Monday for lhe purpose ol'
engaging lhe Club from that city in
a series of matches throughout the
day. Something must have gone
wrong, however, for when the players arrived home each had a clever
alibi to put up to the inqulsltives ones
"lack of practice." Sufficient to say
AlbeTnl overwhelmed lhe visitors hy
taking ten of the fourteen mulch,
played.
Cumberland did show lack of practice, not individually but as teams,
and against the brilliant net work of
the Alberni players individual playing amounted to naught. Thanks
to tlie defeai, the local teams now see
their fault and are practicing diligently in order to wreak vengeance-
when Port Alberni pays tlie return
visit on June 3rd.
The members of tiie club who made
tiie triii on Monday were Mrs. U. W.
Clinton, Mr. and Mrs. J. James. Miss
I'. Partridge, Miss O. Oliver, Miss M.
Redford, Miss 1). Uickle, Dr. G, Mai -
N.uighton, II. Stewart. Hev. W. Leversedge. A. lt. Stacey, W. II. Cope, E.
Bickle, M. Graham, ('. Graham and T.
Graham, Jr. Play commenced at
10:30 a.m. and continued until 5:30
pin., vvlih a short Interruption ror
lunch at which tile visitors were tin:
guests of the I'ori Alberni Club in the
New Beauiorl Hotel. Afternoon lea
was served ou the courts.
Following are ihe scores, the Cumberland teams being mentioned first
in each case:   Mrs. James and   Mis'
Bickle  lost io  .Mrs.  Blackmore  ani
Mrs. Hanna. 2-0, 1-li; Miss Oliver and
.Mrs.  Clinton  lost  to  .Mrs.  Vaughan
'and Miss Bird, 0-2. 2-0. 0-0; .Miss I'm
Itrldgo nnd Miss Redford losl lo Mr.
Hurnes  and   Miss   F.   Bird,  3-8,  4-0;
'■ M. Graham  and  T.  Graham  lost   io
Vaughan and Warner, 0-4, 1-6, 4-6; C.
Graham and Bickle won trom Barnen*
'and Svvayue, 0-2, 6-8]  Dr. MacNaugh*
Hon and II. Stewart won [nun Driinn-
couilie   and   Hanson.   6-0,   3-ti.   0-5;
Copo and  Stacey   losi   lo  Ilroad  and
Harries. 0-6, l-o. 4-6; Leversedge anil
: James   won   from    Hanna    and    B
j Vaughan.   0-2,   3-0   0-1;   Miss   Bickle
and T. Graham won trom .Mrs  Black-
more and  llrlniaconilie, 0-2. 5-0. 6-11;
Mrs. James  and    M.    Graham    losl
to    Mrs.    Vaughan    mid    Vaughan,
1-0; Miss Oliver aiid c. Graham
4-1
losl lo Mrs. Hanna and Harries. 0-3,
4-0. 5-0; .Miss Redford and II Stewart lost to .Miss Bird nnd Swaynn,
2-0, 1-0; Mrs. Clinton and Leversedge
losl lo Mrs. names and Hanson, l-ti,
l-o; .Miss Partridge nml Stacey losl
to .Miss !•'. Bird and Board, 6-3, 2-6
4-6.
For a good lime on .Saturday nlglil
attend tlie Dance in Hie (!. W. V, A
Hall. Excellent music, excellent
dance floor.     Gents 50c. Ladles 10c.
NOTICE
Any person, or persons, having
claims againsl the estate of the late
Mrs. Mary Ann Joyce, of Cumberland
B.C., arc requested to send same to
Mr. A. Joyce, whose address is
Courtenay, ne. 22-23
disappointed, The short time that
Cliffe has spent under the wing of his
manager, Lonnie Austin, has worked
wonders in tlie former lanky youth
who used to strut his stuff among the
liig trees in the logging camps near
Courtenay. He is no longer the gang
ling youngster maintaining solely on
his good right list for tlle knock-out
blow but has developed Into a lighting machine Willi a wallop In both
mitts and a quantity of science that
surprised even his most hard-boiled
critics. \yth proper handling and
still more experience there is no
reason why Itoy should not go far
ill ills chosen profession, no reason
why he should not get a crack at the
heavy-weight. championship of the
world, and if ambition and enthusiasm count, he'll get  it.
Ilorcol Seconds I I life
Those who attended with the desire
of also seeing Dode Bercot, welter-
welghl champion of the Pacific Coast,
had their holies realized, for the noted
little boxer was Introduced to the
crowd hy tiie announcer and received
a great ovation. He seconded Roy
during the bout. Lonnie Austin,
who manages both ("Hire and Herein,
was also ill tlle corner.
Seven good preliminaries were staged before the main go. doing much to
put the fans in a good humor. These
were between" boxers from Everett.
Cumberland, Courtenay and Nanaimo.
I iclil li)  Idinails
Hound 1 Boxers sizing up each
other without a blow being struck lu
the lirst minute, Cliffe got his bearings and landed a light tap on Morris'
lace. Al. dropped ins guard and
Hoy lapped iilin again on the mouth,
bringing a fulril tinge of red. Morris
did nol connect in tliis round.
Hound 1 Morris missed a right
swing and Cliffe landed a straight lei't
lo the Btomach. Both boxers exchanged lo ihe head. Morris danced
around Hoy without gelling near enough to conned and when the hell
rang Cliffe had him in a dangerous
position in one corner of lhe ring.
Round :! Cliffe side-stepped in
lim- io miss a rlghl swing which was
carrying dynamite. Morris came
back and took a hard right to Hie
holly followed by a straight left to
the rlghl eye which opened up a
i deep gash from which the blood flowed down Ids face. Hell caught them
in clinch in cantor of ring.
Round I Morris' seconds bad stop
Iped ill'- bleeding Iml Al. looked tired
while ("Mill's hair was nol even out
of place. Morris tried hard with his
rlghl bul could nol sem to land li
dangerously, Cliffs was content to
a.., his h'tt even when there wcre
ninny openings lor his right. Both
si 1 up and slugged hard for several soconds iu Morris' comer. Cliffe
missed rlghl swing and Morris landed 0 snl'i one lo lhe chest. When
hell Bounded Koy was working on Al'.i
eye and had again brought the dure:.
Round .*' Morris gave a good Imitation ol Pnavo Niirnii for the first
minute bul suddenly stopped his
• prom ing and lauded several hard
ones lu CllfTe's face and body. One
of these, a one-two punch to the Jaw.
made Hoy a little more wary for the
rest of the round. Thla was the only
time when .Morris was really dangerous. The bell caught both boxers
showing signs ol' lhe hard going.
Round o Cliffe continued his jabs
in AI's c\c bul was always on the
lookout for (lie Everett boxer's wicked right. Referee Jackson separated them fiom a clinch and Hoy miss
ed a rlghl hay-maker which wolll I
(Continued on  Page Two) PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
Straight  Right  To
Jaw: Morris Out
(Continued From Page One)
have lifted Al oul of lhe ring. .Morris was in difficulties and the crowd
was yelling for the kayo.
Hound 7 Morris could not see
clearly for tlie blood streaming down
his face bul ids clever foot-work
served him in good stead In eluding
Hoy, who was trying hard lo land
his rlghl nnd end the fight. Morris
clinched and took a severe beating
on i oming out. With aboin live seconds of ihe round left, Hoy finally
landed his rigid to Al's jaw. knocking
the latter through the ropes for Mie
kayo. Tlie blow came so quickly
that the crowd could hardly realize
the  light, was on r.      Morris  did  nol
Here and There
Agents specializing in Irish business in Canada and the United
States look fur a big boom in steamship passexger traffic, according to
reports received from steamship
companies. Tlle present outlook is
said to he for the highest level of
emigration to Canada since the war.
Sir William S. Glyn-Jones, Secretary of the British Pharmaceutical
Society, is touring Canada under the
auspices of the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association with a view tn
explaining the workings of tlle Proprietary Articles Trade Association
of Great Britain. He is opposed ti
"cut-rate" methods of selling drugs
Willi 3,000,001) milch cows, DOO.OOl
dairy farmers, 1,500 creameries and
many thousand cheese factories.
Canadians are the greatest btittei
eaters in the world with an annual
average per capita consumption in
1923 of 27.43 pounds, according to
D'Arcy Scott, secretary and treas
urer of the National Dairy Council
of Canada.
The shield taken from the gates
of Quebec City when the Ancient
Capital was taken in 1759 and which
was donated to the City of Hastings
by one of the conquerors, General
Murray, will be returned to Quelle
after an interval of 165 years. Lord
Willing-don, First Viscount Ratton,
will be the special emissary who will
bring the Shield back to Canada.
Salmon-fishing in the Eastern
Townships of Quebec will be one of
the attractions of that region when
the Gaspe salmon eggs brought tn
the provincial government hatcheries
nt Lake Memphreiiingog are developed. A number of trays packed
in ice and holding some thousands
of eggs recently passed through tht
Canadian Pacific Railway warehouse
on the Montreal Windsor Station for
St. Paulin and Mont Tremblant.
Miss P. Carlisle, an English
authoress of repute, who recently
took up ranching neat Calgary, has
become so enthusiastic about the
West that she is planning to bring
out girls from the Old Country to
follow her example. She found
plenty of them willing to try out
this plan. She herself harvested
7,000 bushels last year from the 250
acres under wheat on her SOU acre
ranch.
By winning the New Brunswick
Provincial Trophy Competition of
the St. John Ambulance Association
in March last thc Canadian Pacifii
Railway First Aid team from McAdam, N.B., now have a chance to
compete this year for the Montizambert Trophy emblematic of the
championship of Canada it) First
Aid. Ihe team hns a record of four
championships to their credit since
Inst June
At a recent meeting of the Royal
Society of Canada a gold medal for
outstanding achievement in science
was awarded to Charles Saunder
for his discovery and development
of "Marquis" wheat. It is claimed
that mis variety has raised the Do-
minion to its present position as
a wheat-growing country and has
added millions of dollars to the
pockets of farmers here and in the
United States.
Exiled from Hungary of which he
had been president, after the Communist revolution of l'.ll!), Count
Michael Karolyi toured the United
States in March and April but was
forbidden to address meetings or ex-
plain his political views in that country. He returni d to London where
he now lives, wilh Countess Karolyi,
passing through Montreal and sailing on the Canadian Pacific S.S.
"Montclare" from St. John. Interviewed in Montreal he expressed a
great admiration for Canada and
said he had once been on the point
of settling either in Montreal or
Toronto,
recover his normal senses until nearly an hour later.
