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The Cumberland Islander Jan 3, 1925

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Array Start Jthe New Year   Right by Subscribing to   Your Home  Town Paper   \
THE* ^CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated tbe Cumberland Newt.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR— No. 1
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA   SATURDAY,  JANUARY 3
Funeral of
John Burghiner
The news of Ihe dentil of John liurg
hlnor, for many years In the employ
of tho City of Cumberland, caused
much regret to his many friends and
acquaintances, and the sympathy of
the entire community ls extended to
his sorrowing wife and children. Mr.
Burghiner was in his 40th year and
has been a resident of Cumberland
for many yenrs. The funeral took
place from the family residence on
Wodncfiday, December 24th at 2 p.m.
Cumborland Lodge F.O.E., ot which
the deceased was a prominent member, had charge of the funeral. The
pallbearers were Messrs Rega, Patrick Mullen, J. Frelone, V. Frelone,
Chas. Tobacco nnd J. Dallos.
The following floral tributes are
gratefully acknowledged: Wreaths
—Mrs. Burghiner and family, Corporation of the City of Cumberland, Cumberland F.OE. Lodge, Mrs. Balagno,
Mrs. F. Francescini, Mrs. V. Frelone.
Miss J. Balagno, Marocchi family, Mr.
F. Scavarda and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Aspect and family, Mrs. Cavallero and
family, Mrs. Duces and family, Miss
M. Picketti and family, Mr. John Fro-
lone and family, Mr. Louis Frelone
and family, Mrs. Boga and family,
Mrs. K. Bobba and son, Mrs. Louis
Scavarda and family. Mrs. John Scavarda and family. Bouquet—Messrs
Harling and Ledlngham.
h
Vft
w
License Fee Is
Subject Of Rumors
Various rumors are ln circulation
as to the fees to be charged for beer
licenses ln British Columbia.     It Is
understood that the amounts will vary
In different parts of tiie province as
obviously a license In Anyox Is not
worth as much as one in Vancouver.
The old liquor license in Vancouver was $1000, but lu view of the more
restricted conditions which now prc-
f vail the lioteliuen are contending for
ti   a Biusller amount
• -
Alberta's .System
There Is expected to be much difficulty ln adjusting the amounts In different parts of the province, and examination of both the Quebec and Alberta methods is being made.
In Alberta the license tee is in relation to the population of the city
or town. In cities of 15,000 or over
the fee is (400 and by a series of graduations steps down to $200 In places
of less than 1500 population.
In Quebec province there are a
dozen or more classifications. Montreal Is ln one class, Quebec Is in another and there are other classifications within these cities.
On Itenliil Value
In both Montreal and Quebec the
amount of license fee varies according
lo the rental vnluo for the premises
on which It Ib issued.
In other towns and cities the
amount license fee varies according
to the number of licenses Issued within the town. Ono license In a town
costs J450 but If there nre four or
more the fee drops as low as $150
l<
St. George's Xmas
Concert Was Very
Successful Affair
COURTENAY, Dec. 31.—The Christ
mas concert held In St. George's Presbyterian Church last Wednesday evening included a tableau "The Nativity."
The first part of the program was
composed of songs and recitations by
the Juniors. The tableau made up
the second part of the program and
the parts were taken ns follows.
Joseph, Fred Duncan; Mary, Violet
Trotter; Angel Gabriel, Beatrice
Catchpole; Zacharlah, Harold Tull;
The Three Wise Men were Robin
King, Warwick Revie and Stanley Wll
Hams; Shepherds, Annie Crawford,
Muriel Leighton arid Annie McCourt.
The text was read by-Hazel Leighton
and Barbara Duncan was the accompanist. A Christinas Tree Social ln
the basement of the church occupied
the latter part ot the evening, when a
large number ot children received
presents. Santa Chins in the person
of Sidney Williams was the central
figure at this evsnt and It was quite
plain that he played the part In the
right spirit, for he made a flrBt rate
Father Christmas.
Famous Quartette
To Pay Visit Here
The Nanaimo Welsh Quartette will
visit Cumborland on Friday evening,
January 10 and will give one of their
famous concerts at the llo-Ilo Theatre
The Quartette composed of Messrs D.
Jones, tenor; C. Roberts, tenor; T.
Lewis, baritone and R. Johnson, bass,
wlll be assisted by the well known
soprano, Mrs. Mulr, with Mr. W. Mor-
Iniry accompanist Make a note of
the date, January 16.
High School
Report for Month
Of December
Xmas 1934
(Names In order of Merit)
Grade XI
First Class, (80% and over)—Toshlo Kajiyama
Second ClasB, (607o and under 80%)
—Thomas Abe, Edward Bickle, Christine Sutherland.
Third Class, (Under 00%)—Henry
Watson, Gwenneth Emily, Sadlo
Brown, Hawthorn Graham.
Grade X
First Class—Margaret  Robinson.
Second Class—Beth Horbury, Edna
Gear, Mabel Jones, Ella Henderson,
Edith O'Brien, Jessie Baird, Toshiko
Iwasa, William Brown, Marjorie
Grant, John Richardson, Jessie Brown,
Leland Harrison. Mary Walker, not
ranked owing to absence.
Grade IX I
i
Second Class—Helen Parnham, Is-1
ao Abe, Minnie Harrigan, May Tay-,
lor, Irene Bates, Beryl Hudson, Eileen |
Kelsey, Sara Davis, Evelyn Carey, May I
Hughes, Myrtle Caiman, Jessie Grant, j
Low Man.
Third Class or Pass Marks—Walter
Hughes,. Archie Dick, Norman Gomm,
Jcan Smith, Dorothy Maxwell, Leslie
Dando, Llllbin Banks nnd Edna Smith
(equal), Robert Yates, Jack Hill,
Prlscilla Cloutler, Thelma Gray, Low
Yuen, Tom Graham.
Cumberland Gets
$1,751 As Share
Of Liquor Profits
VICTORIA, Dec. 31.—Liquor profits
and pari-mutuel taxes, the municipalities' Christmas box from Hon. J. D.
MacLean, Minister of Finance, are being distributed and cheques have been
mailed. The municipalities' direct
share of the liquor profits for the sIk
months ending September 30, after deducting enforcement charges, amounts
to $372,404, of which Cumberland receives on a pro ratio basis $1,751.47.
The municipalities receive all of the
parl-mutuel profits, less enforcement
charges, amounting to $308,512. This
was for the current year's racing. Nanaimo gets $6,879.67, or a total of
$16,189.86.
The profits are distributed on the
basis of a population of 398,080 for
the entire province, the ofllclnl census figures of 1921. Hereafter, as
the result of an amendment to the
Government Liquor Act, passed this
month by the Legislature, profits will
be distributed on the basis of the
school population,
Alberni gets a total ot $1,290.52;
Courtenay, $1,155.08; Cumberland,
$1,751.47; Duncan, $2,142.85; Ladysmith, $3,616.67 and Port Alberni,
$1,631.89.
PAUL PHILLIPPS HARRISON
Barrister, etc., Cumberland, B. C.
Member Legislative Assembly, Comox Constituency
Our neighbor, and long time resident of Cumberland,
is making a name for himself in the Provincial House of Par
liament. He spoke at length on the Barber Act which was introduced at the recent session, a report of which will be found on
Page Six. He has also been active in respect to the roads in thc
Comox Constituency and in spite of the fact that the constituency
covers a much less area than formerly, owing to the formation of
the new McKenzie Riding, he has obtained a grant of $55,000.00
for road maintenance in the Comox Riding.
In addition to the above grant, there will be large sums spent
in relocating part of the Campbell River Highway and parts of
Union Bay Road. The triangle formed by the roads between
Cumberland, Royston and Courtenay, thence to Cumberland will
be put in first class shape and Will then be subjected to oil or tarvia surfacing. Our Member has also completed arrangements
with the Minister of Public Works, whereby a trip to all parts of
the riding will be undertaken, so that first hand knowledge may
be obtained as to the general condition of the roads and highways.
Mr. Harrison will not return to Cumberland until the end of
the coming week, stopping down at Victoria for the express purpose of conferring with the cabinet on matters relating to the welfare of the Comox Constituency.
Rev. Thomas Menzies Is
Appointed Superintendent
BASKETBALL MEETING
■ A meeting of the Cumberland Basketball Club will be held ln the Athletic Club at 8:00 o'clock on Sunday
evening, January 4th, for the purpose
of drawing up a new schedule for the
second half ot the league. All members are requested to attend.
OLD-TIMERS' RE-UNION
A meeting will be held at 7:30
o'clock on Monday evening at the
home of Mr.. John Thompson, Third
Street, for the purpose of making arrangements for the second annual
Old Timers' Re-Union ot Cumberland.
All Interested are cordially Invited to
attend.
