BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Feb 12, 1921

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0070300.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070300.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0070300-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0070300-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070300-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0070300-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0070300-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0070300-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0070300-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0070300.ris

Full Text

Array VICTORIA
Provincial Library
THE
■■'si    \!
!       m v i
ISLANDER
*•/
With which is consolidated the •Cumberland News
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 7.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
$1775 Raised For
Famine Relief Fund
Splendid .Response to Appeal for
Sufferers in Drought-Stricken
Provinces of China.
Including Chinatown, the sum of
$1775 has been raised locally towards
the Famine Relief Fund for the people
in the drought-stricken provinces of
China, where no less than 30,000,000
are suffering from slow starvation.
$675 -was raised in Cumberland and
$1100 In Chinatown. In the latter case
tho residents of Chinatown will be
making further monthly contributions.
The amount raised is very gratifying,
indeed, to the canvassers and those
connected with the appeal, and was
somewhat of a surprise in face of the
supposed opposition.
To the success of the local canvass
too much credit cannot be given to
Mr. C. A. Colman, of the Presbyterian
Mission in Chinatown, and Rev. Jas.
Hood, for the energetic way in which
they worked to make the canvass the
success it was. Others who contributed materially to the success of the
canvass were Dr. MacNaughton, Dr.
Hicks, Rev. Geo. Kinney, Mrs. Hood
and Mrs. Bunbury and Mr. Fouracre.
Owing to many people desiring that
their names be not published we are
unable to print tlie list of contributors.
One gentleman of his goodness gave
$150 and another $50, while $11 and $5
donations were of frequent occurrence.
On Thursday the sum of $674.50 was
sent to Mr. D. A. Cameron, treasurer
of the fund In Toronto.
• The canvassers for thc Chinese *
• Famine Relief Fund wish to ox- *
• press their thanks to tlie citizens *
' of Cumberland for  the  kindly *
• way in which they wore every. *
• where received during the recent *
• canvass of the city for the fund, •
• The  sum  subscribed  demon- *
• strntes once again that given a *
• worthy cause Cumberland wlll *
• respond generously. *
Cumberland Wins
Championship Cup
Defeated South Wellington Saturday and Win Upper Island
League Championship
The Cumberland foothballers added
one more victory to their long list on
Saturday last, when they decisively defeated the South Wellington aggregation by a score of two goals to none,
thus winning the Upper Island League
Championship and Cup.
Th game was very fast and clean,
Cumberland having a slight edge on
their opponents from the start to the
last minute of the game, and only
superb work on the part of the South
Wellington goalie kept the score down
to two goals. South Wellington forwards were absolutely helpless against
the local team's half-back line. Dicky
Stubbart, who is reckoned by some to
be about the best all-round player on
the Island,, worked like a trojan, but
his efforts were fruitless; the only
players to give him adequate support
were Green, McFagan and Linn. With
his team one goal down Stubbart
changed position with Potter for the
second half and was able to bring a
little pep into his forward line. The
change just suited the local boys as
the game became much faster.
A large crowd witnessed the contest,
which was refereed by Mr. Joe Craig
of Vancouver, who gave all-round satisfaction.
The cup, a lino piece of silverware,
is now on view in Campbell Bros.'
store window.
Coal Situation Is Fully
Discussed At Convention
Different Angles of Coal Question Fully Discussed at Meeting in
Vancouver—Mr. Thomas Graham Delivers Comprehensive
Speech in Relation to Mining on thc Island—Does Not Fear
Any Investigation Into Their Operations.
Masquerade Dance
On Monday Night
St. Valentine's Day to Be Celebrated by Monster Dance in
Ilo-ilo Dance Hall.
ORGAN FUND BENEFITTED.
FOOTBALL GAME
HERE TOMORROW
Cumberland Plays South Wellington Team in Vancouver
Island League Match
Football fans will have an oppor-
tunily or seeing tho local team In action Sunday afternoon, when they
meet the South Wellington aggregation in an Island League lixture. Given
fine weather a record crowd will be on
hand, when it is imped they will render
ample financial assistance, as the
management have been put to a lot of
expense lately.
The visitors arc coming up bent on
avenging their defeat of a week ago,
when Cumberland whitewashed them
aud won the Upper Island League
Championship after a scries of drawn
games. Campbell, the crack full-back
of Ihe local team will not be playing,
Strang having for his partner a new
player named Gough. The team will
line up as follows: Goal, Clark; backs,
Gough, Strang (captain); half-backs,
Irvine, Conti, Roberts; forwards, Ban-
nernian, .Milligan, Bowman, Kitchens,
Home. All ollioi* players are requested to be on hand. Kick-oft will be at
3 p.m. prompt.
ANNUAL MEETING OF
HOLY TRINITY W. A.
On Monday last In the Anglican hall
tho annual meeting of the Women's
Auxiliary was held, when very satisfactory reports were presented.
The election of oflicers for tho ensuing year resulted us followB*
President, Mrs. Vi. Leversedge.
Vice-presidents, Mrs. O. J. Richardson, Mrs. Jas. Treen and Mrs. J.
Miens; secretary, Mrs. J. Cameron.
Treasurer, Mrs. J. Spicer.
PLEASANT WHIST PARTY
Mr. and Mrs. T. Mordy gave a very
enjoyable whist party at their rest
dence on Saturday evening last, about
thirty people attending. After the
thirty people being present. Mrs. C. J
Bunbury Becurcd the drat prize for
the ladles, while Mr. C. J. Parnham
copped the first prizo, -a box of cigars,
which the Cub Rep. thoroughly enjoyed. Modesty forbids mention of the
ladies' first prize. Mrs. J. Cameron
won the consolation prize, a lovely
hand-worked centrepiece, and Mr.
Allan Nunn won the gent's, a "watch
dog.
The organ fund in connection with
Holy Trinity Church benefitted to the
extent of nearly $40 as a result of the
dance given by the ladles in the hall
on Monday evening. A very enjoyable
time was spent by those present. The
ladies served a buffet supper.
FIREMEN GIVING BIG
MASQUERADE BALL
The members of the Fire Department are making all preparations for
tho Masqnorade Ball to be bold ***n
St. Patrick's Night, March 17th. The
Ilo-llo Dance Hall has been engaged
and the boys are out to make this a
humdinger!
Board Of Trade
Elects New Officers
The annual meeting of the Cumberland Board of Trade was held Thursday night in the City Hall. The meeting was most enthusiastic and augurs
well for the success of the work of
the board during the coming year.
The most important business was the
election of oflicers and the reading of
the secretary's report.
The election of officers for the ensuing year resulted as follows: Hon.
president, Mr. Wesley Willard; president, Mr. A. MacKinnon; vice-president, Mr. J. Sutherland; secretary,
Mr. J. Walton; assistant secretary,
Mr. J. W. Cooke; treasurer, Mr. T. H.
Carey; executive committee, Messrs. T.
H. Mumford, A. C. Lymn, T. B. Bate,
F. McCarthy, S. Davis, R. E. Frost and
F. Partridge, also one representative
from the G. W. V. A. to be named by
that organization.
Arrangements for the annual banquet were gone Into, when it is hoped
that Mr. G. I. Warren, president of the
Associated Boards of Trade ot Vancouver Island, will give an address.
NANAIMO AND REFEREE
DEFEAT CUMBERLAND
Last Sunday Cumberland United
went down to defeat before the Nanaimo United team—assisted by the
referee. The score of 3-1 does not Indicate the play at all. A drawn game
would have been a much better result.
The referee, Mr. Bumip, was evidently
out to give Nanaimo a win, and how
well he succeeded Ib evidenced by the
score. Just as soon as the Cumberland
team stepped on the Held the crowd
started rugging Campbell, calling him
a dirty player and several other foul
names not fit to be published. It ls no
wonder Campbell lost his head. We
have had the pleasure of seeing Campbell play on several occasions and he
is by no means a dirty player—he is a
vigorous player, which is perfectly
legitimate. Mr. Burnip put the climax
on when he ordered Campbell off early
in tlie game. It was no wonder the
local boys lost out with one of their
best men off. Again in the Becond half
Roberts wus laid out and had to be
carried off.
For the good of the game It ls to be
hoped the league management dispense
with Ihe services of Mr. Burnip as
referee and relegate him to the retired
list.
VANCOUVER, Feb. 11.—Tbe annual
convention of the Associated Boards of
Trade of British Columbia held Its
sessions here this week, over one
hundred delegates being present from
all parts of British Columbia.
One of the main themes of discus
sion was the coal situation, now so
prominently before the public. Among
the important speakers on this ques
tion were Mr. Thos. Graham, General
Superintendent of the Canadian Col-
lieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, and Mr.
Alexander Sharpe, one of the oldest
milling engineer's in the province.
"Fifteen per cent, of tbe world's coal
fields are in Canada," declared Alex
ander Sharp, one of the speakers at
the Mining Institute convention yesterday. "The Canadian coal resources," he stated, "were very great
and on their development and utilization much of tbe nation's prosperity
depended,"
The coal question was discussed at
length, the subject being dealt with in
detail from the time the miner set to
work in the pits until the coal was delivered to the consumers.
Another subject of which much Interest was shown was the utilization
of bog fuel ln the province.
There were a number of additional
delegates present when tbe forenoon
session opened, bringing the total number ln attendance considerably over
one hundred.
"Fuel Supply, Distribution and Substitutes" was the subject engaging the
attention of the Mining Institute
throughout ahe afternoon session of
their convention, which was continued
yesterday, and several exhaustive
papers were read and afterwards generally discussed. Mr. Nicol Thompson
occupied the chair.
Mr. George Wilkinson dealt with
the cost of coal in his paper read by
Secretary Lamb, showing tbat a ton of
coal mine run on Vancouver Island."
and many other provincial fields, cost
$2.12 after leaving the hands of the
miner at the face of a level, but there
were a great many additional costs before it reached the wharf prepared for
shipment, bringing the inside production cost to $4.00 per ton. Outside
costs were 80 cents railroad, shipping
and washing, and $1.00 general expenses, making the total cost per ton
$6.25. Against this there was a return
of $6.98, showing an apparent profit of
73 cents per ton. Higher grades demanded by the consumer cost the
dealer $12.50 and $13.00 per ton of
2000 pounds. The increased cost of
coal had not been out ot proportion to
the Increase ln wages and cost of
materials.
"A Cheaper and Better Coal" was
the subject treated by Mr. Alexander
Sharp, one of the oldest coal mining
engineers in the province, with fields
at Coalmont and in Alberta. "The
Ideal coal mining," said Mr. Sharp,
"was not only to produce the greatest
tonnage at the lowest cost, but to produce the greatest amount of lump coal,
and the three greatest principles employed ln mining coal were hand-mining, blasting from the solid, and
machine mining. Engineers were to-'
day more disposed to employ coalcutter machines, which gave a greater
output per man and more large coal,
with a reduced cost of production and
reduced risks to the miner, than in the
case of hand-mined or blasted coal.
"Fifteen per cent of the world's coal
was ln Canada," said Mr. Sharp, "of
which the Crow's Nest Pass district
was credited with 34 billion tons, the
Nicola, Coalmont and Princeton district with 22 billions and Vancouver
Island wltb six billion tons. There
were in addition large areas in the
northern districts of the province. The
Canadian coal resources were great
and on their proper development and
utilization much of the nation's prosperity depended.
"A more general Introduction of
coal-cutting machines and other labor-
saving devices In the mines of Britisli
Columbia would cheapen coal and help
Canada to compete more favorably
with tho United States of America ln
the manufacture of cheaper goods.
Mr. Gruhuni Speaks en "The C'oul Industry of Vancouver Island.''
"The Coal Industry of Vancouver
Island" formed the subject of an address given by Mr. Thomas Graham.
General Superintendent of the Cana
dian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)   Ltd.,  al
the luncheon to the delegates by the
Manufacturers' Bureau yesterday. Mr.
Oraham said:
/
Mr.   President   and   .Members   of   the
Vancouver' Hoard of -Trade—
I desire to express to you my appreciation of tbe honor conferred upon
me by your honorable body, in asking
me to address your membership and
your invited guests bore assembled.
/ 1 have beeu at a loss to know why
I have been thought of on this occasion, and can only attribute it lo tlie
fact that you were anxious to hear
something of the coal industry ou Vancouver Island first hand, or perhaps
it may have been that you were anxious let learn when tlle next advance in
price was likely to occur.
Having been associated with the coal
industry oil Vancouver island for the
past sixteen years, I shall endeavor to
talk to you for a short time today in a
general way ou the Island coal fields.
My remarks may be somewhat
rambling, as there is quite a large
subject to cover, and tbey will in no
way be technical, nor do I propose to
weary you iu quoting figures extensively. I proposo chiefly to refer to
certain fallacies that exist in the public mind relative to the coal Held and
coal industry on Vancouver Island.
Most of us gathered here today have
unlimited faith in the future of British
Columbia. We believe that within Its
boundaries lie Immense mineral wealth
this wealth awaits the advent of the
prospector lo brlffg it lo light, capital
to produce it, and tlie development of
our coal resources to manufacture,
and shape it to tiie wants of a world
eager and willing to pay for it.