After the bom Cliffe was lieseiged
in tlie ling by hundreds of admirers,
anxious to shake hands and extend
congratulations. Harry Jackson, of
Cumberland, acted us both announcer
and referee for tho main bout and all
the preliminaries. Cliffe's weight
was announced as 175 pounds and j
.Morris' at 1S5 pounds.
The Preliminaries
11. Watson, of Cumberland, 105 lbs. |
and M. Smart, of Courtenay, 108 lbs. |
went three two-minute rounds to a
draw and then went one more to
settle the dispute. A draw was again I
announced.
It. Henderson of Nanaimo, and Jim
Matthews ot tho same city, mixed rast
and hard lor three rounds, but the
former was the more aggressive and
was given the decision. Until weighed  115 His.
Thc nexl bout wns three lVfe-minute
rounds between .1. Sweeney of Cumberland. 115 lbs; and Syd Williams of
Courtenay 121 His. Williams' superior weight mid ami he was given the
declelon.
Everett Boys Show Class
lhe next preliminary was an exhibition houi of three 2-minute
rounds between Young Gar and Roy
Baker, both of Everett. This was the
best on the card, tlie boxers being
given a great hand by the crowd. Both I
weighed 125 pounds.
Th" only knock-out of the evening. I
outside ol*  the main event, occurrel
when   Holi.   Hunden  of  Everett,  laid
low Juck Foster, of Cumberland, in
the cocend round of their scheduled
three round match. A left upper-cut
did the trick. Foster though ten
pounds heavier, was no match for his
speedy opponent.
Number six on the card was a three
2-mlnute mix between Harold Roberts
of Nanaimo. and Jackie Johnson of
Everett. Both boxers showed considerable class and received a great
hand from the fans. Johnson received the referee's decision. He
weighed 130 lbs and Roberts weighed
140 lbs.
The seventh and seml-flnal bout
was a farce, and did nothing more
than give the crowd a goo dlaugb.
Adam Monks, of Cumberland 150. and
J. Walker of Nanaimo, 155, were the
contestants. Monks can. and should
put up a better exhibition than he did.
while Walker's wild swings were nn-
(hlng more than that. The affair
lasted for eight minutes, seven of
which were spent in loving embrace
in the center of the ring.
'Baseball from p. 1
fanned hut Al. Hansen singled and
! scored Heft, to the wild delight of the
I fans. J. Galligher then came up and
j slammed Into a double play—Banner-
j man to James to Plump—for the final
out of the inning.
Box Seme
Cumberland AB R H PO A B
Plump, lb     2   10   2   0   0
Bannerman, ss      2   10   0   2   0
James, 2b     3   0   0   110
McKay. If     3   0   2   0   0   0
.Marocchi, 3b     3   10   2   0   0
Richards,  c      2   0   2   a   1   0
Hunden, cf p      2   0   1110
Robertson, p cf ....   2   0   0   0   0   0
Farmer, rf     1   0   0   0   0   o
Totals
Powell Itlver
Hashiin,   lb   ...
Sliunerman.  cf     2
Heft, rf     3
A. Gallagher, 3b .
A. Hansen, 2b 	
.1. Gallagher, cf
Sellnian. ss  	
20   3 5 15
AB R H PO A
3   0 1 (i
1 1 2
1 3 0   0
3    0 0
3   I) 1
1    1
2    0    0    3    1
2    0    0    0    3
S.  Hansen.  If       10   0    1
Carivean, p 	
W. Gallagher, p
1   0   1   II
10    10
Totals 21    2    8 16 10    i
Seme b)   Innings
12   3    4    5
Cumberland       0   II   0   1    2—1
I Powell River     0   0   1    I)   1 —:
Summary—Earned   runs:   Cumber
land   2,   Powell   niver   1;   Two-basi
na:
MONTREAL TO ^OLD COUNTRY
TO PLYMOUTH . CHERBOURG . LONDON
Ascania June 0, July 11, Aug. 15;      Antonla June 19, July 18, Aug. 22
Ausonla June 27, Aug. 1, 29.
TO LIVERPOOL
Aiiraiiia June 20. July 24;
TO GLASGOW
Saturnla June 12, July 10.
Athenla  June 19
FROM NEW YORK
TO QUEENSTOWN' AMD LIVERPOOL
Franconia June 0 Caronla June 13
Laconiu June 20 Carmania June 27
TO CHERBOURG ANI) SOUTHAMPTON
Aquitanla June 9. July 1, 29 Berengarla June 17, July 8, Aug. 5.
Maurctania June 24, July 15. Aug. 12
TO LONDONDERRY AND GLASGOW
Assyria June 6 Columbia June 13.
Cameronia June 20 California June 27
TO PLYMOUTH . CHERIIOUIKi - LONDON
Albania June 13, July 18
TO PLYMOUTH - CHERBOURG    . HAMBURG
Andania June 27, Aug. 1. Sept 5.
Money Orders and Drafts at lowest rates; Full information from Agents
OR COMPANY'S OFFICES, 622 HAST1NCS ST. W, VANCOUVER, IU*.
Alaunia Aug. 7.
Letltia July  3.
PETER McNIVEN
...TPaUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
I'ETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND rHONE ISO
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Specials
For Pay Day
Hoys' Black and Drown Leather Shoes, sizes 11 to 13
Reg. $3.60,     Special   $2.70
Boys' Canvas Shoes, Leather Soles sizes 11-13 $2.50
Same* in sizes 1 to 5.    Special $2.75
Mun's Lirowt) Canvas Shoes, with Leather Soles, sizes
(1 to !) .'..... $3.60
Men's Black Hose, 3 pairs for $1.00
House Dresses, in a good assortment of colors at $1.45
A better dress at   $1.85
C'ir^G'iiTghamlK-Tsses" at $1.75 "and "AAA. A AA.' $ 1.95
.7'sH'^^Zsr U>_. -     '. . '     ... •:-. I _. l_.»a,i.: ■ J»; _aa,^»i.t.-^Z t
Cotton Crepes, all colors, per yard   25c.
Ginghams, in newest checks, per yard SOc.
Spun Pongee, per yard   75c.
A. McKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FSbi
ni mm
Qfl D *
There's nothing puzzling
about the quality of tho
foodstuffs here — or the
prices. They help solve
the problem of high living
cost.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. Slli and Dunsmuir.
hits: Hunden, Sliunerman, and Heft:
Double iliays: Bautierman to James
to Plump; Stolen bases: Plump, Bannerman, McKay and Hunden; Double
steal: Plump and Bannerman; Left
on bases: Cumberland 5. Powell River G; Struck out: by Robertson 4, by
Hunden 4, by Carivean 1, by Gallagher 4; Base on balls: oil Robertson
1, off Carivean 1; Hit by pitcher:
Plump and Bannerman by Gallagher,
Gallagher and Hansen by Hunden;
Passed balls: Richards 3, Gallagher
1; 5 hits, 1 run off Robertson in 2 1/3
innings; 1 run, 3 hits off Hundon in
2 2/3 Innings. Credit win to Hunden
4 hits, 1 run off Carivean in 3 2/3
innings, 1 hit 2 runs off Gallagher in
1 1/3 innings. Charge defeat to Gallagher. Umpires J. Bono and P.
Fletcher.
The Color of Soap
The while color emphasizes
the purity which has made
Baby's Own Snap so popular
in Canadian Nurseries.
Its soothing- fragrant lather
cleanses and refreshes.
It is impossible to buy a purer
soap than—
Baby's Own Soap
10-lt
"Beif for uou and Baby too"
Job
Printing
—of the
Better Kind
Obtainable at the office
of the
Cumberland
Islander
Phone 35
; Job Printing that won't stick is
\ not worth any more than that
kind of a friend.
BEFORE WARM DAYS COME, PHONE WILCOCK §|
BROS. FOR ICE. jj
j     Always at your service—huge cakes of cooling Wilcock Hj
tiros. Ice—your guarantee of maintaining a healthy §§
household during the summer season. |||
jg      Leave your order today at Wilcock riros., so that H
you will have your ice when you want it. §|
I Wilcock Bros. I
H      MEAT
llllllllllllllllllllllllA : A
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
and
FISH    =
A GRAND
DANCE
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE
CUMBERLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS
WILL BE HELD IN THE
Ilo-llo Hall
AS A CLIMAX TO THE SPORT.S
HELD   ON   THE   RECREATION
GROUND DURING THE DAY.
Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllli
TICKETS MAY BE OBTAINED
FROM SCHOOL CHILDREN OR AT
THE DOOR.
ADMISSION
Gents $1.00 Ladies 25c
nil!
Dance Commences at 9.30 p.m. on
■•"■*■.
Wednesday, June 3rd
Plump's Orchestra in Attendance FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
The largest bottle in the world, in Yellowstone National
Park. Beer by the open bottle, especially this kind of
bottle, would be enough to supply all the beer parlors in
Cumberland for several days
B. C. BUSINESS
SHOWS UP BETTER
THAN EASTERN
WINNIPEG, May 26.—The weekly
report of the Canadian Credit Men's
Trust Association, Limited, reads:
Halifax—Business conditions not
up to expectations owing to weather
conditions.
Montreal—Boot and shoe sales
slow. Grocery sales fairly steady.
Dry goods show very little increase
in sales.     Collections fair.
Toronto—A slight improvement In
some lines is noticeable, but this is
counteracted by other weaknesses.
On the whole, no change since last
report.
Winnipeg—Wholesale business hold
Ing steady with hardware and associated Hues reporting improvement in
conditions. Retail trade fairly satisfactory.     Collections fair.
Regina—No material changes have
been noted In wholesale trade conditions during the last week, and re-
tall trade remains fair. Collections
fair to slow.
Saskatoon—Both wholesale and retail reported fair and collections fair
to slow.
Calgary—Trade conditions In both
whole and retail trade remain unchanged.    Collections fair.
Edmonton—Whole district has had
wonderful seeding season. Prospects
good.
British Columbia—Retail trade reports business fairly good. Collections all lines fairly good.
CIRCUS SNAKE TAKES
LIKING TO LADYSMITH
PATTULLO FIRM
IN STAND ON
LOG    EXPORT
Permits   Being   Granted   This
Year Only Half Those For
Last Year
illon T. D. Pattullo, Minister of
Lands, stated that permits for tlic export of logs from licensed areas was
only fifty per cent of that granted In
tbe same period last year.