Rev. Thomas Menzles, formerly Independent member for the constituency of Comox, has been appointed Superintendent of Neglected Children, according to an announcement made by
Hon. William Sloan, Provincial Secretary. The order-ln-councll confirming the appointment was passed
by the Executive Council a few days
ago.
The new appointment, it ls said,
grew out of representations made by
Mr. D. B. Brankln, who has held the
double position of superintendent of
the Boys' Industrial School and superintendent of Neglected Children to
the effect that the duties of the two
offices were too onerous for one official to properly discharge. Mr. Bran
kin's cntention has been supported by
child welfare associations and other
publlc bodies Interested both In Victoria and Vancouver, and other Provincial cities, it is said.
Mr. Menzles possesses the experience and qualflcatlons necessary to
properly conduct the affairs of the
important office to which he has been
appointed, and Hon. Mr. Sloan believes that the result to be obtained
wlll more than justify the action of
the Council. Mr. Menzles for many
years was pastor of the Presbyterian
Church, Comox, and in that capacity
was closely connected with the activities ot various charitable organisa
tions. During the period of the war he
became president of thc Comox Patriotic Society, and was brought Into
contact with the children of tho ilis-
j trlot requiring assistance. Ilo was
principally responsible tor the formation of the throe Red Cross Societies
of the Comox district, and since becoming a resident of Victoria he has
been cloBely associated with tho
Friendly Help and Children's Aid Societies.
Ticket 876 won
Fret-Work Bracket
J. Thompson, of Minto Rond, was
the fortunate winner of the Fretwork Bracket which was drawn for
on Wednesday evening at the Ilo-llo
Theatre. The Bracket, a masterpiece of hand work, was raffled In aid
of Mr. and Mrs. T. Robertson and family who havo been In needy circumstances for some time owing to Mr.
Robertson's Illness which has prevented him from doing any work.
If Mr. Thompson will present his
ticket, which was No. 876, at the Islander ofllce the Bracket wlll be transferred to his possession.
Choir Entertains
Hospital Patients
Last Sunday the local choir of the
St. George's Presbyterian Churoh
rendered a few anthems and soIob to
the patients of the Cumberland Hospital, after the usual evening service
had been concluded. Many favorable
remarks were passed and kind appreciation felt by those who were unable to leave the Institution over the
holidays at the thoughtfulness of the
choir In thc spreading of good cheer.
J. M. Barrie's
"Peter Pan" at
Ilo-llo Theatre
The beloved by who would not grow
up, "Peter Pan" by J. N. Barrle, Is
coming to town to make you happy
and will be at the Ilo-llo Theatre on
Thursday, Friday and Saturday. January 8, 9 and 10.
This picture was shown ot the Capitol Theatre, Vancouver ou New
Year's Eve at an admission charge oi
$100 for Loges and all other scuts
75c. Prices at the lo-Ilo for this
super special wlll be, adults 50o. Children 25c.
This week in more than 250 leading
American cities Peter Pan will be
shown, including such largo centres
as New York. Los Angeles, San Francisco, in the movie world, Cumberland is therefore on n par with thi
great centres. You must see this
picture. Peter Pan, ou the legitimate
stage has charmed millions during the
last twenty-one years.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE; TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Ladysmith Five
Won Game 21-12
Tlie Ladysmith Durante, star llns-
! k-ttball leum or the lower-Island coal
city, took the measure of Ihe local
boys here last Friday evening by thu
score of 2\ to 13 after what was a
hard-tought and unnecessarily rough
| forty minutes of play, replete with
plenty of thrills and excitement for
the numerous spectators who crowded the Hand Hull. The superiority
of the Visitors wus shown In their
coolness and combination and their
ability to take advantage of every
opportunity, while the home team
seemed stricken with singe fright or
something of a kindred nature, for not
one of them played nearly as well as
we have often seen them play. Den-
holme played a fairly good game but
was attended by had luck for many of
his shot.! rolled around the basket
and then foil down, but not through.
Follownig are the lineups and the
points scored: Ladysmith—Lowe, 7.
Celle, 10: Lowe, 2; Wargo. 2: Stlck-
noy and Bryan. Cumberland—Watson; Aitken; Dcntiolme, 4; Sommerville, 3; Robertson; James, 6; Stov-
enson and Oraham. II. Plump was
very satisfactory as referee.
A ladles' game, prior to the main
event, put the spectators In good humor, for these are always fast and
psppy. affairs, Interesting to watch.
"A" Team, composod uf tho Misses C.
Oozannl, K. Bono, 11. Bickle, A. Dallos. J. Baird and .1. I'.nnu, won from
"II" Team, composed of the Misses L.
Dallos. F. Strachan, M. Hertford. V.
Aspecy and A. Hoird, by the score of
17 to 8.
NOTICE
A public meeting will be held
on Saturday night, January 3 at
7:30 o'clock, for the purpose of
discussing ways and means of locating Mr. Thomas Michell, who
has  been  missing since  Dec.  4.
Will all able bodied men please
assist.
Chas.  I'lirnluini.
Mayor.
Civic Election
Will Be Cause
Of Much Interest
COURTENAY. Dec. 31.—It is several years since any Interest wns taken in the municipal elect ions ia Coun-
enay until Just before polling day. Of
the present City Council, Aldermen
Chas. Simms and Frank .McPherson
have definitely announced their intention not to seek re-election this year.
Councillor Fielder Is the lirst to make
publlc his offer of further service; hut
It Is felt probnble thut Alderman
Cooke, Embleton, Hagarty nnd Pearie
will again consent to let ihelr names
Ko before the ratepayer*, and from
among these unities may come nominees for the olllce of mayor.
The names of several prominent
business men around town are being
mentioned ns likely nominees for civic office, but It remains to he seen
which of these will look municipal
honors. Polling will take place on
the Kith of January, 'this year for
the first time, tho three Aldermen who
obtain the largest number of votes
will hold office for a term of two years
instead of one year ns in the past.
This will menu that ne*t YWt and in
subsequent years there will only be
three Aldermen to be elected for a
term of two years instead of six Aldermen for a term of one year ns hero
tofore. Other oflices to be Soiled are
those of Police Commissioner and
School Trustee.
Two Issues will be put to tho ratepayers in the form of plebiscites. One
of those will be Ilio important, question of thc backing of bonds by Ihe
citizens for a freight boat for the
Vancouver-Courtenay service. The
other plebiscite In a little (?) matter
between those who would let their
cows roam the city streets and those
who are interested in city gardens)
tidy streets and orderly traffic. It
will be well for Courtonay to get this
much debated question settled,
New Year's Dance
Was Huge Success
The holiday dance under the auspices of the Cumberland Rangers Football Club held ,011 New Year's night
was a stupendous .success In every
way! The spacious (lo-Ilo dunce
hall wns tilled to capacity, bofh young
and old being in attendance. Paper
Hals supplied by the Club assisted In
effecting a gay holiday spirit. Plump's
Orchestra was at Its best and each
dance was so clamorously applauded
as to necessitate three or four encores to satisfy the untiring dancers.
Old Fashioned Dances
During, the evening several old
fashioned dances were singed, thus
giving a real opportunity of enjoyment to those having preferences for
those dances, and to the spectators too
they proved most entertaining, At
2 a.in. the orchestra oonouded with
thc Home waltz and It was with a
general feeling of reluctance that tho
dunce was brought to a close.
Mr. W. McFadyen returned to Vancouver on Saturday morning.
Courtenay Elks
Dance Was Very
Brilliant Affair
Considerably over Ihrco hundred
merrymakers attended the Courttlnay
Klks  annual  d :e  which  was  held
in the Qalety Theatre on New Yenr'.i
Eve. The ball Was mine thun lllled
in capacity very many irom outside
points bolng In attendance. Any an-
Uclpated reveh* 'tt the dltooe wero
not I,, Hu- least disappointing, The
music wan all that could be wished
tor, Plump's orchestra of Cumberland
supplying all the latest dance seloc-
tlone. Gaily colored paper bats In
various shapes and /onus were provided tlie guests.
Thc Old Year Out
Mr. "Jock'1 Tliompsiin Impersonating Father Time denoted the passing
of the old your as the chimes pealed
out the midnight hour while little .Miss
McKnight, most attractively cosluin-
(<! marked the advent of 1025. The
little lady, and very young she ap-
peared, delighted the spectators by a
pretty little fairy dance after which
she was loudly applauded by tlle enthusiastic crowd. Mr. Brantley on be
half of the Courtenay Elks, presented
the little girl with a doll as u marie
of appreciation. Two song selections
were then rendered by the Misses K.
