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The Cumberland Islander Oct 14, 1922

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 M
Provincial Library
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which is consolidated the   Cumberland Sews.
al=
FORTY-FIRST YEAR — NO.  41.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
B. C. Students
Campaign For
Accommodation
To Present Petition to Government for Permanent Buildings on Point Grey Site.—A
Serious Loss to Province
Through Lack of Support.
VANCOUVER, Oct. 10. — Renewed
emphasis was placed on tho publicity
campaign which the students ot the
111 Iversity of British Columbia aro
waging throughout the province with
the object of securing the removal of
the college to the permanent site at
Point Orey, during the opening week
of the university session here.
With an enrollment of 1,175 students, at compared with 1,016 las';
your and 1)112 in 1920-21, conditions at
tho temporary site on Willow Street
have become almost unbearable. . The
students organized this campaign at
the close of the last session, determining to place before tbe people of
tiie province the facts concerning the
university and to make an appeal to
the Government to relieve present
conditions.
To this end a petition calling upon.
the Government to adopt a "definite
and progressive policy towards the
University of BritiBh Columbia" and
to "take immediate steps towards the
erection of permanent buildings on
Ihe chosen site at Point Grey" was
circulated throughout the province
during the summer. More than 17,000
signatures were secured, a large portion of this number being from outside points. It is expected that more
than 25,000 will sign the resolution
before It Is presented to the Government at Victoria.
In addition to the circulation of the
petition, Btudcnt speakers appeared
before many public nud semi-public
organizations throughout the province, securing the co-operation and
assistance of a great many of these.
In this connection many resolutions
calling upon the Government to take
action were passed, and these will he
forwaTded to Victoria.
Strlous Loss to Province.
Tho students point out that many
graduates and a number of third anil
fourth-year students of the university
are attracted to American and Eastern
Canadian colleges because the Provincial institution, througli lack or
adequate Government support, can not
give complete courses In many subjects. The custom of such students
Is to llnd employment In American and
Eastern cities, with it resulting loss
in the personnel oMlrltlsh Columbia's
I rained men.
Unless adequate facilities are provided, they point out. there will continue to he such an annual loss. The
university, on the other hand, if properly boused and adequately financed,
would attract a large number of students from other colleges. The fact
that more than forty graduates of the
University of British Columbia hold
Important scholarships In American,
Canadian and English universities, is
pointed out as an Indication tliat the
standard of the local Institution Is
very high.
"It Is a very good sign when students of the university will give their
time und money in an effort to secure
lor their successors what they themselves have been unable to enjoy," declared President L. S. Klinck when
advised of the nctivitiea of the student
committee. "It Is an Indication thut
the British Columbia students possess
un admirable spirit and are worthy of
their Alma Mater."
Looking for Another Church.
President L. S. Klinck and Mr. F,
Dallas, bursar of ll/h University of
British Columbia, stiirled bright uud
curly last week on a hunt for another
church In which to ucconimodiite
some of the larger classes of llrst-
year students. The Baptist Church a',
the corner of Tenth Avenue nnd
Lnurol has for three years done yoe-
man service as an overflow classroom
but with the steadily Increasing number at the university, even this accommodation must be augmented.
"Just to give you an idea of how
crowded we aro thin year, I might
point out that there are thirty-live
more studenti) In llrst-year Physics
class than we can accommodate," declared the president this morning.
"The maximum number we can handle
is 240, and at tlio present moment
there are 275 attending the lectures
In tills course. We are making every
effort to secure nnothor church or
similar building in tlle vicinity of tho
university for use as classrooms."
Many visitors to the present site of
the university are surprised  to find
VICTOR BECKWITH
IS CHARGED WITH
ATTEMPTED ARSON
Proprietor of Glacier View Cafe
at Courtenay Alleged to Have
Arranged Fire Last Week.
As a result of an investigation of
the (ire that occurred in the Glacier
View Cafe at Courtenay last week, the
proprietor, Victor Beckwith, was arrested on a charge of setting the Ure
The ilre occurred about four o'clock
last Friday morning and might very
easily have resulted ln a general conflagration demolishing the entire
block on Union street of which this
cafe Is about the centre. The blaze
was noticed by two men driving along
the street and they proceeded to break
Into the building and managed to extinguish it before much damage was
dene. Botli men are reported to have
said that the flames were of a de
cldedly blue tinge, and investigation
shows that the entire premises had
been liberally sprinkled with coal oil
or gasoline.
Proprietor Absent.
lleckwlth claims to have left Courtenay for Vancouver, via Nanaimo, on
the1 previous Wednesday evening and
did not return until Friday afternoon.
It is said that the contents of the cafe
had been Insured by Beckwith for one
thousand dollars and that this amount
bud been materially increased with
another agent a few days before the
fire, an interim receipt having bee.i
given for the premium.
Preliminary Hearing.
Following Beckwith's arrest he was
arraigned before Magistrate Hames on
u charge of attempted arson. The case
waa remanded until next Monday,
when a preliminary Inquiry will be
held to determine whether or not
lleckwlth shall be sent down for trial.
Hail was fixed at $2,000, but up to a
late hour Thursday night the security
had not been put up and Beckwith
was still ln jail.
P. P. Harrison, of Cumberland, ban
been retained to prosecute the case
lor the Crown.
Provincial Deputy Fire Marshall McDonald is in Courtenay assisting lu
the investigation of the affair.
GEORGE YARROW DIES
AFTER LONG ILLNESS
The death occurred at 3.30 Wednesday morning of George Yarrow, aged
l!S years, u resident of Cumberland for
lhe past fourteen years. The late Mr.
Yarrow underwent an operation for
appendicitis eleven months ago and
never recovered from same. He leaves
a widow and one daughter, Isabel,
aged 10 years; his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. George Yarrow, of Nanaimo:
three sisters, Mrs. Schofield, Mrs.
Thomas Taylor and Miss Annie Yarrow; and two brothers, Robert and
Sidney, of Cumberland.
The family is well known at Nanal-
mo, whore they resided for over
twenty-live years.
Deceased was a prominent member
of the Ancient Order of Foresters and
lhe Moose Lodge here.
The funeral will take place from the
family residence at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon to the Cumberland
cemetery. Hev. James Hood will officiate.
CHINESE WARNED ABOUT
FAST DRIVING IN CAMP
Two Chinamen, Jim Quong Ma'i
und Mali Fung, clime up before Magistrate Balrd on Thursday charged with
driving automobiles to the common
danger In camp. They were lined Ave
und ten dollars and costs respectively.
Magistrate Balrd bas promised that
any more cases of this kind that come
before him will be severely dealt with,
the law providing for a fine of (300
In lie Imposed for an offence of this
kind, nnd It Is the Intention of the
police to put a stop to fast driving that
Is u inenticc to the lives or children.
Whai might have been a serious accident occurred on Monday last when
Chester, tho small son or Mrs. ,1.
Honors, was knocked down by a car.
Tho lad was taken to the hospital
whore his cuts were dressed and then
removed to his home. Injuries were
not serious.
that a number or chemistry students
must do their laboratory work In a
huge tent which has been erected as
an udjunct to the chemistry building.
Hut this Is the case, however, and
any day or the week will find" the
canvas-house crowded with students
who are carrying on various experiments In connection with their
studies.
Courtenay Board Of Trade
Promises Helping Hand
Delegation Tells of Difficulties
Being Encountered and Un-
kept Promises to Supply Roai
Work.—Would Cost $50,000
to Seed ..Company's Burned
Area.
The Comox-Courtenay Board or
Trade met a delegation or settlers
from Merville at its regular meeting
on Tuesday evening and listened attentively to the plea advanced by
Messrs. Kerr, Rekie and Hughes on
behalf of the settlers on the Mobile:
area. The delegation pleaded for the
assistance of the Board of Trade to
have their wrongs righted. Mr. Kerr,
spokesman for the soldiers, stated that
his committee had been chosen at a
meeting of settlers, and, realizing the
friendliness of the board and what
the citizens of Courtenay bad done for
the victims or last summer's holocaust, they knew they would be given
a sympathetic hearing.
Mr. Kerr outlined the origin or tlio
settlement and its development up to
the present time, reiterating the oft-
repeated statement that the people of
Merville were not receiving the treatment that had been promised them.
They had no deeds or titles to their
land nor could they get a satisfactory
adjustment. When they approached
the supervisor he nearly always referred them to a higher official, witli
tho result that tbey had been in thi
dark for many months as to the outcome ot their efforts to become established on tbelr land.
Little Bond Work.
In regard to the progress loans that
had been advanced to certain members of the community, lie said thii
had not been a satisfactory metho.l
of helping those on Hhe land as it only
added to the debt already existing.
They had been promised that tea
thousand dollars would be spent on
rond-maklng, giving each man so employed two weeks' work throughout
last winter. Alter a rew days at thii
work the men were laid off, and sonu
of them wondered where the te:i
thousand dollars had been spent.
Lund (iood.
Mr. Kerr went ou to say that th:i
land at Merville was all right desplt-.'"t<,rv,ewed Mr' Filber« wrdlng the
statements to the contrary made most-1lll!eulnB down ot tho bnrned-over area
ly by irresponsible parties acting oh! of tl,e Comox Loes»HS Company's
their own account apart from tho ln"d'W" ma«e by R. U. Hurford, who
community committee and the almost | "tate(1 U'a.t Mr;.P'lBf.r*. n*d 8I"d ibnt
unanimous opinion of the settlers
fluence must be at work between the
Land Settlement Board and. tbe Government.
Committee Named.
On the suggestion of Charles Plgott,
supported by P. L. Anderton and Mr.
Cleland, that a committee be named
tc act in conjunction with a similar
number ut members of the Comox
Agricultural Association to take into
consideration the plight of the soldier
settlers, have the Government accept
an Impartial assessment of lands made
by three of the most successful
farmers of the Comox valley who
know real values, und pluce the men
at Merville on a more substantial
footing, Messrs. Plgott, Anderton and
Cleland were appointed to take this
work over.
After thanking the Board of Trade
for the generous reception accorded
them, the Merville delegation retired
Correspondence.
Communications were read from
Mr. Napier Dennlsou of the meteorological station at Victoria, stating
that storm warnings could probably
be sent by C. P. II, wire to Nanaimo
and from there to Conrtenuy by Government telegraph. The secretary
was Instructed to acknowledge receipt
or the letter and say that this arrangement would be acceptable.
An Interesting letter written to the
secretary from Shanghai, China, told
of mauy Inquiries the writer had rs
ceived respecting the climate of
British Columbia and the best part of
the province tor ex-service officers
and men to settle in to raise small
fruits. The writer, Wiltred Smith,
once an enthusiastic member ot the
board, said he had charge ot a gang
of from three to four hundred men
laying pavements in Shanghai, and
jocularly remarked that he was learn
ing to make good roads and woull
soon be able to come back and help
Courtenay put tarvla on the streets
The secretary was instructed to acknowledge the letter and to send a
supply of advertising literature on the
Comox district.
Seeding of Hurued-over Area.
The report of the committee that
MUSICAL EVENING
METHODIST CHURCH
NEXT WEDNESDAY
' IleiidJiis'Jmciits.
They were willing to stay at Merville, but the load of debt on their
farms was so great that It was working a great hardship. The valuation
o f their   properties   should   bo    re-
the cost or seeding all the burned-over
land ot the Comox Logging Company
would bo about fifty thousand dollars.
He promised to take the matter un
with the directors ot the company aud
forward the decision to the Board of
Trade as soon ns possible.
The resident engineer wrote to say
adjusted   so  to  give   them n proper | tliat he had looked Into the subject of
the removal of certain stumps on the
Little River road and hoped that as
soon as funds were available he could
hove the work done. He also sail
that he had done some work at the
Royuton crossing of the Logging
Company's railway, but that the company had as yet done nothing to Improve the crossing.
chance to make good, as undoubtedly
most of them could and would.
After the delegates had been heard,
members of tbe board asked many
question, the general Impression
seeming to be that it was not altogether the fault or the Government
that conditions are as they exist it
present, so that apparently some in-
FISHERMAN OF
DEEP BAY ENDS
LIFE WITH GUN
John Glennie's   Mind   Becomes
Deranged and He Commits
Suicide on Boat.
The body ot John Glennie, a fisherman Tor the Deep Bay Canneries, was
tound In his boat at Deep Hay on
Wednesday morning with a shot-gun
between his knees and the lett side of
his head shot away. It is supposed
that he committed suicide Monday
night, as he was last seen on Monday.
On Wednesday, another fisherman by
the name of Hunt decided to look f ir
Glennie as he had not been seen
around nor had any smoke been se'in
coming from his cabin.
Provincial Policeman A. Dunbar was
communicated with, and he and Constable Regan, of Union Bay, went
down to Deep Bay and took charge or
the body. An Inquest was held Wednesday evening, the jury bringing In
a verdict that Glennie came to his
(lentil by u gun-shot wound self-i-i-
Ilicted while temporarily insane. A
search of Glennie's boat resulted ill
the finding of several letters which
proved conclusively thut his mind wn-'
unbalanced.
No Relatives Here.
Glennie had no relatives in this
country that are known ot. He was
a native ot Aberdeen, Scotland, and
a Great War veteran. He wns about
fifty years or uge and hud been fishing
in the vicinity ot Deep Bay since 1917.
SACRED CONCERTS
RAPIDLY GAINING
IN POPULARITY
A Creditable Rendition of the
"Hallelujah Chorus" Given
Under Direction of Mr. A. J.
Merry.
The Ilo-llo Theatre was crowded to
tlld doors Sunday evening during the
second sacred concert of the season
by the Cumberland Amateur Orchestral Society. Handel's "Hallelujah
Chorus" rendered by a lurge cho!.'
added greatly to the success of tho
evening.
The orchestra gave several verv
popular selections, Including Handel's
"l.urgo," " Les Adieu" by Beethoven.
" Cuvalina," and the reverie "Apple
Blossoms." The violin and concertina
duct by Mr. McGinnls and Mr. Robinson was greatly appreciated and w,
one of the best numbers ever presented by the society.
Thev vocal selections of Mrs. J.
Pinfold, "Down the Vale," Mrs, C, J.
Fernance, "Cathedral Voices," Mrs. J.
Lidlnghnm, "My Task," and Mr. G.
Itaiusdell In "The Lost Chord," were
greatly enjoyed.
These concerts arc rapidly gaining
In popularity, and the society Is to be
congratulated on the success of its
efforts to foster the love of goud music In the city and the Increased attendance at each concert should be
very gratifying.
The Orchestral Society Arrange
Entertainment—Rev. G. R. B.
Kinney to Give Illustrated
Lecture.
Arrangements tor the musical evening by the Cumberland Amateur Orchestral Society to be held in the
Methodist church Wednesday next at
7.30 p.m., are now completed. Un
fortunately, It has been impossible to
obtain the lantern slides for the
'Story or Ben Hur," which was to
have formed the second part of the
program. In place of this, however,
the society has arranged with Rev.
G R. B. Kinney to give his popular
lecture on "The Unexplored Canadian
Rockies," illustrated wifli pictures
taken by himself amid the awe-lnsplr
lug grandeur of the finest Alpine
scenery ln the world.
The pictures that will be shown next
Wednesday evening have been exhibited before the principal geographical societies ot the world, including the New York Geographical Society, the Brooklyn Institute or Arts
and Sciences, the Chicago Geographical Society, the Boston Institute of
Technology, the National Geographic
Society or Washington, D.C. At the
lost-mentioned exhibition the largest
auditorium possible' wus obtained, and
so popular was the lecture that It had
to be repeated, and on the second occasion over six hundred members had
to be tunred away from the overcrowded ball.