The fact remains, however, that
more logs are being cut than the
market will absorb and the Minister
has notified the president of the Loggers' Association, giving warning that
there is no intention of the Government to relax Its regulations with regard to export, ond should the market become glutted by reason of op-
omions carried out with the knowledge that there is no market to absorb the product, export will not be
allowed to relieve the congestion.
The same problem is facing operators on the other side of the line.
More logs are being cut than the
market wlll absorb.
The Minister claims that the present situation proves conclusively how
absurd has been the contention that
mills were being constructed on tne
other side of the line for the deliberated purpose of cutting logs Import
ed from British Columbia.
This has nothing to do wilh the
strength of Government Beer, nor
yet is It a story of squirrel whiskey,
Just a yam about a snake which escaped from the circus here two weeks
ago. lt has been residing In the locality of the print shop, and was seen
for the lirst time on Wednesday. It
Is bluc-hlack In color and from four
aud a half to live feet in length.
Twice during the day this crawling
reptile was seen, but not caught.
Yesterday morning he shifted his
quarters across the road and was seen
entering the garden of a neighbor
near the print shop—where he is now
no one knows. The circus proprietors have been notified of the travels of their black pet. So far as we
can learn, he is of a perfectly harmless species, his chief food being rodents of every description.—Ladysmith Chronicle.
THRILLS APLENTY
IN CAREY FILM
Bloody   Brawls,  Blinding  Blizzards and Wolf Attacks
Make for Excitement
Many many months have elapsed
since you will enjoy anything so Immensely as "Silent Sanderson." Harry
Care/8 latest Hunt Strombery production, which will be showing at the
Gaiety Theatre. Courtenay on Wednesday and Thursday, June 3 and 4.
It's an impelling story, having most
of Its action in the frozen North. As
a great-hearted Westerner who seeks
furgeifulness In the gold country
when his life is broken by a woman.
Carey gives the finest performance
we've ever seen him give—and we've
probably seen everything he's done ln
the past.
It deserves the lion's share of credit
for novelty in plot and Incident. Its
thrills and daring and vastly Impressive. These constat, notably, of a
blinding blizzard in the Yukon that
losses men about ut will; an attack
by a band of sly, blood-thirsty wolves,
who tear a man to pieces before your
eyes; several spine-tingling flst-flghl3
with the despicable villain on the receiving end; and a drought In tb*
cattle country tllat kills the kine by
tlie thousands, leaving their sprawling, mewling young to perish at their
sides. The scenes In the Yukon barroom, we thought perfectly drawn—
the vulgar dancing girls In their
tawdry duel.-, the bestial men. the
bitter brawls are so entirely convincing that lhe audience actually shuddered, gasped and exclaimed aloud
as the tide of the story ebbed and
flowed.
Tlie love story which runs through
this harrowing tale, together with the
delicious blls of new comedy business
put over by Carey, throws a pleasant
glow over the bitter reality of the
piece, tendering lt a well-balanced bit
of entertainment with an equnl nppenl
tor all tastes.
PETER WHISKERS, MINER,
IS KILLED AT EXTENSION
Peter Whiskers, 57, died at 12.30
Friday week in the hospital at Ladysmith as Ihe result of being struck
by a fall of rock while engaged at his
work in the Extension mine, the- accident taking place two hours previous to his death.
The late Mr. Whiskers was born in
Hamilton, Scotland, and had resided
In Extension for the past 21 years.
Besides his wife he ls survived by
three sons, Peter, Charles and Andrew, all at home, and four daughters,
Mrs. R. Lawson, Mrs. T. M. Wilson.
Ladysmith; Mrs. V. Pick, Tlmberland;
and Mrs. 0. A. Buck, Nanaimo.
With the death of Mr. Whiskers
canio the firnt filial accident which
has occurred in tllc Extension mines
for the past five years.
The funeral of tlie late Mr. Peter
Whiskers, took place on Sunday la?t
from the residence of his daughter,
Airs. T. M. Wilson to tlle local cemetery. Rev. Mr. Graham conducting
the services.
A British surgeon declares that
men are getting handsomer eveiy
day. This ls not the usual reflection
of the store windows.
H
ere an
JTh
ere
Agricultural products harvested
in British Columbia during 1923
were nearly $4,000,000 in excess of
the 1922 total, according to the annual report of the provincial department of agriculture. Total production for 1923 was $59,169,798.
  i
The ninth winter carnival at
Banff, Alta., will be held from February 7 to 14, 1925. The curling
bonspiel in connection with the carnival will run concurrently from
February 9 to 14. Revelstoke has
fixed its carnival dates for February
3, 4 and 6, 1925.
Tourists to the number of 100,000
are estimated to have entered the
Province of Nova Scotia during the
past season. These people have left
approximately $7,500,000 in the
province, an increase of 26 per cent,
over the previous year. The number of motor cars entering the province during the tourist season exceeded 11,000.
Canada Book Week was held from
December 1 to 6 this year. Addresses, radio broadcasting and
special displays in stores throughout the country drew attention to
the objects of the week, which are
to promote the reading of good
books generally and to foster Canadian literature. The week was, at
usual, a distinct success.
The foolhardy recklessness of
certain motorists was recently strikingly illustrated at a public crossing on the Canadian Pacific Railway
line at Blind River, Ontario, when
a speeding auto approached the
crossing so rapidly that the driver
was unable to pull up, and ran his
car into the side of a train which
was passing at the time. Fortunately, no one was injured.
In recognition of its excellent exhibits at the 1924 exhibition at Toronto, the Canadian Pacific Railway has been awarded one of tho
medals specially struck off for presentation to the Dominion and Provincial governments, and to a limited
number of other exhibits whose
high class entries in the live stock
and agricultural departments won
them championship prizes.
The plans for the construction of
an immense amusement centre at
Victoria, B.C., to be called the
Crystal Gardens, have just been announced by the Canadian Pacific
Railway, which is responsible for
the scheme. The gardens will include a salt water swimming pool
160 feet long, and a series ef dancing floors, with tea rooms and
gymnasium. Great quantities of
plants, vines and shrubs will be
grown in the structure, which is
•n the lines of a vast conservatory,
containing 36,000 square feet of
glazed glass roof surface.
A considerable increase in the
sheep population of Canada, which
has declined since 1920 from 2,255,-
020 to 1,575,000, is expected as' a
result ef the recent importation by
Alberta ranchers of 400 Rambeuillet
rams. These animals are merinos,
with fine wool, bred in France from
Spanish merino stock. Louis XVI
obtained the first floclt as a gift
from the King of Spain. A hare'i
of 20,000 western range ewes will j
be provided for the Alberta purchase. The enterprise is impcr'.-int,
on account of the prevailing woriJ
shortage of wool.
AND
SATURDAY.
And Saturday Matinee 2:30
EES
Two Great Stars
Nazimova and Milton Sills
in
MADONNA
Of The Streets
FAMOUS RUSSIAN ACTRESS CO-STARS WITH MILTON SILLS IN GREATEST
MELODRAMATIC ROLE OF HER CAREER. A STARTLING STORY OF REVENGE
CONQUERED BY LOVE, MARVELOUSLY DIRECTED AND THRILL1NGLY ENACTED WITH THE MOST PICTURESQUE    AND   FASCINATING   SPOT   IN   THE
WORLD—LONDON—AS  ITS SETTING
Also 2 Reels Comedy And
International News Reel
ADULTS 50<>
CHILDREN 35«"
iJ5c
MATINEE
15c
MONDAY and TUESDAY
-JUNE-
Famous Lasky Presents
The Fighting Coward
AND TWO REELS OF COMEDY
ADULTS 35c
CHILDREN 15c
Wednesday and Thursday
3 .JUNE 1
It's a Thrilling Romance! Riders Up!
ASENSATIONAL SCREEN VERSION FRO M THE FAMOUS GERALD HEAUMONT
RED BOOK MAGAZINE STORIES OF TH E RACE TRACK. A TRUE TO THE LIFE
PHOTOPLAY RIGHT FROM TIA JUANA,     THE    GREAT    RACING    MECCA    OF
AMERICA.
FEATURING CREIGHTON HALE AND ETHEL SHANNON AND A SPECIAL CAST.
Chapter 4 of The Fast Express
IF YOU ARE NOT FOLLOWING THIS SERIAL YOU ARE MISSING A WHOLE LOT.
ADULTS 3-V CHILDREN 15c
\m
Zi
COMING
COMING!
COMING!
"SINGLE WIVES"
HOW TO HE HAPPY 'THOUGH MARRIED
FRIDAY 5-JUNE-6   SATURDAY
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
7:00 TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 8:45 PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
The Cumberland Islander
KEEP IN MOTION
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
AT
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
Our friend, the mechanical engineer, tells us
| that it takes six times as much power to start a
i flywheel from a dead start as it does to keep it
jgoing, once it is in motion. In other words, it
I takes only one-sixth as much effort to keep going
•= ' good once you are on the way as it does to stop a
bit and rest and then start over again. When
= !you are tempted to slacken just because things
are coming your way, remember the flywheel.—
Salesman's Service.
BE USEFUL
There is but one straight road to success, ami
that is merit. The man whp is successful is the
man who is useful. Capacity never lacks opportunity. It cut! not remain undiscovered, because
it is sougb.1 by too many anxious io use it.
IS IT WORTH  WHILE?
Is it worih while, this rush and hurry in endless search for what is poorly termed success?
After all, what is gained by the mad 1025 mania
DON'T GET TOO GOOD
Whatever you do, brother, don't get too good.
There is a piety that is depressing, and which immediately breeds suspicion and distrust. Most
men have faults and if our secret acts and
thoughts, or even those things people know about
us, but which we think they don't know about us,
were held up to the public gaze, we would shrink,
.-it to the quick, and flee to hide our moral and
spiritual nakedness.
"ome of us get drunk, and that's bad; some
for speed?     We tear along tha road in high-pow- of m yle ]ike t|ogSi aw* that wol.se; somD of „..
ered automobiles ami rush through   the  mi' .m ! pWid!, vile talk and that's pitiful; some of us love
planes thut cross the continent between sunrise
and dark. \\ hy ? Will any man confess that he
believes it pay- to sell a life or precious days for
things material.' Somo time wo will awaken to
the real fact, that men are most richly blest when
they realize that wealth of character is more valuable than stocks and bonds.