Williams and 13. Shannon, ihoso being
much enjoyed. Alter these items the
first call to simper wns announced,
(ho crowd being so great as to necessitate three sittings. It was not until
4 a.m. that the Cltowd dually disbanded with the general feeling tliat they
had attended one of tho most enjoyable dances ever hold In  Courtenay. page two
TfflS  CtTMBERLAN-D  BLAKD0R, CCMUBHl/AWft, WC.
SATtmnAt. iiAmjARr a, im.
Ask Your Grocer For
Comox Jam
Comox Creamery Butter
Comox Creamery Eggs
Comox Creamery Potatoes
EGGS  ARE   CANDLED   AND   GRADED   CAREFULLY  AND   ARE
GUARANTEED TO BE STRICTLY FRESH.
JAM WAS MADE IN OUR OWN PLANT FROM FRESH GATHERED
BERRIES DAILY.
WHEN BUYING POTATOES "LOOK FOR THE TAG ON THE BAG."
IF COMOX CREAMERY THE "GROWERS" NAME IS THERE AND
THEY ARE GRADED BY US.
l-imifflSEIEKJSJEEHD**^^
Comox Creamery
Association
MOONSHINE GLIDE
WITH CIDER CHASER
MAKES BIG HIT
COURTENAY, Dec. 29.—There was
a splendid turn out for the dance at
Headquarters on Saturday night.
About one hundred and fifty people
participated. Tbo lucky numbers at
the door, which entitled the holders
to line fat turkeyB, were won by Mr.
Marsh, and Mr. Al. Symonds. Moody's
Orchestra supplied the best of dance
music, and everyone was In the best
of humor. A keg of delicious elder
handed round among the dancers was
very refreshing during the evening.
The catering for the supper was In
the hands of Mr. D. M. Isenor ot Merville, and the viands were both ap
petlzing and plentiful. The usual
Wednesday evening whist drive did
not take place this week on account
of the Elk's dance ln Courtenay.
Betty Compson plays the part ot
an author's wife. She Is Interested
in normal entertainments, walle ber
husband, played by Elliott Dexter, It)
surrounded by high brow writers. A
dashing society leador, a fascinating
role for Adolph Monjou, seen an opportunity for a flirtation, but the husband breaks up the alliance by bringing a social outcast to a dinner party.
Zasu Pitts has the part of the human
pawn.
PLEASANT TIME AT
PROGRESSIVE WHIST
LOOK!
We have just unpacked the swellest line of Table
Lamps, Shades, Candle Lamps, Etc., which have just
arrived from the east. The very latest in electrical
fixtures. Come and select yours early before the
Xmas rush begins.
Our Sporting Goods Dept. is still busy with all the
best Guns—Ammunition—Hunter's Clothing, Etc.
1 Do You Know?
THAT if you neglect the minor hIkiih
of stomach fllstreaa such us bum
pains, sour- burning stomach, bloating, belching, and after-eating mis-
cry, you arc condemning your body
to years of chronic stomach trouble.
Jo-To sold by druggists everywhere
will quickly relieve all -stomach
misery,
-RADIO	
-RADIC
We sell reliable Radio Sets and Parts and service the
seta we sell.    Get your radio from a reliable firm who
know their business.
THE
Piket Electric
TokphM* 184
ConrtMMy
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
Hi* White Store
Tht WhIU Baker
■at McBrrde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, tha loaf that drlTM
the potion from the system.     He that ls hailed as the greatest
writer on health says, "Patent foods should be shunned like the
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
lint Ckaa Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantee! the quality
THI COURTENAY TEA ROOM
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
T.WHERW
JooemsiftUNNfR
ELKS CLUB HANDS OUT
VERY NIFTY PRIZES
COURTENAY, Dec. 24.—The Elks'
Christmas drawing for over fifty prizes, Including line turkeys, fat geese,
choice hams, prime sirloins of beef,
handsome Xmas cakes, boxes of cigars, etc., took place at the Elk Home
ln Courtenay at 7:30 o'clock on Wednesday evening. The large billiard
table was literally covered witb the
splendid prizes which-made a very
tempting display. About forty people were present to hear the lucky
numbers called out.
The services ot the little Misses
Kathleen Hagarty and Mlrren Thomas were enlisted tor the occasion, the
one drawing the lucky numbers and
the other the prizes to correspond.
The first name out of the box was that
of Mr. Howard Cox, and to htm went
the largest turkey. The young ladles
were assisted by Messrs W, J. Hagarty and Peter Maclntyre. Mr. V,
Tull acted as clerk and Mr. H. Brantley, the club steward, was general
factotum.
HOW TO HOLD
,YOUR WIFE—LEARN
LATEST DANCE STEPS
Dance—that ,s an effective way to
retain the affections of one's wife!
This advice ls pointed in William
de Mllle's production, "The Fast Set"
which is showing at the Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and Saturday, January 2
and 3.
"Improving the mind is not one of
the indoor sports of the tea dance,"
says a subtitle in the new Paramount
production. But another title says,
"Bachelors step where husbands will
not tread," adding "P.S.—And always
the latest steps."
Adapted by Clara Berganger, "The
Fast Set," which Is a visualization of
Frederick Lonsdale's New York and
London stage success, is probably the
last word ln diagnosing the relationship betwen the Jazz mad set and the
modern family.
The play and screen version are
considered the most unusual, and at
the same time, most humorous expositions of the irresponsible set. William de Mille as director and Mrs. Bor-
anger having captured the tull spirited
flavor of the original.
L
A. GAMBA
COURTENAY
Milk. Cream, Eggs, Farm Products
A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED
Leave Orders at Marocchi's or Scavarda's Grocery....
Store.
" Happy
New Year
TO ONE AND ALL WE WISH YOU A BRIGHT AND
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR.
Come in and inspect the New Star Special Sport Model
with full balloon tires, disc wheels, trunk rack and
other accessories
—PHONE OK CALl FOR DEMONSTRATION	
Bell-Irving Motors, Ltd.
Telephone 182
Courtenay, B.C.
COURTENAY, Dec. 30.—A very
pleasant time was spent at the Sandwick schoolhouse last night when
some forty of the residents gathered
together to indulge in progressive
whist. Play resulted in Miss Edith
Janes winning the first prize for the
ladles and Mr. Alec. Hogg the Arst
prize for gentlemen. Mrs. Trenerne
secured ladles' second and the booby
prize went to Mr. Geo. Piercy. Ten
curd tables accommodated the players
aud there was a Jolly holiday spirit
abroad. Before leaving for their
homos the card enthusiasts partook of
coffee, sandwiches and cakes which
were daintily served and much appreciated.
WHIST DRIVE
AT GRANTHAM
The whist drive and dance at Grantham ast week was a splendid success
No less than forty tables were required to accommodate the card players.
Thc prize winners were: Ladies' first
Miss Madeline Swan, second Miss
Berklnstock, consolation Mrs. "Bunt"
Wood. Gent's first prize went to Mr.
John Blackburn with Mr. Ray Parkin second, and Mr. Lover secured
the "booby." After the card playing
refreshments were served and enjoyed by all present. A Jolly dance followed to excellent music supplied hy
Messrs Symonds. Marininch, Stuart
Smith and W. H. Ford, all members
of the Courtenay Novelties Orchestra.
ft was Intimated tn tbe report trom
Ottawa that the order-ln-councll giving a lease of the necessary property
to the Canadian National Railways
would be signed within the next few
(lays. The signing of this lease removes the obstacle In front of the
railway company to the construction
of the elevator and assembly plant, as
it ls Impossible for the railway company to Issue any bonds tor buildings '
except ou the terminal lands ot the
railway company. The terms of the
order-ln-councll which has not been
prepared make tho necessary transfer.
It Is expected that railway bonds
to the amount ot $400,000 will be issued by the minister of finance at Ottawa to cover the coBt of the work.
These bonds were provided for under
original railway terminal plans here
but had never been Issued. They aro
of the series of provlnclally guaranteed bonds.
A further communication from
C.N.R. ollicials at Ottawa, received by
President Schwengers of the Chamber
of commerce, on Saturday, stated orders had been placed for all machinery and t'luiptnenl including powerful cranes for the lumber assembly
plant and locomotives for the yard
trackage at Ogden Point. . All other
necessary machinery and equipment
for a very complete assembly plant
hare been ordered and It was stated
that Installation would take place Just
as soon as delivery Is obtained from
the manufacturers.—Journal of Commerce.
$400,000 GRAIN ELEVATOR_
AND LUMBER PLANT WILL
BE   BUILT   BY   CANADIAN
NATIONAL AT VICTORIA
VICTORIA, Dec. 27.—Following negotiations that have been conducted
by the Victoria Chamber of Commerce,
under Mr. C. W. Schwengers, president, word has been received from Ottawa that the Canadian National Railway Company hns decided to construct a grain elevator at the Capital
city. It is understood that plans
have already been prepared and thnt
work will be commenced early ln tho
new year. The cost of the new plant
and Its necessary facilities wlll run in
the neighborhood ot $400,000.