Mr. Kinney has also, at the request
ol the war office, exhibited his views
to the troops on several of the important battlefields ot the Great War,
In which he served as a private in the
Fourth Field Ambulance, Second Division, and he has had the distinction
oi lecturing thereon before the Royal
Geographical Society or London, Eng
In arranging this popular entertainment the Orchestral Society is endeavoring to show its practical appreciation or the kindness or the church
officials in providing facilities ror rehearsals and practices by the society.
POLICE SUSPICIOUS OF
FIRE IN JAPTOWN
A house in Japtown occupied bv
Mrs. It. Yoshida, widow ot one or the
victims or the recent mine catastro-
phy, was badly damaged by fire about
1.30 Monday morning last. The place
is owned by C. Harrow, Japanese.
Tbe fire started iu an outshed nt
the buck of the house and appears to
have been of incendiary origin, having
started In a pile of shavings and other
Inflammable material in one corner of
the shed. Much damage was done before the lire was gotten under control,
but the place wus not totally destroyed. The fire brigade was not
called.
Provincial police are still Investigating the case.
CHILDREN COMPETE
FOR FORESTRY
ESSAY PRIZE
Scores of school children in every
school district of the Dominion arc
competing these days in tile national
school essay competition on "Forestry
and Tree Planting," Inaugurated by
the Canadian Forestry Association.
Questions as to the forest resources
ot Canada, the damage done by forest
llreB, what trees to cboose for planting und how to plant them, arc being
asked by a multitude of young people,
and the resultant information Is being
applied to the essay competition.
Three substantial cash prizes are be
Ing given In each province, and the
effect of the national effort to stimulate juvenile interest In the forest resources of the country and the multiple benefits of tree planting has secured the hearty endorsatlon ol all
the departments ol education which
aro giving every co-operation.
PHOENIX BREWERY CASE
TO BE TRIED NEXT VVEEK
Charged with selling beer, tbe
Phoenix Brewery will be tried at
Courtenay on Friday next. The charge
arises out ot tho tact tliat tho Phoenix
Brewory is the occupant ot a brewery
warehouse at Courtenay, from which
warehouse an agent sells beer, and Is
morely on a technicality In the
Liquor Act which slateH that anyone
occupying the sume building us a
brewery agent may be charged with
selling beer ir same Is sold by the
agent.
H. A. MncLean, or Victoria. Is de-
rending the brewery, and P. P. Harrison, of Cumberland, Is prosecuting.
Douglas Case Is
Again Thrown
Out_Of Court
P. P. Harrison Appeals Case in
Behalf of Crown, But Counsel
for Defence Claims Appeal is
Made by City of Cumberland
Because City Puts up Deposit
for Costs.
On Wednesday morning Judge
Barker, presiding over the County
Court, heard the application tor appeal in the case of the Crown versus
William Douglas, agent for the Silver
Spring Brewery, who was charged
with having beer unlawfully in hla
possession. His Honor dismissed the
application for appeal on the grounds
that there was no case against Douglas as the charge did not disclose
what the unlawful purposes were for
whicli the defendant was said to have
had the liquor.
P. P. Harrison, Crown prosecutor
in the case, acting under instructions
from the Attorney-General's department, made formal application on behalf of the Crown to appeal this case.
It, appeared that A. J. Merry, chief ot
police for the city of Cumberland,
paid to the County Conrt clerk the
sum of $25.00 from the city of Cumberland as a deposit for costs of
appeal.
ThlB fact was brought out In '.tie
prosecutor's examination of Chief ot
Police Merry and County Clerk Balrd.
A. Lelghton, ot Nanaimo, counsel tor
the defence, stated that the magistrate should have set the amount ot
the deposit. He also stated that as
the deposit had been made by the
city of Cumberland, the application
for appeal was naturally made by the
city also.
Magistrate Satisfied.
In reply to questions put by the
prosecutor, John Baird stated that the
sum ot $25.00 had been put up when
he was served with a notice ot appeal
as magistrate sitting on the case In
the firBt trial, and that he had accepted the amount and was satisfied
with same.
Mr. Harrison stated most emphatically that he had made the application
for appeal on behalf of the Attorney-
General of the province, and aB the
appeal therefore was In behalf of the
Crown, no desposlt was necessary.
No Charge. /
Little was said by either side in regard to the charge, except that Mr.
Lelghton stated that the clause of
the Liquor Act covering this case provides merely for the confiscation of
the liquor. Mr. Harrison repeated
that the information on the case
states that the defendant had beer for
unlawful purposes. His Honor rules
tbat the unlawful purposes had to be
shown or there was no case. He
therefore dismulssed the appeal on the
grounds that there was no charge.
JUDGMENT GIVEN
KERBY IN CLAIM
AGAINST CREAMERY
Comox Creamery Must Pay for
Dispute Over Dismissal of
George Kerby.
Judge Barker on Wednesday award;
ed George Kerby, of Courtenay, judgment I'or the sum of (9.99 and costs
tor wages due him from the Comox
Creamery. Kerby was suing the
Creamery for dnmages for alleged
wrongful dismissal and balance of
wages due him.
A lengthy parley took place In which
Kerby was examined and cross-
examined by his counsel, P. P. Harrison, and counsel for the Creamery,
Tliecd  Pearse, of Courtenay.    Kerby
luimcil he was under contract to
work tor the Creamery for a period ot
about four months at a wage of (100
per month and that he had been
wrongfully dismissed by the manager.
R. U. Hurford. who appeared a.i witness for the Creamery. His Honor de
elded that he could do nothing in the
case but give judgment to Kerby for
the wages due him, amounting to $9.99
nnd costs.
TAG DAY, OCT. 21.
All preparations are now being
made for the tag day to be held on
Saturday, the 21st, by the Woman's
Auxiliary to the Cumberland General
Hospital. Money raised by thii organization is used to supply additional
comforts ror patients at the hospital,
nnd as the supply ot thcBe was pretty
well depleted nt the time of the mine
disaster, tlle ladles are anxious to
bring the supply up to normal again
as soon as possible. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
MR. MANSON'S APPEAL.
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
CONGRATULATIONS
The correspondent of The Islander
at Campbell River heartily congratulates the proprietor of that paper on
his enterprise In branching out Into
a greater field than that of the city
of Cumberland. The more advertising
we receive ln the local papers the better for those endeavoring to bring to
the attention ot outsiders the advantages and opportunities to be found In
the vast fertile fields in the outlying
settlements of this part ot Vancouver
Island. Without a doubt the country
to the north and west of Cumberland
Is one that will compare favorably
with any section throughout the whole
of the province ot British Columbia,
and the more publicity we can get as
to the opportunities to be found in
this great undeveloped region, the
sooner will this part or tbe Island
come into Its own. The almost
unlimited extent of its forests, its
mineral wealth. Its hundreds of thousands of horse-power (electric) contained ln the numerous rivers and
streams, its unrivalled attractions as
a tourist resort, and a dozen other
advantages, are just beginning to be
known throughout the world, through
the agency of the newspapers and the
thousands of tourists who visit this
part of the world annually. It 1b to
be hoped that The Islander will prove
another link between the pioneers of
this richly-endowed land and those
who have the wherewithal to develop
to the fullest extent the great resources that lie around us.
Campbell River Correspondent—
A perusal ot some of the daily
papers creates the impression that
the operation of a chain of liquor dispensaries ts the chief business of the
Government of tbe province of British
Columbia. From any other standpoint
than that of financial gain the liquor
business Is not the most desirable in
the world, but to have wished it upon
our representatives lu the Legislature
places the responsibility for success
or failure to control tbe truffle
squarely up to the mass ot the people.
If we arc consistent, if we are sincere
in our desire to have the liquor business cleansed morally and purged oi
ull the rottenness that waB claimed as
its companion in days gone by, it is
our duty to hearken to the appeal of
the Attorney-General, get behind him
and lend our assistance in the
entorcement ot the Liquor Control
Act. Tire- sooner we do that the
sooner will we attain that measure ot
success which will allow us to turn
our hearts and hands to the real industrial and commercial development
of the province.
JUST A HINT.
Can It be a fact that ln an audience
oi live hundred people or more in a
place the size of, say, Cumberland,
not one person realizes tbat "0
Canada" Is the Canadian national anthem and when it is being played or
sung in their presence they should
stand?
It most certainly Is an established
fact.
When and where did such a thing
occur?
Time: Last Sunday evening.
Place: The Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland, on the occasion of the sacred
concert by the Cumberland Amateur
Orchestral Society.
The programme opened with "0
Canada" played by the orchestra und
sung by the massed choir. Practically
every seat downstairs was occupied,
und the only people who stood during
this number were those at the back
who could not get seats.
It was noted that during the singing of the "Hallelujah Chorus" six
people stood. It Is customary ln
churches when this chorus Is sung
for the congregation to stand. This,
however, may not be a very well-
known fact and is really only a matter of taste. The other Is a more im
portant matter.
It Is surely only thoughtlessness
that would permit such ui uct of discourtesy to our own national anthem
It looks bad and certainly should not
be allowed to occur again.
Cumberland 1b probably aB patriotic
as any town In the Dominion, but
ilicsc little things give the opposite
impression to strangers and transient
visitors, which are a town's best ad
venlslng medium.
This is Just a gentle hint.
ROOT HOG, OR DIE !
One of the Vancouver newspapers
has suffered another headache. Tho
cause wus the appointment of a man
not a resident of the terminal city,
lo membership On the board ot mana
gers of the Canadian National railways. While we on Vancouver Island
might be Inclined to say to British
Columbia's chief sea-port, "Root hog,
oi die," we cannot do otherwise than
admire the regularity with which her
citizens have gone after the things
that have helped to make her great.
COMOX VELLEY IDEAL
FOR BEE-POULTRY-FRUIT
SCHOOL NOTES.
Basketball has been organized for
the winter and practice will be held
four nights a week, a teacher being
In charge each evening.
The lumber has arrived tor the
large shelter to be erected on tho
school grounds for the comfort of the
children In rainy weather.
The new furnaces have been Installed In the schools and steam heat
Is now all through the buildings.
HELPING FOLKS UP HILL
It seems to us that playing up the
crimes of the country and falling to
emphasize properly the value of men
who actually are doing things, is one
of the saddest mistakes of the city
Press. Twenty columns of social
errors, scandals, murders, hold-ups,
business mistakes, official blunders, to
one column of praise for the men and
tho women who are the real silent
partners in our national progress.
Ten dirty shows to one clean entertainment.
The civic interest ot any community can never rise higher than the integrity of the individuals of the community, irrespective of religious belief. In other words, every man or
woman is held responsible to the Idea
ot carrying out the convictions ol a
clear conscience, so long as these actions coincide with the laws or the
laud and the rules or right behaviour.
The great country Press, the newspapers published in the villages and
smaller cities, is not guilty or thU
sensational catering to criminals and
social lepers. We find greater pleasure in the work ot helping humans up
the hill than we do In kicking them
down.
TheOnly Remedy"
Says This Doctor
"The treatment of ikln df•euei(ecientti)
tnd dfieuei of tbe scftlp ii known to be
difficult," writes Dr. W. L. Randolph.
"However, there ii one remedy that it
known to be entirely dependable in thin
dtitreuinr and troublesome diieaie.   I
refer to D, D. D. Prescription."
!f you have never tried D. D. D. for ikin diseases, whether a small spot, or whether one of
the dreaded forms—the torment of eciemaor
the hard scales of psoriasis—ret a bottle at once
on our guarantee that if it doesn't relieve you
four money will be refunded.  $1.00 a bottle,
ry D. D. D. Soap, too.
M lotion for Shin Disease
Sold by FROST'S DRUG STORE
Try Tiie Courtenay Garage for Re
pair Work. Only the best mechanics
employed.
Tag Day, Oct. 21st
for the benefit of
Cumberland
General Hospital
The following article, published In
the October number o( the Agricultural Journal, and written by Mr. A.
W. Fiudlay, inspector of apiaries, will
give an idea of the possibilities of a
combination of small fruit, poultry
and bees, for which Comox Valley is
undoubtedly well adapted:
"Bee-keeping is a very Interesting
branch of agriculture that is promising to become a most profitable sideline with many of our soldier settlers.
It fits in well on the small fruit and
poultry tarm, and is especially
adapted to the man who is physically
Incapable or the continuous heavy labour of handling the plough or hayfork.
Day Breams Realized.
" Chas. Courtman, of Huntingdon, Is
an example ot the disabled war veteran who. In spite of many handicaps,
Is making a complete success along
these lines. Charlie la minus several
pieces of his anatomy, and swings one
leg stiff trom the hip, but is still full
oi energy and ambition.
"In his own words, be says: 'While
I lay for many long months in various
military hospitals, I bad plenty of time
to consider my plans tor the future
Previous to the war 1 had always
worked for the 'other fellow,' and I
made up my mind tliat as soon as 1
was patched up enough to get around
again I would be my own boss. Back
to the olllce desk did not appeal to me.
My day-dreams went 'back to the
land.' A nice little home ill the country on a few ucres of good land, sonic
chickens, a cow, a few hives of bees,
and an acre or two of small fruits; so
in 1919 I purchased, through the S. S.
B., 10 acres of wild land and started
In. It's not all clear yet, but I havo
gone a long way towards realizing my
ambition. Two acres are iu bearing
raspberries, logons, etc. My house,
bam, poultry sheds, and workshop are
complete and comfortable. The Jersey cow is a winner: 100 pure-lire I
Plymouth Rock bens are giving profitable returns; and the bees provide me
with Interesting study and relaxation
from the heavier work of the tarn),
besides being by far the most profitable stock on the place.
Successful lice-keeping.
'I started with one hive of bees ln
1920, and being absolutely green to
bee-keeping, I sought instruction from
the local Aplnry Inspector, who fortunately lived near me. 1 don't believe
In wasting time trying to Und out by
experience what an expert in beekeeping or any other line can tell me.
My apiary and equipment lias been
modelled along the lines of the Provincial Government demonstration
apiaries, and bow well this system has
been successful with me may be
judged by the fact that ill 1921. with
three colonies, I secured 500 lbs. of
surplus honey and Increased my stoek_
to five colonies. This season my live
colonies produced 1,200 lbs., and increased to ten, an average of 240 lbs.
each and 100 per cent Increase. My
equipment cost about $30 per colony.
This may seem pretty high, but results
justify the cost, for where will you
find any other stock on the farm Hint
will pay for itself and equipment the
Ilrst yenr and give 100 per cent profit
besides? When I look around the
little rami, bees, chickens, rruit
pleasant surroundings, nnd a comfort
able home, say, boys, you couldn't get
me back to the city with a block anil
•tackle. Of course I am not entirely
independent, yet; 1 have to supplement
my Income with outside work to keep
ahead, and to hire assistance with the
SPECIAL SALE
THIS WEEK
Ladies'  One-piece Dresses in Serges, Tricoline and
Silk.   Values from $13.50 to $16.50   (J»Q fJC
Special Sale price, each	
Misses' Rubberized Tweed Raincoats, value
at $12.50.   Special Sale price, to clear
$5 75
NEWEST EXCLUSIVE STYLES
IN LADIES' SPORT SKIRTS .:.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Just received our Fall Stock of Men's and Young Men's
Cloth Overcoats, in the Newest Cloths and Styles,
from  $25 to $32.50.
Boys' and Youths' Curly-cloth Reefers, Plaid Lined.
Special Value at $9.75 each
GROCERY  DEPARTMENT.
Shoe Polish, black and brown 3 tins for 25c
Jameson's Coffee, 1 lb. pkts 60c
Rogers' Golden Syrup, 2 lb. tin  25c
Rogers' Golden Syrup, 5 lb. tin  55c
Singapore Pines, tall tins 25c
Molasses, tall tins, 5 tins for $1.00
Bulk Cocoanut, per lb 25c
White Swan Soap, carton  30c
Van Camp's Pork and Beans,  2 tins 25c
CAMPBELLS'
CUMBERLAND
heavy work of clearing, but we will
soon bo seli-supporting and in no
.imall measure this will be due to tht1
bees.'