THE KICKER
Not long ago a wild ass from Persia was
brought to the United States to be shipped to a
certain zoological garden. But just before th<"
vessel reached port he took a notion to kick,
wore himself out trying to kick the ship to pieces,
but all he succeeded in doing was to make a few
dents on the vessel and in killing himself. Instead of burying the ass at sea, the captain dumped him into the furnace. So he became fuel to
help the vessel on its way.
Every community has a human ass that kicks
at everything.     He feels called to criticize and
find fault with every effort made for advancement or improvement.     Such a kicker has his ,
mission.     He does some good in the world, but J
it is after he is dead.
The knocker or kicker builds up nothing. He
is a parasite upon the community, feeding upon
Ahe gifts and interests of others. But there is
a cheerful thought connected with thc kicker. He
soon kicks himself clear of the community. Give
him a little time and he will kick himself to death
like the wild ass from Persia.
There is no person less respected in the community than the kicker. He has but few real
friends, and they are ashamed to have his name
mentioned in connection with theirs.
The kicker stands in the way of all progress.
He is met with in society, in business, in politics,
and in religion. So each community should remember that the kicker will always be there.
money better than we do truth, honor and goodness, and that's pretty bad; some of us- cheat,
.teal and dodge our taxes, and that's contemptible
though among the elect it is sometimes considered
a virtue. But the crowning sin of all is a hard,
unloving heart and a soul without charity for the
frailties of others, which rejoices when others are
crucified and which attempts to hide its secret
joy with sniffling and pious depreciation.
Men dislike such people, and God despis:;s
them.     No, whatever you do, don't get too good.
Heaven is going to be a big surprise party to most
He I of us.
FROM
J he Rag Bag
BY HECK
Prohibition may not prohibit Inn it plays thunder with
the quality.
Courtenay Is thinking of requiring lights on baby carriages
They are equipped with sirens
already
There are germs,thai live on oilier germs. There
nre people like that too.
Our friends advise a cold every morning will prolong
life hut who wants to freeze lo death.
Those research folks might try lo lind a way lo make
baldness attack the chin Instead of the head.
Women who formerly complained that carrying a
heavy mop of hair made their heads ache now complain
of neuralgia from necks left unprotected by bobbed hair.
We're just wondering If thnt Yankee woman accused
But be not discouraged, the kicker helps you after jot* poisoning people because she liked to go to funeral*,
all—foi* he magnifies your faults so you can see has got up into this country and trying out her hand on
them yourself. I The islander printers.
BEAUTIFYING   A   RAILROAD  SYSTEM
*-;■
STe.THERese.Que,
 <E3=^
APAfASVI LLE, Que I
PORT HOPe.ONT.
wBaW1 ■'    ^«4s"D*Bil]liBta^li»
^'■■fjll llli C IL li I n p
nffmm
3^rf**
'AMACHICHe,Que7
Qtrangers, travelling upon the railways in Canada
^ find pleasure in passing through a country that
la new and fresh and i isesstng a wild, primitive
grandeur practically untarnished, But in no smiil!
degree this pleasure is heightened and contributed
to by a wonderful transformation wrought artificially
by the lavish use of trees and flowers which have
been planted anil cultivated undc-r the supervision of
expert horticulturists employed for the purpose by
the railway company,
The most striking example of what can be effected
by this means is to be seen nlong the Cnnadian Pn-
cific tracks through the Prairie Provinces, according
to an article "n the subject in the April "Landscape
Architecture" by  E.  I.. Chlcanot.
"Along the
main line," wri
a  good  many
and others wli
more than three thousand miles of
lea Mr. Chlcanot, "there were naturally
men, station agents, section foremen
0 were garden  lover* and who, with
the limited in lans at their command and to the best
of their ability, cultivated little pieces of ground
• bout the scenes of their activities. The planting of
a little garden at a station, especially in certain bleak,
treeless areas, was a conspicuous feature nnd added
■ome little beauty to the surroundings. This gave to
a higher official of the company, about thirty-five
years ago, the idea of expanding the work of beautifying tht grounds by assisting and encouraging
agents nnd others in work of this kind. This took
concrete form in the distribution to station-agents
throughout the system of free packets of flower
seeds, inevitably, of course, some men did not bother
about them but sufficient did to produce a very
marked effect and make noticeably attractive those
stations where the seed had been properly used and
cared for.
"The impression was so striking that the Operating Department of the company proceeded to have
small gardens laid out and planted at some of the
principal stations and division points along the system. The result of this again was so impressive that
a special study was made of the whole question, and
subsequently it was decided to engage in the work
thoroughly and systematically and to add an expert
horticulturalist to the staff."
"The work since that time (1908) hns grown tremendously, each year seeing a number of new gardens laid out about the company's stations until today the Canadian Pacific Railway has thr* largest
number of gardens of any railway company in the
world.
"Now along the steel Bystem from coast to coast
lies a series of fair gardens and spots of green sward
and often the cool and refreshing shrubbery about iho
station constitutes the one cheerful feature of entry
into * town otherwise drab and unattractive."
H
ere an
dTH
ere
il 1
C a n n d a exported 143,592,5011
pounds of woodpulp during February, of which 133,801,000 went to
the United States and to Great Britain, none. Our newsprint exports
had a monetary value, in the same
month of about seven and a half million dollars.
Two hundred and sixty thousand
acres of land in central and northern Alberta will bo settled by the
British Land Settlement Corporation, it is announced. They are
located north of Kdmonton and from
north of Vermilion to Wabuman,
west of Edmonton.
Approximately 750,000 tourists,
apart from delegates to conventions,
visited Montreal last year by railway, steamer and automobile, according to an estimate compiled by
the Montreal Tourist and Convention
Bureau. It is anticipated that the
influx for the current year will be
even greater.
Geraldine Farrar, famous prima
donna, who gave a recital of Carmen
in Ottawa and Montreal recently,
had a run in with tho U.S. Customs
at the border on her return to the
United States. It was claimed that
i-hampagne and fine wines were
found stored in the piano of her
sumptuous private car, but the great
singer says it was only near-beer.
England's great military spectacle,
the Aldershot Military Searchlight
and Torchlight Tattoo, which is held
annually in aid of the Aldershot
Command Charities, is being presented this year from the 16th to the
20th of June and will, as usual, be
contemporaneous with Ascot Week.
The special feature is to be a Pageant
of Battle which will recall some of
the famous engagements of thc British Army. Nearly 100,000 patrons
attended last year.
To enable French-Canadian students to become acquainted with
Western Canada, the Universite de
Montreal has organized a 28-day trip
to the coast from Montreal next
July. They will pass through Winnipeg, Kegina, Moose Jaw, Calgary,
Edmonton, Banff, Vancouver and
Victoria, with stop-overs at Lake
Louise, Field, Glacier, the Fraser
Canyon and other beauty spots of
the Canadian Rockies,
,Ttt^Ti.\w'iircfl*'WT^
"'Canada has a fine record of
musical and artistic students who
work under the auspices of the Royal
College of Music," says Sir Hugh
Allen, director of the London institution, who is making a tour of Car.-
ada in tho interests of tho College.
Keep Smiling J
i^M^iaraE^r^-ifaratEjiy^ijj: ^oisiefsjsiajsiaici]
Stickers on the wind-shield; a sign
ou ihe rear. This Is a fine world, but
ain't the people queer?
ItHUBABB
Mr. Newly wed — "Good gracious
dear, what a long pie! It is surely
loo big for just two."
Mrs, Newlywetl—"I'm sorry, Cecil,
but I couldn't get any shorter rhu-
barb anywhere."
HIT IT'S HABD WOltK
Lecturer: "Yes, my friends, in
China human life is considered ot
very little valuo, Indeed, if a
wealthy Chinaman is condemned to [
death he can easily hire another lo
die for liim. In fact, many poor fellows get their living by acting as suh-
otitutes.
HOW'S Tilt: GIUCKEN1
Finding a seat In n corner, he adjusted his glasses and glanced over
Uie menu.     Turning to the waitress.!
who  was standing at his  elbow, ho
aeked;
"How's the chicken today?1'
"Fine, old top! Mow's the the kid;"
was the unexpected reply.
Two   farmers  met  after  church
and had this conversation:
"I hear you've sold your pig?"
"Yes, sold him last Thursday."
"What d'ye get?"
"Eight dollars."
"What's cost ye to raise it?"
"Paid  three dollars for the sholo,
and five more for the feed."
"Didn't make much, did ye?"
' No. hut 1 had the company of the
pig all summer."
■■.•■vyvwyv
LKMSBBK ■»»*■*: LMLW
P. P. HARRISON
HAi'iMS'mt   and   SOLICITOR
NOTAItT PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
NOTICE
Wool) for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone !>2U Happy Valley
W. C. White
The Right Way
to Boil Potatoes
Put the potatoes In sax 8MP
Enameled Potato Pot. Cover
with water. Add aalt to
taste. Boil until soft. When
finished, drain off all the
boiling water through the
strainer spout. No danger
of steam scalding the hands
because the handle securely
locks the cover on. If your
family uses potatoes, you
require one of these.
Enameled
Potato Pots
 »"
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UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
20   rooms,   electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone li.
R. TATBI, lUaager.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.M BHUIPIELD,    Proprietor
UOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUMINS
Dunsmuir Avenue. Cumberland
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & He«Hng Engineer, Set
R. RUSHTON
Phono 121
Courtenay
Phoie 117
Cumberland
Your   needs  will  receive  tmasiiate
attention.
Student tours, operated by the
Canadian Pacific in conjunction with
Mi-Gill University, are to bo extended
this summer to include students from
the British Isles. Heretofore, these
tours have been restricted to scholars in other parts of Canada and in
the United States. As Montreal is
regarded as an ideal centre for the
study of the French language, it is
anticipated tliat the new project will
attract muny visitors to the Canadian metropolis.
The body of Dr. Sun Yat Sen,
President of Southern China lay in
state in a wonderful blue-tiled old
Temple near the "Altar of Heaven,"
during the long drawn out ceremonies at Peking attendant upon his
interment. Through the courtesy of
the government the bier was viewed
by a large party of Canadians and
Americana touring the world on the
Canadian Pacific S.S. "Empress of
France." They were also invited to
attend the final burial rites which,
with a wealth of colorful Chinese
ceremony took place later in the
JVcstern hills.
MINEHAL ACT
(FORM I*M
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE
Teal Fractional, Robin, lted Bird, Canary. Illnck nird, Blue Jay. Lark, Wren
Snow Bird, Birch No, 2. Hemlock No.