Our province in no sense can be
termed agricultural. Its greatness
must lie iu its timber, Ashing and mineral resources, and our ability to
►"innufneture; and no country can be
great in manufacturing when dependent upon some othlT state or country
for their fuel supply.
Experience gained during tiie war
has demonstrated to the world that industrial supremacy lies with a nation
in proportion to its ability to produce
or control the fuel to drive its machinery.
Despite tbe part that fuel oil has
played iu retarding the development
of the coal industry in British Columbia it, generally speaking, plays a
small part in the world's production of
steam, and is every day destined to
play a smaller part. The industries of
the -world the today run by coal and
will be run for hundreds of years to
come. Floyd Parsons, late editor-in-
chief of "Coal Age," a journal devoted
to coal, makes tlie statement that we
have on tlie North American continent
enough coal to last us 1500 to 2000,
and enough oil to last us 10 or 12
years.
Tbe production of coal in tlie province of Britisli Columbia was 500,000
tons less in 1920 than in 1910. There
is' some room for thought on this
statement. This is to say that during
the decade in which British Columbia
made the greatest Industrial strides in
its industry, its bas-is industry, coal,
retrograded.
To those of you who have made and
watched witli pride the industrial progress of tills city in tiie past ten years,
it should be quite plain that such progress should be upbuilding prosperous
communities adjacent to you, paying
tribute to you as their chief distributing agent. Such would have been the
case on Vancouver island had its coal
Industry kept even pace with the
growth of your industries.
Fuel oil lias displaced approximately
600,000 tons of Vancouver island coal
per year, and at present prices paid for
coal oil means tbat we are sending
out of this province $0,000,000 per year
that should be spent iu supporting our
own industries and building up our
own province. $6,000,000 per year to
help swell the balance of trade against
us and depreciato the value of our own
dollar.
Tlie transportation couipaules, rail
and coastal waters, who hail must to
gain by the upbuilding of our own
province, contribute largely to this
amount, lint they are not alone iu
this; your manufacturers, and the
owners of large business blocks in this
city and Victoria all contribute, and
are lurgely*,resprinsible foi- a condition
that a few years hence will block and
retard the Industries of this province
Alld, sir, may 1 ask, what has the
body which you have tin: honor to be
president done lo develop the coat industries of this province? If my memory serves me right, iu 1915 tbe coal
mines of Vancouver island were working one aud two days per week, and an
attempt was made lo have a sligbl increase placed on Hie tariff on Call
Monday being St. Valentine's Day. a
big Masquerade Dance will be held In
the Ilo-llo Dance Hall, commencing at
9.30. As will be noted, good prizes are
offered for tlie best characters and a
large entry is anticipated.
Best dressed lady, $10.
Best dressed gent, $10.
Best Valentine, lady, $10.
Best sustained character, $7.50.
Best national character, lady, $7.50.
Best national character, gent, $7.50.
Best comic group, $15.
Best comic, $5.
Best topsy, $5.
Best flower grll, $5.
Seats for both spectators and dancers will be provided) so that everyone
can view the proceedings in comfort
A six-piece orchestra will supply the
latest music.
Promotions In
Public Schools
Classes Will Move Into the New
School Building on Completion Next Week.
REBATE PERIOD HAS
BEEN EXTENDED BY
ELECTRIC LIGHT CO.
!n our advertising columns Cumberland Electric Light Company announces that they have extended the
rebate period ou current electric light
accounts from the 20th to the end of
each month. The usual ten days
heretofore prevailing caused confusion to some consumers and the
management decided to extend the
period to the end of the month, and so
eliminate the source of annoyance to
both consumers and company.
Tbe rebate period is now from tbe
15th lo tho end of the month.
Dr. McLean Fraser
Lectures Friday
Member of B. C. University Staff
To Give Illustrated Lecture
In Anglican Church Hall
Under the auspices of tbe B. C.
University Extension Committee, and
of the Coraox Teachers' Ai-oociation,
Ur. McLean Fraser of tho University
staff, will give Ills lecture on "Tho
Sea Beach at Ebb Tide," nt Cumber-
laud on Friday next, Feb. 18, and nt
Union Ray on the Saturday following.
The lecture will lake place in the
Anglican Church hall, commencing at
8 o'clock.
Tho lecture Is Illustrated with many
beautiful slides and will be a revelation to those whose walks on the beach
have been unobservant.
CONCERT AND DANCE
AT PUNTLEDGE
On Wednesday, February 23, a concert aud dance will be held iu the
.school at Puntledge, in aid of the
Piano Fund. Thc concert commences
at S and dancing at lo. Admission 50
cents. Ladies are asked to take refreshments.
HAVE YOU GOT YOUR
MOTOR CAR LICENCE?
$300 is Maximum Penalty for
Neglecting to Take Out the
Necessary Licence.
All motor car and truck owners who
have not as yet taken out this year's
licence are liable to a line of $3001
Persons who so far have neglected
to do so ure advised lo get In touch
witli tbe Provincial Police, as they
have received instructions to take this
matter up at once.     ¥
Trade Licences,
A number of provincial iraile licences
also have not yet been taken oul for
the current year. There Is a heavy
penaltytor trading without a licence.
folllia fuel oils, to permit the mine employees lo obtain sulliclent employment to live, 't'he Vancouver Hoard of
Trade opposed tbe movement, preferably to build up tlie industries of our
neighbor lo the south rather than those
of our own province,
1 note, sir, since arriving In your
city to attend this meeting, tliat your
body has launched a great movement
to foster the purchase of ".Made In B.
('." goods, and much display and advertising is being done to Impress the
Importance of the movement upon the
people of ibis community. I am heartily iu sympathy with your movement
but I have been wondering, sir. it tin
promoters' were really honest witli
themselves in the movement. Are you
honesl enough to tell the public that
(.Continued on  Page Two)
The following promotion list has
been Issued by Mr. Chas. E. Burbrldge,
Principal of the Public School.
The new school building is expected
to be ready for occupation during next
week. New pupils .will be admitted
on a day which wlll be announced at
the school.
The various divisions will move into Ihelr new quarters during the week.
Hull-Vein ly Promotions.
Beginning with ibis term the system
of half-yearly promotions into the
Third Reader classes is in force; this
system has beeu adpoted for the following reasons:
1. To reduce the excessive retardation now existing by doing away with
the necessity lor pupils In the Second
and Third Headers repeating a whole
year when retarded. Pupils retarded
a whole year frequently lose interest.
2. To enable pupils entering school
In February lo pass the extra half-year
required by the school course, in a
higher grade than Second Header.
Such pupils usually spend one and a
half years In Ihe Second Reader, even
If ready for promotion.
The school Is now graded as follows:
New llnililiiur. Ground Flour
(The upper floor is occupied as to
three rooms by the High School, one
room being vacant.)
Division 12-Receiving, Miss Watson.
Division 11—First Primer, Miss
Robertson.
Division 10-Second Primer, .Miss
Harrison.
Division 8—First Reader A, and part
of Second Reader, Miss Reese. *
Old Building.
Division 9—First Header, B, Miss
Colman.
Division 7—Second Reader, Miss
Bannerman,
Division (i—Junior Third B, Mrs.
Baker.
Division 6—Junior Third A, Miss
Partridge.
Division 4—Senior Third B. Mis.*
Potter.
Division 8—Senior Third A—Miss
Beckwith.
Division 2—Junior Fourth, A and B,
Mr. McLean.
Division 1—Senior Fourth and Entrance, the Principal.
The B classes ot tbe Third Header
do lirst term work, Ihe A classes doing
second term work.
The Junior Fourth A class does somo
entrance work in addition to the work
of the Junior Fourth Header.
The promotion list as issued by the
principal Is as follows:
Division VI. to Junior 3rd B.
Kathleen Cooke, Harold Conrod,
Jack Horbury, Norman Hill and Shlglo
Kawaguchl equal. Margaret Gibson
and Lilah Lewis equal, Peter Massey.
Jennie Bolfy, Satsuml Iwasa and Wilfred Shouldice equal, Jennie Eccleston,
Sarah Oyama, Tado Dol, Hert McLellan, Robert Conn, Sidney Eccleston,
Margaret Shearer. Lem Jam.
Division 7 to Second Reader.
Norman Frelone. Margaret Salmon,
Robert Colling, Willie Allara, Jean
Braes, Mary Sweeney. Tom Comb,
Edna Davis, Josephine Welsh, Low
Leong, Tommy Bate, Percy Jones,
Jackie Watson. Charlotte Stant, Willie
Thompson. Willie Smith, Joe Williams,
Cordon Keenan
Division 7 to Junior 3rd H.
Sakayo Suglmorl, Isabel Yarrow,
Vaye Nagai, Lena lingo. Nabuo llav-
ashi. Emina Picketti, Tsaueto Asao,
Josle Plroz/.ent. Annie Beveridge,
Tadachl Dol. tchiye Ashlkawa, Fred
Bolettlno, Alex. McDonald,
Division 8 to Second Reader.
Alko Yoshlkanl, Klshlo Knga, Shigue
Tawara, Ella Johnston, Rena Benora
and Lena Merlettl equal, .lame Drown,
Elsie llevls, Victor bowling, Ellen In-
irear, Oeorge Log.in.
Division 8 t*> First Reader.
Russell McMillan and Floyd McMillan equal, Sarah Lawrence and
Beatrice Cavallero equal, Ida Wong,
.Mary Mali, Jimmy Chin, Josio Blng-
lieimer, Kathleen O'Brien, Mlnoru
Tawara. Isahelle Brown, Bessie
Nicholas, Clarence Lewis, Tokio Nn-
kano. Tom Mossey, Teruko Dol, Delma
Peretto, Leslie Farmer, Annie in-own,
Rosina Thompson, Annie Young, Hong
Low and Ping Low equal.
Division 9 lo First Reader.
Heta Devoy, William Pryde, Dorothy
(Continued on Page Eight]
COMPETITION ON
WEDNESDAY NEXT
The monthly competition in connection with the St. Johns Ambulance
Association will lie held on Wednesday
evening uext, February 10, al 7 o'clock.
w Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
February 12,1921.
Coal Situation Is Fully
Discussed At Convention
(Continued from Page One)
your made in Ii. C. goods are manufactured with imported oil, or that tbey
are being .sold to them in buildings
heated with imported oil?
But I started out to speak of some of
the erroneous ideas existing in the
public mind re coal areas and the coal
industry of Vancouver Island.
The resources of this province aro
sufficiently large and attractive to
satisfy most people, without resort lo
gross exaggeration and misrepresentation,
1 feel that in many instanees for promoting, as well as political purposes.
much exaggeration and misrepresentation has been indulged in. and to such
an extent that many people who are
right on the ground, and who should
Know better, have in their optimism
beeu carried away by such statements
and readily make use of them.
It is finite commonly believed that
the greater portion of Vancouver Island is underlaid with several seams
of high-grade coals. In fact, many
people believe you can back a barge
up against any portion of the East
Coast of tbe Island, scratch a little of
the soil away and proceed to load coal
on the barge.
Some millions of ears ago, how many
I do not care tp venture a guess, in
that age known to geologists as the
carboniferous, a period when nature,
so far as coal making was concerned,
was in a most generous mood, the
great coal deposits of the eastern portion of this continent were laid down.
If the geologist is correct, this portion
of the continent ou which we live did
not then exist, and in proof of their
theory, we have no rocks on tlie
western portion of the continent he-
longing to that period. 1 presume
some millions of years later this portion of the continent appeared, and we
have the rocks belonging to lho cretaceous period lying close upon the
trap or igneous rocks. It is to this
period that the Vancouver Island coals
belong, and apparently nature was not
in such a kindly mood at this period,
as the seams are interlarded with
many intrusions of shale, some of these
bands varying from a few inches to
as much as four to six feet in thickness.
The area of the deposit was undoubtedly large, but following the formation of the seams, ihe great uplifl
that formed tbe mountain range now
comprising the backbone of Vancouver
island, and the corresponding drop
which formed the area now known to
us as tbe Gulf of Georgia, destroyed
ihe greater portion of tlie field. Foi
lowing this came the glacial period,
which completed the work, and eroded
much that tbe uplift had spared, until
today we find that, instead of the
greater portion of the Island being
underlaid with coal, there aro only a
few isolated basins left, and these are
very much faulted and disturbed.
It is generally believed that the K
& N, land grant on Vancouver Island,
comprising approximately two million
acres, is all underlaid with three
seums of coal. The public are not lo
blame for this belief, as it has been
fed to them by promoter and politician
for the past 40 years. At the risk of
being termed a knocker and a pessimist I desire to say that at least one
and one-half million acres of the two
million acres In the grant cannot possibly contain coal, being nude of coal-
hearing strata. Of the half-million
acres left which may contain coal, hut
the greater portion of which is tin-
proven, we know that large areas do
not contain coal in seams snufliciently
thick   and   advantageously   placed   to
EVERY HOUSEWIFE NEEDS
convenient utensils for cooking and kitchen use.   We
carry a complete line of the best grades in
HOUSE FURNISHING AND
KITCHEN WARE
Come in and look over our stock and replenish your
supply.