"Mrs. Courtman takes a keen in- |f=
lerest in her husband's bees as iu ~=
everything else on the farm, and gives {sj
practical assistance with the poultry,' ^s
etc. Pulling together in this way,
there is apparently no more contented couple i nthe Praser Valley."
^ll[HHI!!iil>!!H1 Illlllllllll!l>llll !II!!III!IIIII>IIIIII!I1III1IH!II>IIIII!I l!lillllllll!llll!!lllll!llllllinil!!lllll^
Geo. J. Hardy
A  SOCIAL MEETING.
IIII
llllllllllllllll
The
Piket Electric
WE DO ELECTRIC WORK OF
EVERY DESCRIPTION  .:.  .:.
Onr Stock Comprises of |§|
Lamps of Every Description pi
Flash Lights and Batteries g
Hot Shots — Hot Shots H
Irons — Toasters — Grills 9
Radiant Heaters — Stoves pj
Washers on Reasonable Terms     ==
HOUSE WIRING
Call 164 at my expense for Information and Estimates
Len D. Piket
The Parent - Teacher Association
will hold a social meeting on Monday,
October 16th, in the Anglican Church
hall. There will be an interesting
program followed by refreshments
Not only members of the P.-T. Association, but all who are interested in
the welfare of the Cumberland Public
School scholars, are cordially invite]
tc attend.
Committee: Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Burns,
Miss Beckwith.
NOTARY PUBLIC
m    REAL ESTATE AGENT     :     INSURANCE AGENT
AUCTIONEER
B    Phone: Office 10.
1
COURTENAY, B. C.
See The New Arrivals In
Ladies Velour Coats
VARIETY  OF  SHADES  AND  LATEST  STYLES
PRICES RANGING  FROM
$20.75 T0 $26.10
ALSO A NEW SHIPMENT OF
Rubber Footwear
"LOWEST  POSSIBLE   PRICE   FOR HIGHEST  QUALITY GOODS"
C. KENT & COMPANY
COURTENAY
M  |        P. O. Box 10
COURTENAY
Phone  77
■■I  I rf
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THREE
WOMANKIND AND HER SPHERE
Social and Personal
Farewell Dunce for
Miss Lenora Ilolatll.
On Friday evening last a number of
tlio friends of Miss Lenora Bolatti
gathered in tbe Anglican Hall for a
farewell dance in her honor. The
ball was nicely decorated for the occasion and a delightfully Informal
eood time wns bud by all present.
An excellent program of. dance music
wns supplied from eight till one
o'clock, and during the Intermission
refreshments were served. Mr. Geo
Mlchell made a splendid master of
ceremonies and kept things moving all
tiie time. The party dispersed after
tlle singing of " For She's a Jolly Good
Fellow" and "Auld Lang Syne."
Among those present were: Dr. and
Mrs. Hicks, Dr. and Mrs. Christie, Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas Mordy, Mr. and Mrs
Walton, Mr.^.and Mrs. Allan Nunns,
Mr. and MrB. J. W, Cooke, Mr. nnd
Mrs. C. Nash, Mr. and Mrs. McCarthy,
Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Scott, Mrs. Carson, Mrs. J. Harry Mann, Mr$. Frost,
Mrs. A. C. Lynn, Mrs. F. J. Dalby,
Mrs. Wylle, Mrs. J. J. Potter, Misses
Olive and Edith Dickie, Miss Margery
Mlchell, Miss Tarbell, Miss Blanche
Dando, Miss Margery Beckwith, Mls3
Eleanor Parfltt, Miss Mnrjorie Mordy,
Miss Bollhouse, Miss Sehl, Miss Fowler, Miss I. MacFadyen, Miss Hannah
Harrison, Miss L. Carey, Miss J.
Bolagno, Miss D. Wilson, Miss 0. Bird,
Miss Nellie Reynolds, Miss Laura
Robertson, Miss Bannerman, Mr. Chas.
Graham, Mr. George Mlchell, Dr,
Driggs of Courtenay, Mr. George Tarbell, Mr. Alex. Denholm, Mr. J. Den-
holm, Mr. Alex. Dunbar, Mr. Kent,
Mr. Douglas, Mr. McLean, Mr. J. Wilcox, Mr. D. Watson, Mr. Cyril Mlchell.
Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Arthur Lee, Mr.
Campbell, Mr. Robertson, Mr. Shaw,
Mr. McLean, Mr. William Wood, Mr.
J. Vernon Jones, and a number of
others.
* • «
.Masquerade Ilnll Announced.
The Cumberland United Football
Club announces that they will hold
a masquerade ball on December 22nd.
*. * *
Week-end Visitors.
Mrs. Keller and two children, accompanied by ber mother, Mrs. Bircb,
came up from Cobble Hill last Saturday and spent the week-end at the
Union Hotel with Mr. Keller, who
joined tbe staff of Bums & Brown
about a month ago. The family expects to take up their residence in
Cumberland shortly.
* •      •
Surprise Party Is Family lie-union.
Mrs. Sarah Brown was the surprised party last Friday evening
when for the lirst time In several
years her children got together and
paid her an unexpected visit. The
party included her eight sons and
fourteen grand-children, there being
present: Mr. and Mrs. Martin Brown,
ol Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Brown, of Bevan; Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. W. Brown, Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
Matt Brown, Mr. George Brown, and
Mr. Robert Brown.
* * ♦
Week-end Visitors from
Niinulnii).
' Mrs. Crossan and Mrs. McQuhart
left on Tuesday morning for Nanaimo
after spending the week-end here to
attend tlle meeting of tlle Rebekahs
on Monday evening. They were the
guests of Mrs. Andrew Thompson during their stay In Cumberland.
Local Ilebekiilis Entertain
Nanaimo Delegation
On Monday evening about seventeen
members of the St. Cecelia Rebekah
Lodge at Nanaimo were guests of the
local lodge. Dinner was served in the
Fraternal Hall on the arrival of the
visitors by motor from Nanaimo about
six o'clock, and a very interesting
evening was spent in lodge work,
about forty-live ladies being present.
The officers present from the Nana!
mo Lodge were: Mrs. Neilson, N.G.
and Mrs. Jardeno, V.G. Light refreshments wero served before the
visitors left about eleven o'clock for
home.
* *       *
Guests from Vancouver Return.
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Brown left last.
Saturday for their home in Vancouver
after spending the past two months
here visiting Mr. Brown's mother, Mrs.
Sarah Brown.
* *       *
W. II. 0. Club Holds
IMIglitful Banquet for Mothers
The second annual Mothers' and
Daughters' banquet held by the W. H.
0. club on Wednesday evening was a
most delightful affair and the girls
und Mrs. Kinney are to be congratulated ..on the splendid arrangements
so well carried out. The Anglican
hall was artistically decorated with
the club colors of blue and gold and
the color scheme of the tables was
the same with bouquets of chrysanthemums and roses. The ball presented a charming picture and the
guests of the club were charmed with
the dainty supper provided for them.
Mrs. Kinney, ns organizer of the club,
acted as toast-mistress for the evening. She called upon the president.
Miss Elsie Horwood, to propose the
toast to the mothers .to which Mrs.
A. J. Fouracre responded. Mrs. F.
Horwood proposed the toast to the
club, which was responded to by Miss
Irene llateman, past president. All of
these short speeches were most gracefully made, and were followed by a
short talk to tlle girls by Mrs. Hood.
A musical program followed with
solos by Miss Isabel Crawford and
Mrs. McAdams, accompanied by Mrs.
Finch, and a recitation by Miss Beatrice Mitchell. A comedy sketch by
six,of the girls, Misses Annie Haywood, Grace Horwood, Jessie Stevenson, Irene Batcman. Hilda King and
Eleanor Parfltt, proved very popular.
Much credit is duo Mrs. James Burin
I'or the writing of the sketch and
training the girls. The program
closed with a chorus to the mothers
sung by the hostesses. Those present
included: Mrs. G. Kinney, Mrs. Fred.
Horwood, Mrs. James Hood, Mrs. Jas.
Burns, Mrs. D. Mitchell, Mrs. McAdams, Mrs. A. J. Fouracre, Mrs. 'H.
Farmer, Mrs. Treen, Mrs. W. Four-
acre, Mrs. Maxwell, Mrs. W. Henderson Sr., Mrs. G. J. Richardson, Mrs.
J. Horbury, Mrs. G. Richardson, Mrs.
II. Mounce, Mrs. D. Stevenson, Mrs.
G. II. Robertson, Mrs. J. Fraser, Mrs.
T Armstrong, Misses Isabel Crawford,
Given Hughes, Irene Bateman, Elsie
Horwood, Iris Treen, Edith Horbury,
Carrie Richardson, Eleanor Parfltt
Beatrice Bickle, Madge Fouracre,
Annie Haywood, Isabel Henderson,
Lizzie Henderson, Hilda King, Grace
Ilorwoijd; Beatrice Mitchell, Jessie
Stevenson. The following junior
girls very kindly assisted the W. H
O. members by serving during the
banquet: Misses Olive Jones, Lily
Banks, Elizabeth Cunliffe, Ella Burns,
Beth Horbury, Winnie Young. Olive
Richardson und Queenle O'Brien.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING   MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES AT  LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159
Night—134-X  Courtenay
Congratulations.
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Martin are being congratulated on the birth of °
daughter last Sunday.
* *       •
Hallowe'en Party.
The choir of Holy Trinity Church
intends holding a Hallowe'en party ln
the church hall. Plans are being
made for games, dancing and refreshments. Tlle admission charge will be
announced later.
* *      •
Surprise Party.
On Monday last, the occasion of
Mrs. S. Marocchi's sixth wedding anniversary, sixteen of her friends pai 1
her a very delightful surprise visit
and gave her many handsome presents
with their best wishes. The evening
was spent in games, music and dancing. Among those present were: Mrs.
J. Marocchi, Mrs. Bardessono, Mrs. J.
Scarvardo, Mrs. W. Little, Mrs. Raga,
Mrs. L. Ferionl, Mrs. J. Bolettino,
Mrs. Bogo, Mrs. M. Bolettino, Mrs.
Conti, Misses Mary Picketti, Mary
Bardessono, Edith Francloli, Mary
Mussatto, Victoria Bono and Mary
Tobocco.
* *       ♦  '
Victoria Party Motored Up.
Mr. Ernest Haynes, post office inspector, motored up from Victoria on
Thursday, accompanied by his mother
and sister, Mrs. Sharratt, Mrs.
Tricker and Mrs. Stevenson. Mrs.
Haynes Is an elderly lady of eighty-
two years but thinks nothing of motoring up from Victoria in one day.
Mr. Haynes spent Friday at Denman
Island, and expects to drive his party
back to Victoria on Saturday.
* •      »
larfre Crowd nt Dance.
The dance held in the Gaiety
theatre at Courtenay on Wednesday
evening by the volunteer firemen to
celebrate the first anniversary of the
opening of the Courtenay waterworks
system, waB very largely attended.
Several parties went from Cumberland and thoroughly enjoyed the
splendid program provided.
* *      *
Basket Social at Mlnto.
On Monday evening last at the home
of Mrs. T. Pearse, Minto, the splendid
sum of $96.50 was realized from the
sale of baskets, and will be turned
over to the school board to assist in
the installation of electric lights In
the school,
* *      *
Visitor from llazelton. .
Miss Minnie Horbury Is here from
Hazelton visiting her father, Mr. Thos.
Horbury, and her sisters.
* *       *
High School Inspector Here.
Mr. Albert Sullivan, of Victoria, inspector of High schools, was iu Cumberland on Thursday.
For satisfactory   repair   work—Try
The Courtenay Garage.
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
S. DAVIS, *—
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SONG POEMS
WANTED
If you have a Song or Song Poem,
Words or Music, which you have
written, let us hear from you.
YOU CAN MAKE GOOD MONEY
We will Publish and Market
Them   for  you      :    :    :    :
DO NOT DELAY     -     WRITE NOW
The Mosher System
OF CANADA
MUSIC PUBLISHERS
Box 61(1 WESTVILLE, N. S.
A FEW FRIENDS
There Is an old legend that when
man was cast out of Paradise, an
angel secured for him three blessings:
wife, children and friends. These
blessings are still his and God pity
the man who doe3 not possess at
least one of them. Wives and children may not be granted to all men.
but each of us may at least have
friends. Not many, it is true, but a*
least a few. Publicity attracts
friends, prosperity attaches friends,
but adversity is the acid test of true
friendship. How comforting it is to
call to mind old friendships—friendships that tolerated you in times of
stress—friends that forgave you for
your flagrant faults, your foolish e>
rors. And we all have a bunch of
these.
In your circle of acquaintances are
several rather inconsplcious men so
far as the limelight goes, but these
men are none the less great and good
men. There Is the one who Is as
constant as the North Star In his
friendship, true as the dial in tlle sun
In his business dealings. You just
know that he is for you always and
that he is to be trusted to the limit
of human endurance. You bank on
him, you count on him. Perhaps you
do not see him every day, but you
know he Is there when you need him
and will come when you call him.
Then there is the friend who reminds you of the old translation'
"The great man is he who does not
lose Ills child heart." He is the
friend you spend your summer vacation with, the friend in whom you
confide your gains and losses, the
friend who plays Santa Claus to your
children.
There is the cheerful, optimistic
friend who, when he talks, unweaves
a rainbow with homely philosophy and
when tlle world looks dark will place
before you a blessed star to guide you
back to Hope. He makes you believe
111 things that you did not believe before. He convinces you with a lef-.-
banded logic, which is always nearest
Ills heart.
And so we might go on listing
these friends by their various characteristics. Some of them bark at you,
but down deep ln your heart you know
they would never bite you. So prize
them deeply, for among the greatest
blessings to be found along the rugged
path of life, are those few, real friends.
Car  For   Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
PRICES REASONABLE
From 8 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Phone 24.
From 12 Midnight to 8 a.m., Phone 22.
Geo. Mason
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and j
Poultry Supplies
Also
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electrlc'ty.
WILLIAM JONES. Proprietor.
Cumberland. B. C.
Q§xi$tnxa$
WE INTERPRET THE OLD MASTERS
OF   THE  17th CENTURY   AND
DESIGNERS OF TO-DAY IN OUR
CHRISTMAS   GREETING   CARDS   AND
ANNOUNCEMENTS      ::      ::      ::      ::
The Exclusive Cards we are showing this
year outclass all previous efforts. Embossed
and handsomely colored Greetings Cards
from $2.50 per dozen up. We invite you
to inspect samples at
The Islander Office
A friend told the other day how he almost
lost a good nurse. The girl was excellent
in her position, but when she answered
the telephone she spoke into it as if she
was standing on the back step shouting
across lots. It was pointed out to her that the telephone was a very responsive instrument and all that
was necessary, was to speak in an ordinary tone of
voice.
"I guess I know how to answer the telephone,"
she replied with a little heat. And it took a couple of
hours to pacify her.
How do you answer the telephone ?
British Columbia Telephone Co.
McLaughlin Cars
The Last Thing in Comfort
and Durability. 15 Models
to  choose from for   1923
RANGING IN PRICE FROM
$1,490.00 forT,der $2,790.00
regular to
i'or Special Big Six Sport Touring.
Having installed a Lathe, I can now take care of any
of your Lathe Work, Axles, Etc.
McLaughlin
Garage
George   H.   Pidcock,   Proprietor.
COURTENAY : :   -      Phone 25
For Results Advertise in The Islander fOUR
fHE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1923.
■a? I SPORTING NEWS OF THE DISTRICT
Badminton
Etc.
OUR STORAGE   BATTERIES
are the result ot years of experience
in Battery Making and Improvement.
They are without doubt the strongest,
most durable and efficient batteries to
be had anywhere at any price. We
also He-charge and Repair Batteries
of! all makes at Reasonable Rates.