2, ('edar Xo. 2. Spruce No. 2, Tamarack No. 2, .Swan No, 2, Haven No. 2.
Pine No. 2. Fir No. 2, Maple No. 2.
Oak Fractional, Locust, Long Frae-
tlonal, Loon, Hawk Fractional, Mink
Martin, Eagle No, 11, Eagle No. 12 and
Eagle No. 18 Mineral Claims, situate
In the Quntstno Mining Division of
Rupert District.
Where located:— Near Old Sport
Mine, Elk Lake.
TAKE NOTICE tllat I, Frank C
Green, acting as agent for Coast Copper Company, Limited, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 76,8960, Intend, sixty
days from the date hereof, to apply to
tlie Mining Recorder for Certificates
of Improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining crown Grants of the atiove
claims,
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must he cotnmencAd
before the Issuance of such Certificates of  improvements.
Dated this 2Slh day of October. A.D.,
192-1.
F, 0, CiriEEN, I
221 Pemberton Bldg..    I
10-24 Victoria, B.C. I
New Car Service
CAR FOR HIRE DAY OK NIGHT
21   - TELEPHONE IM
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay,
A»k for
Charlie Dalton
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  llo-Ilu  Theatre
CUMBKRLANU, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
| Night calls: 184X Courtenay
|Ofllce: 169 Cumberland FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
"SAVE-THE-LABEL
CONTEST" STIRS UP
GREAT ENTHUSIASM
That this province produces a great
variety of goods both from its soil
and factories has been clearly and
forcibly demonstrated to tlle "Save-
the-Label Contest" Committee during
the past few days. Although the
contest has only been running for a
few days, wonderful enthusiasm has
meen shown by the citizens, not only
women but men entering and actively
getting behind the committee in their
desire to bring prosperity to British
Columbia.
Labels of all kinds and colors nre
pouring Into the B.C. Products Bureau
olllce at the Vancouver Board of
Trade. Their receipt followB announcement of a contest by the bureau, with awards going to those who
turn in most labels taken from pur-
chaseses of British Columbia produced goods.
Tin can labels, candy wrappers,
milk bottle tops, empty cans, on
which trade marks have been lithographed, receipts for drygoods, bread
stickers and a hundred and one other
varieties of marks by which B.C.
products are made known.
Department stores of the city report a largely increased demand for
goods manufactured or grown within
the province.
A. A. Milletlgc manager of the Bureau, whose Job is to check off the
proofs of purchase as they are turned
ln and give credits arroding to the
value of the goods, claims the contest ls taking a big hold all over tlie
province. Entries have ben received
from the Kootenay country. Central
B.C. Nanaimo, Fraser Valley and the
Okanagan.
The Committee urges all consumers to start saving and turning in
their wrappers, containers, stickers,
labels, and tags as soon a spussihlo.
Mr. Mllladge also states "Thnt there
should be no hesitancy on the part of
the small purchaser about entering
the contest; it is surprising how soon
the points mount up and even if the
contestant does not qualify for one
of the capital prizes, she will probably win one of the useful and valuable prizes which will be offered from
time to time as the contest proceeds.
'SEA HAWK' SILLS
GETS A NEW ROLE
Noted Screen Actor Has Strong
Part in "Madonna of the
Streets"
The first appearance of Milton
Sills, noted screen star, since his,
triumph In "The Sea Hawk," Is as
a minister of the gospel. The picture is Edwin Carewe's "Madonna of
the Streets," in which Bills is co-
featured wit lithe famous Russian actress Nazlmova.
"Truly," says Sills, "the present
day movie actor leads a versatile life
Eight or ten years agoan actor was
classified either as a society leading
man or a rough Western type and
never allowed to step out Into a different role. The demand for varied
entertainment has changed all this.
In "The Sea Hawk" I was an English nobleman exiled in disgrace who
became the terror of the sea in the
sixteenth century. I appeared ns a
galley slave, bronzed by the sun to
the waist.
"In 'Madonna of the Streets' I am
a refined nnd polished mission worker
catering to present-day British society. And in my next picture I am
liable to appear as a hard-working
American business man or even, who
knows, as a cowboy of the West.
"Life to a screen player is filled
with Interest. He is made versatile
by the ever changing demands of tlie
American public, and the old saying
that variety is the spice of life holds
true here."
"Madonna of the Streets" is an
adaptation of one nf tbe most popular
books of the English novelist W. B,
Maxwell. It was published under
title of "The Ragged Messcngor." Tlle
photoplay marks the first screen appearance of Nazlmova in two years.
This picture wlll he at the llo-Ilo
Theatre Tonight and tomorrownight
_JW
.JUNE,-
1925
8
rt
Y
w
T
F
s
fat
1
2
3
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5
6
7
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16
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fix*
-
TEN COMMANDMENTS
OF MAIL ORDER HOUSES
The followng Ten Commandments
were read by G. W. West, at the Retail Merchants Convention held in ono
of the larger cities recently, and is
taken from the Commercial Review:
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA j THREE BIG SHOWS AT
The June Issue of Rod and Gun in I*125 ROSE FESTIVAL
Canada takes the form of a specinl
Ontario Tourist number which In i
eludes the attractive features of a personal message to tourists from the
Hon. G. Howard Ferguson, Premier of
Ontario, and a special section setting
PORTLAND,  Ore.,  May  29.
I big "shows" and  a  half-dozen  other
; attractions  are  announced    for    thc
1925 Rose Festival, which opens Mon-
| day, June 15, and continues through
1.   You shall sell your farm  pro- j forth the attractions of Ontario to the
duce for cash, where you can, for we ■ tourist.
buy nothing from you. I    The month's articles are specially:
| selected to be appropriate to the num-1
ber and provide a wealth of Interesting and seasonable reading   for   ull |
2.   You shall iielieve in us and trust;
j field sportsmen.   Dick the Bummer ls
| a story of canoe travel in Northern
Ontario; Dependable Penage of small
mouth   bass.      The   regular   feature
j stories aro of t heir usual high qual-
1 ily and include Caravanning,  Photo-
piaphing and Troutlng on Nova Scot-
la's Brawling Rivers by Bonn/cast lo
I Dale,  The  Young  Mall  Carriers   by
Martin  Hunter.   In   the departments.
j W. C. Motley's Outdoor Talk ls full of
i new wrinkles for the outdoor man;
Angling Talk and Speculation is the
I theme for this month's Fishing Notes
I by   Robert   Page   Lincoln   and   deals
| among other things with  steel  rods
and casting.     Guns and Ammunition.
no confidence ln you.
3. You shall send your money to us
in advance, so we can buy the goods
from lhe factory with your money.
You may have to wait a few weeks,
but that is our business method.
4. You shall get help from your
nearest city or village to build good
roads, so you may easily haul our
goods from the depot; but dn not nslt
help f.oni us—wo don't help to build
good roads.
5. You may buy church bells and
altar utonsila from us, and send the
money in advance—that ls our rule.
6. You shall get all lhe help you
can from  the business men ill your j The Trap am* The Kennel are also ot
•neighborhood.     Although    we    may j gl.ei,t interest  to tchlr devotees and
have more profit from you than they I others.
have, it is against our rule to give to j Ro(* am| Gun in Canada is printed
your churches nnd community sub-! monthly by W. J. Taylor, Ltd., at
scrlptlons. I Woodstock, Ont.
7. You shnll canvert your neigh-
bors also to your fnith In us for we
have room for more money.
8. You shall look at the pretty pic-
tures in our catalogue as often as you |
can, so as to strengthen your desire j
for tilings you do not need, bu; which :
you may order with  other goods to
save the freight.     Send us all of your j
ready cash so that you may not have !
any left to buy necessities from your
home dealers.
I
9. You shall believe us rather than
your home business men. for we waul!
your trade. Wc get to be millionaires
on your support.     Don't be bluffed.
10. You shall call on the business !
people of your vicinity for help and j
credit if you meet with hard luck or .
sickness. It's your money we want;
we don't know you unless your orders j
are accompanied by cash. W. P. Symons
have extended only over three days.
"Rosaria." the Floral Parade and
"Merrykhana" are the three big attractions and two of them are to be
the first attractions of their kind ever
seen anywhere. "Merrykhana" is to
he a distinct novelty—a conglomerate
parade with the carnival spirit ilomin-
of the Nations," Thirty-seven nation- ilivertisement Just before the finale,
alllies represented in Portland's pop- Miss Harriet Leach, dramatic soprano
' ulatlon will have characteristic en- i will slug "A Rose for Every Heart"
Three | tries, many of them with bands. Other; with a rose ballet and a large group
sections will be the "Funnyails" the ■ of waltzers In the background. Chas.
"Razzberry" section, the Industrial, Wakefield Cadman, Composer of the
fraternal and booster clubs. Ever}*, "Kosariu" music, and everyone who
civic club in the Pacilic Northwest is
eligible to enter with a comic float or
stunt.
The pageant "Rosaria" is the one
big thing these days In the lives of
5,0011 dancers, actors and singers who
are spending weeks rehearsing for
its performance nightly June 15 tu i
19.     A new feature of "Rosaria" has
$
has heard this waltz song predict It
will attain tremendous popularity
after Its introduction at the pageant.
Six p'ricesses and 45 ladies in waiting have been chosen for Queen Suzanne the First Court of Rosaria. The
princesses are the Misses Dorothy
Haradon, Lee Tevls. Sarah Jane Talbot. Leslie Kerns, Flora Jane Mene-
ant ln all sections except "The March  Just been announced,     As a special   fee and Janet House.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
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surface litter.
$65.00 $65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30-inch extension tubing, 7-inch aluminum nozzle with detachable
upholstery brush, and radiator tool.
$10.00 $10.00
FOR SALE BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
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CUMBERLAND, B.C.
*#
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M01'e than ihe Price
of the Cheapest Car huilt
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PHONE 99
IllllllfUlV
is io Suit YmvOmventence
^=E
ESS
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a i/g-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
6£
"The Moit of the Best for the Lead"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
'HONE 11
CUMBERLAND
COMOX CREAMERY
BUTTER
IS A FRESH CHURNED PRODUCT FROM JERSEY COWS
THE CREAM IS PASTUERIZED AND TIIE MOST UP-TO-DATE METHODS ARE IN PRACTICE IN OUR CLEAN, SANITARY FACTORY AT
COURTENAY.       YOUR   INSPECTION   IS   INVITED   AS   WE   ARE
PLEASED TO SHOW VISITORS THROUGH THE PLANT.