T. E. BATE
M    P. O. Box 279
Phone 31    m
CUMBERLAND
Sill
illUHIIIIIIIIIIIII
111
FISH SPECIAL
1 tin HERRING IN TOMATO SAUCE
1 tin KIPPERD HERRING
1 tin FRESH HERRING
1 tin KIPPERED SALMON
1 tin PILCHARDS
1 tin SALMON
With Recipe Book
$1.00
m
EXTRAORDINARY
TEA BARGAIN
Owing to the failure of a business firm in Vancouver
we were able to secure a shipment of this very fine
blend of India and Ceylon Tea to soli at the very low
price of '
3 Lbs. for $1.00
MUMFORD & WAtTON
havo commercial value.
There have heen some very good,
although small detached, basins ol
coal on Vancouver Island, as ut Old
Wellington, Extension, N'anaimo Harbor, and adjoining Comox Lake, and it
is probable that there are some more
similar basins ou the Island, but they
have yet to be found and proven.
There are. however, no large ex-
tended and unbroken coal measures on
Vancouver Island, containing continuous and regular seams ot coal similar
to those ou the eastern portion of the
continent, or in the plains und foot
Hills of the Rocky Mountains. We have
only very small basins, much faulted
and contorted with many barren spots,
containing seams very dirty iu char-
actor, anil presenting problems to the
mining engineer unequalled in any
milling country in the world.
The present areas now operating are
principally those originally opened,
and the mines are now very old and
cover immense areas and tho coal being produced Is cliielly that which in
the early days of the mine was either
lost or left because it was too dirty or
mo thin to work at a profit
Vi'ii will naturally ask why we do
nol upon now mines, The reason is
simple, We have no proven territory
in which to make the openings, and II
requires money I" prove and open new
mines on Vancouver Island. To illustrate tliis, the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., with whom I am employed, have for the past two years
been prospecting a likely basin. During that period we have made 21 miles
of roads for transporting diamond
drills and supplies to run these; wo
have drilled 2S holes, an aggregate of
16,000 feet. The area so far prospected dues not contain more than 1000
to 12nd acres; the work has cost $100,-
iion and the In formation obtained to
date Is not sufficient to fully convince
us that the Meld has commercial possibilities and would justify the cost of
di velopment and building of ten miles
of railroad to connect the field with
tide-water.
Again, it is generally believed that
wc pay the coal minor around 70 cents
per ton for mining, and the difference
between that and $11.75 received for
lump coal at the docks is clear profit.
Now tho tonnage rate of the miner at
present is slightly over .$1.00 per ton,
plus a yardage rate, plus so much for
letting timber, plus a cost of living
lonus of $2,011 per day. But the actual
•oal miner is only approximately 25
per cent of the men employed in and
around a mine; ho merely breaks down
the coal at the working face; the great
I'my of men are employed in trans-
ortatlon, malntainance of roadways,
entiltttlon, timbering, pumping, track
laying aiid general preparation for the
coal, nnd are paid by day labor. Some
idea of Ihe amount of this work will be
obtained when 1 state that No. 4 Mine
ot Ihe Canadian Collieries, Comox district, covers an area of 1300 acres, and
tliat the nearest coal producing urea
in this mine Is almost three miles from
the entrance of the mine.
An eight-hour day in a coal mine is
eight hours from tho time the workman
leaves daylight until he returns to daylight; when ho travels these distances
to and fro, lunches during the period,
the net result is about six hours actual
work.
The actual miner is paid for the
weight of coal contained in the mine
car at the tipple; this is known as tipple weight, and Is the production of
tho mines given from month to month
in tbo press by the Mines Department.
The coal is here screened and separated into the commercial lump coal sold
as such on Ihe market, and screenings;
these two products are then transported by rail to tidewater at Comox, a distance of 21 miles, and at Extension a
distance of 11 miles.
The lump coal and screenings are,
relatively speaking, 50-50 ill proportion; the screenings are then submitted to a washing process; this product contains a largo quantity of fine
siinlos from the rock bands contained
In the seam and cannot be extracted
except by a mechanical process which
is called washing, and consists of agitating the material on a series of gigs,
in water, the difference in tlie specific
gravity of the coal and rock being
used lo separate these two substances.
The product saved is again separated
into nut coal, pea coal and fine coal.
Fifty per cent, of the tipple weight
goes to the water, and in the process
of washing 40 to 50 per cent, is lost,
being too high in ash for commercial
purposes. So tliat in a colliery having
a tipple tonnage of 2 000 tons per day.
1 nun tons would be lump coal and 500
to (100 tons of washed products, making
a daily commercial recovery of 1500
lo llliio tons from tho 2000 tons the
miner was paid for at the tipple.
The production ot the Canadian Collieries in 1020 was 100,000 tons less
than in 101(1; 37 days were lost in the
Comox Colliery due to lack of demand,
And hero let me say that our mines
are not like a factory—we cannot lock
the door and leave them on an idle
ilay, like' you lock your store or lac-
tory. The roadways and ventilation
must be maintained and water
pumped. The gases aiid water do not
stop when we stop producing coal. It
costs us $211011 por day to be idle.
We have throe mines ill the Comox
Collieries In which the ventilating fans
uni 21 hours por day, 305 days in the
year. Each ls callable of producing
2(10,0(10 cubic feet of air per minute
and each fan requires a 860-horse-
power motor to drive It.
As nn illustration of our water
problem we have one mine producing
750 to S(KI tons of coal per day; wo are
hoisling from this mine 1200 gallons
of water per minute; at 10 lbs. per
gallon this Is 1*2,000 lbs. of 0 tons per
minute, or 300 tons por hour, or S040
tons in twenty-four hours, of eleven
times the weight of tlie coul produced.
In addition to the large quantity of
water handled, It is acid In character
and all the pumps used must bo made
of bronze.
The Vancouver Island field will
never be a large producer of coal as
compared to other coal producing centres, and will never produce n cheap
'uel as compared with other coal-pro-
Itieing centres. The cost at. the docks
is in no way out of keeping with tho
I natural difficulties ol the Held, neither
has the cost of the product at any time
luring the war and re-construction
period been out of keeping with the
jeneral*advance In cost of labor and
supplies.
The coal industry has been thc only
industry in llritish Columbia that has
practically been controlled by the gov-
irnment during the war. The Labor
Department regulated the advance in
mr labor rates, in accordance witli the
cost of living, and the Fuel Controller
regulated the advance in selling price.
Our entire business, production, as
selling, payrolls, cosi sheets and receipts, from the lirst appointment of
the Fuel Controller lo ihe present time
are monthly sent to the government
at Ottawa, who are as familiar with
our business as the auditors of our
own company.
Vancouver City bus for tho past six
years been fortunate in its coal supply.
Throughout the entire year and Ihe
two years since, not a day has been
lost by Vancouver Island mines
through labor troubles. Vour supply
of coal has been regular, when tlie
rest of the world was rent with labor
troubles and lucked fuel to operate
their industries and heat their homes.
Voti obtained this supply, not at an
outrageous price for labor, but nt a
price that was only in keeping with the
increased cost of living. 1 desire to
here pay tribute to the fairness of the
miner on Vancouver Island, at a lime
when their product was an absolute
essential to the country. They faithfully abided by their agreements and
rendered splendid service to their
country.
Both the miner ami the operator of
Vancouver Island nre to lie congratulated on the achievement of the past
six years. It Is unequalled in any
basic industry in any country in the
world.
The price you pay today is 100 per
cent, above pre-war limes. Now, as
business men, 1 appeal to you -how
many of you have been handling goods
during the past few years that have
not increased that amount in price?
The increase iu our labor cost was
approximately 85'por cent and the remaining 5 per cent. Is easily accounted
for in rise of cost of material.
The coal business, as you will note
from what I have said, is seasonal.
There are two seasons in Vancouver,
Ihe season in which you don't give a
damn if every mine on Vancouver Island closed down and every miner und
his family starved, and the season
when a cold spell strikes you aud you
expect that the people who kept us
alive during your indifferent spell
should bo told to go to blazes and gel
his coal, in order that your temporary
wants may bo relieved. 1 had almost
forgotten a third season which is peculiar to Vancouver. 1 refer to that season Immediately preceding the municipal elections, when the good steaming qualities of Vancouver island coals
aro much iu demand to raise the necessary pre-election pressures to the
blowing-oil point.   (Laughter.)
Then there Is tiie ever-roady belief
that over-capitalization of the coal
companies is the thing that makes
Vancouver Island coals cost so much.
Paying dividends on watered stock.
Many of you remember that the
Canadian Collieries bought the 1/iins-
niuir coal interests in 11)10 for eleven
million dollars; much reserved and
common stock was placed on the
market, and a debenture issue of $5,-
Ouo.Ouo gold bearing bonds was floated
in order to raise money to develop the
property these bonds carried 0 per
cent, interest; the interest was paid on
this issue iii Kill and not one cent of
Interest has been paid or one dollar
of the issue since that year, ln 101-1
the bondholders took over the property
to protect their interests, so that the
preferred and common stock holder
ceased to have an interest iu the property. The bondholder decided to
forego Interest ou bis bonds until after
the war. Since tliat time the company
has. been reorganized and the bondholder accepted in the reorganization
$500 of stock for every $10(1(1 of bonds
he owned, so that this company has
not paid a cent of interest on its bonded indebtedness in the past nine years,
let alone pay interest on stock, either
real or watered.
A second company on the Island recently closed down, being unable to
meet its payroll.
The day Is not far distant when this
city must return to the use. of coal for
power and heating purposes. When
that day comes the coal industry of
Vancouver Island is in no shape to
take care of your wants. It has boon
neglected ami starved, and will be unable to respond on notice to tlie increased production required to maintain the progress you have made in
this city during the past ten years, a
progress built on Imported fuel. You
w i.l then pay for the past neglect, not
only In price but iu curtailed output
of your factories through insufficient
supply of that material on which your
whole industrial fabric must rest,
namely, coal.
In conclusion, sir, let me say that
the producing end of the coal business
iu no way fears any Investigation into
Ihelr operations. We do, however,
strongly object to the verdict being
rendered before tho investigation has
functioned.
We believe, however, that although
you live only •*■ few miles from us, you
have been too busy iu attending to
your own affairs to get acquainted with
our business, and therefore on behalf
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) j
Ltd. 1 extend to you, sir, and a committee of our Mining Division, nn invitation to pay us a visit, and we shall
he pleased lo show* you our conditions,
and we feel confident wo can convince
you that there nre many industries in
llritish Columbia that are more pleasant nnd more remunerative and less
hazardous financially than coal mining,
We would be pleased If .Mayor dale
of your city would accompany ihe
Committee, We do not expect that the
smile for which your Mayor Is so
justly famous will dispel the gloom
that eternally pervades the interior of
a coal mine, but we hope he may garner sufficient information on our business to enable him to remove many of
Hie erroneous ideas held by his fellow
citizens about Ihe coal industry of Vancouver Island.
The Rexall Store
^ COMBINATION ^
CREAM
ontee.
A Wondrous Beauty
yearn
YOU will love the fragrance first. Then the
velvet Gnioothr.ess, the delicate creamlness,
of this marvelouj beauty cream. It fairly melts
into the skin—without a trace of grease, or the
clogging of a single pore. Anemic tissues
speedily drink it in, becoming smooth and softly
pliable under Combination Cream Jonteel. A
perfect base for powder.    Take home a jar
j     perfed
I     today.
SEND
Valentines
THIS YEAR-
-Get them at
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
CUMBERLAND
"London Lady" for Women "Derby" for Men
Weston's, Leckie's and Ahern's for Children
WE SOLICIT
your patronage and we strive to deserve it by selling
supreme quality Slippers and Shoes for Women-
knowing how particular women are about their footwear being fashionable. We aim to carry in stock at
all times a full range of sizes, lasts and latest models.
WE GIVE OUR GUARANTEE
with every pair of shoes you buy here. Any defective
pair can be brought back and we will give you a new
pair or refund your money.
Just received a large shipment
of Spring Goods in the
very latest styles
Til's
Cavil
Cash Shoe Store
Quality Gaiters   Rubbers   Boots and Shoes Findings
J
OFFICERS OF PARENT-
TEACHER ASSOCIATION
Member of Central Federation to
Address Cumberland Body
At Next Meeting.
The newly-formed Parent-Teacher
Association of Cumberland got down
to business on Friday, when a well-
attended meeting was held in the city
school,
Tlie meeting decided to Invite a
j uiembei* of the Parent-Teacher Feder
ation of Vancouver to address its next
meeting and outline the objects and
work of a branch.
The regular meetings have been
ilxed for the third Monday In each
month, at 8 o'clock.
Oflicers wero elected as follows:
President, Mr. John Sutherland.