Starting Batteries, Lighting Batteries
or Batteries for any or all purposes
ore here awaiting you.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
TOM SCOTT HEADS
BADMINTON CLUB
Court in Anglican Hall Opened
This   Week.—Club   Has
Tuesday & Thursday.
The Cumberland Badminton Club
held its organization meeting for the
forthcoming season on Saturday evening last, when the following officers
were elected: President, Mr. T, W.
Scott; Vice-president, Mrs. O. W
Clinton; Secretary, Mr. Bud Rose;
Treasurer, Mrs. Harry Bryan; Executive., Mrs. W. A. Owen, Miss Margery
lleckwlth, Mr. Geo. Tarbell and Mr
.1. Vernon Jones.
i The club decided to charge a $4.00
membership fee for the season for
former members, and the same (ot
new members with the addition of an
Initiation fee of $1.00. As many new
members as wish to Join will be welcome.
Plnp was started this week, the
court being open for the use of tho
club Tuesday evenings from 6.30 till
11 o'clock, and Thursdays from 2 to
11 p m. All equipment Is found by the
club and the games are played in the
Anglican Hall.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY  STORE
(loud Selection of Pipes, Cigar and
Cigarette Holders.
OLD COUNTRY SOCCER
RESULTS, SATURDAY
James Brown
Cumberland
TENNIS SERIES.
Another match In the Inter-club
Tennis Series was played Monday.
when Messrs. Graham and Christie
defeated Messrs. Nash and Fouracre
G-4, 4-6 and 6-2.
TOO MUCH FOR DAD.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • -  B. C.
Moir'
High
s
Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goodi
all the time.
Henderson's
"Mary," said a man sternly to his
daughter, "1 positively forbid you
marrying young Johnson. He is an
Inveterate poker player!"
"But, papa," tearfully protested
Mary, "poker ploying Is not such an
awful' habit. Why, at your own
club "
"That's where 1 got my information,
child. I'll have no daughter of mine
bringing home a man that I can't beat
with a flush, a full house and fours
Whirlwind Finish By Locals
Three Goals In Succession
In First Half, Ladysmith Lead
3-0, But Cumberland
Evens Up.
That the Cumberland United are ii
crack eleven ot soccer lighters, that
Cumberland has at last found the real
centre forward of the team, and that
a soccer game is never won till the
referee whistles for time. This is
what the observers of tiie Cumberland
United football team learned from
lust Sunday's game at Ladysmlth.
I.udrsmltli Looks (lood.
In the first half the Cumberland
lads did not even enter tlle picture.
The Ladysmith eleven were by far
the superior team during the initial
half, and Goalie Wilson was given a
chance to display bis talents. The sun
was ln the eyes of the locals during
this half and It helped the opposition.
Dave Kenney was at the centre forward position, and while his exhibition was not faulty by any means, It
was clearly demonstrated that he Is
of much more value at centre-half.
At the cessation of play In the first
half, the score stood: Ladysmlth 3,
Cumberland 0.
What Shall We Do 1
This brought joy to the hearts of
the southern crowd. They smoked
lhe pipe of satisfaction and had fond
hopes of a cup, medals, 'neverythlng.
But, alas! the talc is not all yet told.
Cumberland decided something had to
be done and done quick. They played
football In the Interval by deciding to
replace Kenney at centre forward by
Sack! Conti who had been playing
centre half. For the first twenty minutes or so, the home team still thought
the Joke was on Cumberland.
One, Two, Three I
Suddenly Cumberland got mad.
Things began to happen, and before
the home team realized what had happened Charlie Hitchens scored the
first goal and Cumberland was pressing! Charlie, just to demonstrate hint
easy It really was, done duplicated
his feat of the previous performance,
and Mr. Goal-keeper was again forced
to pitch the pigskin out of the net
Time was drawing near and Cumberland still pressed. The half-backs
kept the ball where It belonged.
Sackl Conti seemed to put the punch
Into the forward line, and Cumberland still pressed. Ladysmith was
not in the game by this time and
Sack! finished the Bcorlng when he
nipped In tlle equalizing tally.
Ilncc Against Time.
Meanwhile tlle Southern supporters
were wearing out their watches slipping them In and out of their waistcoat pockets, and ln frantic hopes
that tlle whistle would blow for time.
In tiie last few minutes the vlstors
were value for another goal; on one
occasion Sackl bumping the crossbar.
How To Play Basketball
(By Observer)
BEVAN DIVIDES POINTS
WITH UNION BAY
Each Score Two Apiece in Fast
Game at Union Bay
Sunday.
' KIDS " WIN 2-0;
CUMBERLAND
JUNIORS LOSE
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'   and
Fashionable
Gents'
Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY  WORK
write for prices tc
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office '26:10 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and   Residence:   vVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Spirited   Display   by   Locals.—
High School Grab Points.
On Saturday at the Recreation
Grounds, the High School and Cumberland Juniors clashed In the Junior
Football League. The former grabbing the two points with just as many
goals. Although outweighed by their
opponents, they made up for this
handicap In speed and an eager desire
to win. On the day's play, the best
team won; only Boffy's brilliant work
In the goal-mouth saving his teammates from a worse display.
Right from the time Referee Mortimer commenced the play tho
scholars made a dash for Boffy and
Co, The play reverted to the other
end where Sommervllle made the
hearts of the High School supporters
flutter. The bombast did not last long
nnd Boffy was kept firing them out.
I'can u t Robertson scored from a
scrimmage, giving Body no chance to
save,
JIAIIK IT TWO.
In the second half, the Cumberland
boys had to contend with the sun in
their eyes. Play evened up a little
more lu thin half. The Cumberland
Junior half-backs were kept busy and
nl times the School forwards would
break away aud il was a mad rush
tor goal between the forwards and
lull-bucks. Once Barney Burns bad
nobody but the goal-keeper to beat.
It took young Jones to send ln the
liinil tally which ended the scoring.
Tlle Scholars had the best full-back
on the Held lu I lee Stewart. Jones
was the pick of the halves. The entire forward brigade was fine, light lu
weight as It was; the left wingers being superior.
I For the losers, Boffy was fine. Geo.
Hunden was the pick of tlle none-too-
good backs. The halves showed up
the best on the team, there was no
complaint there. In the forward line
Ibere Is room for improvement. This
fellow Reid Is a youngster with lots
of sleam but Is minus experience,
tuk matsi
High School: J. Fouracre J.
Stevenson and H. Stewart, R. Reid, H.
Jones and J. Wllcock. C. Mlchell, W.
•Jones, It. Robertson, D. Watson and
'leo. Bums.
Cumberland Juniors: Boffy. O. Hunden and ,\l. Damonte, M. Mitchell, A.
Fanner and A. Sommervllle, Taylor
Held,   J.   Bond,   R.' Tolman   and   D.
Stevenson,
NOTE.—This is the (Irst of a series of
Ten Articles written by a Sports
writer who has played the game himself and who has watched many championship games both in Canada and
the United States. He Is conversant
with all phases uf the game, and Is
known as a keen student of various
plays used by leading Basketball
teams of the East.
I.-(IKNKHA1, MOTHS.
TRAINING,
three   main
. micstion of training becomes an Important one where teams are organized  chiefly  to  afford  recreation,
' aa In church, town or city leagues.
| In the absence of a coach and trainer
j such as the colleges and larger Institutions like the Y. M. C. A. possess, training and the observance of
training rules becomes a personal
matter. It Is entirely "up to you."
You call observe them or not as you
please,
Is  Simmons  (inine.
Basketball Is one of the most strenuous sports of the day, and If a player
falls to keep In excellent condition he
In the remaining game played during the week-end In the Junior Football League, Bevan visited Union Bay
and came away with one point after
the fastest game ot the Junior
League this season. In the first halt
the homo team was value for more
than two goals, whilst in the second
half the Bay boys had several closo
calls at the goal-mouth.
The first half belonged to Union
Bay. The visiting defenders were kept
on the go all the time. First blood
was drawn by the locals when Bob
Strachan made a beautiful drive into
an empty goal-mouth; the goalie just
recovering his position from a scrimmage just previously. About live
minutes later, Nakamura, the Japanese inside right, put In the equalizer.
The Bay continued to press, and
several minutes before halt time the'r
inside left, Guilland, made it two.
The Second Half.
The second half resumed witli
Bevan handicapped by one goal, and
they redoubled their efforts to win.
Union Bay did not get away as much
in this half and the play centered towards the home goal, keeping Messrs.
Campbell' and Auchinvaule on the
jump. It was during the Bevan attack
that the ball fouled off Glover's arm
in the penalty area. Dilly Faulds
scored the penalty with an unbeatable
drive. The ball was carried to the
other end, but soon the visitors were
pressing again, and just before time
the Bay had a close call at the goalmouth.
The Teams.
For Bevan: Marshall at full back
was great; both Weir and Faulds delivered the goods, and Robertson is
ihe fastest right winger in tiie Junior
League. Campbell was the pick of
the local backs; Glover and Nakamura were always in the game.
Bevan.—H. Reid, T! Campbell and
W. Auchinvaule; H. Hutchinson, D.
Campbell and E. Glover; D. Johnstone, N. Nakamura, J. Campbell, J.
Gullllland and. W. Marshall.
Union Bay—Walker; Robertson and
Marshall; B. Westfleld, W. Faulds
and W. Weir; A. Robertson, Aitken,
Robertson, R. Strachan and A. Kienan.
FOR BABY
"Safety First"
Four generations of babies
have been kept clean, fresh,
fragrant, and free from skin
troubles by the use of
BABY'S OWN
SOAP
^Sa6y
ALBERT SOAP9 LIMITED
Gun Repairing
SHOTGUNS
Re-bored, Re-stocked, Repaired
RIFLES
Overhauled,   Repaired,    Sights
Fitted.
E. T. ELLISON
GUNSMITH
14 Yrs. Old Country Experience
-   Agent for   -
Cleveland, B. S. A. and Paragon
Bicycles.
Complete Line of Accessories
Repairs a Specialty.
COURTENAY, B. C.
Union Buy Itiiad : Opp. Ford Oarage
In general there mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm„^—^^^^^^^^_^^^_^^^_
qualities demanded of a basketball' is apt to so Injure the organs of bis
player—strength, speed and endur-j body—especially the heart—bb to
mice, and any man who wishes to be-, handicap him for years to come. A
come a star at the "hoop game" must rigid physical examination should be
possess at least these three baalc J made of every member of an organ!
qualifications. Strength without speed zed team which will have a strenuous
is useless, and speed without endur- season's piny. Several times it has
ancc almost equally so. All three ore: come to my notice tliat a youth with
essential. n weak heart has ruined   his   heart
Strength and speed are more or less through desire to ploy at any cost,
natural gifts of the average athlete, ] Players of poor physical condition, no
but endurance can  be developed by  matter bow skilled, should be barred.
BASKETBALLERS
ORGANIZE UNDER
ARTHUR LEE, PRES,
proper training. It is to this phase
ol the question that we first turn our
attention.
Basketball training rules are practically the same as those governing
any other branch   of   athletics.   The
The preservation and the building up
oi a strong physique rather than the
personal ambition of a player or the
desire to turn out a winning team
should be the Ilrst consideration of
the one In charge.
ti
The Superior Grocers
>>
WE HAVE NOT HAD TO RE-ORGANIZE OUR
BUSINESS—OUR  MOTTO  IS  STILL  THE
SAME—"A SQUARE DEAL FOR ALL."
Large Tins Tomatoes (Quaker Brand) 2 for ..' 35c
Quaker Corn (Quaker Brand) per tin 20c
Spices-Pure English Spices (Ginger, Cinnamon, Clove,
Pepper, Etc.) per tin 10c
Carnation and St. Charles Milk, 15c, 7 for $1.00; small
size, 3 for 25c
Beach-Eaker Plum Jam, 4s 60c
Italian Prunes, 20 lb. Boxes $1.10
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
"THE SUPERIOR GROCERS."
T.  H. Mumford : : J. Walton
Three Leagues in Organization
for Coming Winter: Ladies,,
Men's Senior & Intermediates.
... —All Local Teams.
A meeting ot the old Comox Olstrlct
Basketball League was held In the
Athletic Club lust Saturday for the
purpose of organizing for tiie year.
It was decided after considerable dis
mission to discard the old name and
adopt a new name, the Cumberland
Basketball Association, and confine all
entries to local teams.
(Inkers Elected.
The honorary president and vlco-
prcsident, Mr. Thomas Oraham and
Mr. Charles Graham respectively,
were re-lccted, and the following active officers took otilce: President,
Air. Arthur Lee; Vice-president, Ml.
John Cameron; Secretary-treasurer,
Mr, Alex. S. Denholme; Scorers,
Messrs. W. White and A. J. Fouracre.
KYNtlKS BY OCT. It.
The Association decided to run
three leagues this season If possible,
a ladles', men's senior league, and
men's Intermediate. The men's intermediate league will consist of players
twenty years of age and under.
All entries must be in the hands of
lhe secretary of the league not later
than Saturday, Oct. 14, and must be
accompanied by a two-dollar entrance
too. Entries may be left at the At-
letlc Club, and Mr. Trlmlett will for
ward same to the league secretary.
BAM) HALL COLD.
A matter that was given attention
by the association was the condition
ol the Band hall where the games are
played. The studding at the ends of
the ball Is very dangerous to players,
and the coldness of the place is a
great drawback to the game.
The Athletic Club collects, the same
us last year, sixty per cent of all gate
receipts, the association getting forty
per cent. It was felt by the association that this should be reversed, and
the Athletic Club Board of manage-
tlie executive was Instructed to meet
incut in regard to tills matter, as well
as Improvements for the hall.
^r
rmr
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or do you e •; other less nourishing foods.'
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLWAY'S BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
I    HOTELS AND CAMPS
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Conl, Wood nnd Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts ol District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE CO TELEPHONE
er Leave Orders at Yendome Hotel. $
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
FIVE
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
The New
Edison Baby
Console
$235.00
SINCE the New Edison in Console Model has found
favor in the finest homes, this design has been
added to the group in response to popular demand.
The simplicity and srace of the Baby Console will
be welcomed among household furnishings—its conservative lines are certain to suit the style of other
pieces. As a perfect Musical Instrument, the Baby
Console incorporates the Latest Features of Mr.
Edison's laboratory experiments.
The G. A.
FLETCHER
Music Co.
Local Representatives
Marshall Music Co.
CUMBERLAND Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
COURTENAY      Top of the Town—Jeune's Furniture
These cool evenings the cosy open
fireplace is a great attraction at
The
MaplesTea House
Royston Beach
CHOCOLATES
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO, ETC.
LIGHT LUNCHES
Church Notices
HOLT TRINITY.
Rev. W. Leversedge, Vicar.
Sunday, Oct. 8th, 1922.
Sunday School   2.30 p.m.
Baptisms 3.30 p.m.
Evensong  7 p.m.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH.
Rev. Geo. R. B. Kinney, Minister,
SERVICES.
Junior Congregation 11 a.m.
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service  .7 pja.
St. George's Presbyterian Church.
Rev. James Hood, Pastor.
Church Services:
Morning   11 a.m.
Evening 7 p.m.
Anthem by the choir; "The Lord is My
Light." Solo by Miss Beckwith, selected.
Adult Bible Class meets at 1.30 p.m.
"The Soft Pedal or the Trumpet?"
"Shall W'e Bring People to Repentance with Sledge Hammer Blows or
with Melting Words?" Question Ilka
these will be discussed by the class
on Sunday.
Sunday School   2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Thursday 7.30 p.m.
District Junior League Standing
Goals
P.W. L. D. F.A.Pt.
Union   Bay     5   2   12   7   9   6
Bevau     3   1116   4   3
Cumberland       3   111333
High   School ....   3   12   0   4   4   2
.Watches to be Played:
Oct. 14—Bevan vs. High School.