Thc new elevator will be located at
the government's docks at Ogden
Point ond within the breakwater, so
that ncean ships wlll be able to take
on their cargoes here In any kind of
weather. It will have a capacity of
25(1.000 bushels.
Construction of a lumber assembly
plant at Ogden Point in connection
with the piers there Is also included
in the plans. This plant will be tor
making up cargoes ot lumber from
Island mills for shipment to foreign
ports. For some time there haa been
a demand for such a plant because
many of the Island mills do not individually produce enough lumber In
make up n paying shipment, hut by
combining their output they can take
advantage of the foreign markets.
BEAUTIFUL CALENDAR
FREE
Subscribers to the Family Herald
aud Weekly Star of Montreal have
been advised that they will receive
free of charge a beautiful calendar
for 1925 with a most attartive picture
in colors entitled, "The Sale of Old
Dobbin." When one considers that
the subscription price of this big 72
page family and farm Journal is only
$2.00 per year, one is amazed by the
value received, but with a beautiful
picture calender thrown In, the value
Is Indeed superlative.
OLIVER-WILL TRY
TO DISPOSE OF
"WHITE ELEPHANT"
VICTORIA, Jan. 2.—One of the
most Important Issues which has ever
been raised lu British Columbia ls the
disposition ot the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. That acknowledged
"white elephant," haa cost the taxpayers of the province tremendous
sums, and a sale ot the property would
mean a saving ot enough money each
year to decrease materially the public expenditures. Premier Oliver
hns received assurance from Ottawa
that the Federal railway conference
will be held In January. He will attend and present British Columbia's
case. First of all will come tbe disposition of the provincial line and secondly the question ot linking up the
great Peace River country with the
llritish Columbia coast. The premier
has been trying for years to get rid
of the P.G.E., but without success.
Following his representations to
Premier Mackenzie King, a general
conference was arranged. After this
is over It Is expected that some solution will be reached as to the future
ot the line and the settlement of the
transport nt inn problems ot Peace
River. The potential wealth of the
latter district is conceded to be of
Inestimable value in the fuller development of British Columbia.
Hitting On All Six ■aATURClAT, tomJAftT a, 19«.
THE   CTJMBEWLAND   KLANTJBR,   CtrMBBRLAND, ttC.
PAGE THRBB
URCB     4,
BRITISH YOUTHS TO STUDY FARMING
f      A >A( >:."""
k.
" 4"   **
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■    *                   :■ '   &
1      f'
r        : -  ;-«5>Bj.    ;»          ■.*<■■
Erf     «£ *   T* -•£ * * <*.
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!.*      |*5  *
. ... w»:m-ffl!i23BKrT'   ■-■....:■-
TAe Ltffe o/* /^e cMountams jj
(Specially Written for The Cumberland Islander)
THE   first   party   of   British
youths   brought   to   Alberta
under the Empire Settlement
plan to study western farming conditions, reached Vermilion, over the
Canadian National Railways last
week. The boys are shown here on
their arrivel at the Canadian National station at Quebec en route
to Western Canada. — C. N. R.
Photos.
Mann's 'Bakery
The home of high class cakes and pastries
Delicious Cream Cakes, Buns, Rolls, Sponges,   Etc.
Hot Pios and Sausage Rolls, tasty and satisfying
every Saturday.
Scotch Griddle Scones, Oat cakes, Biscuits, Etc.
Get Your Cakes and Shortbread for the New Year
at
MANN'S
Phone 18
Cumberland
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND  OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
PHONE no
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
There are numerous people In the
Comox district who formerly lived on
thc great Canadian Prairie and some
of these folk often meet together and
discuss their pioneering days. Memories of the terribly cold winters come
back to the old 'prairie dogs' on these
occasions and one nnd all agree thnt
they don't want to swap the climate of
Vancouver Island, even if It does rain
pretty hard some times, with that °f
the forty, fifty, yes and sixty below
zero of the old N.W.T. Many are
Ihe strange stories to be heard when
these men get together nnd to a casual listener are sometimes very Interesting.
ASK FOB
Fletcher's   No.  1   Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNG PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market   Wilcock Bros.   Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C. W.  Sillence 0. M. Swan        Fraser & Home
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay
THE old prairie dogs met at a
house in this dtsfrlct the other
night, and It wasn't far from
Cumberland cither. If you had been
there und had had your eyes wide
open you would hnve noticed that you
were sitting on a great robe made of
coyote skins, several chairs were covered with different kinds of fur—fox,
wolverine, bear, beaver, badger and
marten. On the floor wns a largo
rug composed of one line bear skin.
Around the room on the walls anil
curtains were to be seen stffed wood
chucks, squirrels, gophers, weasels,
and real buffalo horns were used as
supports for the flower stands aud
fern pots.
"Well," someone said, "I guess you
are'not sorry you're further away
front Calgary than yon were ten years
ago, eh!"
"I guess not," came thc reply. "Ten
years, let me see," he went on, "It's
eighteen years ago this winter that 1
wns snowed up Ihe mountains with
my two nieces. I don't think any of
us realized what we had been through
until nfter wo got out Ihe following
April."
"tloodness," asked a new acquaintance, "do you mean to say that you
were actually snowed up in thc mount
alus, thc Rockies, for a whole whiter
and lived to Ull Ihe tale?     Did lite(
glrlu survive such a terrible export- j
encc?     I don't see how they could, j
ln thnt uwful cold, too."
"Survive It, why wo enjoyed it, most
Of It anyway.     You see they calne out I
ln Ihe spring with some nice furs und j
—but I'm starting backwards.     You
see these nieces of mine were just out
from England.     Both girls were very |
fond of out-door life.     Didn't worry
much about fashions and putting their
hair up and things like that, and  I
don't think they wanted to 'grow up'
a bit.     Any kind of sport wns much
more ln their line, very keen on natural history, entomology and all thnt.
Our place was on tho    prairie,    you i
know, Alberta, our section used to be j
a famous place for coyotes In tho old
days.      Wc used to get hundreds of j
them.   Yes, I killed considerably over
five hundred during the    thirty   odd
years I lived there.      Used to feed
the carcasses to Iho hens nnd save
tho skins.    Years ago you could Only
get a dollar ouch for tho hides but
they wero worth more Inter on.     Wc
killed forty-four on ono quarter-section one winter."
"Well the girls came out in tho sum-
jer time.     I wasn't married then and
iy mother was visiting mo from Eng-
ind.     Of course I knew overyone for
illes around the country and used to
.ike tlle girls visiting all over.   They
.lotigbt the prairie was just line, and
lways   wanted   to   accompany   me
herever  I went.      They were both
ilrly good shots, could rldo well and
:ldn't seem to know what fear was.
nking all these things Into consideration, I decided to accede to their
epeatcd requests to be allowed to ac-
umpuny  me  on a trapping expcdl-
ion to the mountains that I was con-
emplatlng that fall.    They were very
inxlous to get skins    of    mountain
iheep, deer and the like, and It was on
.he understanding that   they   would
ikin these animals themselves, that 1
promised to get them specimens. The
winter turned out to be one ot the
severest  ln   memory,  however,   with
the deepest fall of snow on record, and
It was the great depth of snow that
kept us prisoners in the   hills   for
three months, with no food other than
what we could trap or shoot.     Owing
to the generosity of an old friend, Mr.
James Brewster, of Banff, who was
known as (he 'Rocky Mountain Millionaire,' we were well provided with
pack ponies, of which   animals   the
Brewsters had over a thousand at one
time."
"We started out on the first duy of
September, 1906, with nine cayeusas
(six pack and three saddle) and one
donkey. The donkey proved to be
much more bother than he was worth.
He was generally last ln the procession. He would get himself and his
load tangled up with trees or any
other object on the trail. His pack,
Instead of being on his back, was usually hanging around his legs. How
I 'blessed' that donkey. After a few
days, mostly spent ln putting the donkey straight, which alwuys ended with
him getting !,, a worse state than
ever, I decided to abandon him. As
soon as his load was off, he showed
every sign of being extremely pleased
with himself. We hoped he would
get left behind, and we certainly did
not encourage him to come any further. We were, in fact, fed up with
donkey, but we couldn't get rid of
blm though and he followed us for
days."
"We spent several weeks getting
further and further into the hills.
For the most part the weather wns
beautiful. Nights got colder of course.