Vice-presidents, Mr. Chas. B. Burbrldge and Mrs. Jas. Hood.
Secretary-treasurer, Dr. B. R. Hicks.
Convenors of Committees—Educational, Mr. Wood; Library, Mrs. Oliver;
Buildings, Grounds and Equipment,,
Mr. Bate; Social, Mrs. Richardson. February 12,1021.
TBE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
^
Three:
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKB5IFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. C.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE BA1LWAY STATION.
Pint Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietbr.
Cumberland, B. C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)."..$5.00
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Phone (6
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Hare /on tried our Pickled Pork
■nd Corned Beef} It ls delicious.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially Invited.
Prank Bond, Chief Ranger; A. 0.
Jones, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
INCUBATORS
BROODERS
We have the largest antl most
complete stock of Poultry Supplies in B. C.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUES
A. I. JOHNSON & CO.
844 Cambie St.
Vancouver
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
s. davis, Dcr.'
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
begs to advise that it has for rental at
moderate prices
SAFETY   DEPOSIT
BOXES
They are recommended for the protection from fire or
burglary of valuable business or private documents,
Victory Bonds, jewelry, etc.
THE MANAGER WILL BE GLAD TO FURNISH
PARTICULARS UPON APPLICATION
STRANGE TALES OP
THE AFRICAN JUNGLE
Rev. H. C. Withey, who has spent
many years as a missionary in Africa,
principally ln the Angola region, has
been paying a visit to civilization. He
brought back with him many stories
of the jungle, of which the following
arc interesting samples:
The wild natives of Angola had again
revolted against the Portugese traders.
There were wholesale massacres of
the most terrible nature, and runners
of cannabillstlc rites struck terror to
the hearts of all whites. So far, however, the missions had been unmolsted;
for tbe tribesmen are believers in
Nzambi, the creator of all things, and
the men who have taught them religion
and sanitation they call "the People
of Love."
Often they will do much for them
without gifts, though at other times
they hint most strongly for the welcome present. The hammock-carrier
chants proverbs, and occasionally he
mny be heard singing as be ls swinging you along through the Jungle:
"A white man is praised for his liberality, not because he is white. The
egg of a hen Is white also."
Which is an African hint, so to
speak.
It was during these fearful massacres tbat one of the missionaries
was being carried through a high,
grass-covered pathway, when, with a
swish through the undergrowth, a war
party was on them. Summarily they
commanded the white man to get down
from his hammock.
Who is he?" they demanded gruffly
from the carriers.
'He's a harmless chap," replied the
faithful blacks. "He's just a missionary."
That's all very well," and the hungry eyes of the hunters looked him up
and down, "but we don't know him."
There were repeated assurances of
the reverend's Innocence, which had
not succeeded ln convincing for itself,
when one of the hostile group had a
brilliant thought.
"If he's a missionary he can sing
and pray. Sing and pray, there!" the
savage commanded.
The preacher obliged them with a
few hymns and prayers ln their own
dialect. And what looked like imminent death changed to mutual salutations and tbe freedom of the jungle.
There are some who would see in
this, doubltlese, an answer to the question as to the efficacy of prayer.
How Kolohondo Became Chief.
This Is a folk-talke that the African
boys will tell you in the firelight of a
chill evening on the veldt.
Some day you will be wandering
along the bank of a river, or across a
tract of jungle-grass, when a tall taked
black will come stalking along toward
you.
"My name is Kolohondo-Ka-ndala-
ndengl-tuma - ndenge - jlmbulula!" he
will say.
Now, that explains a great deal; but
I shall not tell you what, until the end
of this story. Then, perhaps, you will
have guessed what the tall naked black
is called.
Once Kolohondo's father told htm to
go out to catch a rat. So the boy
obeyed. When he brought back tbe
dead rat, his father said:
"Go and cook the rat with your
brother!"
Now you know, and I know, what bis
father meant. But not so Kolohondo.
He beat his brother over the head with
a stick and put tbe boy and the rat
into pot for a nice stew.
He was forced to flee from home.
All along the land went Kolonhondo,
and it was ever so with him. He did
what people told him to do, but it was
never tlie right thing.
Finally he came to a certain tribe,
where the chieftain grew to have great
conlldeuce ln his ability. One night
Kolohondo was told to watch out for
enemies, and to shoot whomsoever he
heard prowling around.
At dusk Kolonhondo took his great
bow and arrow and climbed Into the
top ot a great gray boabab tree, the
fruit of which at a distance looks for
all the world like so many dead rats
bung up by their tails. There Kolohondo watched and listened to the
noises of the jungle at night, the noises
that are like the rustling of many
secret things in the mystery of the
heavens. Soon he saw shining oiled
limbs bleaming along the green ways,
faintly lit by the stars.   Twang!
Tbe chief himself lay dead by Kolohondo's arrow.
The tribe gathered to punish, but
Kolonhondo stood his ground.
"I did as I was told," he said simply.
"That's so! That's so!" and they
nodded their palm-oil soaked heads
and grinned gleefully. "He did as he
was told.   We will elect him chief!
And so it became that Kolonhondo,
the simple-minded, became a tribal
chieftain.
And you have guessed his name?
"When you command me to do anything, explain it thoroughly."
Choose
Musical
Gifts
When the Band
Goes Marching By—
—everybody stops to look and listen.
Eager faces crowd every window.   Footsteps just naturally fall
into time.
The kiddies are full of excitement.
All of which shows how the power of music stirs the soul.
And you can have Music in your home every day—music that
is enjoyed by every member of the family.
Have YOU got a Phonograph?—a Piano or Player?—stringed
instruments ?
If you have, you wouldn't be without them for any price.
If you haven't, you are missing a source of pleasure, the value
of which cannot be measured in money.
HEINTZMAN & CO.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
3
Don't make your reports so long,"
said the manager of a small railroad
to his overseer. "Cut out all unnecessary words and get right to the point.
Saves time, you know."
A few days later a river overtlowed
Its banks and washed away the railroad tracks. The overseer sent In his
report ln one line:
'Sir: Where the railroad was the
river Is. Yours faithfully —"
Teacher (to small boy): "What was
the reason you stayed at home yesterday. Tommy?"
Tommy: "Please, teacher, my mother
was making Jam."
Teacher (looking surprised): "Well,
and what had that to do with youj
staying at home?"
Tommy (shyly): "Please, teacher, I
had to go to tlie cemetery to collect
jam pars."
New Home Bakery
Fresh Broad, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFETaml MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $156,673,215.00
Life Funds    58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital antl
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
"The Continental Limited"
A NEW THROUGH TRAIN
ACROSS   CANADA
Leaves Viuirtiin er 7.15 |i. m. Illlll)*.
DIRECT AND FAST SERVICE TO
EDMONTON
SASKATOON
WINNIPEG
PORT ARTHUR
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
Connections for all points in (lunula und United Slates.
Compartment Observation Cars, Slandiinl nml Tourist Sleepers.
EDWARD W. IIICKI.E, District Agent.
Canadian National Railways
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE  CREAM  PARLORS
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
I*"01l
WINDOW'S, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY  WORK
write for iirlces to
TIIE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
(Mice •>«•!« Ilrldgo Street*, Vicloria, U.C. Pour
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
February 12,1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
.-Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland
B. C,
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1921.
DEVELOPING CANADA'S RESOURCES
At the annual meeting of a leading Canadian bunk held
recently, one of the speakers directed attention to the need
for more thorough investigation of Canada's natural resources as an essential prelude to the greater development
of these resources. The essence of his statement was to
the effect that, in this matter of securing greater knowledge and 'greater development of natural resources,
Canada should wake up.
I Hiring the past decade the stall experts of the Commission of Conservation have been engaged in the constant
study of tlie extent and character of Canada's resources
Willi their more efflclenl utilization. Results of the Commission's studies have indicated very clearly that, in regard
tti many of the Dominion's most valuable resources, the
interests of true conservation demand an immediate extension rather than a restriction of development. It has,
therefore, been an important feature of the Commission's
■work to promote such development by giving the widest
publicity to the data it has obtained relating to the extent,
situation and character of potential resources, The publications issued by the Commission cover a wide diversity of
subjects and have been compiled especially for the purpose of rendering them of practical value to the business
interests engaged in the development of watr powers,
forests and other resources.
years in the British Columbia Forest Branch, also with the
Canadian Engineers in France. He is a graduate of the
Pactulty of Forestry. University of Toronto. The establishment of the new School of Forestry at Vancouver should
mean much in the future development of forestry work in
the western provinces, particularly British Columbia,
which has had to bring her forestry experts from outside
the province. The existence of progressive forest faculties
is largely responsible for the progress of the forstry movement in Canada.
THE IMPORTANCE OF HOME TRAINING
i
Moral education and training in tlie home, in tlie school
and in the church, must bo more generally applied and
stressed, if we are to do our duty and achieve the results
that our progress in civilization requires. It has been
noticed everywhere that the greater number of criminals
in this pout-war wave of crime are boys nr very young men,
youthful amateurs in evil, whose callow minds have been
most easily impressed by the pernicious inlluonces of the
ie. .Many of these, it has been shown, have gone out of
comiortahle homes lo the exercise of banditry. This is a
feature of the phenomenon that is most impressive in its
call for tlie application of ihe counteracting influences of
good in the bringing up of boys.- St. Louis Globe-Democrat,
m
First Showing Early Spring Goods   j
Saturday, February 12th ■
Certain papers in the United States are drawing alien
tion to the fact that England has broken three powers he
cause each in turn threatened British supremacy on the
seas. The powers are Spain, France nnd Germany. The
argument is a difficult one to answer soley because it is
half true. It Is entirely true that England (and later
Britain) broke Spain, France and Germany; the cause is
entirely different to the one given. These powers were
defeated in the war because each menaced the liberties of
the world. Whon Spain launched her Armada against England we had no overseas Empire whose safety demanded
that we rule the sens. But we had a love of civil and
religious liberty which was directly threatened, and so we
fought and defeated the powers which in that day stood
for autocracy. Under Louis XIV. and Napoleon France's
armies overran Europe, but eventually, thanks almost to
the stand taken by Britain, that menace to liberty was overcome. In 1914 it was Britain who stood between Germany
and world-power—between the world's liberty and its
destruction. Again the forces of liberty triumphed. True,
we destroyed the fleets of each of these nations; anyone
who has studied elementary tactics of war knows tbat Ihe
power which commands the seas will eventually win tbe
battle, no matter how strong the enemy may be on land.
Furthermore, Britain is essentially a sea-going nation, to
he attacked we must be attacked by sea, to be triumphant
we must be triumphant on the seas. It may be laid down
as incontrovertible that great wars are conflicts between
ideals; between Right and Might, or as Lincoln put it,
between Free and Slave. It is for this reason that Britain
has emerged successful from her great wars, and that the
enemy fleets have been destroyed in the conflict. We need
have no fear of war breaking out between the United
-Kingdom and the United States unless one or the other
espouses the cause of Might, Slave or Autocracy, against
that of Right, Freedom and Liberty.—Montreal Star.
Surgeon-General Gumming of lbc United Slates public
health service has just issued a fresh warning against the
use of horse-hair shaving brushes, to which not a few cases
of anthrax have been traced. He says: "The public health
service has made" every effort possible under existing laws
and regulations to prevent the occurrence of anthrax due
to infected shaving brushes, but in spite of its efforts anthrax
cases occur and will continue to occur unless the public
ceases to buy and use horse-hair brushes for shaving. It
Is the concensus of expert opinion that shaving-brush
anthrax is contracted only when the shaving brush Is made
of horse hair; and congress at the next session will be
asked to prohibit the use of horse hair for that purpose. It
Is doubtful, however, if any effective measures can be taken
by health officials to curtail the use of the horse-hair shaving brushes now in (he trade channels, some of which are
presumably infected, except a direct warning to the public
not to buy or use such brushes."
UNIVERSITY FORESTRY DEPARTMENT
An important recent development in forestry is the inauguration of a Department of Forestry in the Faculty of
Science, of the British Columbia University, under Prof.
H. R. Christie. A five-year course will be given, during the
first two years of which the instruction will consist of
general arts and science subjects, as in the courses in
chemical, mechanical, mining and civil engineering. During the last three years the student will specialize in forestry, this being definitely recognized as a branch of the
engineering profession.   Prof. Christie was for a number of
GEMS OF THOUGHT
Tlie deepest tenderness a woman can show a man, is to
help him to do bis duty.—Mulock.
It is better to suffer wrong than to do it, and happier to
lie sometimes cheated than not to trust.—Johnson.
No fallacy can hide wrong, no subterfuge cover it "so
shrewdly but that the All-Seeing Due will discover and
punish it.—RIvarol.
Would you touch a nettle without being stung by it;
take hold of it stoutly, Do the same to other annoyances,
and hardly will anything annoy you.—Hare.
Of all the vices in which human nature is subject,
treachery is Ihe most infamous and detestable, being compounded of rraud, cowardice and revenge. The greatest
nigs will not justify it, as it dstroys those principles of
mutual confidence and security hy which society can subsist.*— L. M, Stretch.