Oct. 15—Cumberland   vs. Union  Bay.
DID YOU EVER STOP TO
THINK ?
THE NEW FORD PRICES
Announcement has been made by
Ford Motor Company of Canada,
Limited, that a still further reduction
In the prices of Ford Cars and Trucks
lias been made, the price change being cltective as of September 26th.
Tills announcement has great significance because it marks a new valuation record for automotive products.
Ford products are now selling at the
luwest prices in history.
Oi the several factors which induced this situation, the improvement
in exchange has been of greatest importance. Ford of Canada purchases
large quantities of raw materials in
the United States which are used In
Canada iu manufacturing the Ford
Car, and which cannot be purchased
In Canada. The return of the Canadian dollar to par now permits of the
purchase of such raw materials on a
more advantageous basis.
Anticipating that the Canadian dollar will not remain at normal, Ford
oi Canada has established the present
schedule of prices.
It Is hoped by this reduction ln price
tii speed up production and lower
manufacturing costs which must be
done In order to effect the additional
economies needed to Justify these record-breaking low prices.
In putting this plan into effect,
Ford of Canada is following its established policy of passing on to the
public any savings effected in the
manufacture of Ford products, thus
placing Ford Cars and Trucks within
the reach of the greatest possible
number of people.
A comparison of Ford prices with
the prices paid for other staple commodities shows that Ford has effected
the greatest decrease since 1919 when
all prices were at the peak—
Building materials, apx. ..12.57c lower
Animals & meat ....apx. ..24% lower
House furnishings, apx. ..16.7% lower
Fuel & lighting, apx 14.3% lower
Ford Touring Car 111U per cent Lower
The price for the Touring Car is
the same as In 1916, but the Touring
Model has many new features, including one-man top, sloping double
ventilating windshield, demodntable
rims, tire carrier, Improved upholstering and seating arrangements.
THAT the wise buyer always reads
the advertisements.
THAT It is the way to save money.
THAT everybody should know of
your city's greatness and business advantages.
THAT yuur city is an acknowledged
leader in your section for many lines
of business.
THAT it is a good plan to think before you speak.
THAT some men often speak before they think.
THAT it often causes much grief.
• THAT If you think more about your
city and study its advantages, you con
bo a better city booster.
THAT It is also well to look before
you leap.
THAT there are two sides of human
nature, optimistic and pessimistic
THERE SHOULD BE ONLY ONE
SIDE IN YOUR CITY.
THAT some citizens would rather
knock tlielr own home city than to
boost it. PUBLIC OPINION should
make this class of citizens hard to
find.
THAT cities get reputations the
same as men.
THAT your city should have the
best of reputations.
THAT optimism and common sense
should be mingled in good proportion.
THAT it you do this, you will find
il easier to think, to speak and act
in a way that will help to make your
city a better and bigger city.
THAT pernicious propaganda in
bnsiness circles should cease. NOW
Is the time that the trouble monger,
the fellow who has done his best to
keep things down, to shut up and do
some thinking.
—E. R. Waite, Secretary Board of
Commerce, Shawnee, Okla
A WOMAN'S EPITAPH.
For Results Advertise in The Islander
THEM WAS THE DAYS.
"Sorry, but I can't Insure you—
you're too tall," said the agent to tho
man who wanted to take out an accident policy. -^
"Too tall? What's the matter with
that?" protested the applicant. "And
nnyway I'm not as tall as my father
wan and be had no trouble getting insured."
"But your father," the agent explained, "was Insured years ago when
there was no danger of a fellow having his head knocked off by a skidding
aeroplane." — The American Legion
Weekly.
It has been Bald that some skulls
would grin at the thought of the fulsome praise contained  in  their epitaphs.   But the grin must be on the
wrong side of Mary Bond's skull  if
she has any cognisance of the inscription on her tomb.   Here it is, as it
still may be seen on a monument in
Horsley Down Church, Cumberland.
Here lie the bodies of
Thomas Bond and Mary his wife.
She was temperate, chaste and charitable,
But
She was proud, peevish and pasionate.
She was an affectionate wife and a
tender moth,
But
Her   husband  and   child,   whom   she
loved, seldom  .
Saw her countenance without a
disgusting frown;
Whilst she received visitors whom she
despised
with an endearing smile.
Her behaviour was discreet towards
strangers,
But
Impudent in her family.
Abroad her conduct was Influenced by
good breeding,
But
At home by Ill-temper.
She was a professed enemy to flattery.
and was seldom known to praise or
commend;
But
Tho talents In which she principally
excelled
Were differences of opinion and discovering flaws and Imperfections.
She was an admirable economist, and
without prodigality,
Dispensed plenty to every person  ia
her family,
But
Would sacriflce tlielr eyes to a farthing candle.
She   sometimes   made   ber   husband
Happy1 with her good qualities,
But
Much more frequently miserable with
her many fallings.
Insomuch   that   in   thirty   years'   cohabitation,   he   often   lamented   that,
Maugre all her virtues.
Ho had not on the whole enjoyed two
years of matrimonial comfort.
At length,
Finding Bhe had lost the affection of
her husband, as well as the regard of
her neighbours,  (family disputes
having   been   divulged by servants),
She died  of vexation,
July 20, 1768.    Aged 48 years.
Her worn-out husband survived her
four months and two days, and do-
parted this life
November 22, 1768,
111 the 54th year of bis age.
HEALTH SERVICE.
E. O. HAUKEDAL
Doctor of Chiropractic
(8 Years Experience)
Olllce Hours: 12 to 3 p.m.; 5 to 7 p.m
Over Mrs. King's Book Store
I Dunsmuir Ave.      :     CUMBERLAND
McCLARY'S
Electric Ranges
Women's burdens for centuries past were heavy
because the human race did not know how to lighten
them. An enlightened age has gradually brought now
labor-saving devices to assist her—the greatest of
which is the Electic Range.
McCLARY'S ELECTRIC RANGE
has exclusive features that further reduce women's
burdens, saving time, labor and anxiety.
There is the Protected Element—the Element is
the burner, where the heat comes from. Like other
Electric Appliances, the heat is radiated from wire
coils, but the Protected Element snugly encloses these
coils in porcelain to save them from carelessness or accidental upsets. Therefore, McCLARY'S Protected
Element lasts longer, r.s acids, moisture and grease
cannot harm it. It heats quickly and holds the heat
long after the power is turned off.
The wonderful seamless, round-cornered Oven—
not a nick or crevice in its smooth, even, impenetrable,
glassy enamelled interior. lAs sanitary as any enameled
interior. As sanitary as any enameled utensil, rust resisting, cleanly. Racks and rack holders removable.
Elements swing on hinges, so that entire surface of
oven is clear for cleaning.
The Oven has a 1% in. insulation around the side
and a l'/i in. magnesia block insulation in the door—
this holds the heat in oven. Roasts and baked foods
retain their full flavor. The result is better baked
foods with minimum shrinkage.
Warming Oven with small element inside.
Signal lights to show whether current for Oven
is on or off.
Switches for elements plainly marked.
Extra plug for other Electric Appliances.
Mercury or Compensating Thermometer.
Fuses easily-accessible.
FOUR TYPES OF McCLARY'S RANGES
E. S.—E. S. C.—D.—and E.—supplied in the immaculately clean battleship grey enameled finish, also black
japan—see all these features—have them
demonstrated to you at
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with the valves ot tbe mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Ir=
SHOES   SHOES
This Week we are showing a Line of Andersons' Welts
for Children. You will appreciate the Real Lasting
Value and Quality of these Shoes. Let your next Pair
be Andersons' Welts. You will like them. Better than
"Other Makes," and they will cost you less money
DRY   GOODS
Just arrived, a shipment of Boys', Youths' and Young
Men's Suits.   The latest styles in a large assortment
of colors.  The quality is the best that money can buy.
Prices range from $7.50 up to $25.00.
William Bond, brother to the deceased
Erected this stone as a
Weekly monitor to the wives of this
Parish, that they may avoid  the
Infamy of having tlielr memories
handed down to posterity with a
patchwork character.
Try The Courtenay Oarage for Repair Work. Only the best mechanics
employed.
GROCERY  SPECIALS:
Purity Flour, 49 lb. sack  $1.80
Okanagan Apples, per box $1.50
Okanagan Apples, 10 lbs. for 50c.
Onions, No. 1 Quality, 8 lb. for 25c.
White Wonder Soap, 16 bars for 95c.
A largo assortment of Fancy Sweet Biscuits, regular
40, 50 and 60c. per lb. Saturday only, ...2 lb. 75c.
Limit 2 lbs. to each customer.
"Service  With  Satisfaction, Coupled
with   Lower   Prices," is Our Motto
GORDON'S
Box  350
Phone 133
Wood for Sale
rBLE.L0AD... s^.oo
FRED McKENZIE
Phone 92L Happy Valley
Lank mil for lhe Foresters' Folly
iroiipi' making it's Ilrst appearance
In Cumberland In tho near future.
SPICY, IF NOT CAUSTIC.
Before the silly season closes, wc
must reprint the following from tiie
American Mutual Magazine:
Man (In drug store)—I want some
consecrated lye.
Druggist—You mean concentrated
lye.
Man—It does nutmeg* any difference. That's what 1 camphor. What's
ll sulphur?
Druggist—Fifteen cents. I never
cinnamon with so much wit.
Man—Well, I should myrrh myrrh i
Yet 1 ammonia novice at It. SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
Chevrolet
C H EVR 0 LE T
INVITES  COMPARISON  BECAUSE
COMPARISON SELLS CHEVROLET
Let us (Jive You a Price on Your
Chev or Ford, on a New Chevrolet
on Our Easy Payment Plan     .:.
The Courtenay
Garage
Phone 61
BLUNT & EWART
Phone Gl
Royal Candy Co.
Comox Creamery Ice Cream.
Ice-Cold Drinks of all Kinds.
Home-Made Candies, Fresh Daily
Luncheons Served.   Open Day and Night.
CAR FOR HIRE
Table Models from $15.00 Up.
News Of Courtenay District!
This Instrument only $60.00.   $5.00 Cash and $5.00
Per Month. I
MARSHALL MUSIC
CUMBERLAND — Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
COURTENAY — Top of the Town
 SINGER  SEWING   MACHINES	
Men's Athletic
Club Organized
At Courtenay
Elaborate  Plans  to  Enter  all
Branches of Sport—Colors
Red, White and Blue.
About twenty-live men attended a
meeting held in the Courtenay city
ball on Thursday evening to organize
mi Athletic Club. P, Leo Anderton
was elected chairman, and Max Blunt
acting secretary. No discussion was
necessary as lo the advisability of organizing such a club in Courtenay and
lhe actual business of organization
was  Immediately proceeded  with.
The election of officers resulted as
follows: President, P. Leo Anderton;
vice-president, J. N. McLeod; secretary, Max Blunt; treasurer, it. Smith;
membership committee, H. Everett,
Lome Cleland, 13d. Thompson; hall
committee, T. Menzles, H. Lelghton,
Wilfred Cunningham; finance commit
tee, A. Robinson, C, Plgott, E. T. Ellison; advertising committee, A. H.
Herd, W. O. Marshall and J. H. Mclntyre.
Membership Fees.
Fees wero set at. five dollars per
year for members over eighteen yenrs;
ol' age and two dollars and fifty cent,:
for members from sixteen to eighteen
years of age. A committee of A. H.
Herd, W. A. W. Hames, K, Ii. Dalby
and W. G. Stubbs was appointed tu
look after the boys of the city and
district and report at the next meeting as to fees to be charged for junior
members.
The colors chosen for the club are
red, white and blue.
A committee of three, W. A. W.
Hames, H. Herd and W. G. Stubbb
was appointed to draft by-laws to be
submitted to the next meeting, which
will be held on Thursday evening
next.
linskclliiill Team.
The secretary was instructed to enter a team In the Intermediate Basketball League at Cumberland.
Arrangements have been made with
the lire department for the use of the
second floor of the fire hall as a
gymnasium, and the services of Jucit
Roberts, ex-champion of the British
army, have been secured as boxing
and physical instructor.
The Courtenay Athletic Club has
been launched under most auspicious
circumstances and intends to enter all
branches of sport.
Items of Interest
Tiie people of tlle Sandwick district
held a community social last Friday
night. It took the form of on Impromptu dunce and whist drive and
was a most enjoyable affair, attracting
about sixty guests. Winners at cards
were: Ladles' Ilrst, Miss Phyllis McLeod; second, Miss Agnes Hogg; gentlemen's Ilrst, Mr. Robert Chllds; second. Mr. Thomas Woods. A guessing
contest was won by Messrs. James
Copp and Alex. Hogg.
Mr. Thomas Pickett was a visitor
to lhe city from Denman Island on
Thursday.
Miss  Meadows, of  Denman   Island,
was In Courtenay on Thursday.
Mrs.  William   Sutllff  has  returne.
from a trip to New York.
Mr. James Moss, of Victoria, is iu
.lie district renewing old acquaintances.
The regular meeting of the Native
Sons of Canada will bo held on Monday evening and will take the form
ot a combined business and social session.
COMOX M. L. A. IS
COVERING RIDING
VICTORIA, Oct. 13.—Rev. Thoma--
Menzles, M.L.A. for Comox, is now jii
.i trip to the West coast points of ills
.■idiiig, studying conditions there and
getting in touch with the settlers
whose needs he will bring to the at-
lentlon of the Provincial Legislature
it the forthcoming session.
THE OLD RED
SCHOOLHOUSE
AUSTRALIA'S WIRELESS.
(London  Times).
Early in ltllli an operator at the
Perth wireless station In Western
Australia was trying to get in touch
with a convoy of Australian transports
crossing the Indian Ocean. Suddenly
he picked up an unfamiliar note, and
n few minutes later he was listening
In a Hood of strange war news—all ol
II decidedly unfavorable to the Allies
There came the signature of the
sending stallon, " P.O.Z." lo finish lhe
message. "P.O.Z.?" The operator
glanced incredulously at the code
book; P.O.Z. could mean one station
alone, and that was Nauen, In Germany, thousands of miles beyond any
station previously heard ill the Commonwealth, Nauen was responsible
for much mischief during the war.
Yet out ni' the untold harm that il
wrought there came a certain amount
nl' good, Its powerful range suggested
lo Australians the possibility of illrec;
wireless communication with Europe
The possibility of live years ago Is
near to being an accomplished lad today, lly an agreement signed In
March last, the Amalgamated Wireless Company of Australasia lias
guaranteed to Hie Commonwealth
Government llinl it will erect a hlgh-
.Mnny traditions cling about the
little red schoolhouse. It bus been
lhe theme of song and story for many
decades. And tlio fact that it is
rapidly falling into disuse is no reduction whatever upon the Institution,
liui merely brings the realization that
il Is being supplanted with something
better.
Authorities on education and schools
say the little red schoolhouse is
wasteful and inefficient.
At lirst thought these words seem
harsh, as applied to schools from
which came many eminent men and
women, scholars, ministers and public servants.
Yet, It Is almost certain that the
country school is not going to func-
lion to any great extent for very many
more yenrs. Our future leaders who
nmc from agricultural districts will
'uive had access to the centralized
schools, which have become communi-
y centers, affording the student body
nrncticaily every opportunity that the
city boys and girls enjoy. The approval of the populace Is behind It.
Many will shed a tear or two as
the little red schoolhouse passes Into
history. It has served Its purpose
well, but It has outgrown Its real use
fulness.
Try The Courtenay Garage for Re
pair Work. Only the best mechanics
employed,
LADIES—You can more than save
lhe price of your gasoline when oul
driving by making Layer's Store at
Courtenay your destination. Some-
thing new all lhe time.
power station and establish direct
wireless communication with the
Hulled Kingdom before March, 1924.