We didn't hurry but just took our time
about things. We had some good
hunting and had by now arrived at
what we reckoned to be our last camp
for any length of time. As a mutter ot fact It was our camp for longer than wc expected. The girls each
had a lino of traps out and wero very
keen on outdoing each other with their
catches. They set out their line lu
opposite directions so that thoy would
not bother each other. Things wero
going along well, and I was beginning
to think about getting back when, one
night we were awakened by tho collapse of our tent. Snow hud conic
on In the night and a heavy fall hud
taken place. Tho ridge polo of the
tent wns only n very light one and
OOUld not stand Iho strain. I remembered how wo ull Inughcd when wu
found out whnt had happened. The
girls Ihought It u big joke. Anyhow,
It didn't bother us much us wo propped up the caiivns with the tripod of
my camera and other articles in the
tent, and wore quite snug until morning. Wo hud lots of work whon daylight came though getting the snow
which wns quite deep, cleared away.
"It was a few days after this that I
realized that tho snow on the mountain pusses was so deep that all
thought of getting out before spring
wns out of the question. Wo therefore set about building a log house
The place whero we had made cump
wns nn Ideal one. Wo were well protected with line spruce and pine trees.
There was an abundance of fuel, and
within a stones throw wns a rushing
mountain torrent with tho dourest ot
crystal water . Wc had started our
Journey with provisions for threo
months and It was now well Into December. 1 felt no concern about the
ponies because feed wns very plentiful In our valley nnd they were all
doing well,' Wo could often use the
ponies both for riding and other purposes. They wero very useful for
hauling the poles for the shuck and
after tho frame was completed, we
(Continued on Page Six)
JACK CANUCK
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people think, say and do
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«    Srd «
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«    6th **
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I»nlc	
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ftumber of words us per attached list  	
Start 1925 Right!
ASK  YOUR  LOCAL  VENDOR   AND   DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
English Ale  and
Stout, Lager Beer
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
1
This advertisement ia not published or displayed by tho
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
"The Moit of the Beat for the Leut"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
and Grocers
11   LOAVES FOR  $1.00
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND I
PAGBf-OTJB
THE  CTrttBEfitAWi  fSlAMD-ER,  ■OTMDEHtANB, B.C.
BATOHOAT, JANBART ft, 1086.
CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY.  JANUARY  3,   11125.
THE BRANCH THAT
THOUGHT IT WAS A TREE
It had every right to be proud ot
itself—this grafted branch. In the
blooming season, its Ilowers were
large and the creamy petals red on
the edges, while the other blossoms on
the tree were small and scruggly anil
dlrty-whlte.
When Autumn changed the 'lowers
to fruit, the apples on this branch
were big, deep-red, with hearts as
white as snow.
And the branch, seeing this, wns
swollen with pride.
"Why should 1 reamain a part of
this tree? I give mure fruit than
the rest of the branches combined. J
will be a tree unto myself, that men
may know me, and give me credit for
my fruits."
The next time a strong wind blew,
the branch strained and pulled and
twisted, and finally tore itself from
the tree. The tree bled at the wound
a little time, but tbe gardener came
along and grafted another branch iu
the place.
But the branch that tore itself away
died very quickly.
It did not realize that the sap—the
life blood that gave It health and
strength to produce—came from the
roots of the tree. The branch could
not see that because the tree had
other branches, It was also to drink
ln more sunshine and rain—that all
branches drew life from the soil and
air and gave it gladly, that the one
branch could flourish and produce
much fruit
So, the grafted branch that thought
It could be a tree, died.
The tree lived on.
There are men who draw the very
life-blood of their Inspiration from
the organization of which they are n
part. They produce great works, and
are blind to the sources of their power
Happy is the man who can see, iu
the results of his efforts, more than
an Isolated, personal achievement—
who can view the organization of
which he ls a part, as a whole.
—By W. L. Brann, In Forwad.
the simple pra/ora, I like the simple
friends who take us as we aro. I
like the simple beautleB of the field
—the tiny flower that Is unnoticed by
the many who tread it under foot.
1 like lo think of God in simple
language. 1 don't like to think of him
us the "Almighty" or anything like
that—but just as the One who understands and who forgives seventy times
seventy over and over again.
1 can send thoughts up to One like
that and not be afraid they will be
misunderstood.
The thoughts of my mother, so long
gone uway, ure always simple, beautl-
tul thoughts for there was nuthiiig
mysterious or iuisUikable ubout her
love.
Clothe your mind with thoughts.
And build great storehouses for them,
with big doors so that you may gel
them easily and quickly.
If you are rich in great thoughts,
you arc rich indeed. And wheu you
have gone the entire world will share
in your estate.
—Oeorge Matthew Adanu.
ILO-ILO BOOKS PETER PAN
1st WEEK AFTER RELEASE
IN DOMINION AND U. S. A.
THOUGHTS
Your most precious possessions arc
your thoughts. Make no mistake-
there Is nothing so powerful for good
or evil as thoughts.
How lonely we nil get at times. But
It Is mostly because we dismiss our
thoughts and flounder In the emptiness of our selfishness.
Thoughts! Why, we can take tlicni
with ub everywhere we go. Into the
quiet hotel room where we so often
find ourselves away from those near
and dear to us. At night time as we
pull the covers of our bed about us
and review the day during Its last,
brief moments. Or on the street as
we go and come from work. Or out
for a walk with these same thoughts
scampering all about, like children
running before and behind us.
These little brothers of the mind
that trot with us wherever we go—
these thoughts that make us all we
ere or hope to be—arc able to thrill
us with their beauties, Inspire us, com
fort us, soothe us and make us a
blessing wherever we go.
I like the simple thoughts.     I like
As nationally advertised in the Saturday Evening Post, the Herbert
Urenon-Puramount production "Peter
Pan" made its first appearance
throughout Canada and the United
Slates the first of this week, commencing December 19th. The management of tho Ilo-llo Theatre has
been able to procure this production
for showing at the local theatre the
last three days of next week, January
S, 9 and and 10. This picture will
be shown here thc same time as it is
making its premier run iu all the
larger cities in America. It is a
picture worth seeing and its success
is assured by the popularity of the
play on the legitimate stage for the
past 7 or S years.
"Peter Pun." the boy who wouldn't
grow up, has come to take you to the
land uf make-believe on the screen.
The Herbert Brenou-Paramount
production of James M. Barrle' immortal fantasy Is one of the cleanest,
cleverest und most entertaining pictures you've been given the opportunity to see.
Betty Bronson, selected by Barrie
himself to portray the title role, heads
a strong cast of featured players
which includes Ernest Torrence, Cyril
Chadwick, Virginia Brown Falre and
Anna May Wong.
Xo need to go Into tho story here.
Willis Ooldbeck wrote the screen
play which tells ot a little boy who
always wanted to remain young ami
have fun. He flies through the nursery window of a modern-day home,
teaches the three children he finds
there how to fly and carries them off
to his underground home and the Little Lost Boys in the Never Never
Land.
The picture shows, as the stage
production never could, their adventures with the Indians and pirates.
Every word picture the author painted in the story has been visualized
on the screen—even to the children
flying over the house-tops. Roy
Pomeroy, who obtained such marvelous effects In "The Ten Commandments." saw to this. You've never
witnessed anything quite like it before in your life and tt wil Ibe a long
time before you see such a plctuie
again.
Go see "Peter Pan," then you'll understand why the piece has been playing to standing room only for the past
twenty-one years on the legitimate
stage.
WCW3C***
<s««*s*«-w«««
New Car Service
CAB FOR HIRE DAT OB NIGHT
U TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders It
Tommy's H»rdware Store
CimffllRT.Altn. B.C
With best wishes
and may
the New Year bring you
days of joy and
prosperity.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
SATURDAY   EVENING   SPECIALS   TO
CONTINUED NEXT WEEK FROM
6:30 TO 8:30 P.M.
*wvvv*v*v&
■# 1
W-TOmNNKt-*^^
When you are ln need ot a
numbing* * Heating Eaflneer, 8m
"rTrushton
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 1(7
Cumberland
Vour  needs   will   receive   immediate
attention.
w
DR.   R.
.BRUCE  GORDON
B.   DIER  AND  DR.
Dental Surgeons
Offlce:  Cor. ot Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite llo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
iCtfWCsfiro
THE GOOD WILL YOU HAVE
DISPLAYED TOWARDS US, OUR GREETING TO YOU IS ONE OF KINDNESS—
WE EXTEND SINCERE GREETING FOR A HAPPY
AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
A. MacKinnon
T. Malpass
GENERA!  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS Ol'lt .MOTTO
OK l'HOXK 1.1 ONION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
EQUAL FREIGHT RATES
ALL OVER CANADA
IS PREDICTION
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING  AND  PRESSING
Open for business November 20
Under New Management
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue
VICTORIA, Jan. 2.—Looming largely upon the horizon of Canadian affair's at the present time ia the freight
rates issue. Many times during the
past year the question has been commented upon In these columns, but u
solution of tbe problem has not yet
been found. However, today the entire freight rates tangle is closer to
an untanglement than ever before and
It has been clearly proven that the
West has won an Importnat victory.