Build yourself into your church. If you give of your
means to defray its expense, you are a pillar, supporting
God's house. If you welcome people into its membership,
you are a door in tbe house of tbe Lord. If you teach a
class in its school, you are a window, letting in the light
—J. A. Holmes.
Advance Spring Styles in Ladies' Coats in Velour   m
as
and Tweeds in the Newest Shades g
SERGES
PRINTS
Dress Goods
TRICOTIXES        JERSEY   CLOTHS        BROADCLOTHS
PLAIDS AND SMALL CHECKS
Wash Goods
DRESS GINGHAMS STRIPED CHAMBRAYS
GALATEAS AND  FLANNELETTES
Ready-to-Wear Goods
LADIES'   BLOUSES      MIDDIES      MONKEY JACKETS       POPLIN
AND WASH SKIRTS HOUSE DRESSES AND HOUSE APRONS
CHILDREN'S  DRESSES IN GINGHAM, CHAMBRAYS   AND   WHITE
VOILES      ALSO CHILDREN'S ROMPERS
A complete stock of Ladies' Misses' and Children's
Spring and Summer Underwear
Sole Agents for the District for the Slater and
Invictus Shoes
"MOTHER"
Her arm*, my cradle undergirt with tireless care;
Mer ears, the open door to every sigh and cry*
Her brow, deep-furrowed with the toil ot years gone by;
Her lips, the first to kiss, to call, to bless in prayer;
Her hair, with slivered threads, agleam witli radiance rare,
Her eyes, the depthless well of love that cannot die;
Her face, uplift witli light of heaven's highest sky;
Her heart, the throbbing life of (Jod; Mother who bare.
My mother, thou ait all of this and more
Than tongue can ever tell or ears receive or hear.
Thou art my mother!    That is more than all on earth
Besides.   What though I said farewell to thee a score
OI years ago'.'  I love thee still.   Deatli does not part.
Deathless in love and life  -Mother, who gav'st lift to me.
Wm. Hiram Foullkes.
A minister, with two lovely girls,
stood entranced by the beauties of a
flowing stream. A fisherman happened
by. and mistaking the minister's occupation, said "Ketchin' many, pard?"
"1 am a fisher of men," answered
the preacher, with dignity.
"Well." said the fisherman, "you sure
have the right bait."
An   unprofitable   apartment   house
may be considered a flat failure.
An old Scottish lady was asked as
to the whereabouts of her husband.
She replied: "It the ice is as thick as
Henry thinks it in, he is skating; if it
is as thill as I think it is, he is swimming."
Husband: "Did you take a two-dollar
bill out of my vest pocket last night?
Mrs. Snoops: "Certainly not. Probably you don't know it, but there was
a hole in the pocket where you put it."
And every man is afraid of something; It It Isn't anything else it's a
woman.
One of thc only two white kangaroos in the world has been sent to
England from Australia.
Doctor: "1 am sorry to tell you, but
this illness has left you a broken man."
Patient: "You bet I am, doc; I got
your bill this morning."
m
"8—"!
2=
ST. VALENTINE'S DAY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14th
Grand Masquerade Ball
In the Ilo-llo Dance Hall, Monday, February 14th
Six-Piece Orchestra will
provide all the
Latest Music
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
BEST
111
PRIZES:
DRESSED LADY  SIO.OO
DRESSED GENT  §10.00
VALENTINE  LADY   $10.00
SUSTAINED CHARACTER    $7.50
NATIONAL CHARACTER, LADY    $7.50
NATIONAL CHARACTER, GENT    $7.50
COMIC GROUP  $15.00
COMIC  CHARACTER      $5.00
TOPSY"    $5.00
FLOWER GIRL    $5.0tt
Dancing Commences
at 9.30 sharp
Come and have a
good time
Masked Gent., $1       Masked Lady, 50c.      Spectators, 50c.
-d tf
February 12, ML
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Five
15 Kewpie Dolls
Given Away
School Children's  Letter
Writing Competition
Begins February 9th.   Emis Match !)(h, 1921.
BOYS AND GIRLS UP TO 10 YEARS OF A(JE
WRITE ABOUTs"SANTA CLAUS"
First I llest totters will receive a lieivpie Dell each, vulue $1.1111.
Second " Best l.ellei*:. will receive a heopie Hall each, valuo -1."*<0.
Third (I Besl Letters "ill receive a Pencil l!o\ each, rnluo 7."»c.
BOYS AND GIRLS FROM III TO 15 YEARS OF AGE
WRITE ABOUT WHAT YOU THINK OF
"OUR CITY HAM,"
Klrst. 5 Best Letters will receive u Kewple Doll ouch, vnluo (13.00.
.Second .'I Best Letters trill recclie a hcup'c Dell each, valuo $1.60.
Third 0 Best Letters "ill receive a Pencil lies eacli. mine 75c,
RULES OF CONTEST
, Letters niusl not exceed 50 words.
Kacli letter must liuve attached a Purchase Slip from this store
for $8.00 or more of Dr* ('ends purchased between February Otli
mid March lllh.
Writers must sign names in full and agree lo abide by Ihe
decision of tlie Judges.
Three School Teachers huve agreed to acl as Judges.
DRY  GOODS
Men's Grey Heavy Ribbed Underwear, garment $1.-10
Men's White Heavy Ribbed Underwear,"garment $2.15
Men's Work Shirts—Reg. $3.50 value for  $2.75
Men's Work Sox—Pure wool, pair  85c
Men's Overalls—Black and Blue .stripe, pair $2.50
Boys' Jerseys—A good selection, each $2.75
Boys' Jerseys—In White, each  $1.75
Boys' Sweater Coats—Brown $2.75 to $4.75
A GOOD LINE OF HOYS' STOCKINGS
Per pair, from 60c to $1.25
Specials in Towels
Regular $1.75 &-\   A A   Regular $1.50 (|»-|   nn
pair for •JJJU'-iU       pair for tpl.^U
These are good strong, colored Towels.
GREY BLANKETS—
Regular $7.50 value for	
$6.50
W. GORDON
THE CORNER STORE Phone 133
MILLIONS KILLED
IN ACTION
Wonderful sows! Millions and millions of germs killed in. notion and
thousands and thousands of victims
relieved of bronchitis, asthma, coughs,
and colds. There is groat rejoicing in
the fact that science has at last invented the world's surest death trap
for germs—Buckley's Bronchitis Mix-
tare. With tho first doso this remedy
gets right down to business, mid
never cesses In its destructive work
until every trace of tbo disease is
completely removed and tho victim
restored to normal health. Letters
from all parts of Canada praising tliis
wonderful mixturo aro literally pour-
ing into headquarters. It cad this letter:—"Years of suffering from Unit
terrible affliction, bronchial asthma,
ordered by all medical men to close
my business in Montreal and go south
to a warmer climate, but I noticed
your ad. in the "Montreal Standard"
for the above mixture and 1 Buid T
would give ono mora trial to health
beforo I leave my native town, end
thank the good maker I did. My
bronchial tubes aro clear, the hacking
cough has disappeared, tho wheezing
cough has ceased as if by magic, nail
all discomforts havo gone since taking
your wonderful mixture."—Herbert
Corrl, 417 McKay Street, Montreal.
There is no reason whatever why you
cannot be completely and speedily restored to health If you take this remedy. You aro satisfied or tho money
is refunded, according to our guarantee. Don't delay, iluy a bottle now
from your druggist ' is
SOLD IN CUMBERLAND BY
K. E. FROST.
i  CRICKET CLUB PROPOSED
Several Influential gentlemen in town
have expresed a desire to see a cricket
club formed in Cumberland for the
coming summer. All interested in the
grand old summer game, and who
would like to see a club formed, are
requested to send their names and ad
dresses to "Cricketer," care of Tin
Islander.
It' sufficient names are received to
warrant it. a meeting will bo called in
the near future
.Nine names were rcceivd this week,
it' thero are any more men in the dis-
tricl interested, they are requested to
send their names in lu the above address.
MOUNTAINERING IN THE
CANADIAN ROCKIES"
One Hundred Colored Lantern
Slides to Be Shown By Rev.
Geo. Kinney, F.R.G.S., at the
llo-Ilo on Thursday Next.
These photographs were taken on
his many expeditions made during
several years, while exploring through
the Canadian Rockies. These trips
were made by pack-train and often
lasted two aiid three months, and at
times under great difficulty and privation.
These trips resulted In the discovery
of some of the most wonderful alpine
beauty spots of the world, and in Mr.
Kinney successfully capturing Mount
Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies.
As an original member of tho Canadian Alpine Club, Mr. Kinney had made
nniiiy noteworthy climbs. Including tbe
highest peaks along the C. P. R., but
his capture of Mount Robson brought
him at once into prominent notice before the alpine and geographic worlds,
lor all previous expeditions to Mount
Robson, many of which were by noted
men, had failed.
The slides to be shown on Thursday
next at the Ilo-llo Theatre, were colored by the finest artists in New York
City, and have been shown by Mr.
Kinney before many of the greatest
societies on this continent, including
the Geographical Societies of Chicago,
New York aud Washington, tbe American iMuseum of Natural History, New
York, the Brooklyn Institute of Arts
and Sciences.
The slides are souvenirs of the
Great War, for while serving as a
private in the 4th Canadian Field Ambulance Mr. Kinney often showed them
to the troops in Y. M. C. A. huts during brief periods of rest. The were
shown at the great camps at Whitley
and at Epsom, aud were even taken
up into Germany, where Mr. Kinney
went with the Army of Occupation,
for after tho signing of the Armistice
he had taken them with him at the request of the War Office.
For a year, while Mr. Kinney was
at the front, the slides were on exhibition under a special electric machine
built- for the purpose, at the headquarters of the Royal Geographical
Society at London, England, the latter society honoring Mr. Kinney with
a Fellowship of the Society.
Sam:  "There's something doveliki
about you."
Reno (blushing): "No, really."
Sam: "Sure; you're pigeon-toed."
Some spinsters spend a lot of time
looking for husbands—and so do some
married women, according to reports.
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at thc
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
WANTED
Cedar  Poles
Any Quantity     Anywhere
in this district on water.
Write -
Geo. ('. McGown & Co.
402 Winch Building
VANCOUVER, ii. c.
THE FAIRY'S VALENTINE
I saw a little elf,
Who was sitting by himself,
In n hollow that was warm and sunny.
lie had made a little pen
Of a feather of a wren,
And he dipped it into golden honey.
And he wrote with all his might:
"Oh, my darling little sprite,
You are sweeter than the clover
That the bee is buzzing over;
And I love you, I adore you.
And I'm always longing for you,
And you're always growing dearer,
And i wish that you were nearer;
1 can think of nothing clever,
But I'm yours, und yours for ever,
If you want it so or not!"
And he ended with a blot.
Then 1 copied out ills letter
{Since I couldn't write a better)
And lm sending It to you,
For it's true.
GRIMSBY OLD BOYS AND
GIRLS HAVING REUNION
Did you ever live In or near Grimsby
Ontario? They are having an Old Boys
anil Girls reunion there on August
lit! and 27, 1021. Send your name and
address to The Old Home Committee'
Grimsby, Out. They want to write to
you.
MY VALENTINE
CORPORATION OP THE CITY
OK CUMBERLAND.
Tenders for Lots
Tenders are Invited for the purchase
ot any or all of
Lots 3, I and ">, Block 10, and
Lot 2, Block 15
bellnglng to the Corporation of the
City of Cumberland, all facing on
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Tenders must be in the bands ot the
City Clerk on or before 7 p.m., Monday, February 11, 1021.
Lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
T. MORDY,
Cumborland, B. ('.. City Clerk.
February 2, 1021.
G.W.V.A. MEMORIAL HALL
OPEN DAILY
The hull Is now open daily from 111
a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sundays from "
to 5 p.m.
LOOK!   LOOKS  LOOK™
BIC $ DAY BARGAINS
THREE DAYS, Saturday, Monday, and
Tuesday, commencing Saturday morning,
February 12th and ending February 15th
We have many more pleasant surprises than we can
advertise, but you can be assured that you can get
more for one hundred cents than you would expect.