Healthy Cows
Efficient Methods
-GOOD   BUTTER
Comox Creamery Association PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1626.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
PASS RESOLUTIONS
Question of  Restocking   Lakes
And Puntledge River is
Dealt With
COURTENAY, May 22,—At a recent
meeting ol* the Comox District Hod
und tiun Club held in the city hull
several resolutions were passed. One
ol these requested ihe government
to Razetto a strip ol laud, along the
north bank of the Puntledge Itlver in
order that (his line trout stream may
always be available to fishermen. This
resolution was passed witli a view to
what might happen in ibe future, although at presenl til" laud in question is uncultivated. The question
of restocking Upper Campbell Lakes,
above the famous Elk Kails was
brought up by Mr. John Sutton who
ls anxious for this and other work
to be done. Some of the members
asserted that those lakes nre being
depleted of lish and Ihat lish are show
ing signs of in-breeding. Mr. Sutton
thought It would be a mistake to allow these fine lishing waters to become exhausted. He also urged thai
the Puntledge River be restocked
with sleclhead fry.
The club wlll petition the game
conservation board to do this important work. Much discussion resulted from the motion to request the
appointing of an assistant Game
Warden lo Mr. Ronald Stewart. The
discussion indicated that the district
was too large for one man. however
gooil he may be. Tbe motion carried and the request wlll go forward
to tbe Game Conservation Board. The
secretary. Mr. Keith McKenzie. is also
to write Mr. P. P. Harrison, M.L.A..
asking his help in getting the appointment made.
It we are ever to attain Universal
peace and goodwill we must cultivate friendly relations with other
nations. What we need most today
among men and nations ls a true
-piri! of brotherhood.
Give the parable ot the "Good
Samaritan" hands and feet and don't
shut it up in tlie Uihle and in Lodge
rituals. Jesus meant that it should
be incorporated In human life. Begin with tbe children. Teach thom
lo live but not to hate. To help, not.
o binder.     To play but not to fight.
ln hearts too young for enmity
There lies the way to make men
free.
Where children's friendships aro
world-wide
New ages  will  be glorified.
Let child love child and strife will
cease
Disarm the hearts for that is Peace,
REGULAR MEETING
OF AGRICULTURAL ASSN.
*'"     WAS HELD TUESDAY
VACANT LOT CONVERTED
INTO TENNIS COURT
Tenders For Printing of 1925
Prize List Will be Called
For by Directors.
COURTENAY. May 20.—Some of!
the members of the C.G.I.T. with the
help of Mr. antl His. Ueattie antl Mr.
and Mrs. .1. M. Rodger, have made
quite a passable tennis court out of
the vat ant lot opposite tlie north side
of the school. It Is true that the
ground is not as level as one might
desire, but some must enjoyable
games are being played. There is a
decided sporting chance in halfvot-
leying on the court in its present
condition.
SPECIAL SERVICE IS HELD
IN PREBYTERIAN CHURCH
Junior Organizations Assembled
And Paraded To Church
Under Leaders
COURTENAY, May 20.—A special
service was held in St. George's Presbyterian Church on Sunday evening
for Dominion Hay. Tlie special service was an occasion for a church
parade of the junior organizations of
Courtenay. These organzations assembled near tbe school and consisted of The First Courtenay B. P.
Scouts, Tbe Girl Guides under Miss
Glendlning (Capt.) The Wolf Cub
Pack ln charge of Scout Law-rente
Moncrleff and tbe Brownies led by
Mrs. R. L. Ramsay and asslstetl by-
Miss Kathleen Halley.
In his special address. Ihe Hev. Mr.
W. T. Ueattie said in part: "On Earth.
Peace. Goodwill towards Men." (Luke
2:14.)—Jesus came Into this world
to bring Pence anil Goodwill among
men through the witness of his
cross. The spiritual peace He brought
was  to  have  Its  outcome   in   human
lives and in   human    relationships.
Every true Christian musi of necessity lie a peace maker aud a peace
brlnger. If we have not In some
measure, at least, this priceless possession of Christ's peace, should we
not question our Christianity? We
must believe In peace, thin' pence,
dream peace antl work for peace.
Every student of psychology
knows the power of a word
when it Is on everybody's lips, in
everybody's ears nnd before everybody's eyes. When all the organizations relating to our social, political,
business, church and scliool life
make peace their slogan year in and
year out we shall be In measurable
distance of a warless world. Wails not leal evil bin ii is the symptom
of a hidden disease from whence
came wars and fightings among you?
Came they not hence even from your
lusts that war in your members. Ii
we arc to have universal peace nnd
goodwill wc must strike at the poison
of hate and hatred within ourselves. |
COl'RTENay, May 27.—The directors to attend the regular meeting ot
the Comox Agricultural and Industrial Association on Tuesday night
were, Mesdames D. Bell, W. Brown
and Messrs H. S. Baker, J. W. Gunn,
Ben Hughes. R. U. Hurford, B. F.
Thomas ami M. B. Tribe. President
A. R. England was in the chair. After
the correspondence had been dealt
with, the secretary read a list of
special prizes which have been solicited for the 1!>25 fall fair. Among
the trophies to be competed for this
year is a fine silver challenge cup
gi ven by i he Comox Argus Co. Ltd,
silver cup for the best dairy cow to be
judged by points from thc Canadian
Bank of Commerce, and a silver cup
for the best senior Jersey bull, donated hy the Royal Bank of Canada.
The Comox Farmer's Institute wrore
per their secretary Mr. C. E. Yockney
informing the Agricultural Society of
a special prize of $30 to he awarded
for the best district exhibition of potatoes. The prize I.', to be divided
inio a first of twenty dollars and a
second of ten dollars. A letter of
appreciation is to he sent to the
Farmer's Institute.
Novel Scheme for Mectlnij Loan
For some months past the directors
have been endeavoring to obtain a
loan so that ceitain buildings and
repairs might be taken ln hand. Up
to the present the efforts have been
unsuccessful hut last night a scheme
was put forward by Messrs Hughes
and Tribe whereby a sinking fund suf
ficient to take care of the repayment
of the proposed loan would be reasonably assured. The suggestion was
that tlie Agrlcultuarl Association take
out a twenty-year endowment insurance policy in the name of a young
man of the district for an amount sufficient to meet the sum of the loan.
This, It waa explained would creale
the desired sinking fund at an investment of ahout fifty dollars per annum.
Subject to arranging the loan the
policy is to be written, It was decided.
A special tag day to take care of tic;
premium and the loan interest is to
be set aside for each year. In connection with making arrangements
tor the holding of a basket social ami
a grand raffle with which is lo be
Included a poll for the election of the
most popular young lady ot the district, the president appointed the following committee, Mrs. W, Brown,
and Messrs R. U. Hurtord, B. Hughes
and H. S. Baker. After discussing
various clases In the prize list and deciding to call for tenders tor the print
ing ot the 1925 list, the adjournment
was effected on motion of Mrs. D.
Bell.
/ Will Call
•t your house in time tf) take you to
the train or boat.
Car   For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE i!5 OK 22-A8K FOR
Geo.  Mason
BILL %e BARBER
SAYS
WEfo SEEING
VACOtNATION
MMBTHBE1
gto**]
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
Instead of
Writing Letters
The quicker, easier, and more personal method of
communication is that of long-distance telephoning.
Consult the directory for examples of our new night
rates.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
I
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND ICE CREAM PARLOR
The White Store The White Bakery
COURTENAY, B.C.
IIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
THE GREAT THING
THESE DAYS IS TO
8|   GET A GOOD DRINK
AND THAT YOU
§   CAN GET AT OUR
FOUNTAIN
Commencing with June 1st, GAIETY
THEATRE presents its patrons with 3
changes of program each week
Monday - Tuesday, June 1-2
44
Code of the Sea"
Chapter 3 The Fast Express'
and "Felix the Cat"
ADULTS 35?
CHILDREN 15?
Wednesday  and   Thursday
JUNE 3 and 4
Set upon by a pack of hungry wolves !
HARRY CAREY, in
"Silent Sanderson
i*
BUNDING BLIZZARDS THAT LAST FOR DAYS — PACKS OF LEAN, HUNGRY
WOLVES, LURKING IN THE DARKNESS — FURIOUS FIGHTS FOR THE FAVOR
OF FICKLE DANCING GIRLS IN STUFFY  BARROOMS — THAT'S THE  YUKON
COUNTRY.
ACTION! THRILLS! VILLAINY AND ROMANCE!
A WONDERFUL STORY OF THE NORTH COUNTRY
ALSO COMEDY
ADULTS 35?
CHILDREN 151
Friday & Saturday, June 5-6
Anna Q. Niilson. James Kirkwood, Raymond
Hatton and Sheldon Lewis, in the
"Top of the World"
FROM THE NOVEL BY ETHEL M. DELL
THE STORY DEALS WITH A ROMANCE STARVED ENGLISH BEAUTY WHO
MARRIES A RATHER COLD BLOODED MAN. HER CHILDHOOD SWEETHEART
TURNS UP AND FOR A TIME HER HEART IS TORN BETWEEN THE TWO MEN.
IN THE END HUSBAND AND WIFE REA LIZE EACH OTHERS REAL VALUE AND
TRUE WORTH AND THEIR MARRIAGE BECOMES A HAPPY ONE. AN ALL-
STAR   CAST
COMEDY FOX NEWS
ADULTS 50?
CHILDREN 25?
Gaiety Theatre
Courtenay, B. C.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES 7—10:30
SHOW EVERY NIGHT FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
Additional News
From Courtenay
STUDENTS SUCCESSFUL
Word was received on Thursday
from the Misses Madaline Swan and
Edith Crockett from Victoria that
these young ladles had both passed
their Normal exams and that they will
arrive at their homes In Grantham on
Saturday.
FIRE DOES LITTLE DAMAGE
COURTENAY, Mal 28.—In response
to a recent Are a number of cars hurried out of town to Mr. Dan Kilpat-
rlck's ranch between Courtenay and
Cumberland. The fire, which had
started in the shack In one of the
fields occupied by Mr. Kennedy, was
extinguished, however, before the arrival of the volunteers from Courtenay.     Little damage was done.
SUN DRUG STORE
HAS SMALL BLAZE
COURTENAY, May 28,-Wliat might
have been a serious fire started on
Wednesday afternoon when Mr. Wallls of the Sun Drug Store Co., was
making violin- varnish on an electric
heater, which caught fire. The alarm
was 'turned in and the fire deparl-
ment responded in their usual efficient manner but in the meantime
Mr. Wallls managed to extinguish the
flames. What might have been a bad
fire in the centre of town was thus
prevented.