The restoration, temporarily, of tha
Crow's Nest Pass Agreement ratei.
might appear upon the surface as a
set-back for British Columbia, but <■"
experts It appears that the removal of
all discrimination against the West
wlll shortly be accomplished.
For years Premier Oliver hns fought
almost a lone fight for British Columbia's Interests. True, he hns been |
supported by boards of trade and
other public bodleH, but the initiative
was his and to him belongs a largo
share of the credit. Bofore the coming session of tho House of Common:
bus passed Into history It Is predict
od that equal freight rates ull over
Camilla will be in force, which means
that tho Pacific Province will, for thc
flrst time, he able lo meet the competition of Ontario, Quebec and tho
Maritime Provinces.
BEER QUESTION TO BE
SOLVED EARLY IN YEAR
VICTORIA,    Dec.    2.—Despite    tho
dllhculty ot thc situation, Hon. A. M.
Manson, attorney-general, is rapidly
working nut a solution of the beer
question. Throwing everything Into
the hands of the new liquor commissioner, Mr. Hugh Davidson, he has
shown that the liquor, problem shall
be taken out of politics and before
the New Year Is very far advanced a
plan will be announced which should
meet with the approval of the majority ot the electors.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent tor—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Eetabllehment
on Vancouver Ieland. Wa Clean or
Dye all Wade ot Ladlei' and Qenls'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnlah-
Ingi, at*. Drop In and ee* Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you on ant* work you wlah
to have dan*.
Ou Wns Md  Rml-t*
WUI FImm Tn i ■    ii
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
UNO OEOROB V.
Demand is the Cause of Supply
Demand an old and WELL"
MATURED whisky and you
will get it.
"gNADIAN (Big)'
WHISKY
are soundly manufactured, old,
and well-matured whiskies.
If you demand these you will get
them.
Read the label on every bottle and observe the
date on the Government Stamp,
DISTILLED AND BOTTIED »Y
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited
WALKERVILLE   .   ONTARIO
Montreal, Que.
Distillers of Fins
Whiskies since ISSS
London, Eng.
New York, U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquoi
Control Board or hy thc Government of British Columbia.   w^ ■
^r*s.A\ 8ATBW1AT, trAWrTART 9, »M6.
THE  LtJMBEftLAND  ISLANDCR,  CTMBEBLAND, B.C
PAGE FITS
•$t
Hi
I
I
Eft
ILO-ILO
THEATRE
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
JANUARY 2 & 3
MATINEE SATURDAY  AT
—2:30 P.M.—
PRESENTED BY
ADOLPH ZUKOR,
JESSE LLASKY/
Friday & Saturday
January 2nd and 3rd >
First Show 6.30 p.m.
Second Show 8.30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FRIDAY &
SATURDAY
January 8th 9th and 10th
ADOLPH ZUKOU 0 JES5E L LASKY PRESENT
James M. Barrie's
You'll be sorry if you miss this one!
Why be sorry?
Adults 50c. - Children 25c.
Betty Compson
Adolphe Menjou
Elliott Dexter
zaSu Pitts
Adults 50c. Children 25c.
Matinee Saturday Afternoon at 2.30
AdulU 35c. Children 15c.
MONDAY, TUESDAY, &
WEDNESDAY
January 5th, 6th, and 7th
TfeTOMTERRISS
PRODUCTION
THE BANDOLERO
All the Thrills of the Real
Spanish Bullfight Arena!
The picture wu filmed in Spain,
witb Canero, the greatest bullfighter in the world, leaping on
horseback over the charging bulla, ,
flirting recklessly with death
A Full Blooded Romance
A brave, luoty ototy of
young love in old Spain,
superbly acted by a cast
that include* Pedro da
Cordoba and Renee
Adoree.
w-tft'Wv'wD
Adults 35c.   Children 15c.
5 PAGE SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SATUBDAT, JANUABT  a,  19S6.
BARBER'S ACT CAUSES
SUPERHEATED DEBATE
IN THE HOUSE
IIjST BKFOKii bAUNCHIM.
The "Princess Marguerite." Built ot Clydebank, with a sister ship,
the "Princess Kathleen." for service between Vancouver, Victoria and
Seattle, under the Canadian Pacific flag The new vessels, of 6.000
tons, were specially designed for service on the British Columbia coast
and, being capable of maintaining a speed of 22Vi knot, W 11 conoid-
eraily reduce the time between the mainland and Canada s western playground—Vancouver Island.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
J Night calls: 1J4X Courtenar
PH0NES {Ofllce: 169 Cumberland
Year Round Joys
Electrical Appliances
Here are gifts that are certain to make her
NEW YEAR
one of joy. Picture her delight on New Year morning when she steps into the parlor and finds there, on
the table, an Electric Iron, an Electric Percolator, an
Electric Heater, an Electric Toaster, an Electric Warming Pad, a Vacuum Cleaner, and many articles from our
store that will aid her in the home.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
The above act was introduced at the
recent session for the purpose of
forming the barbers of the provluct
into a corporate body, on somewhat
similar Hues to that existing ln England. In fact the Idea Is anything
but a new one, as legislation of thai
nature is already on the statute books
of the province in regards to lawyers,
doctors,' architects, engineers, chiropractors, drugless healers, optometrists, osteopaths, homeopaths etc., and
like legislation regarding barbers pertains In many of the slates of the U.S.
The Provincial Barber's Bill, however, met wilh strenuous and bitter
opposition from some of the members
on cither side of the House, including
some of the Ministers of the Crown, in
fact It caused more acrimonious and
lengthy debate,* not to mention waste
of time, than any other bill that came
before the House during the recent
session, not excluding the bill to raise
three and one-half million dollars;
The P.O.E. resolution; Sale of beer
by the glass, and other measures of
more or less vital Importance to the
province.
Apart from the question ot a waste
of time, perhaps the most regrettable
part of the opposition to the BUI consisted In the strenuous and continuous
efforts of many members of the House
to defeat tho measure, not by means
of intelligent arguments aa against
Its principles or wording, but by some
of the most childish and frivolous objections and criticisms and ridiculous
proposed amendments that have ever
been heard ln any Legislative Assembly or House of Parliament. Apparently these members felt that It they
could not defeat the bill that they
would be quite satisfied to have it
placed on the Statute books ln such
an absurd condition, that It would be
Inoperative and therefore useless, except perhaps as a monument or striking example to what lengths of folly
some, otherwise fairly intelligent
members will go ln order to satisfy
their prejudice and instincts ot snobbery, and to some degree their desire
was accomplished, for when the bill
was ln Its final stages during the last
day or so before the close-of the session, and amendment or so couched
in unintelligent and ambiguous language were slipped in, and this was
accomplished by not following the
usual course of putting the proposed
amendment ln writing on the Order
considered by all members, but by-
Paper so that It could be read and
scribbling out the proposed amendment and handing it to the chairman
of the committee of the whole to
gabble off at a high rate of speed, a
speed only equaled by the speed In
which he declared the same as 'passed',-this course of conduct making it
impossible for members who sit at the
end benches farthest trom the speak
er to hear a single word, it having
been a constant cause of complaint
from such members that they cannot
hear anything said ln a conversational
tone by members speaking In the
House who sit two thirds of the way
down the room or closer to the speaker. During the course of the debate
the member for Comox caused some
of the members to look very sheepish
when he pointed out that the very section that they were ridiculing and
claiming to have no sense at all, were
word for word, punctuation for punctuation, and ln every respect Identical
with certain sections contained in the
Architect's Act, which they themselves
had helped to pass in the Session of
1920. He further stated that he was
surprised that some members should
Indulge In frivolous and senseless objections and criticisms and feared
that the same could only emanate
from underlying strata of snobbery
coupled with the consciousness that
barbers did not move ln thc same social plane as they did, and thnt they
therefore felt It Incumbent on them li
treat barbers ns a class with contempt
and unworthy of legislative consideration. This rebuke caused one of the
Victoria members to heatedly objeel
to the speaker that the Member for
Comox should attribute snobbery to
him or any other of the Honorable
Members.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
The January number of Mod and
Gun ln Canada comprises a variety
of interesting stories and articles In
addition to Ihe excellent regular departments. Teddy's Hospitality from
the pen of It. Valentine Gllhnm Is a
well-written and entertaining story,
while the first installment of Close
Races by A. J. Colboume tells of the
thrilling adventures of a seal hunter.