Air. E. T. Flsk, the managing dl-
| rector of the company, Is now busy
at Australia House, making arrangements for carrying out lhe agrce-
ineiil.- -  Kamloops Standard-Sentinel.
Why Send to Vancouver?
FLOUR, all brands, per 4!l lb. sack 	
GRANULATED SUGAR, per 2(1 lb. bag 	
ICING SUGAR, per lb 10c
DEL MONTE RAISINS, per large packet  2flc
SHREDDED COCOANTJT, per lb 25c
EDWADSHURG CORN SYRUP, r, lb. tin  5(lc
MRS. HAINE'S MARMALADE. ■! lb, Un  Hllc
PINEAPPLE MARMALADE, lu  glass  ilflc
NO. 1 JAPANESE RICE, ,1 lb. for  - 25c
When You Can Get Goods  Delivered at These Prices'.'
 $1.90
 *I.HII
PURE JAM—
Strawberry, Raspberry, Black Currant, Apricot, glass ....80c
I.IIIIIY'S VEAL LOAF, per tin »|)o
MAGIC BAKING POWDER, per Un  lillc
JUTLAND SARDINES, per till  10c
NORWEGIAN SARDINES, lu O'.lvo Oil. per tin     15c
EAGLE  LOBSTER,  per  tin   ! ||0c
CHOICE  PUMPKIN,  per Un   goi-
KE-CLEANEIJ CURRANTS, 2  i I.  for  "'lie
CHICKEN HADDIE, Lily Brand, per till  "".Mi
Our Motto: "Quality and Service."
Courtenay Cash Store    -     Pigott Block    -    Phone 56
McLeod's Store
GENTS'  FURNISHINGS  IN  ALL  LINES
BOOTS, SHOES, ETC.
We still have s«me
RAINCOATS AND WATERPROOF CAPES
AT SALE PRICES.   ALSO LADIES'
OXFORDS AT $2.75
Our Fall Samples of SUITINGS & OVERCOATS from
the Tip Top Tailors have now arrived and give you a
very select assortment to choose from. We take your
measurement, guarantee fit and satisfaction at $27.00
only, Suit or Overcoat.
Our Winter Stock of Sweaters, Underwear, Hosiery
& Children's Old Country Reefer Coats is now on hand
IT WILL PAY YOU TO GIVE US A CALL
WHEN MAKING YOUR FALL PURCHASES
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
The House of
Quality
Pacific, Carnation and St. Charles Milk, ....7 tins for *1
Pan Yan Sauce, delicious for cold meats and steaks,
per bottle  65c
Dow Son Chutney, per bottle 65c and $1
100 Cakes of Soap for $4.50
Delmonte Pork and Beans, 3 tins for 25c
Cheese, per lb * 30c
Tea, per lb 45c
Biscuits—
Lemon Cakes, per lb 25c
Orange Bars  25c
O Boy  30p
Short Bread and Short Cake—
Belmonts, pee lb 50c
Short Cake Fingers, per lb 50c
"       Cocoanut, per lb 50c
"       Sterling, per lb 50c
Dundee, per lb.  50c
Ladies' Fingers, per lb 75c
We are Agents for " Robin Hood " Flour
The Flour that is different.
T.  BOOTH  & SONS
Courtenay, B.C.
AUCTION SALE
Wednesday, October  18, 1922
at 2 p.m.
Instructed by Mr. C. J. M. Phelps, 1 shall on the above
date sell by Public Auction at the premises of the
above, Little River Road, Comox, B. C, the following:
Two Yorkshire Brood Sows from pedigree stock; one
fine Yorkshire Brood Sow; Twenty-two Young Pigs
from Sows and Boars of pedigree stock; Two Steel Cow
Stanchions; Heavy Wagon, four-inch tires; Spring
Wagon; Perfection Two-burner Oil Stove with oven;
30-30 Winchested Rifle, good as new; Quantity of
Wyandotte Pullets, etc., etc.
TERMS: SPOT CASH.
Oilier Entries accepted up to noon of the day of sale.
E. FELIX THOMAS
AUCTIONEER : NOTARY PUBLIC : INSURANCE
Telephones: Office, 151; House, 24-L, and 51-R
Booth Block, Courtenay
COURTENAY, B. C.
If you wish to be on ray Mailing List for Sale Notices, Phone or
write me your address.   Phones! Olllce, 151; House, 24-L or 51-R (3°
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVEN
Through Service to Europe or Eastern Canada
un the
CONTINENTAL
LIMITED
Alternate Route via brand Trunk Pacific Steamships
to Prince Rupesrt and Rail Line
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
t'onipnrlnicnt Observation Curs, Standard nnd Tourist Sleepers.
Leaving Vancouver 7.45 p.m. daily
For Full information, Apply to E. W. Bickle, Agent
Cumberland, B. C.
anadiartNatirwll^luJsilf
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Don't Forget the Grand
MASQUERADE
BALL
-IN THE NEW-
HI
GAITEY THEATRE
Courtenay
Hallowe'en Night, Oct. 31
iillllliliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
We are complete House Furnishers.
No matter what you want in the Furniture Line,
come to us.   We have it. ,
You will find that we sell SUPERIOR things at'
PRICES that will delight you. ,
Jeune's Furniture Store
PHONE 144 COURTENAY, B.C.
III
GENERAL AGENT.
COURTENAY, B. C.
M     P. O. Box 253
ROYSTON 1
LOTS |
FOR CHOICE LOCATIONS, INCLUDING H
BEACH FRONTAGES, SEE g
FREDERICK FIELD 1
Phone 53    §|
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNEIl
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.,
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MARK TO ORIIKli.
Pressing    ■     Cleaning    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.     -     P. 0. Dux 17
CUMBERLAND^ II. (J.
FOOTBALLERS DRAW
SUSPENSIONS FOR
FIGHTING ON FIELD
Upper Island Board Hands Out
Penalties to Milburn and
Edmonds of One and Three
Months.
At the regular monthly meeting of
the Upper Island District Governing
Football Board held last Saturday at
Nanaimo, severe sentences were handed out to two players for fighting on
the playing field. Milburn, of the
Celtic football club of Nanaimo, was
given one month's suspension, and
Edmonds of the Davenport football
club was suspended for three months
The Board intimated that it intended to make the penalties tor ungen-
tlemanly conduct on the field as severe as possible ln all cases that are
brought before that body. They are
going to make every effort to have
the game played as it should be, and
they are endeavoring to attend as
many games as possible iu order that
they may have first-hand evidence In
the event of mis-conduct during any
game.
llrnckmau-Ker Entries Close.
Entries for the Brackman-Ker Cup
competition close on Sunday, Oct. 15.
Tills competition is open to all senior
clubs in the district and the cup is
emblematic of the Upper Island championship and entitles the winner to
compete for the Provincial championship.
In all probability the Ilrst round ln
the Upper Island championship contest will be played before Christmas
so as to have the final played before
(he end of March, as according to the
new rules, another project is on foot
lu connection with junior football iu
this district. It is understood that
Ihe two junior teams heading the
league ln the Cumberland district wil'i
play a league series of home and home
games with the two leading teams in
Die Nanaimo district.
Books ol Rules.
The Board has now got a supply of
books of rules and laws of the game,
and much valuable Information may
be obtained by soccer players and
fans. Same may be obtained from
Mr. Jack Quinn, of Bevan, or Mr. Nat
Bevis, of Cumberland.
There were present at the Board
meeting: Mr. Nat Bevls, Cumberland,
president; Mr. A. E. Thorneycroft, ot
Nanaimo, vice-preBident; Mr. Mm.
Macdonald, Nanaimo, secretary; Mr
.1. Quinn, Bevan ;Mr. W. Hart, Nanaimo; Mr. R. Morgan, Ladysmlth, and
Mr. W. Brown, South Wellington.
ANNUAL POTATO
FAIR TO BE HELD
DURING NOVEMBER
Second Event of Its Kind Arranged by Department of
Agriculture—Prizes for Table
Stock.
SLAT'S DIARY
Friday—Ma was a canning tomatoes
today and Jakes little sister Nellie
was down at are house
und she kep a teasing
ma all the time to Let
her put the Garters on
around the top of the
cans. Thats how much
girls no about Agracul-
ture and etc.
Sat—Pug Stevens got
a cupple fellas oil of
ure futball 11 by
crooked means & they
was the best 2 men
ou the Tlgercats team.
But we will fix him 1
of these days. I intend to give him a
good slap in .the face sum time.
When hla back is turned behind htm.
Sunday—Pa was reading about sum
woman up in Conetticut going into
tho undertakcing bisness. Ma sed it
was getting so a woman can do most
enny thing a man can do. Pa sed
Yes xcept raise a beard & keep a
Bocrlt.
Monday—Almost got In dutch with
lhe toecher. Juke und nic was bave-
lug a discussion on futball tacktlcs
lor are team of witch I am the captain of it and she slamed her ruler
down on her desk and yelled at me
nnd she sod 1 hope I diddent here
you tnwklng then. 1 looked ritJ
square ln her eye and replyed and
sed I hope you dont. And got by
with It to.
Tuesday—Are chirch had a 2nd
handed social. It was to get stuff to
mil nnd they told each lady to bring
sum thing they liaddent no use for.
So ma tuk I and pa and we had a
very good time generelly speaking.
Wednesday—Teecher ast Blisters to
dlscrlbe Washington crossing the
Dellawarc and he sed Geo Washington carryed a little baby In 1 haul
und fought off Simon Legrees bull
dogs with the other arm till he
roached the other side of the Ohio
river at Cincinnati. Teacher was
plum disgusted and told him If Ignorance was a pebble he wood bu a hoi,:
gravel road.
Thursday—The Sunday skool supt
woddent let his boy get lien Her out
of tho llbrarry todny. Ho sod Because he had herd It was so very racy.
The second Annual Potato Fair will
be held some time during the month
ot November, under the direction of
the Department of Agriculture. The
exact date and place for holding til's
fair will be announced later.
On account of tbe deep interest
Bliown ln the first annual Potato Fair
held last year In Chilllwack, the department has decided to give prizes
for table stock as well as good potatoes this year.
It Is hoped that the various agricultural organizations and all others
Interested iu the potato industry will
co-operate with the department to the
fullest extent and help make this fair
a success. A series of lectures on
the potato industry will also be given
at the same time.
THE INTERMEDIATE
BASEBALLERS BANQUET
ON WEDNESDAY
Intermediate League Will Present Cups Wednesday
Night.
The battle is all over, the smoke
has cleared away, and the Japanese
team, winners of the Coinox District
Intermediate Baseball League and the
Cumberland Intermediate's team district champions for this year, will be
duly honored and presented with their
respective trophys on Wednesday
night at the G. W. V. A. Hall. This
was the decision of the league meeting on Monday night.
Refreshments will be served at the
commencement of the evening, when
the two cups will be presented, and
this will bo followed by a dance. The
managers of each club will issue
twenty invitations, which will probably be as many as can be comfortably accommodated In the hall.- A
bommittee of Messrs. J. L. Brown, D.
Aitken, Hojo and A. S. Denholmn was
appointed to handle the arrangements
of the affair.
WHAT HE THOUGHT.
Cigar Clerk—"For 300 bauds of
tliat brand they give you a gramo
phone."
Customer (puffing hard) —"If I
smoked 300 of these 1 wouldn't want
n gramophone, I'd want a harp."
FIRST TIME TO BE
SHOWN IN B. C.
" Human Hearts," a Great Film
Drama, to be Seen Here
Friday & Saturday.
Superb ln strength of story and cast
" Human Hearts," the Universal-Jewel
which comes to the Ilo-llo Theatre on
.'"riday and Saturday of this woek for
in engagement of two days, stands
orth prominently among the offerings
of recent months as a drama teeming
.vith incidents and action of a compelling variety. House Peters, popular veteran of stage and screen, heads
tiie notable cast.
The picture version of Hal Hold's
famous old play presents people from
the humbler walks of life who live
and love, liatelaud light, Just as do the
people we meet every day. Ilouso
Peters Is cast as a blacksmith, a Hue
specimen of manhood, a simple son
of the Ozark Mountains. His father
Is a stern and unbending mini, but
just and honest, who objects to his
son's courtship with a pretty maiden
who plotted to beat the family out of
their rich coal lands. She really full'*
In love with him and marries.
When the romance of married life
gives way to the stem facts of reality
sho longed for her old, free life, and
the tempter comes In the person of
u smooth-tongued ex-convlcl who Induces her to ileo with him, The aged
father attempts to stop the elopement
and is killed. The son, blamed for
the murder, believes his wife was the
slayer and refuses to olTor any do-
fence. He Is sentenced lo prison for
liio.
In the working out of the plot to
a logical conclusion, the director.
King Baggot, has shown a fine sense
of the dramatic. The picture is nr-
tistlcally photographed and splendidly
acted In roles which require dramatic
ability ot the first order.
By all means see this picture, lake
(lie entire family. It will give you a
new and hotter angle on life, even
while It affords you the best entertainment you have had In many a
month.
'flip usual  ('timed}   lipids   will   be
screened with this special.
■iiiuiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 1 ii mum iiiiiiiiii uiiiiiiiiiiiii.iiiiiiriiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ihimiiiiiiii g
"AstoriaShoes,
'Jailor-made for Particular "Jrade       |
Cavin's Shoe Store
Still Illlllllllllll lllll|l|||l|||l|INI' UIIIIHII —1 i — PI I""—1
NOTICE
S. SMITH (LATE OF ROYSTON GARAGE) BEGS
TO ANNOUNCE THAT  HE  HAS  DECIDED
TO DEVOTE THE WHOLE OF HIS TIME TO
WELDING and BRAZING
(14 Years' Experience in England)
ANY METAL,  AND ANY ARTICLE, FROM AN
ALUMINUM PAN TO A DONKEY FRAME
If It's Broken—Send it to Royston,—or a Phone Message will Bring Me to the Job.
A Good Job at a Price as Low as is Consistent with
Good Workmanship.
WELDING IS A TRADE, NOT A SIDE-LINE
and can be either good or bad.   For the former, try
S. SMITH, Royston
Temporary Phone 134-M.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERUIFIEU),   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. B.C.
For satisfactory   repair   work-Try
The Courtenay Oarage.
Blankets
Comforters
White Blankets, pure wool, ranging in  (JM^* QC
prices up to per pair  tDl.U«Otl
Grey Blankets, per pair ranging from   d»£» /»A
Large size Flannelette Sheets, per pair   (JJQ QC
at     tyO-Lv
COMFORTERS in a good range of Colors and Prices.
COMPLETE STOCK OF HEATERS NOW SHOWING
A SPECIAL LINE OF CARPETS ON SALE THIS
WEEK, SIZE 2'/4 x 3 YARDS, EACH
$15.65
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1828.
News of Campbell River District
RUMOR THAT ROAD
WILL BE MADE TO
COMPANY'S LAND
It Is to be hoped that the report relative to the new road being opened
to the International Timber Company's property, on which a number
of settlers have- taken up land behind
Campbell river, is true, for no public
work is more urgently needed than
this to open up the fertile lands in
this vicinity. There are no less than
u dozen settlers who have taken up
hind on the logged-off areas iu recent
years and who ure handicapped most
seriously for want of roads. Unfortunately for these settlers, Campbell
ltlver has been looked upon more or
less as a loggers' paradise and their
appeal for roads has apparently fallen
on deaf ears. Now that tlle district
engineer has taken a survey of tlle
country to the south and west of the
fiver, and noted the great urgency
lor transportation facilities for the
ranchers, there is a possibility that
efforts will be made by the authorities
iu tlle near future to construct a road
throughout this productive territory.
Samples of vegetables and other pro-
duets from these lands on view at the
Campbell Uiver Trading Company's
store and at the Publicity Bureau, is
proof positive that no better soil caa
be found than that of the logged-ott
land lu this locality.