LOOK AT THIS
10 doz. Pairs Men's Black and Colored Mall-Hose—Regular 50c Q Prs. (I»1 AA
and 75c sellers.   Special Dollar Sale price O   for «PX»Ul/
10 doz. Pairs Men's Black All-wool Cashmere and Ribbed Half-Hose— d»1   A A
Values $1.25 and $1.60.   On sule, per pair .'.... «pl.UU
Men's Strong Leather Working Gloves— • (J»-|   AA
Priced in this sale at .       «P 1.1/17
Men's Poplin and Knitted Silk Ties—These were selling at $1.50 and $1.75.   (J»-|   AA
Your choice in this sale at «PJL-»UU
Men's High-Grade Suspenders—Best elastic web and kid ends. (£1 ■ AA
Men's Underwear—Shirts and Drawers— (PI   A A
Per garment  irP J. »UU
Boys' Caps in All-wool Navy Blue Serge—Regular price $1.50. ■ d»-|   A A
On sale at, each    »Jjl.\j\3
Boys' Underwear—In Penman's—All sizes 2(i to ?.l. Shirts and drawers. (j*~t AA
Don't forget the buys.   These are selling now at, per garment    «PX»UU
Boys' Heavy Wool Mills—Regular SOc a pair. Q Prs. <|»-|   AA
Selling now at  _<•)  for vlaV/U
50 Boys' Sweaters, in Brown and Maroon—Sizes 26 to 30.    Regular tf»1   A A
values $1.25 and $L50.   While they last, each     «pl.UU
GIVEN  AWAY FREE
50 Boys' Suits on Sale—In Navy Serge, Oxford Greys, Mixed Tweeds, in the (j>H PA
latest styles; with belt and bloomer pants.   Priced to clear from   «P I «OU
WITH THE FIRST DOZEN SUITS SOLD WE GIVE THE PURCHASER OF EACH
AND EVERY SUIT A POCKET "HEN" WATCH OR A POCKET KNIFE (three-blade,
British cutlery), both valued at $2.50.
This is done as an introduction to my Clothing Department.   COME EARLY.
Men's Overalls, $2.25 per garment
GENUINE UNION-MADE OVERALLS—Staunchily fashioned, heavy weight, which will
shand the "gaff." Made with strong double seams. In black, with or (£Q () f?
without bib. Also in blue with white stripe.   Per garment   *ytU,tUO
Model Clothing Store
Opposite the Post Office
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
llov. W. Levorsedge,
Sunday, Feb. 18, I'll—I Sunday In Lent.
Litany and Holy Communion, II 8.111.
Sunday Scliool, -.30.
Royston, 3 p.m.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
(Vedncsdn*.  I'vcnlngs In Lenta
Service o£ li.tt rees Ion si .'- p.m.
Reading of atldres ;es on "The . v t ■ • n a - -
ment," (Bishop ol' Winchester).
With so many faces fair,
It grows harder every year
To choose one's Valentine.
North and south and east and west,
Wiio shall suy which girl Is hest?
Vours, of course—and mine!
Perhaps the easiest way to do
Is to let your girl choose you—
So It was with mo.
And she chose so well—that now
If other girls exist, I vow,
I've no eyes to seel
—Richard Le Clalltennc.
"Father," said the sharp small boy
"I saw a deaf and dumb beggar in the
street this morning, and he had an
impediment in his speech."
"A deaf and dumb man with an Impediment in his speech!" exclaimed
father.   "Don't talk nonsense, son."
"But he had, father," insisted the
hoy. "One of his middle fingers was
missing."
ROHAN CATHOLIC (III lit II.
Rev, Father It. Boston, Comox.
PRESBYTERIAN smmciis
Rev. Jas. Hood. Pastor".
Morning Service at 11.
Sunday School at li.llu.
Evening Service at 7.
Prayer .Meeting Wednesday evening
at 7.30.
Choir practice Friday evening nt
7.30.
(.HACK  •dl.lil'lI'l.SI (IIIHICH
Ilcv. (J. It. Kinney, II.A.,1'.II.C.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, II a.m
Sunday Scliool and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Proaching Service, 7 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday at
7.30 p.m.
S. B. Club, Tuesday at 7.30 p.m.
Basketball Clubs. Tuesday night.
Bible Class Study, Wednesday, 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday nt 7.30.
W.ll.O. Club, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Mary had a Thomas cat,
It warbled like Caruso,
A neighbor swung a baseball bat-
Now Thomas doesn't do so.
Thos. H. Carey
PIKE AND  LIFE  lNSIKAM'E
Cumberland, 11. ('■
TASTE is the TEST
of ihe DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH (COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Uesl
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water ^!lfcf Pure
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
L=
y Six
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
February 12,1&21.
Household Helps
MAYTAG ELECTRIC WASHER,      -SMOK Kfl
with Wringer attached; special  tpJLaWVaOU
WATER-POWER MACHINE—Regular &S)H (TA
$32.00.   Special W& I *OXJ
HAND-POWER WASHER—Regular      (IJOQ HS
$27.50.   Special «P«4*D. I O
1 ONLY. KITCHEN CABINET— <£QK KA
Regular $40.00.   Special ♦JjOtl.tH/
1 ONLY KITCHEN CABINET— <£07 QK
Regular $33.00.  Special tytCi I »00
A Full Line of Furniture and
Furnishings in Stock
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching tbe point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of affluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT  ALL  THE   LEADING  HOTELS
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
WHEN the 'storm king is rampant, and the telephone v/ireg g0 down, the trouble is almost
instantly known at headquarters and steps are
immediately taken to affect at least temporary repairs.
Usually, the service is out of commission for only a
short tiro e, for every preparation has been made for
tne emergency. When you see a storm raging, when
you hear the wind, remember that the telephone
troubleman is checking up his kit to see that everything is ready when the news comes that the wires are
down. Before the storm is over he is on the job to
keep continuous the service on which the public depends.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
THE MAKING OF A HEN
Styles and Forms Decreed by
Utility Rather Than Fancy-
Proper Measurements Are Significant.
■Illlll:
Common sen so Is a great mystery to
many people. When a man who has
made a fairly careful study of a certain problem and gives a lecture containing a number of so-called "secrets
of the business" it generally turns out
that he has simply used good judgment
in recognizing a fixed law of nature
and working in accord with that law.
Some years ago Sir Thomas Barrpli.' ==
then plain Tom Barron, the famous I =■=
English poultry breeder, was invited l||
to visit a number of Important centres j :§=
ln tho United States to explain to fan- ■ §§=
ciers and enthusiasts, whom he had pp
beaten badly in egg-laying contests, i§=
how he did thc trick. Not being selfish
or miserly with his knowledge he accepted the Invitation and surprised his
hearers with the simplicity of his
philosophy.  For instance:
"The secret of obtaining gotfd layers is tn breed good hens to cockerels
from good laying hens," declared the
egg-wizard. In other words, a male
from a heavy laying hen will he more ==i
apt to produce heavy layers tlmn wlll ES
a heavy-laying female. What more |=
natural? ==
Of course only a fool would expect ===
to get the best results by mating a JE
"boarder" hen with a nondescript male. •==:
Yet a good few have paid so little at- —|
Lentiou to the subject that they have E=
done just that and expected to succeed.  Uf
Tom Barron told, in a few words, ==
how he had picked or produced the §S
birds that won in the contests with =
their United States "cousins." "You," ===
don't suspect me, do you," said he, "of ===
being such a dunce as to breed from =j|
pullets to send lo a laying competition |||
in America? I tested the pullets the =
yenr before to find if they produced
good layers by a certain cockerel; the
year after I had their certain pullets
to send to the laying competitions."
Barron Believed In Type.
Barron believed in type because he
had mastered every detail in that respect. He made it a study; he devoted
years to investigation. He could pick
out the ordinarily good, bad and indifferent lays in every flock.
In every Hock that he inspected he
would point to one or more hens and
say they were good or they were poor
layers, as the case might be, and reference to the trapnest records would
prove Barron was correct. He did all
this without handling a single bird.
Years of tests and study made Barron
safe in the matter of selection; he fixed
in his mind a certain and definite type
and It never failed him.
"Not always the largest hen is the
best layer; nor is it generally the
smallest. In 91) cases out of 100, It i
the medium sized hen that is the best
producer, and always the hen that is
inclined to be squirrel-tailed. Thit-
holds good with either Wyaudottes or
Leghorns. I like a hen with a good
cushion behind her, and a good length
from the breast right to the back. This
Is an indication that she has a long
breast bone. A tight feathered bird Is
always a better layer than a loose-
feathered one." This is one of Barron's declarations resulting from careful and long observation.
» s
Ford Service that is
Satisfactory
Ford repairs* in our shop are made at contract rates
on labor. You know before th% job is started how much
it will cost you.
The excellence of our shop equipment and the mechanical skill of our men enables us to guarantee our work
fully. If your repair work proves unsatisfactory, return
it to us within Ave days and we will do it all over again
to your satisfaction, free of charge. Genuine Ford parts
used.
The average man can easily afford a Ford car. It is the most inexpensive car to drive.
Twenty to twenty-five miles on a gallon of gasoline is an every-day
occurrence; 33 miles is frequently reported by Ford owners. Yearly repair
expenses of less than one dollar are not unusual. The car is light in
weight, and tires give more mileage on a Ford than on any other car.
You can always sell a "used" Ford at a good price. You have to accept
a big reduction for a "used" larger car.
Come and take a ride in the 1920 model. See how comfortable it is.
And stylish, too—stream line effect, tapered hood, crown fenders, beautiful finish. You need one for business. Your wife and children need one
for pleasure and health.
SEE US FOR FORD PARTS, REPAIRS AND ACCESSORIES
E. C. EMDE, Ford "Dealer
COURTENAY, B. C
m
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and. Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Dsj and Night.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
DR. R. P.CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Offlce: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
fc— _-*
Inbreeding Opposed.
Inbreeding, according to Barron,
will not produce a good egg-laying
strain; for, in order to have a lien a
good layer she must bo in good health
and full of vigor. Barron would not
breed from a male that was not the offspring of a hen that laid at least 200
eggs in her pullet year. He had no
use, either, for the 300-egg bird, far
lie felt that was overdoing tilings. He
preferred high averages instead of
phenomenal individual records.
"It is wrong to breed related stock
for egg production," said Barron, in
one of ills lectures. .Annually lie
trapnested a thousand or more pullets,
and from these selected the best layers. Breeding Mocks were made up
of 15 females eacli and mated to males
not related. But all tho birds were In
tbo 200-egg class.
Barron is a firm believer in trap-
nests. It is his Mendelfsm. He mainly
wants this device to pick out tlie sons
of tlie best layers—and tliis to him has
been a great secret. Tlie cockerel
transmits tho laying qualities to the
females. He said that were he to begin again lie would purchase 12 liens
as near unrelated to each other as
possible and with pedigrees well over
200 eggs eacli in their lirst year's laying. These hens he would divide into
four pens of three liens eacli, numbering the hens from one to twelve. To
these liens there would be a male for
each pen, and these males should be
unrelated. When banding the offspring (and by tlie way tho cockerels
are banded 1, 2, 3 and -i) give both pen
and cockerel number, for instance a
pullet from pen 1 would be No. 11, the
first number being the male's number and the second thc pen number.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
What matters it friend If the way be
long?
There are wayside (lowers, thero are
bursts of song
To gladden the fleeting hours.
Tlie ship sails not till thc strong winds
blow
And the sun shines on tho' the clouds
hang low—
Why fret at tiie passing hours?
You mny bear tlie sunshine wherever
you go,
For a smiling face is the face to show,
The world has need of your cheer.
Why add to its burdens of groans and
sighs?
'Twere better by far to call to its eyes
A smile, instead of a tear,
lie brave, and be glad, and your joy
will rest
Like a nested bird ln some troubled
breast;
Some heart with its sore repining
Will find the star In the midnight sky,
And catch the gleam  as  the  clouds
drift by
Of the radiant silver lining.
Marriage may be a lottery, but It is
one ot the games of chance that
clergymen do not try to discourage.
If men could only live to hear their
own funeral sermons and rend their
own epitaphs thore would bo no getting along on earth with them.
Tills would give four distinct families,
and there would be no danger of Inbreeding for yeurs to come.
Barron believes in the alternating
of males ln tho breeding yards. His
plan is to have two cockerels for each
pen, using one at a time. He runs one
bird five days and then he runs thc
other. He claims, and it also has been
the experience of poultrymen In this
country, aud in this way he gets bettor
fertility and he also breeds better lay-
era, The cockerels are brothers. He
says that his observation has been that
better layers can be bred from two
liiothers than from one bird.
Barron wanted to see a hen stand
high in front; with the back not on a
level, nor the rear higher than the
front. He wanted unusually large
combs, a high tail and prominent,
large bright eyes. He wanted tlie pel-
vie bone thin nnd straight, for herein
is shown capacity and lots of room for
tbe egg and digestive organs. He preferred the wedge shape, rather narrow in front, but wide behind and wide
between the legs.
EXTENSION
OF REBATE
PERIOD
§|| Commencing from February 15, the
js rebate period on current Electric Light
|H accounts will be extended to the end of
g the month.
H Thus the period in which discount will
S be allowed in future will be from the
I 15th to end of each month
PAY YOUR ACCOUNTS PROMPTLY AND SAVE
THE DISCOUNT
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons hare
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It Is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should tht offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to th*
very fullest extent ot the law. ....■£
111
Illlll February 12, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
<tf
Seven
Music and Photoplays
The Sea Wolf
Jack London's Famous Novel of
Adventure is Basis for Thrilling Screen Production—Won*
derful Scenes of the Sea Are
Features of the Picture.