In his Winter Snipe or "Winter Ox-
eye" Bonnyeastle Dale furnishes Interesting and valuable facts concerning a rare and little-known Canadian
bird. The other regular contributor s
of stories, J. W. Wlnson, F. V. Williams and Martin Hunter uphold their
reputations in One style and a number of articles on miscellaneous subjects of Interest   to   sportsmen    In-
The Lure Of
The Mountains
(Continued From Page Three)
used them for bringing thin layers or
.iat rock up from the little river. With
this rock, we completely roofed the
ihack, using it in the same way thnt
tiles are used. No fastenings being
.leeded as the roof was nearly Hat. I
also constructed a Are place with thc
rock and both the fire place and the
roof answered very well. I don t
Anuw that I would appreciate another
sxperience of the sort just now, but
looking back over the years, 1 feel
that I would not have missed it for
anything."
"We were thrown absolutely on our
own resources before we came out in
.he spring. It must have been about
New Year, our supply of groceries
.vas almost exhausted. There were
some odds and ends including a small
packet of rice. So far we had plenty
of ptarmigan, several mountain sheep,
grouse, a deer and lots of squirrel and
porcupine but 'groceries' were already
,-ery scarce. On going to use the
last of the rice one evening, the girls
.'ound to their dismay that it had all
jone. A few dried apricots that had
jeen kept for a great treat, were also
rone. Now we had all been spend-
.ng most of the day time away from
he shack, being very busy with our
.-arious occupations. Wait, I said aud
■/e'll see who ls getting these things.
Next day I kept a very sharp lookout
md was rewarded by the appearance
it a little animal know,, as a pocket
jopther, an animal that 'ills 'be large
pouches of its mouth and carries its
pllferlugs away to its retreat where
it stores them for future uso. Alright, 1 thought, go to It my friend,
and we'll see where you live. He
went straight to the spot where the
rice had been, collected a few remaining grains and then off he ran. I
followed. ft wasn't many feet to
ivhere he had his store. The girls
were so angry that they unearthed
him and took back all the rice and
apricots, which were duly washed,
cooked and eaten."
"After this our food supply often
became very low, and once tbe situation became serious. There was
practically nothing left for our immediate requirements nnd for some
days we had absolutely no luck at all
In the way of game and we hadn't
seen a deer for weeks. It was when
f was getting anxious, and was out
with my rifle, hoping to get some
thing that would keep us going for a
while that my hopes were fulfilled,
but not at all in the way I had anticipated. I had gone farther than usual
and had come across fresh deer trades
and at the same Instant I realized that
a panther had tracked the deer I was
now tracking. The tracks were very
fresh. My heart beat quicker. Who
waB going to win—the deer, the pnnth
er, or I? It's hard to say how far
1 went after first seeing those tracks.
but all at once there, by a large
boulder and close to a thick clump of
trees was something sharply defined
against the snow. My blood quickened ln my veins. Now was my
chance. But what was It? Where
did the steam come from? And then
I realized what had happened. The
panther had only then killed his quarry, a fine buck, and was even then
dlsembowllng him. It was the knowledge that we were sure of fresh meat
for the camp that steadied me. But
at that moment the large cat-like animal turned his head and saw mc. He
Instantly wheeled round and stood
with tall wagging furiously. I knew
what that meant. Before I had time
lo raise my rifle he was coming towards mc in a series of leaps and
crouches. I remember pulling thc
trigger. I remember feeling my coat
collar pulled violently and 1 remember ducking. As the brute sprang nt
me I had fired and at the same time
I Instinctively ducked. Quick as I
Had been, the panther had all but got
a claw In my neck, had actually torn
my coat collar. Fortunately the bullet had struck him fair in the chest,
shattering Ihe heart and lungs. Ho
had leapt right over me but hardly
moved after he had hit the ground
Yes, I was excited alright for a minute or two. Then I remembered
that I was a long way from camp. I
made quite sure my late friend was
absolutely dead, then 1 got him as
high up as I could ln a near-by tree.
I then cut off one of the hind quarters
of the buck and making the other
parts of him safe against wolves, I
started back to the camp with. the
feeling of having a real good dinner
for us all on my back, and plenty in
the larder for another day."
eluding that ot conservation, will be
sure to hold their attention. The
regular departments, conducted by
the departmental editors, are all up
to the mark and complete an unusually good number of the magazine. Published monthly by W. J. Taylor, Limited, Woodstock, Ont.
TheS6. uBeerS the Products of Vancouver Breweries, Limited, are extremely
popular on the Island—because of their absolute purity, their wholesomeness, and their
fine "hops-and-malt" flavor.
vBeerwithmtaPeer
id
U. B. C. Beer
On Sale at all Govt. Vendors
This advertisement is not
Liquor Control Board or by the
published or displayed by the
Government of B.C.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'   and   Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
SYNOPSIS OF
LIMIT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crowu lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 yearB of age,
and by alions on declaring Intension
to become British subjects, aoudl-
tional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purpoaea.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Sarlas,
'How to Pre-empt Land," copies ot
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lauds, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only laud BUltable for agricultural
purposes, and which la not timber-
land, i.e, carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
aud 8,000 feet per acre east of tliat
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions nre
to oe addressed to the Laud Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
ls situated, and are made ou primed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied lor
five years and Improvements made
to value of S10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Infuimatlon tee
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being Umberlaiid,-
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class larable) land is (5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Informal Ion regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands ls given ln Bulletin
No. 10, Land Serios, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites nn
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment nf
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the lirst year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial fur-
poses areas not exceeding G40 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under tho Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
Car   For  Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy Or R-nldeiee
25 22
CUMBERLAND
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo-Ile  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT IVANS
Practleal  Barber,  and  Hairdresser, Shampooing, Slngelag,
Messaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
Eye-Strain Is
Painful And
Distressing
IT Is amazing why so many
persons submit to all the distress nnd discomfort of eyestrain, when certain and lmmod-
Intc relief can be bo easily obtained.
IMPERFECT vision, headache,
nervousness and all the other
results of defective refractive conditions not only cause
you actual suffering but Impair
your efficiency as well. You
are not as good or aB useful a
member of society if a nervous-
leak caused by eye-strain la sapping your energies away.
IF you have defective eyes
you know this to be true.
Can you think of any good
reason why you allow thla to
continue? Is there anything
to prevent you from putting an
end to this difficulty of yours,
instantly and permanently?
DROP ln and see me, I have
something    to    tell    you
about    your    eyes,    you
ought to know.
R. Kaplansky, 0. D.
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
2:30-5:00   OFFICE   7:30-9:30
P.M.       HOURS        P.M. SA»W1»AT,' -fAMMMf 3,' Me*.
TlliS  -CVMUBBLAM)  B3LAKIMM, ,CVMWJHfcAM\ ft,/!.
PAGE SEVEN
I
IV
IP
"THE BANDOLERO"
HERE NEXT WEEK
IS UNUSUAL FILM
"The Bandolero" (The Bandit), will
be the feature at the Ilo-llo Theatre
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday,
January 5, 6 and 7. Made for the
most part in Cuba, and in authentic
locations in Spain, this picture centers around the picturesque character
of Dorando played by Pedro de Cordoba, who throws up his commission
ns captain of dragoons ln Seville and
becomes a Robin Hood type of outlaw leader ln the mountains after his
wife is brutally murdered in a fight
that results from his discovery of the
Marques de la Torre (Gustav von
Seyffertltz) forcing unwelcome love
upon her.
The action ls developed upon the
revenge which Dorando has sworn to
have upon the Marques, and upon the
romatic attachment which develops
between the Marque's son (Manuel
Granado), whom Dorando has kidnapped and hidden In the mountains, and
mf--**«rocw*^^
PLACE YOUR ORDERS WITH
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
Largest Assortment of Building Materials in the
District
Office & Store Lumber Yard
Union Bay Rd.      COURTENAY Mill Street
For any Kind of Lumber, Hardware, Paint, Roofings,
Etc.
P.O. Box 62
Phone 17
ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR
WILD ROSE PASTRY FLOUR
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR
GRAHAM FLOUR
PREMIUM CERTIFICATES IN 49's AND 24*s
Sold by all Grocers
Vancouver Milling & Grain Co.
LIMITED
COURTENAY
CWft**tf«^««^
OUR WINTER TROUBLES
The tight which our forces wage each winter
to maintain hundreds of miles of telephone lines
In the face ot wind, rain, ice and snow constitutes
a creditable and picturesque record. For this we do not seek
praise as It Is part of our regular service to subscribers. All
that we ask Is a tolerant understanding of the fact that some
troubles such as falling trees cannot be guarded against nor
can repairs be made In a few moments, but that when such
troubles do occur we are willing to work night and day to
remedy them.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
and
*       ~"-'i.lu*
■ttSKrtfl'-**' u
U.B.C. Beer
These are the beers preferred by
thousands. They're made in the
finest brewhouse of the West, by a
brewmaster whose experience covers
forty years.
ON SALE AT ALL
GOVT. VENDORS
VANCOUVER   BREWERIES
LIMITED
,, ,„ advertisement is not published or
displayed by Iho Liquor Control Board or
by the Government of British Columbia.