MENZIES SYMPATHETIC
TO MERVILLE SETTLERS
COURTENAY, Oct. 9.—The Rev.
Thomas .Menzles, M.L.A., held a meet
ing on Friday evening last at Merville, where bo consulted a committee
of .Mervilleites nt tho home of Mr.
Kerr re the problems with which th
people of the soldier settlement are
beset. Mr. Menzles gave his constituents a most sympathetic hearing a«id
has promised to do all' in liis power to
have some changes made and assist
mice given.
A committee of Merville people will
meet the Courtenuy-Comox Board of
Trade on Tuesday night to seek as
slstance to havo the Government see
their case as they do.
Government   Agent  Endorses
Cascade
BEER
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
Vancouver-made Product is put to acid test on most difficult
foreign markets in the world, and comes off with flying colors.)
INDUSTRIES ARE
STARTING UP
AT NEW TOWNSITE
Campbcllton is Thriving Settlement. — International Timber
Company Branching Out.
It is understood tliat the International Timber Company will shortly
clear the land recently purchased
from the Campbell River Indians, and
erect thereon a round-house, machine
shop and possibly a number of dwell
lugs for the married men iu their employ. Already the olllces of the company have been moved from the camp
to their building on the Island highway near the new townslte at Camp
bellton, and apparently an all-round
expansion of their plant Is planned.
New camps are being opened in theli
vast holdings to the west of Campbell
river, which will soon result in ill
creasing their output of logs by many
thousands of feet per day.
The new townslte of Campbellton
Is fast becoming a thriving little settlement, as aside from the boom camp
and proposed extensions by the International Company, there is a sawmill on the opposite side of the river
doing a lively business and a boatbuilding plant at the mouth of the
stream with all the orders it can
handle. Three new houses have been
built recently on tlle Hanson and
Smith sub-divisions, and three or foul;
more buildings will likely go up before Christmas.
Sale of Mineral Claims for Unpaid Taxes
in the Comox District.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that on Tuesday, the 7th Day of Nevember, 1922, at the hour of
10 O'clock in the forenoon, at the Court House, Cumberland, B. C, I shall offer for sale at Public
Auction the Mineral Claims in the List hereinafter set out, of the persons in the said List
hereinafter set out, of which Crown Grants have been issued, for the Taxes remaining unpaid
and delinquent by said persons on the 30th day of June, 1922, and for costs and expenses, if
the total amount is not sooner paid.
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the following list where
the Owner is a member of the Allied Forces, and entitled to the benefits of Section 20 of the
" Taxation Act Amendment Act, 1918."
LIST ABOVE MENTIONED :
OWNER.
NAME OF CLAIM.
LOT NO.   TAXES.   COSTS.    TOTAL
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
'Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  .....
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate 	
"'airfield Exploration Syndicate 	
Queen Bee Gold Mines 	
Queen Bee Gold Mines 	
Mathers, Adams & John 	
Mathers, A. & J. & Manson L	
Mathers, A. & J., McLaughlan, Wm. H,
Mathers, A. & J„ McLaughlan, Wm. H.
McLaughlin, Wm. H	
Olsen, Nagnes P	
Kennedy, David G	
Kennedy, David G	
Cascade Beer has made good
in India. This is the most trying climate in the world, and yet
Cascade Beer kept there for
more than a year had the same
pleasant tang and was just as
fresh and pleasing to the taste
as when it left the Vancouver
Breweries.
There is no less an authority
for this than H. A. Chisholm,
trade commissioner for the Dominion Government. Writing
to the Commercial Intelligence
Journal, published by the Canadian Government, under date
of May 13, this year, Mr. Chisholm says in part:
"The last consignment reaching Calcutta is said to have been
a shipment of 'Cascade' from
Vancouver, landed in March,
1921.
"It speaks well of this brand
of Canadian Beer that, although
it has been in store for over a
year in one of the most trying
climates in the world, its quality weather.
^^
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
For more than Thirty Years Cascade has been the Favorite Beer
of Western Canada.
FOR SALE BY ALL GOVERNMENT VENDORS.
has not deteriorated and none of
it has gone bad. Its 'crown
caps' seem to have protected the
contents better than corks have
the German lagers. The writer
was informed that this brand of
Canadian Beer, although not as
heavy as English Ale, produced
a pleasant stimulating effect on
the stomach that German lagers
could not produce. According to
many informants, this particular quality in Canadian Beer is
just what is demanded in the
tropics."
Can there be a better endorsement than this for a hot-
weather drink? Here is Cascade—a Vancouver-made product—that can be shipped to
India, held for more than a year,
and when opened prove to be
more palatable and better adapted for a tropical beverage than
beer manufactured right in
India or imported from other
famous breweries of the world.
Stick   to   "Cascade"   this   hot
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
• —
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know how to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on the subject It you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8
Cumberland
P.O. Box 349
WATCHFUL WAITING AT
CAMPBELL RIVER FOR
GREAT DEVELOPMENT
While there are many rumors goins
the rounds iu Campbell River and
Vancouver regarding the development of the great power contained in
the Campbell River falls, there comes
no authentic confirmation of any of
lliein. Nevertheless, there seems to be
something of a concrete nature will
no question but that In the near future
be forthcoming in the shape of newi
on this most Important question.
Reams of data on tlle possibilities
of the place gathered by competent,
and lu some cases, eminent engineers
lor many years past, makes It possible
for actual development work to be
started without apparently the usuil
Initiatory proceedings which characterize similar enterprises. It is tills
fact that gives the doubting Thomases
their innings in the many arguments
that arise regarding this matter.
Those who bave sufficient vision to
discern the great potentialities of tills
wonderfully resourceful district are
hot at present advertising their.convictions but are quietly awaiting the
advent of "the man with the pick"
and are confident that that day cannot be long deferred. There have been
sufficient Indications in this locality,
especially during the past six or eighl
months, to prove to the wiseacres ol
the district that there Is somethinp
brewing and that "something" mean:
nothing more than tlle inauguration ol
a period of development work such
as no place on Vancouver Island bat
as yet experienced. The harnessing
of tiie great waterfall on the Campbell river will be an event of paramount importance lo the whole of thii
Island and will assuredly result in
the development of the very great resources for which it is so justly fumed
Items of Local Interest.
Master Lome Higgins, son of Mrs.
M, Higgins, underwent an operation
lor appendicitis on Wednesday morning last, and Is reported doing as well
an can he expected.
Community .singing In again lo the
fore for the winter months, nud a
number of people gathered at the
home of Mrs. Holmes on Wednesday
evening lo draft a programme and
malic lhe necessary arrangements ns
In meeting-places and so forth,
Dr. Street, of Vancouver, Is at present at Campbell River, and may locate in this vicinity.
Mrs. II. U. Daley Is a visitor at (he
homo of Airs. Flelchor, Union Bay
road.
The Masonic building Is Hearing
completion, aud the Marshall Music
Company, lessees of a portion thereof,
expect to move in before lhe first ol
November, Other tenants of llw
building will be: W. Emertc and
Harry Richards, confectioner.
Mr. W. A. Crawford, the well-ltnowi
and popular merchant of Campbell
ton ,is building a warehouse near hi
store for the storage of goods. Mr. J
Clanville is now assisting .Mr. Craw
lord In the nianngenieiit uf the bus!
ness.
Dorothy Morton   253
Eva   254
Banker   291
Comox Fraction   297
Percy   299
Dorothy Morton Fraction   300
('hemming   319
Douglas   820
Maggie May   322
Queen Bee   345
Bully Boy   324a
Nlmpklsh   127
Klaanch   128
Magnet   129
Letitia   130
Vulcan   132
Columbia   3012
May Flower   4816a
Humming Bird   4815
13.00
3.75
16.75
10.75
3.75
14.60
10.50
3.75
14.26
5.00
3.75
8.75
12.50
3.75
16.25
6.00
3.75
9.75
13.00
3.75
16.76
12.25
3.75
16.00
.75
3.75
4.60
12.50
3.75
16.25
5.00
3.75
8.76
12.50
3.76
16.25
8.25
3.75
12.00
10.50
3.75
14.26
9.75
3.76
13.50
9.00
3.75
12.75
18.00
3.76
16.76
13.00
3.75
16.75
12.50
3.75
16.25
DATED   AT   CUMBERLAND, B, C, OCTOBER 10th, 1922.
JOHN BAIRD, Collector.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Thulin, who have |
been touring Oregon and Washington
in their car, arrived home on Saturday afternoon. After keenly observing j
the country to the south, Mr. Thulin
comes homo with more admiration
I ban ever lor bis native province.
Mr. and Mrs. James McNeill arrived
home on Saturday after an extended
honeymoon trip to the United States,
and will occupy the cosy little cottage
on. the brow ot the hill overlooking
Discovery Passage.
Try The Courtenay Garage for Re
pair Work. Only the best mechanics
employed.
Health Hint: Never judge a beauty
contest  or a  baby  show.
COMOX
TAILOR
DYE WORKS
CLEANING      - .      PRESSING
T. YONEDA
COURTENAY
Phone 64 Box 123
Victoria man in jail.   He had two
more wives than divorces.
For satisfactory   repair   work—Try
The Courtenay Garage.
NOTICE
ANCIENT OltllElt OF FOKESTEH8,
No. !)H»0.
Above Lodge will hold Double Meetings and Social on every 4th Wednesday of the Winter Months. All members of the Bevan and Cumberland
Courts are cordially Invited. Ladies
bring refreshments.
J. DERBYSHIRE, Chairman,
21 Ways & Means Com.
Tag Day, Oct. 21st
for the benefit of
Cumberland
General Hospital
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, October 13 & 14
Human  Hearts
THE ONE BIG STORY THE WHOLE WORLD LOVES
FIRST SHOWING ANYWHERE IN B. C.
UNIvEKAl
•JEWEL
The Story of Stories—Playing on the Heartstrings
with its Throbbing, Poignant Drama—Replacing with
Tender Smiles the Tears it will bring, as its Gentle,
homely humor sinks deeper and deeper into your
heart—a Story of Pathos and Humor—of a Wife who
was an Outcast—of a Son who suffered—a Story for
You—for Your Children—for Your Father and Mother
—for the whole world.   DON'T MISS IT.
ADDED ATTRACTIONS:
' Business is Business," a Fox Sunshine Comedy.
MATINEE—SATURDAY, 2.30 P.M.
SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE—9.30 P.M.
HouscPcfcft
Edith tlalbrGertrudeClairenaiyPhilbln.
MISimpson.PainseyVftll3ceGeorladattiom8
i • trupeitawf •
d3»ini
i4nm.r1h<3SX)
Humai Hearts'
0 Dedicated to tha rbtter?.rthe\r*rlcl (IT)
bvCiri LhhiIi ||lj
D**riW*K"ge*g0rt
COMING
MONDAY  &  TUESDAY-
" Buffalo Bill."
-Ethel  Clayton in " For the Defence," also Chapter 2 of
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY—Hoot Gibson in "The Bear Cat."
" FOOLISH WIVES " IS COMING. fV
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
NINE
Nerves and Health
THE network ot Nerves which carries the normal flow ot
Life-giving Energy to every organ and tissue is responsible for the health of the body. II through accidents, blows, strains, or unnatural curvature, the
movable bones of the Spine become slightly displaced, they
press on the Nerves and obstruct the free passage of the Health-
giving Currents. The organs or tissues fed by the obstructed
nerves naturally become weakened and diseased. Pressure on
the nerves leading to the Stomach, for Instance, Is often the
cause of Stomach Trouble.
CHIROPRACTIC
by a method of Scientific Adjustment corrects these Spinal Defects, relieves the pressure on the Nerves and removes the cause
of Disoase. With normal conditions restored, the life-giving currents have full power to repair and strengthen, and health results in a natural way, without the use of drugs or surgery. Nc
matter what the Ailment, experience proves that It can be relieved. Three Chiropractic (Kl-ro-prak-tlk) Adjustments of
certain parts of the Spine.
The sick should not be discouraged, even though they have
sought relief for years and tried every known method ot regaining health.
Chiropractic
The Better Way To Health
has done wonders in bringing relief ln long-standing and obstinate cases. Investigate and learn what Chiropractic has done
and is doing for others, and what It can do for you.
E. 0. Haukedal, D.C.
Office Over Mrs. King's Book Store
CUMBERLAND
Up-to-Date Press Now In Use
This week's Issue of The Islander
was printed on the new "Standard"
press shown above. This machine
made practically a carload of freight
and took six days to erect In The
Islander plant.   It is now possible lo
print four pages at a time and three
times as rapidly as it was possible to
print two pages on the old press,
which means much better service to
patrons of The Islander.
Life Worth While
One of the Infallible laws ot Nature
lu "as ye sow, so shall ye reap." Of
course this does not apply to actual
harvesting of the summer's crop, for
many an Industrious farmer who
sowed diligently in tlle Spring may
have his crop ruined by a hail storm
in August. But, barring accident, the
law holds good in man's physical development. The youth who takes
proper care of his health will reap
Ihe reward lu old age.
We have in mind three conspicuous
Americans,,men who have done and
continue to do big things, and who
have proven that llfo is worth while.
Cbauncey llepew jocundly looks forward to the rounding out of Ills "real"
career. He long since passed the
eightieth milestone John D. llocke-
tellcr, on his recent birthday walked
bis golf course with vigor, though he,
too, Is beyond the eighty mark. A
few days ago, John Wanamaker, at
84, walked Into his olllce at 8.15 a.m.
and plunged at once Into a mass of
work that well might have seemed
formidable to any man In the prime
of bis strength.
They are men who have won the
talisman ot lite through hard work.
By clean living, regular habits and
health-giving exercUe, they have progressed normally toward that calm
ripening which precedes the great
change.
Senility is Bin. Lite pays big dividends to those who hear and obey
the -Immemorial and Immutable commandments of the Master ot Life.
The broken man of 40 is a misfit. His
sins of omission and commission have
found him out. He goes to the rubbish heap. But men like our octogenarian disciples of work, having
earned the right to live, go on through
the years, confident and serene, realizing that lite is worth while. They
make it worth while for themselves
and for the multitudes ot their fellow
men.
Writing Politicians
(From the Ottawa Journal)
The report that Mr. Lloyd George
Is engaged ln writing his reminiscences, and that Mr. Asquith, Mr. Churchill and Lord Birkenhead are likewise
writing personal memoirs, draws attention to a curious difference between
British and Canadian politicians. It
la the difference that whereas British
statesmen lose few opportunities ot
writing either for the press, the reviews, or for the great publishing
houses, Canadian contemporaries restrict their scope of expression to the
spoken word. In England it Is the
commonest of common things to find
Premiers, Ministers and party leaders
contributing articles to the newspapers. Mr. Winston Churchill, who
was once a Journalist, does not permit the fact that he is Colonial Secretary to interfere with a weekly article
In the Sunday Press; Lord Birkenhead
becomes journalist at least once a
mouth to discuss Innumerable topics
ln the newspapers; Lord Crewe writes
regularly in the Westminster Gazette;
Labor leaders add considerably to
their salrles by writing tor the magazines and reviews; and so on all down
through the political rank and file.
Nor Is the combination of author-
Journalist politician ot recent growth.
Gladstone, to go back but half a century, wrote a score of pamphlets and
articles. Disraeli produced at least
some good" second-rate 'novels, and
Itoseberry wrote books of distinction.
John Morley, whose "Life of Gladstone" stands among the greatest ot
English biographies, and who Is the
author ot other great works, produced
some of his finest writing while Gladstone's Chief of Staff; Justin McCarthy wrote his "Georges" while ln
the midst of the political turmoil
which followed the death ot Parnell;
and many other Illustrations could be
cited of statesmen finding time for
authorship and journalism.