Every screen fan loves a red-blooded
picture of adventure. Jack London's
stories are all about strong, virile men
and lovely women aud their exploits
and loves. His most famous novel,
"The Sea Wolf." Is the basis for this
truly remarkable Paramount Artcraft
photoplay. It has been filemed against
the background of the sea in its vary
ing moods of storm aud calm. But
such a sea picture was never produced
before! The crashing together of a
ferryboat and a schooner In the fog of
San Francisco Bay, the beaching of the
schooner on a desert island ln a raging
gale, and bitter battles to the death
on tbe ship's deck—these are some of
the spectacular scenes that are shown
with startling vividness in "The Sea
Wolf.
The striking story has lost nothing
of its power ln its transition to the
screen through the experienced hand
of Will M. Rltchey, who wrote the
continuity. Mr. Ritcbey has had a
long and successful career as scenario
writer and editor, adapting many famous novels and furnishing a score of
photo-plots. Among his recent successes is "Told in the Hills," which
served as a starring vehicle for Robert
Warwick. Ho also scenarized the lavish picturization of the great marollty
play "Everywoman." Mr. Ritchey has
never done better work than In his
adaptation of "The Sea Wolf."
This thrilling, spectacular production will be shown at the Ilo-llo this
Saturday.
Victory
Famous Producer Has Made an
Excellent Picture of Conrad's
Great Novel of the Sea.
Maurice Tourneur has a penchant
for the sea. In "The White Heather"
and "The Life Line" he demonstrated
his unusual ability to produce thrill
ing scenes of the ocean in its varying
moods on tlie screen. Now he 1
taken one of the most famous stories
of all times, Joseph Conrad's "Victory," and used it as the basis of a
motion picture that portrays In vivid
detail the tale of love, adventure and
revenge In the South Sea islands. It
is a Paramount-Artcraft picture and
will be shown on Monday evening at
the llo-Ilo Theatre.
Mr. Tournleur loves to deal with
mankind In the rough. His faithful
reproduction of life In the slums and
low dives on the wharves of London
are well known. "Victory" has given
him the opportunity of making a picture exclusively with characters who
love passionately, see red when they
hate, and are quick with the trigger
and knife. Life among the European
wraiths who have drifted to the South
Seas reverts to the raw elemental and
these are the materials out of which
Joseph Conrad weaves his gripping
stories and Maurice Tournleur his entertaining pictures.
There is such a thing as carrying
movie realism too far, according to
some of the actors who took part In
the filming of the new production.
Native South Sea water craft, Chinese
junks, ancient whaleboats, and a nondescript windjammer of tbe vintage of
about 1880 were some of the "properties" which carried the cast over the
bounding deep, while the cameras
clicked merrily, to the island of Catallna, a score of miles off tbe California
coast. Half-way there these boats began to feel the effects of the choppy-
sea that was running and shipped
water in alarming quantities. One of
the craft carrying "extras" overturned
and several people who couldn't swim
were with difficulty rescued.. Others
arrived at their haven with the "crews"
balling frantically to keep them afloat.
The Chinese junk became waterlogged
and the occupants had to be taken off.
Mr. Tournier announced that tbe scene
was a masterpiece of realism and a
huge success though you couldn't get
the actors who took part ln It to agree
with this statement.
THE
EXCHANGE RATE
II.-What Controls It?
THIS series, published each week, is intended to remove misunderstandings as
to the cause of fluctuation in the exchange
value of our dollar in other countries.
When the demand for any commodity
is greater than the supply, the price of
that article is sure to rise.
A foreign dollar is" a commodity in
Canada, that is something to be bought or
sold and not current money, and similarily
the Canadian dollar is a commodity in a
foreign country and not current money
there.
Their value (or rather their price in the
local current money) is therefore governed
by the law of supply and demand.
The reason foreign dollars are commodities is that they are not "legal tender"
outside their own country.
You would not like a debt to you to be
paid in German marks or French francs
because of the difficulty you might have in
converting them into your own currency.
At border points in the United States, our
immediate neighbor, where exchanging the
two currencies is a simple matter, Canadian
money is now generally accepted, but elsewhere in that country it is taken reluctantly.
To protect their peoples all Governments
provide that creditors may refuse payment of amounts due them unless made in
certain specified currencies, and the legal
currencies so authorized are called "legal
tender."
The banker who receives "foreign dollars" cannot therefore pay them out oyer
the counter so they are not money to him,
but only securities, until he can exchange
them for currency of his own country.
Next week in No. III. of this series we
will explain the method of making this
exchange.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital Paid up $15,000,000
Reserve Fund $15,000,000
This series, when completed, will be published in pamphlet form. If you desire a
copy, write to our Head Office, Toronto.
Rio Grande
A Charming Love Affair of a
Certain Brown-Eyed Senorita
on the Mexican Border
"Rio Grande," the Edwin Carewe-
Pathe feature production on view on
Wednesday and Thursday of next week
at the Ilo-llo Theatre, is an outdoor
story. It gets its name from the river
that separates Mexico from the United
States. Across orange-colored, sun-
scorched deserts, the silvery Rio
Grande winds Its way, while the purple hills, their peaks forming a jagged
silhouette against the blue sky, watch
tiie history of that romantic land.
Augustus Thomas' story of "Rio
Grande" concerns itself with the
charming love affair of a certain
brown-eyed senorita on tlie Mexican
side of tlie Rio Grande, and a bold and
adventurous Irish-American on the
Texas side. Rosemary Theby and
Allan Sears were chosen lor tlie loading roles because of their peculiar
suitability for the parts, and tbe remainder of the cast were equally well
chosen. Mr. Carewe staged tbe picture on the very spot Mr. Thomas
wrote about.
The Phantom Foe
PATHE SERIAL STARS
JUANITA HANSEN
Those persons who find their most
satisfying relaxation in tussling with
puzzles, riddles or enigmas of all sorts.
are promised a veritable carnival of
joy when following the new Pathe
serial, tbe first episode of which will
be shown at the llo-Ilo on Wednesday
and Thursday of next week.
"The Phontom Foe" Is a mystery
story calculated to make all Its predecessors appear quite obvious lu comparison with It. The story, by George
B. Seltz, who produced the picture
for Pathe, was put ln scenario form by
that expert in secial photoplay writing, Frank Leon Smith. Miss Hansen
appears as the daughter of an Im-
niensel ywealthy house. Janet Dale
is singled out for persecution by an
enemy whose identity is not disclosed
until the final reel. This villain's
method of procedure is most fantastic.
His victims never see him. Upon occasion the have tbe fleeting glance of
a huge framed man, bundled up in a
great fur overcoat, fur cap and a
collar-piece which entirely covers tbe
face, leaving only a small apperture
through which his piercing eyes dart
venomous glances.
Harold Lloyd in
"Get Out and Get Under"
Harold Lloyd, the screen humorist
supreme of this continent, will appear
In the big bill to be presented on Wednesday and Thursday of next week, in
his hilarious comedy "Get Out From
Under."
If you would a travelling go in a
four-wheeled, gasoline buggy you
might as well be cheerful when you
have to get out and get under, as does
Harold Lloyd in his newest Mirthquake special. And If the boy Isn't
cheerful over his own troubles, at
least he tickles your blues pink and
Alls your heart with joy.
Peggy Hyland in
"BONNIE ANNIE LAURIE"
Peggy Dances Her Way Into the
Hearts of Her Audiences in
Her Patriotic War Drama.
One of the most human, most tender stories of a pure girl's loyalty and
devotion under the trying ordeal of
two noble men's love will be shown ut
the llo-Ilo on Friday next. Tbe title
of this photodrama is "Bonnie Annie
Laurie," and the title part Is played by
Peggy Hyland, the charming William
Fox star.
In this picture Miss Hyland portrays
a winsome Scottish lassie who ls tlie
affianced bride of a gallant Scots captain. While the latter Is at the front
she saves the life of a shipwrecked
stranger who wins her true heart's
love, and later proves to be an oflicer
who has forgotten his own identity.
Cast out unjustly by her stern father
Bonnie Annie finds solace ln minister
lug to the wounded soldiers of the
Allies, and It is then her rival lovers
are brought to her, blinded and In
jured. How a sudden turn of fate
deepens her cruel dilemma, nnd how
she finds true peace and happiness in
the end, are features that raise thi
play to heights of sublime realism.
Every lover of a love story should
see it.
ffl
IL(ML0 THEATRE
Saturday, February 12th
George H. Melford's
production
THE SEA WOLF
By JACK LONDON
A smashing tale of the sea and of far-flung ports of adventure—A tale ol' love and
rogues, of brave hearts and hard lists—A tale of tropic isles, where the world is forgo!
aud torrid passions are lawless. The greatest tale of the greatest living writer of ocean
fiction, painted on the screen by the masterly direction of Maurice Tournier and the art
of a noble cast.   A tale with a "punch" in in every foot of film.
A   PICTURE   AS   GREAT  AS   THE   BOOK
Monday, February 14th
MAURICE TOURNEUR
presents
VICTORY
STARRING
Seena Owen and Jack Holt
Wednesday, February 16th
A drama of flaming passion along the border line   j£
RIO  GRANDE
from the famous play by Augustus Thomas
Also a Two Reel Comedy
Harold Lloyd
— IN—     i
GETOUTand GET UNDER
The first episode of the new serial
THE PHANTOM FOE
Will be sho wri on Wednesday
Friday, February 18th
/-'
DUTY AND  HONOR  BEFORE LOVE
The story of a war nurse who found true happiness
Peggy Hyland
/      '       IN
BONNIE ANNIE LAURIE Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
February IS, i§2i.
Sutherland's First
Stocktaking   Sale
Of Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings
and House Furnishings
FOR 3 DAYS ONLY
Friday, Saturday and Monday, 11,12 & 14
In addition to the many special lines at prices which
you will appreciate we offer a special discount of 10%
on all regular lines, absolutely. No reserve. It is our
desire to make this a big money saving event for you.
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
BREEZES
By X-RAYS.
Jimmy Adams came to light in tlie
football world last week, playing for
Victoria Rotarlans against Vancouver
Player: "What did you send liim off
the Held tor?"
t  Referee: "Because lie called me out
of my name."
Player: "He did no such thing.  Hut
you arc one Just the same!"
One good scoop deserves another.
„ llrs. Gordon, Nanaimo, was a great
success as hostess after the cup was
cinched last week.
There have been some big breaks
made on the table In tlie pool-room.
but we would like to know bow many
breaks were made on the trip home
last week with tbe cup?
"All the World Will Be Jealous!"
Ode tn .luck Clark.
Your nose is tlie pride ot* the team,
that is true,
And your thirst it is second to none,
'1 lie smell of your breath is as guod as
a drink,
Willie all of your whiskey is gone.
You've a smile III your eye when you're
boozing alone,
That's a credit you tried bard to win.
But they say it's a shame that you got
such a name,
Drinking rum, beer, hootch, whiskey
and gin.
He sure must he the Kaiser of A
cerdom, for he ruled witli an iron ii
it is not a very good advertiseme
for a referee acting in tbe capacity of | ■
linesman to break on  to tlie held
play to cuddle a goal scorer.
l.N.KIVAIil.K  WHIST PARTY.
Routledge filled Jimmy Hughes position In goal and gave a very creditable
display.
Skipper Muriay said it was a onesided affair when he chased "Oley"
Harrison along the wing.
The spectators said Milligan worked
like a horse. Well, maybe they wjll
change his name to Mule-1-gan.
There must have been a certain
amount of comedy watching a goal-
tender fall into the Pacific Ocean!
Hll'EOlTS STOCK SOLD.
It Is reported that tlie stock o
Hideout's .Millinery and Dry Omul
Store has been purchased by It. 0
haver ot* Saskatoon.
Alex. Rowan ought really to lie
trainer for Jess Willard. Possibly Jess
would have better luck this time,
Dost part of the population of Nanaimo called In at Headquarters to
hear the boys play and sing on Saturday night.
Hut the following night the whole
town seemed to be there—when the
cup was being handed round.
Sullivan    played    a    steady
against his old-time mates.
Mortimer Stationed at Crunliroiik.
very pleasant whist parly was
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C.
o on Wednesday evening last.
Mrs. Cronk was the fortunate lady to
rt'in lirst prize, a beautiful box of
handkerchiefs, .Mrs. T. Scott receiving
the consolation prize. Mr. J. Vernon-
loncs was the successful winner
amongst ihe gentlemen, receiving a
fine photo-frame, while the Junior
member ul* tlie "combination" succeeded in obtaining tlie consolation prize.
Musical selections were rendered by
.Mr. W. A. Owen and after a community
sing-song the party dispersed, a most
enjoyable evening being spent.
Personal Mention
Dr. E. R.f Hicks went to Vancouver
Monday to meet Mrs. Hicks and son,
who have just returned after a two
months' visit to her parents in Nova
Scotia. During her stay there Mrs.
Hicks' mother and father celebrated
their golden wedding.
Mr. A. F. Owen, of N'anaimo, tlie expert piano tuner, arrived on Saturday
and will remain in Cumberland and
vicinity for tbe next two weeks.