JOLLY WHIST DRIVE
AT GRANTHAM
COURTENAY, May 28.—The Grantham Community Hall was the scene
of an ejoyablc whist drive on Wednesday. The players occupied twelve
tables and the winners were: Ladies'
first, Miss Kathleen Clifford, second.
Mrs. Thos. Beech, consolation, Miss
Kitty Ault. Gentlemen's first. Mr.
John Crockett, second, Mr. Wm. McKenzie. Delightful refreshments including tea were served, after which
dancing to music supplied by Miss
McQuillan and .Mr. Alvin Parkin was
thoroughly enjoyed.
SPECIAL PRIZES
FOR FALL FAIR
COURTENAY, May 28.—In addition
to the Silver Challenge Cups offered
to the Comox Agricultural and Industrial Association for prizes for tli'*
1925 fall fair, the following special
prizes have also been offered:
Quaker Oats Co., per Comox Creamery, 1st prize 98-lb sack of Quaker
Oat Flour; 2nd prize <9-lb. sack of
Quaker Oat Flour for Loaf ot homemade bread made from Quaker Oat
Flour.
Ogllvles Flour Mills Co., per Brack-
man & Ker„ 98-lb. sack of Royal
Household Flour.
Western Canada Flour Mills Co.,
per Brackman & Ker, 4 49-lbs. sacks
Purity Flour.
Lake of the Woods Milling Co., per
Comox Creamery. 4 49-lb. sacks Five
Roses Flour .
Kelly, Douglas and Co., Special
'Nabob" hamper.
Vernon & Buckerileld, sack "Diamond" brand Laying Meal.
Moore Whittlngton Co. Ltd.. $10.00
lumber, sash or doors.
Comox Farmer's Institute, $30,110
for best exhibit of commercial potatoes, to consist of 4 varieties, these to
Include Burbank and Green Mountain, weight of each variety to be ten
pounds. 1st prize $20.00, 2nd prize
$10.00.
Comox Creamery Association, $2.',
Fifteen dollars cash and ten dollars
for the best loaf of bread from Comox
Whole Wheat Flour.
P. G. E. COAL
DISCOVERY MAY
CUT FUEL COSTS
Reporting a discovery of 625 feet of
coal of continuous formation and prac
tically unbroken by shale seams at
Hat Creek, on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. 170 miles north of Vancouver, A. C. McDougall, has reached
Vancouver.
The area where tlie drilling is being conducted is three and one half
miles long and two and a half mile*
wide. Tills Is located fifteen mile*
from Pavilion station.
Mr. McDougall said that he and his
associates expect to ship coal into
Vancouver over the P.G.E. Railway
by next fall. He considers it one of
the most Important coal discoveries
ever made in Western Canada.
"The enormous quantity of coal,
its accessibility and quality Indicate
it will be possible for domestic purpose at prices much below what is
being paid for coal now marketed
here." stated Mr. McDougall.
SYNOPSIS OF
LMDACTMNDMENTS
PKE-KMI'TIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Cruw ii lands may be pre-empted hy
Briti:;h subjects over IS years ot age,
and by aliens on declining Intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation.
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies ot
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria. B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, i.e. carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west ot tho Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-empt ions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of tbe Land Recording Division, fn which the land applied for
is situated, and are made ou printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained  from  the  Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements made
to value of $li) per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
Pl/JtCHASE
Applications are received lor purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tiinberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) laud is $5
per acre and second-class (grazing)
land $2.5U per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites ou
timber laud, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment cf
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsitrveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may he leased ns homes!tes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected iu the first year, title being
obtained nfter residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land lias beeu surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing aud industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a.
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based >n
numbers ranged, priority being glvon
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free.
permits are available for settlers,
camper:; and travellers, up to ten
head.
RACE TRACK HABITUE
CAPTURED BY CAMERA
All Star Cast Plays "Riders Up"
At The Ilo-llo and Gaiety
Theatres Next Wek.
Universal^ latest all star picture,
"Riders Up/' to be shown at the Hollo Theatre Cumberland on Wednesday and Thursday, June 3 and 4 and
at the Gaiety Theatre Courtenay on
Monday and Tuesday, June 8 and :».
was adapted from the Red Book Magazine story, "When Johnny Comes
Marching Home," by Gerald Beaumont. It Is a story of race track
life, and the hero is a tout.
Persons familiar with the manner
of men who make a living by disposing of information concern ings race
horses have said that the magazine
story Is one of the most natural human interest stories ever told of race
track activities.
The picture was filmed in Tin Juana
Real races and many real track and
'■table attaches being shown as atmosphere. Creighton Hole, Kate Price
and Edith Yorke are In the cast which
Irving Cummings, who has direceted
dome of Universal^ biggest successes, made.
The story is that of a youth who
drifted onto the race track after saying goodbye to his widowed mother
md his sister in a little Xew England village. They believed him engaged in a big business venture and
ire waiting anxiously for him tu
;eep his oft-made promise to come
home.
Finally he has a lucky day and
prepares to keep his promise but the
plight for an aged friend, convinces
him that he Is justified in once more
postponing the visit.
tf
:*rp-3
jJlJllfer*:       A|:-V.^|:A-tu
AA*'   }'£. A   '   _ -i-A'j/A '. ".jii';5*'
May 22
I I
iiiitrii
BUTTERS—To Dr. and Mrs. T. II.
Butters, (it St. Joseph's Hospital, at
Comox, a son.
Reductions I
in
Return
Railway
Rates
TORONTO
$113.75
MONTREAL
$132.75
NEW YORK
$147.40
*
Silk Hosi<
For every purpose
WHEREVER worn
Penmans Silk Hosiery
impart dainty elegance to
shapely ankles. The brilliant
beauty of Penmans is as
desirable for social occasions
as its famous wearing qualities
are desirabls for the strain of
sports or evaryday wear.
Sold in all popular weights
from sheer to heavy and in all
fashionable
From Nanaimo or Victoria
Rates   to   Other   Eastern
Points on Application |
Tickets on sale May 22 to [
Sept. 16.   Good returning $
until Oct. 81, >'
OPTIONAL
WATER
TRIPS
via
PRINCE RUPERT
or
GREAT LAKES
lEttiaiTMWf---!-:.' V
Liberal Stop-Overs
EDWARD W. BICKLE
Agent — Cumberland, B.C
Telephone 35
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than vvhen new.
I aim to gii'e the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service ajt—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
MANN'S BAKERY
APPETIZING FRUIT PIES
Our Famed Scotch Oat Cakes Need no Recommending
antl our
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls Are Sure to Please
WEDDING, CHRISTENING & BIRTHDAY CAKES
MADE TO ORDER
at
MANN'S — CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 18 Phone IS
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
3-
ae
ft
SUCH A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your  laundry to us.   Our long experience  safeguards  your  interests and  guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove il.
Free Patches   —   (lean Work
Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry
PHONE 84 Quick Delivery P.O.Box 89-1
■--?r
£9
lhe Judge:- Maube IF It Was Baited. With A Cnw-B„ MB,
VOUNQ MW 1 WANT AMOU5E.TR*\p\
in a, hurry, i've qoT to catch Ay
TRA1H        -^
/^SORRV SIR BUTOUa iAOUSETRAP^
\   ARE HOT qUARANTEED TO
V v     CATCH TRAINS^-"-*-"
8 m  ^W A*;- *
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1925.
I  They're Smart! |
Tailored      |
Silk Frocks   1
Not only smart, but a practical necessity for street
wear in summer, and shown
in such captivating styles,
that Milady will want to own
several. Youthful in sil-
houtte they break their severity by pleats, deftly placed,
and sometimes use contrasting collar and cuffs.
Prices are unusually moderate.
J. Sutherland   |
IIIHIIIIlllBllllllllllHraillHUIII
Dr. J. H. Le Page
OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN
7015 Yates Sfreel, Victoria
Will be at the Cumberland Hotel on Saturday, May 30,
with full equipment for i xamining eyes and fitting
Glasses.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Oilice Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
NOTICE
!
."Tlie   Navigable   Water's   Protection
Act**1 It. 8. ('. Chapter 115
WATER NOTICE
(Diversion nnd I'se)
TAKE NOTICE that Henry John
Bull, whose address is Granite liny,
B.C., will apply for u license to take
nnd use one cubic foot per second of
water out of a creek tributary to
Granite Bay. The water will be diverted al a point about three hundred
feet from the mouth or tlie creek and
v.ill be used for domestic and power
purposes upon tlie land described as
Lot "31S" Sayward district. This
notice was posted on tho ground nn
the 7th day ot April 1925. A copy of
this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to tbo Water Act
1914 will be filed in the oilice of the
Water Recorder at Nanaimo. Objections to tiie application may lie filed
with the said Water Recorder or with
tlie Comptroller of water rights. Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.,
within 30 days after tlie first appearance of tliis notice in tlie local newspaper. Tlie dale of the first publication nf tlie notice is May 22nd. 1II2.",.
HENRY JOHN* BULL, Applicant.
21-20
Tho Koyston Lumber Company Limited hereby gives Notice that lt has
under Section 7 of the said Act deposited witli the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa and in tbe Ofiice of
tlic Registrar of Titles at the City of
Vancouver, iu tlie Province of British
Columbia, a description of the site
ami amended plans of its proposed
wharf. Iionniiiig-grounds, piles ond
works appurtenant thereto to be constructed on the site known as Lot 151,
Nanaimo District and which site is
situate in front of the Marine Drive
which lies between high tide mark and
the North Easterly boundary of
Blocks "C". "D", and "E" of Section
4 in Nanaimo District Province of
British Columbia. Plan 1478.
ANI) TAKE NOTICE that after the
expiration of one month from the
date of the first publication of this
Notice the Royson Lumber Company
Limited will under Section 7 of tbe
said Act apply to the Minister of Public Works nt his office at the City of
Ottawa for approval of the said site
and amended plans and for leave to
construct the snid Wharf and to drive
place and erect thc said plies and
works appurtenant thereto.
DATED at Cumberland, B.C., this
71 li day of May. A.D. 1925.
THE ROYSTON  LUMBER CO. LTD.,
Per G. K. Uchlyama,
lii-22 Managing Director
BS
IE
2=
Rexall
Kodaks
PROTECTION!