In Canada, our politicians have produced nothing with their pens. Sir
John Macdonald, who, aB his correspondence testifies, might have left
most interesting memoirs, wrote nothing. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, whose recollections would have made him a
fortune, left only a few letters; although once a journalist, and to his
last days a great student of literature
and ot the press, he never wrote for
or even permitted himself to be quoted
In the newspapers. Sir John Thompson, Sir Charles Tupper, Sir Mackenzie Bowell, and-Edward Blake were
distinctly non-literary.
One may be permitted to hope that
the English custom will grow In Canada. There Is much that statesmen
can say to the public through the
press; much more that they can say
to It ln the twilight ot life through
their memoirs.
BE TRUE.
Men have ever loved the man with
tbe clear eye and the straight tongue,
the man who never hedged and never
equivocated, who never fawned nor
flattered and who could never be
tnught to lie. Amid the unstablo
crowd such a man Is conspicuous by
his unswerving loyalty to his ideals,
and this steadiness of his onward
course resembles that of the planets
Such a man sometimes fails in finesse
he sometimes falls to hold his friends,
and he sometimes gains a crown ot
thorns and possibly a cross, but the
crown cannot dishonour and the cross
cannot terrify him. When God made
man he put Iron into him, and this
man but reveals to others what God
meant men to be. It Is true that man
Is fallen! It Is not true that he cannot rise. It Is true that man Is weak!
It Is not true that he cannot be strong.
We recognize heredity, but we recognize also divinity. Heredity Is mighty,
but the grace of God is stronger still.
There Is a world of human weakness
round about us, and weak men and
women are proving false to themselves, their frlendH, their God! But
this Is not of necessity. A man may
not be able to avoid disaster, but he
can escape dishonour; he may not bi
able to avoid insult and Injustice, and
persecution, but he can manage to retain his honesty, and If he die he can
at least die at peace with God. But
to do so he must be true to himself,
his friend and his God. The price
may at times seem great, but the reward Is Inestimable.
GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL CLUB
The usual weekly meeting of the
Girls' High School Club was held In
the school room on Thursday last,
Oct. 6th. Eighteen ln attendance. Interesting papers were, given by four
of the members: Evelyn Baldwin,
Margaret Bunbury, Mildred Calnau
and Margaret McNaughton, after
which arrangements were made for a
social to be given shortly.
Basketball practices have been
started with Allan Nunns as coach.
STUDY THE BOYS.
A boy ln the fullness ot youth Is
the wildest creature under the sun.
His enthusiasm knows no bounds. He
is so full of life and the desire to be
doing something that he admits of
no restraint.
The adolescent period Is the hardest to control; yet It Is the formative
period.
There is something of a sentiment
In these days that parents should not
try to cause their boys to form habits,
but that they must concern themselves more Intensely in regulating
what habits are formed.
A father's good example before his
boy is the most priceless possession
the child can have. But fathers,
while they may be the best providers
ln the world and certainly can bo
most charitable toward their oil-
spring, generally speaking, lack both
tact and courage when It comes to
assisting their boys to step over tho
rough places.
Men usually excuse themselves from
the task of helping children to form
habits, on tbe grounds that this is
the mother's work.
The fact Is outstanding, nevertheless, that the average baby boy can
more easily be trained by a father
than by the mother, providing the
father puts his mind to the job and
goes about It with the proper determination.
Fathers need to study their own
and other boys,
No lad ever grows Into manhood
without bearing something of tho
father's habits, good or bad. The
daddy, therefore, has an Important
place ln the home, outside of being
merely a provider.
WILLS FOR PROBATE.
In the County Court on Wednesday
morning P. P. Harrison made application to Judge Barker for probate ot
the wills of the deceased J. P. Davie,
Alexander Cameron and Albert Holt
for $536, 12,000 and $1,005 respectively.
TENDERS WANTED.
TENDERS for the conveyance of
School Children, from a point
on the Royston Road, about opposite Logans', to and from tbe Cumberland Public School, will be received up to October 25th, 1922, by
the Board of School Trustees.
Conveyance to leave Royston Road
at 8.30 a.m. and returning leave Cumberland Public School at 3.10 p.m.,
every school day. Successful tenderer
to supply suitably covered vehicle,
conveniently seated.
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
A. MACKINNON,
Secretary.
21
JOB
PRINTING
We are in a position to handle job work in a satis-
factory manner, and will appreciate any orders received. The Islander plant is well equipped in every way,
being the largest and most up-to-date of any found in a
town the size of Cumberland. We have added considerable equipment to the Islander Plant during the past
year or so in order to be in a position to successfully
handle anything that may be placed in our hands in
the commercial job printing line. The Islander has had
splendid support in this direction, and this fact is very
much appreciated. If at any time our customers are
not satisfied we hope they will tell us so, and we will endeavor to make it right. We go on the principle that
only the very best work is wanted by our many customers, and we endeavor to give them what they want.
To those who have printing to be done, we ask them to
give us a chance to do it. We feel sure that our prices
will be found reasonable, consistent with good workmanship.
PHONE 35
LETTERHEADS
BILLHEADS
PROGRAMMES
POSTERS
ENVELOPES
VISITING CARDS
DANCE TICKETS
INVITATIONS
BUSINESS CARDS
SPECIAL FORMS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ETC., ETC.
"S
THE
ISLANDER
Another PRICE Suggestion
Muffins and Coffee Cake
BREAKFAST is too
often eaten as a duty
rather than a joy. The success of the day may depend upon the spirit of
breakfast. Here are some
breakfast dishes that will
stimulate the most critical
appetite.
(All measurements for oil
materials an level.)
MUFFINS
Scups flour
S IsaspnnrH Dr. Prict'i
KktasPowd*
cupmUk
Sift together Dour, baking powder,
sugar and salt; add null, well-
beaten eggs and melted shortening; mil well. Half fill greased
muffin tins and bake in hot oven
so to is minutei.
CORN MEAL MUFFINS
W cup corn ibmI
1H cups flour
4 UMpootu Dr. Priest
M teaspoon wit
I tablespoon! —
Imp milk
It 111 llHMXH.il
•DR*
PRICES
CREAM
BaMiKPwwier
Made from Cream of Tarter, derived
from Grapes. Produces food that Is
fine in flavor, oven in texture, doll-
clout and wholesome.
MADE IN CANADA
Sift together com meal, flour, bikini powder, tilt and lugar: add
milk, melted ihorteninf and well-
beaten egg: mix well. Half fill
Ereaied muffin tint with batter and
ake about 35 minutei in hot oven.
Scud for FREE Cook KooV-" Table and Kitchen"-US Notre Dame East, Winnipeg, Can.
DATE MUFFINS
H cup butter
less
3 cups flour
2 teaspoons Dr. Price's
Biking- Powder
M teaspoon salt
'I cup milk
li lb. dates
Cream butter, add beaten egg,
then Hour, baking powder and lilt
which have been lifted togethel,
and milk. At the last itir in dates
which have been pitted and cut
into small pieces. Bake about 35
minutes in greased gem pani in hot
oven. If a sweet niurfin is desired,
add H cup sugar to dry ingredient.
COFFEE CAKE
2 cup* flour
Yi teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons sugar
4 teaspoons Dr. Price's
Baking Powder
2 tablespoons shortening
1 i cup milk
Mix and sift dry ingredients; add
melted shortening and enough
milk to make very stiff batter.
Spread Ii inch thick in greased
pan; add top mixture. Bake about
30 minutes in moderate oven.
TOP MIXTURE
'I tablespoons flour
I tablespoon cinnamon
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons shortening
Mix dry ingredients; rub in short-
cuing .md spread thickly over top
of dough before baking. TEN
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1922.
Merchandise
Plus
Satisfaction
SEE OUR NEW
SUITS WHICH
HA VE ARRIVED
1-Oil   FALL.
CORRECT IN
EVERY  LINE.
PRICES :
$22.50
TO
$37.50
The styles displayed
for the coming season
have been planned
with the most painstaking care as to
garment linas and
general harmony of
structure, and we
have studied tho
taste of the most
conservative a3 well
as the " snappy"
dresser in assembling
our line.
Our object, aa always, Ir
to sell not only Correct
Garments but satisfaction
along with them, and we
know you will find il
goodly supply of both in
our New Line.
DRYOOODS
& GENTS FURNISHINGS
Local Briefs
LOCAL BRIEFS	
Thomas Hanks returned Wednesday
from Vancouver, where he spent a
week attending the Undertakers' Convention.
WILL ELECT RHODES
SCHOLAR TO REPRESENT
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Series of Articles on How to Play
Basketball to Appear in Islander
In the "Sports Section" of thU
week's Islander there appears the Ilrst
ot a series of ten articles on "How to
Play Basketball." written specially tor
this paper by a Sports writer who ha i
played the game himself for n number of years and who bus watched
many championship games In Canada
and the United States. He Is conversant with all phases ot' the game and
is known as a keen student of vnriou-d
plays used by leading basketball
teams of lhe East.
Everyone who plays Ihe game and
all fans should not fall to read carefully tlle Ilrst article by  "Observer"
in training rules and habits, and to
1 study the nine succeeding articles.
| Articles 2. 3 and 4 will be on "For-
I wards, Luskct Shooting and General
[Qualifications"; Article 5. "Passing
■nod Handling the Hall"; Article (I,
"Qualifications of Centre and
Guards"; Articles 7 and S. "General
Features and Outline of Formations
ol Offence"; Article 1(1, "A Review of
Important Features."
Don't  inis.i  the  basketball  articles
ibi", week and Die next nine weeks.
For satisfactory  repair  work*—Try
The Courtenay Garage.
Matt Stuart, of Mumford & Walton's
staff, is spending a fortnight's vacation in Vancouver. Victoria and the
Shawiilgan Lake district.
Cn mill after Monday next, October
10th, the curfew bell will ring ut S
p m. Instead of It p.m.
The following articles have been
found is the city and are at police
headquarters, where lliey may bo ob-
tailied from Chief of Police Merry up-
:in Identification: One hunch of keys
me lady's glove, one pair of ladies'
*'ovos, and one pocket knife.
Aliss    Mary    Picketti   returned
Monday last from a trip to Seattle and
Portland. ,
Mr. and Mrs. .1. Hnird. Sr., returned
early In the week from nn extended
visit to the I'ld Country.
Mr. ami Mrs. Harry C. Brown, of
Uevan, are receiving congratulation-.
in the birth of a daughter recently.
The infant children of Mr. and Mrs
\i'. Cart' and Mr. and Mrs. A. Home,
of Union Hay. were bapltzed last Sunday afternoon in Holy Trinity Church
hy Kev. W. Leversedge.
Nanaimo City
Here Sunday
An Upper Island League fixture wi
:>e helif in the Recreation Grounds ou
Sunday. Oct. 15th, when the Nanaimo
City team pay a visit to Cumberland
Now that the locals have at last found
their stride, a win over the Hull Oil:
boys is confidently expected.
The following will ilo duty for Cum
berland: Wilson. Stewart. Campbell.
Brewster, Kenney, Collier, James,
Milligan, Conti, Hitchens and Home,
Kick-off at 3 o'clock sharp.
Omitted
Owing to the installation of several
tons of machinery In The Inlander
office, this issue of The Islander has
been delayed several hours. The report of the tax sale held on Thursday
is unavoidably held over until our
irst issue.
Lin* out for the Foresters' Folly
Truiipe—iiinliing It's Ilrst appearance
!n Ciinilicrli'.iiil in the in.ir future.
Beaufort House, Cumberland, Official Residence, Canadiai
Collieries [Dunsmuir], Limited
There are probably few residences
or. Vancouver Island than "Beaufort
House," shown above, ns It now appears, In the mldsl of twenty acres of
trees, shrubbery, lawns and flowers,
with a grass tennis court at lhe side
of the house, nnd a croquet lawn and
putting green in front, The house
'was erected In 1808 by the Wellington
Collieries Company to be the residence
of Mr. I'. 1). Little, vice-president and
general manager, v. ho moved Into it
from camp jus! twenty-four years ago
Ibis month, The building was re-
inodelled about three years ago by the
present management of the company,
and Is now the summer home of Mr.
James Savuge, manager of tiie Can-
niliaii Collieries (Dunsmuir)  Limited,
and is also used by hlni on his official
visits lo Cumberland once or twice a
month during the remainder of lhe
year.
The grounds constitute a small
park, ure beautifully arranged and
well kip', so that "Beaufort House"
Is n place that Cumberland may well
he proud of.
The annual election of a Rhodes
scholar to represent British Columbia
al Oxford University in 11)23 will be
held not later than November 25. The
scholar elected this year will go to
Oxford and take up his studios there
in October, 1923.
The following are the conditions
under which candidates are eligible
for the scholarship: A candidate must
be a British subject with at least five
years' residence in Canada, and unmarried, He must have passed his
nineteenth birthday, but not havo
passed his twenty-lifth birthday on
October 1, 1!»23. He must be nt least
in his second year in some degree-
granting university of Canada.
Under lhe terms set forth by Cecil
Rhodes in his will, the committee of
appointment must have regard not
■inly to scholastic ability and attain-
i.eiits of candidates, but also to their
physical vigor, capacity for leadership, force of character, devotion to
duty, courage, sympathy, and other
moral qualities.
The scholarship is of the annual
value of 350 pounds sterling 1 year,
and is tenable for three yearB.
Applications should be in the hands
of the secretary of the selection committee, II. T. Logan, nt the University
of British Columbia, not later than
October 20."
When in need of
Fresh Fruits
& Vegetables
Phone 38
LADIES—You can more than Bave
the price of your gasoline when mil
driving by making Layer's Store at
Courtenay your destination. Something new all the time.
For satisfactory   repair   work—Try
The Courtenay Garage.
Onir Personal
to All SIdn Sufferers
You havt ear absolute guarantee cf
rehef from the first bottle of D. D. D.
Your money will be returned without n word
if yfnt tt II in tl ;il tilt: first bottle did not stop
lliiii it' li, did i ot sonthe r.nd cool that eruption    \ minion ■ i re tliejudtfe.
We iV.ve Wdtched the action of this Rtandiird
medio I cliRceve[y < n the nick «)<■■■.* in hundred!
of C88CB uvii v:t know. And ii yon are just
crony with l.chln&orpatt..youwill feel soothed
pnd c«oi (1 the n imeot you apply thit tfwtu-
Ins. (.oodnffwtwh
We have made fiut friend" ot more than one
family in r« i.mWnriinp i>. I). i>. to a ikin
ititfererlit-re ami lUvn; nnd wc want yofl to
try it no'\ nn cvr positive no-pay (tnaranUa
trice, il u buttle,   1r> D. D. U. Soap too-
Sold by FROST'S DRUG STORE
We are at Your Service
See Our Windows
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
Service
Quality
WINTER SWEATER TIPS
Brushed wool will he much seen
Ibis season, on tuxedo anil slip-on
models. A deep rever collar on the
tuxedo Is smart. Stripe effects are
liked. As in other gorments, brown
promises to lie n leading sweater
color.
For satisfactory  repair  work—Try
The Courtenay Garage.
LOVELY BROCADES.
Hroeaded chiffon velvet Is to be very
popular tills winter because it adapts
itself ho admirably to the present
styles. Frequently the patterns are
outlined with beads for extra elaboration.
Try Tlle Courtenay Oarage for Repair Work. Only tlle best mechanics
employed.
COUPE $962.00
THE FROST
IS ON THE TUNKIN'
Delightful as October always is, its
Mornings and Evenings are sure to be
sharp anil frosty and open car driving
will soon cease to be a pleasure.
A FORD COUPE will take you on
your trips in perfect comfort, not
only through October's frosty weather but also through the cold blustery days of November and the freezing, blizzardy days of the long winter.
Hee October's warning and order
your Closed Car now. Easy payments if you wish.
Corfield  Motors Ltd.
Ford Dealers
Phone 46      .'. '.*      Courtenay

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