.Mrs. C. F. L. Agassiz, wife of Provincial Constable Agassiz, of Cumberland, arrived on Saturday.
Mr. ,1. Stevenson, of the firm of
Mumford and Walton, loft for Victoria
on Wednesday, from wherere be will
Ball on Monday on the New Zealand
Steamer for Auckland, lie Bpont several years in New Zealand and is returning to that Jewel of tlie Pacific.
Mr. E. Richards returned lo Vance
ver on Monday.
Mr. Thomas Oraham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left fur Vancouver
and Victoria ou Tuesday.
.Mr.  and  Mrs. T.   11.  Mumford   re
turned from Victoria on .Monday.
Mr. Dudley Michell, of Edmonton,
Alta., arrived Saturday evening on a
brief visit to his parents, .Mr. and Mrs.
T. .Michell, of Cumberland. Mr.
Michell left Tuesday morning lo attend Hie annual meeting the B. C. Division of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy in Vancouver ibis
week. He expects tu return to Cumberland loday for a brief visil before
going to Alberta.
Mr. Thos. Mordy, secretary of Ihe
Cumberland General Hospital, left tor
Victoria on Thursday to attend a
special convention of the British Columbia hospitals.
PROMOTIONS IN
THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
(Continued from l'age One)
Redmond, Jean Brown, Hazel Gibson.
Mi pben Hudock, .Margaret .MacDonald.
Thelma Ronald, Annie Walker, Victor
Tomassi, .Michisuki Asikawa, John
Davis, Tasku Oyama, Nora Wallace.
William Sweeney, .May Smith, John
Hofflielnz, Rudi Benora, Allen Gl*»n.
William Shearer, Violet Zanlnl, lso Lin
Ho, Esther McLennan. Edith Cavalloro,
Harry   Westlleld,   Edward   Stockand.
    . .    I Hugh   Braes,   Nellie   Walker,   George
Constable Mortimer, who has been strachan, Kimiyo Koka, Matsuyo Abe,
re-instated in the Provincial Polii
department, is now stationed at (.'ran
brook.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—SIX-ROOMED HOUSE,
in first-class condition; splendid
lawn, foundation; Interior and exterior in Al condition, For further
particulars apply to Wm. .McLellan.
P.O. Box S3, Cumberland. tt
FOR SALE—A CHEVROLET CAR,
model 192H, In first-class condition;
cheap for cash. Apply I', o. Box 589.
1 2-S
gam"
joe English, one of Nanaimo's best
refereess, was on Ihe line last week.
He was as good as an extra man to
Nanaimo.
The crowd almost went frantic when
Nanaimo scored.
SINGER SEWING MACHINE IN GOOD
condition. Price $45. For address
apply The Islander.
FOR SALE OU TRADE
Campbell was the victim of circumstances last week. No sympathy was
shown to him by the crowd.
After be bad shouldered the blame
for the accident to tlie centre-forward
be was ordered off the Held for absolutely nothing.
If Joe Hinds thinks his type of soccer is going to get him anything he hns
another think coming.
CHEVROLET CAR, 1010, 111 lirst-class
running poder, Will trade tor 1818
or 1010 Ford and cash, or would take
good horse as payuienl. Call after 6
o'clock at Ito'om 11, Kivcrside Hotel.
Courtenay, 1). c. 2-0
 WANTED
WANTED TO BUY OR RENT—TYPE-
•writer, In good condition.   Apply 1
O. Box ;iS8, Cumberland. 1-0
The first thing a footballer will
think of is giving the other fellow a
chance.
"Cumberland had the best all-round
team on Sunday that ever stepped on
to a field in Nanaimo," was tht
freely uttered by the. public
naimo.
remark
of   Na-
Tucker James worked like a Trojan
in both games last week. He must
have been taking some "vigor pills."
WANTED — GOOD GRADE JERSEY
cows, fresh or to freshen shortly;
must be heavy milkers. Will pay
cash for right sort. Apply Warden,
R. M. D. l, Cumberland, -l-ll
LOST
When Hitchln scored Cumberland's
only goal not a sound was heard—in
fact, few knew where the ball had
gone to.
LOST—Gent's Gold Signet'Ring on
Royston Road, Sunday last; initials
R. T. Apply II. Thompson, Royston
Road. 1-ii
FOUND
The referee bent Cumberland to a
frazzle last Sunday.
FOUND—BROWN AND WHITE ENO-
Hsh Setter at West Cumberland.
Owner can have same by paying expenses and cost of this advertlsc-
nitjiit.   Apply Islander. 2-S
Yonemura, Hatsule Matsukura.
Elsie Waterfleld,
Division 9 to Second Primer.
Norma Frost, Enlo Young, Vong
Hong, .May Brown, Alvin Freloni.
Oswald Reid, Harriet Horbury, Che-
yako Kajiyama, Sadako iwaso, llat-
suml Mlyahara, Lim Gee. George Bird.
Willie Mcintosh, Esther Allara, Ed-
mond Carrigan, Ellen .Morrison, Tn-
keru KawagauchI, Norio Herosi, John
Zanlnl, Donald Oraham, Willie Graham.
Tommy Tobacco, Clinton Harrison,
Mali.) Tomassi, Bet-nice Stant, Christen n Small. Violet Williams, Helen
Wesley, Helen Saunders, Margaret
Smith,
Division 11 to First Primer.
Winona Baird, May Beveridge, Catherine Brown, Willie Brown, John
Chapman, John Chong, Nellie ('bong,
Mollie Cooke, Mary Comb, Tom Con-
rod, Cyril Davis, Irene Davis, RonaM
Derbyshire, Alden Francescini, Doris
Hannay, Sidney Hunt, Kayuko Iwasa,
Alfred Jones, shigeru Kiyona, Eunice
MacKinnon. John Mali, Mali Mali.
Nabuko Marukawa, Mason Naghl.
Hisako Nakiino, Yureko Nisbylmi, Ile-
roshl Oltudii, Muriel Partridge, Lily
Picketti, Willie Piket, Viola Reese.
Nina shields, Mary Small, Mninora Tn-
liara, Edna Watson, Archie Welsh,
Jackie Wong, Cazul Yonemura, Allien
Cooper, Willie Eccleston.
Mr. Charles Oraham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Vancouver
on Tuesday to attend the Mining Convention.
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Nanaime
and Ladysmith on Thursday and returned Friday.
Mr. D. A. McRae left for Lanzvlll
Wednesday.
Mr. T. N. Ilihhcn. Jr.. of Vicloria.
was here on a visit during tlie week.
Mr. George Cavin of Ladysmith arrived on Thursday on a visit to Uis
son, Gordon Cavin.
LENT IS HERE
PACO BRAND
READY COOKED MEAL
SOMETHING NEW AND TASTY
"A MEAL IN A MINUTE"
Four Varieties
FRIED FILLETED SALMON
FRIED SALMON AND MASHED POTATOES
FRIED FILLETED CODFISH
FRIED CODFISH AND MASHED POTATOES
30c per Tin, 2 for 55c
Lent Special
SEVEN TINS OF FISH
2 TINS SARDINES  25
2 TINS HERRINGS IN TOMATO SAUCE 30
2 TINS PILCHARDS 30
1 TIN HORSESHOE BRAND SALMON 30
Regular price $1.15
SPECIAL—SEVEN TINS FOR <j»1 AQ
Full Stock of Fresh Fruits
and Vegetables
TETLEY'S TEA IS BACK AGAIN
AFTER A LONG ABSENCE
The Tea with the Lovely Aroma and Taste that All
Connoisseurs appreciate.
RED SUNFLOWER AND TETLEY'S GOLDEN TIPS.
Order a pound with your next lot of groceries.
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38. Limited
LINEN SHOWER FOR
GENERAL HOSPITAL SOON
.Mr. E. C. Emde, the Ford man of
Courtenay, was here on Friday and
announces the arrival of another carload of Fords. Ford Tractors have
dropped $160 in price, selling now al
fSIbi f.o.b. Courtenay.
Mr. Thos. H. Jackson. Mining I:,
tor, is in town.
P.O. Box 93 Established 190'
Does Your  House
Need Repairs?
WHEN SUNSHINE APPEARS
IT MAKES US FEEL BRIGHT
Look around the house and see
if it needs repairs.
Now after tbe winter "
Your house with dirt appears thick,
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
Call   in   Hie   Painter  and   have  your
house fixed.
W. PARKINSON
Painter Cumberland, B. C
SIGN WOKK A sra lAI.TY.
ESTIMATES (ilVEX.
OPIUM POSSESSORS
TO SERVE TWO MONTHS
Bofore Magistrate .1. Uulrd.
Two Chinese, found guilty of having
opitn in their possession, were on Wednesday each lined $200 or with ihe alternative of two months in jail. They
decided to serve Ihe sentence.
Four others who were found guilty
of smoking opium were each lined $20
aud costs, which sums wero paid.
Tbe arrests were made by tbe Royal
North West Mounted Police.
Wong Sing Found Guilty.
Wong Ring, who was charged with
being in possession of opium, was defended by Mr. I'. P. Harrison. The defence put In the plea that tiie opium
belonged to another Chinaman win,
shared the room but bad since disappeared.
However, the magistrate, after hearing lengthy arguments, ruled that the
defendant was in possession of Uie
rooni. Unit tlie opium was found In the
room, and found defendant guilty of
being In possession of same, and lined
liitn $200 nnd costs.
Corporal Cronk prosecuted for the
Royal North West .Mounted Police.
Another case which was beard yesterday afternoon against a Chinaman
of being in possession of opium, was
dismissed by .Magistrate Baird after
bearing tlie evidence. Some Chinamen
who were found smoking opium were
lined $20 and costs. Constable Agassi;-.
prosecuted and Mr. P. P, Harrison defended these cases.
\ Linen .Shower in aid of the Cumberland General Hospital will beheld
ia the Anglican Church Hall on Wednesday, March 2, from 3 to G p.m.
11 is Imped ii large number will be
present and tbat there will he a good
supply of linen to band over to the
hospital,   Tea will lie served.
SHIPPING AT CANAPIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
SUNSHINE CLUB
"J'was the night before Day day,
And all through my jeans
I was searching in vain
For the price of some beans.
But nothing was doing;
The milled e'lge had quit;
Not a penny was stirring,
Not even a jit.
Backward, turn backward,
O time in your flight!
Make it tomorrow
Just for tonight!
A very happy evening was spent in
the basement of St. George's Presbyterian Church on Friday evening when
the members of the "Sunshine Club"
to the number of thirty sat round the
supper table at 5.30. The "Sunshine
Club" is composed of the younger girls
of the congregation and is under the
directing hand of .Mrs. Redmond, who
has had considerable experience in
ihis line of work.
The table was beautifully fixed up
for the occasion and on it was abundance of good tilings to eat. All the
work was in the hands of the young
rls themselves.
The remainder of the evening was
spent in song.-, and recitations, and
addresses and games. Those who
were present are looking forward to
another such evening in thc near
lul lire.
BIRTH
HARVEY—To   Mr.  and   Mrs.   Arthur
Harvey, of Bevan, February 7, a son.
Fob. ?•—Trls, San Francisco.
Feb. 4—Esdud. coastwise; Canadian
Exporter, Australia; Charmer, Vancouver; Tartar, coastwise; Joyful and
Scow, Courtenay.
Feb. 5—Wireless, coastwise.
Feb. (i—Katori Mam, Seattle; Meiwu
Maru, China.
Feb. 7—Beatrice, coastwise.
Feb. S--Spray and Scow, Victoria;
Dauntless, Native, Faultless, coastwise.
Feb. It—chemainus, Vancouver; Celtic Prince, Boston; Active, coastwise;
Protective and Scow, New Westminster.
—
McKINNON DELIVERS
INTERESTING ADDRESS
At tiie usual weekly meeting of Holy
Trinity Men's Club, a most interesting
paper was read by Mr. H. CJ*. McKinnon
on some phases of Sociology. Judging
by the very animated discussion which
followed the reading of the pnper, it
was evident some of the members had
taken n few notes and the questions
tired at Mr. .McKinnon from all angles
did not disturb him in tbe least. The
usual time having been devoted to
questions on the paper and later a
discussion, refreshments were banded
round a most enjoyable time being
spent. A hearty vote of thanks was
tendered to .Mr. McKinnon for his very
interesting paper.
It is hoped that Mr. Charles Graham
will read a paper at the meeting on
Monday of next week.
"Mountaineering in the Canadian
Rockies."
ILLUSTRATED LECTURE
BY
Rev. Geo. Kinney, F.R.G.S.
SHOWING
100 Colored Lantern Slides
IN THE
Ilo-llo Theatre, Thursday Next
Commencing at 8.30, Following the First Picture Show
These beautiful pictures were taken by Mr. Kinney
during his many expeditions while exploring the Canadian Rockies. It will be remembered that Mr. Kinney
was the first person to reach the summit of Mount
Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies.
Admission to Picture Show and Lecture, 50 Cents

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0070300/manifest

Comment

Related Items