USE JONTEEL TOILETRIES FOR OUT OF DOORS
PARTIES
SOOTHING  ANI) RERFESHING  FOR THE  FACE
AND HANDS
Cream
Talc
Powd
er
Try Ls ng's Fountain Service First
Lang's Drug Store
-THE R*7 ;ALL KODAK STORE-
"It 1'AVS to DEAL at LANG'S'
Social and Personal
WAGE REDUCTION
ACCEPTED BY MINERS
No. 5 MINE RE-OPENED
Miss Irene Bateman left on Wednesday morning's train for Seattle,
where she will reside in future witb
her grandmother.
At the last mass meeting of employees of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited, which was held
In the grand-stand on the Recreation
Ground, the Athletic Hall being :oo
small to seat thc huge crowd that nt-
tended, four more members were
added to the Agreement Committee,
wblch was vested with power to see
the management and obtain the besl
terms possible. The result of this
meeting with the management was to
the effect that the men will accept a |
reduction In wages upon a percentage
basts which amounts to 47 cents, 511
cents, and 60 cents, according to the i
position  the employee holds.
The men took this step for the rea-1
son that it is much better to work j
for a lower wage than formerly, than I
to be walking the streets with no |
work at all. All employees laid off
last week have been given back their j
jobs, and as was promised by Col. i
Villiers, No. 5 Mine has been re- j
opened and will employ fifty men five
days a week.
This reduction, though hard on i lumen, was the only possible means
whereby the company could continue
to sell its coal in competition with
other mining centres, hut as conditions   brighten   it  is   quite   probable
Miss Besse B. Stewart, who has
been spending tho past two weeks In
this city with her mother, Mrs. Marlon Stewart, returned to Vancouver
on Monday.
.Miss Etta Hood, who Bpent last
week-end In Cumberland with her
parents, Rev. and Mrs. James Hood,
returned to Port Alberni on Monday.
Rev. Jas. and MrB. Hood of Cumberland, who have been guests at tho
manse, Alberni, returned home to-day
-Port Alberni News.
Mr. nnd Mrs. H. Schroder and i
daughter, ond Karl Coe, of Richmond,
Calif., arrived in Cumberland on Friday last. Karl returned to California
on Wednesday with his parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Coe, of Ibis city,
who are making the trip as a holiday.
Mr. and Mrs. Schrader will probably
remain In Cumberland until they return.
Mr. Frank Potter arrived in Cumberland on Monday to spend the summer with his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
.lames Potter. Frank has been attending the University of British Columbia.
that the old wage scale will oe
brought back again. The situation
in Cumberland has been none too
promising during tlie post two weeks,
bul the satisfactory outcome of the
question has brought a rift of sunshine in the clouds.
r
U5ED
CARS
CHEVROLET SUPERIOR tfCAfi
1923 Model      «PUUU
CHEVROLET TOURING <U07K
1920 Model      $4 I U-
CIIEVROLET TOURING <K1 7*1
FORD TOURING <J» A {T A
Late Model, Good Tires and Top, etc    <p49U
FORD TOURING d»1 AA
FORD TOURING $99-^
ALSO
DODGE TOURING, LATE MODEL
MCLAUGHLIN TOURING, LATE MODEL
FORD AND CHEVROLET TOURINGS, TRUCKS
AND LIGHT DELIVERIES, FROM N
$100.00 Hp to $650.00
COMPARE OUR PRICES
Blunt & Ewart,  Ltd.
Phone 61    THE COURTENAY GARAGE    Phone 61
I    The 20th OF MAY
I       WAS THE CROWNING OF OUR MAY QUEEN M
H AND TODAY IS THE CROWNING OF OUR
H ADVERTISING.
B    We invite our patrons to visit our plant and see where
gs thc goods you place on your table are made.
H IN A CLEAN BAKERY
I  McBRYDE'S BAKERY
COURTENAY, B.C.
Mrs. I). R, McDonald und son Ernie
motored to .N'anaimo ou Friday nnd
returned on Monday.
Mrs. M. Jl. Lang will not receive
on Tuesday nor any other Tuesday
again this season.
H
ere an
dTK
ere
During 1924 the 1,800 bee-keepers
of Manitoba marketed 1,302,000
pounds of honey, valued at $195,-
000, according to official returns by
the Provincial Apiarist.
Prof. J. A. Allen, Provincial Geologist of Alberta, declares in an official statement that sixty-two billion
tons of coal, half of which is recoverable, lie beneath the surface
of Alberta soil.
Seymour Backus, Vice-President
of the Backus-Brooks Company, of
Winnipeg, states that the largest
producing pulp mill in the world will
be in operation at Kenora, Ont., before the end of 1925.
It is estimated that Vancouver
will ship approximately 26,000,000
bushels of grain of the 1924 crop.
Shipments already total 21,188,000
bushels. Commitments for almost
1,000,000 additional bushels have
been made.
The special train operated by the
Canadian Pacific Railway and known
as The Trans-Cannda Limited, which
makes the journey across the entire
country in eighty-eight hours, recently commenced its season, the
seventh since its inception.
According to a bulletin issued by
the Bureau of Statistics Alberta's
foreign population is in excess of
180,000 with approximately 100,000
American included in the total.
About 5,000 Americans reside in
Calgary.
When Their Majesties King George
and Queen Mary paid their official
visit to the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley shortly after the
reopening, they boarded the miniature Canadian Pacific train and
made a trip around "Treasure Island" and expressed treat interest
in all they saw.
An effort will be made this year
to transplant Swiss mountain roses
in the Canadian Rockies. These
roses, which were brought from
Switzerland by Dr. Huebscher, late
Swiss Consul at Montreal, are ex.
tremely hardy and only thrive above
elevations of 3,000 feet. They will
be planted in the gardens at Lake
Louise and Banff.
The first trip of the Canadian
Pacific S.S. Princess Kathleen from
Vancouver to Seattle via Victoria
was recently made under most successful conditions. The people of
Seattle are so enthusiastic over the
increased coastwise service that
they have tendered an address of
thanks to Captain Troup, manager
of the Canadian Pacific Coastal service.
There is every possibility that the
Provincial Government ef British
Columbia may this year complete
the construction of the scenic highway connecting Golden on the main
line of the Canadian Pacific Railway with the summer resorts of
Banff and Lake Louise. When thia
link, much of which was built during the past two seasons, is completed it will make one magnificent
triangle through the heart of the
Canadian  Rockies.
Building permits issued in Canada during the first quarter of 1925'
were 10.2% and 1.2% greater than
in the first three months of 1924 and
1923, respectively. There were else
5.6% greater than in the first quarter of 1922, 46.5% higher than In
1921 and 4.3% above the 1920 total.
The aggregate value of building
permits issued for the first quarter
of 1925 was $19,672,637, compared
with $17,846,969 for 1924 and 119,.
41U69 ftr 1928. 	
Dr. and Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton
and family motored to Port Alberni
on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. R. KaplanBky and
ta lily, accompanied by Mrs. Forcimer
motored up from Nanaimo on Sunday
and spent the afternoon in Cumberland.
Mrs. D. McLean paid o short visit
to Vancouver recently to attend the
fiftieth wedding anniversary of her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Keith.
Miss Agnes Potter, of Vancouver,
spend Dominion Day in Cumberland,
the gueBt of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
James Potter, Allan Avenue.
Don't forget the dance at the Royston Imperial Pavilion on Wednesday,
June 3rd. Moody's 8-piece orchestra
Dancing 9-2
INTIMATE GLIMPSES
Reg. Stacey, just after a strenuous
tennis match at Port Alberni on
Monday,     "Who done that, 'Brb?"
SCHEDULE FOR C.P.C.
LEAGE ANNOUNCED
Following Is thc schedule for Cumberland-Powell River-Courtenay Base
ball league us drawn up by the secretary and president and approved by
tlie competing clubs.
May 24—Powell River vs. Courtenay:  Powell River vs. Cumberland.
May 31—Cumberland vs. Courtenay
Powell River bye.
June 7—Courtenay vs. Powell Rlvor
Cumberland, bye.
June 14—Cumberland vs. Powell
River;  Courtenay. bye.
June 21—Courtenay vs. Cumberland;  Powell River, bye.
June 28—Powell River vs. Cumberland; Powell River vs. Courtenay.
July 1—Courtenay vb. Cumberland
Powell River, bye.
July 5—Courtenay vs. Powell River
Cumberland, bye.
July 12—Cumberland vs. Courtenay
Powell River, bye.
July 19—Cumborland vs. Powell
River; Courtenay, bye.
FOR SALE—House, containing six
rooms. 1 pantry, and out-houseB.
All tn good condition. A snap at
$660.00. Apply Mrs. James Potter,
Allan  Ave., Cumberland. 22-24
WANTED—To rent piano, by family
with no children. Phone 36 or
write to P. O. Box 579. 22
NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that "The Bevan
Lumber and Shingle Company Ltd."
will apply to the Supreme Court of
British Columbia, on Tuesday, the 9th
day of June, 1925 at the Court House,
Bastion Square, Victoria, B.C., at the
hour of 10:30 o'clock in tho forenoon
by way of petition for an order that
tlie said Company, which was struck
off the register on the 21st day of
April, 1925. lie restored to the register and that the time for filing the
Annual Return with the Registrar be
extended until the 19th day of June
1925.
DATED nt Victoria, B.C.. this 22nd
day of May 1925.
The Bevan Lumber and Shingle
22-23 Company, Limited.
IN MKMOItlA.1I
In loving memory of our dear little
sonny Ronald Wm. Derbyshire, who*
passed away at Cumberland,- May 31,
J922, ngetl 8 years antl 4 months.
Cod takes our loved ones, from our
homes but never from our hearts.
No morning dawns, no night returns, but whnt we thluk of him.
Always in tlie thoughts of his loving
Mother. Daddy and Sister Norma.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Derbyshire,
22 Nanaimo, B.C.
CAKO OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. A. Joyce wish to
thank all those kind friends who in
any way assisted them in their recent
Bad bereavement, and also for the
many beautiful floral tributes. Thanks
arc also due the doctors and nurses
at the Cumberland Hospital, of whom
my mother spoke in the warmest
terms.
A. Joyce.
(AI(I) OF THANKS
The management and Sisters of
Comox St. Joseph's Hospital wish to
thank the Cumberland Volunteer Fire
Department for the Are fighting display held on May 20th ln the Hospital
Grounds. The Cumberland boys
made the run from Courtenay to the
hospital ln Comox and hnd the water
on in 4 minutes.

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