Dorando's daughter (Renee Adoree)
The dramatic situation ls further
complicated by the Intrigues of Concha (Dorothy Ruth), who succeeds ln
inducing Ramon to become a bull-
lighter in Seville. It ls in a great
bullfight, scene that the unique picturesque quality of this photodrama
is said to reach its climax.
This bullfight Is not at all of the
usual variety. It was made possible
only after many disappointments,
when Tom Terrtss, producer of the
picture for Metro-Goldwin release,
secured the services of Canero, reputed to be the most renowned bullfighter in Spain. Canero on his
white horse, which Is said to be valued at $10,000 evades the bull's
charges by the narrowest possible
margin, vaults over the bull's back,
and filially despatches him from the
saddle.
$50,000 CONCRETE
BRIDGE AT BASTION __
STREET, NANAIMO
A $50,000 concrete bridge for the
spannnlg of the Bastion Street ravine
was authorized by the ratepayers of
Nanaimo some time ago. This authorization Is due to the state of thc
present wooden bridge, which while
it could be repaired, could be used
for light traffic only. However
heavy traffic also requires the use of
this thoroughfare, thus making It
necessary for a new bridge to be built
Mr. Philip P. Brown of Vancouver has
been Instructed to proceed with the
plans In connection with the construe
tion of the $50,000 concrete bridge,
and that it be proceeded with as soon
as specifications are available.
raiser*
;N]MCH -fPOMil ■
•''wsa&as*'
Writs for Pre* En Cua Book.
NOTICE
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF
CUMBERLAND
PULB1C NOTICE is hereby given to
the electors ot the Corporation of the
City of Cumberland that I require the
presence of the said Electors at the
Municipal Council Chambers on the
12th day of January, 1925 at Twelve
o'clock noon, for the purpose of electing persons to represent them In the
Municipal Council as Mayor, and Aldermen (6) Police Commissioner (1)
and School Trustees (3)
The three vacancies on the Board
of School Trustees have arisen by virtue of the said Trustees having completed their regular term ot ofllce.
Candidates shall be elected to the
said offices as school trustees ln the
following manner:
The two candidates receiving the
highest number of votes shall be elect
ed to bold olllce for the term of two
years. The candidate receiving the
next highest number of votes shall
be elected to hold ofllce for one year.
The mode of nomination of candidates Bhall be as follows:
The candidates shall be nominated
tn writing, the writing shall be subscribed by two electors of the Municipality as proposer and seconder and
shall be delivered to the Returning
Officer at any time netween the date
of this notice and two p.m. ot the day
of nomination. The said writing must
be ln the Form No. 5 In the schedule
ot the "Municipal Elections Act" and
shall state the name, residence, and
occupation or description of each person proposed, ln such manner as sufficient to identity such candidate, and
in the event ot a Poll being necessary, such poll shall be opened on the
15th day of January, 1925 at the Municipal Council Chambers, of which
each and every person Is hereby required to take notice and govern himself accordingly.
The qualifications necessary for
Mayor are: Must be of the full age ot
21 years and a British Subject, and
have been for the six months preceding the date of nomination the owner
ot land and Improvements within the
City of the value as assessed on tho
last assessment roll of One Thousand
Dollars or more over and above all
registered judgments and charges.
The qualifications necessary for
Alderman, Police Commissioner and
School Trustee, are: Must be of
the full age of 21 years Und a British
Subject and have been for the six
months next preceding the date of
nomination registered ln the Land
Registry Office as owners ot land and
Improvements within the City of value
as assessed on the last assessment
roll of Five Hundred Dollars or more
ovcr and above all registered Judgements and charges.
Given under my hand at Cumberland this 1st day ot January. 1925.
W. H. COPE,
1-2. Returning Officer.
il
Bringing East and West Several Hours Closer Together
A FURTHER cut in running
time between Winnipeg and
Toronto has been announced
by Canadian National ollicials at
Winnipeg in connection with train
schedule changes which became effective recently. Last year, with
the opening of the Long Lac cutoff
connecting the north and south
main lines of the Canadian National Railways in Northern Ontario, five hours was sliced from
the running time of thc* Winnipeg-
Toronto service, and with Iho new
train now running, another five
hours' reduction hns been made.
The National now leaves Winnipeg
at 5.30 p.m. daily and arrives in
Toronto at 7.20 a.m. From Toronto, the train leaves at 8.-I5 p..m,
arriving in Winnipeg at 8.46 a.m.
of the second day, making a 37 hour
run.   In each* case passengers be- :
tween the eastern and western
citieB will lose only ono business
day in Ihoir journey, as thc train
leaves after business hours and arrives at its destination in time for
a full day's work. Equipment of
the train will bo the same as formerly, including express and day
coaches, lunch counter colonist
car, tourist nnd standard sleepers,
and radio observation car.
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. Burghiner and family wish to
thank the many friends for their kind
expressions of sympathy and assistance rendered during her recent bereavement. She also wishes to
thank those who so kindly sent floral
tributes.
CARD OF THANKS
MrB. D. Bonora takes this opportunity of extending to the Cumberland
Relief Committee, heartfelt thanks for
their kind seasonable greeting to herself and famlly.ff
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. T. Robertson and family wish
to thank all those who so kindly and
generously remembered them at
Christmas time by sending hampers,
etc., also those who have rendered
generous assistance in the past.
IN MEMOHIAM
DENHOLME—In loving memory ot
John R. Denholme, dearly beloved
husband of Mary P. Denholme, who
died at Royston, B.C., January 2nd,
1922. "Gone, but not forgotten."
Inserted by a loving wife and
family 1.
BASKETBALL
LEAGUE STANDING
With the completion of the first half
of the Basketball schedule we have
been asked to publish the league
standing of the various teams. Our
thanks are due to the scorers, W.
Whyte and H. Stewart for the following:
Mien's Division
P    W   L    For Agst Pts
Owls   4     4     0     118      48     8
Rangers ..431 131 79 6
Doo Dads.. 4 2 2 113 105 4
H. School.. 4 13 92 133 2
Athletics ..404      58    147     0
Ladles' Division
P
W   L
For Agst Pts
P. D. Q's
.. 4
4     0
118     21     8
Yellowjks
.. 4
3     1
99     71     6
H. School
.. 4
1     3
45     76     2
C. O. I. T.
.. 4
1     3
38     81     2
P. School
.. 4
1     3
34     85     2
The scorer's book also tells us thot
Altken leads ln the number of field
goals scored but Denholme heads the
list as tar as goes total points scored.
Sommerville scored 15 foul throws
out <>f 26. In the ladies' division M.
Redford heads the list both In tho
number ot Held goals converted and
also in the number of foul throws
converted.
The following tables show the first
six leading scorers In both ladles' and
men's divisions.
Loading Scorers—Men
P    FO   FT Ftc Pts
Denholm
4     24
4     52
Altken     4 25 5 1 51
Robertson   4 20 6 4 44
James    4 18 11 6 42
Sommerville .... 4 12 26 15 39
Bobba
4     19      0      0     38
Leading Sflorers—Ladles
p    FG   FT Ftc Pts
M.  Redford    4    35     10    6    76
K. Bono   4     27       6     0     64
B. Bickle   4     19       4     2     40
F. Strachan   3     10      6     2     22
P. Cloutler   4      7       8     6     20
B.  Bates   4      8      9     2     18
N.B.—P, Games Played; FG, Field
Gools; FT, Foul Thorws; Ftc, Foul
Throws Converted; Pts, Total Points
Scored .
UNEMPLOYMENT
SITUATION WILL BE
WELL LOOKED AFTER
VICTORIA, Jan. 2.—One of the
sanest policies ever attempted by any
government in regard to the handling
of the unemployment question has
been evolved by the provincial administration. All during tbe winter
months road-work and other public
works will be carried out, wherever
weather conditions will permit.   Hon.
Itr. Sutherland, minister of public
works, has announced his program for unemployment work. This
includes Uie construction and repair
of roads itl many parts of the province
where unemployment is most acute.
Tlie sum of (160,000 has been set aside
for the work and, while there may be
a loss, as the result of carrying ou
highway work during the winter
months, it is felt that the government
has attempted to solve the problem
In the most practical manner.
Bargain Offer
The Vancouver Daily Province celebrating the occupation of its new home makes this bargain offer.
The
Daily Province
by mail to any address in British Columbia outside
Greater Vancouver
4 months   -   $1.00
Subscribe Now
Jbrcl . *
Start the New
Licence
With
A Ford Closed Car
From
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Telephone 46 Courtenay, B.C.
1 PAGE EIGHT
Tfffi <tTMBBRLAWn   IrM-ANDBR,   CTMBEBtANTIJ, RC
SATDtmAT, JAItVAAT a,  lflaS;
FOR THE COMING   1
We extend to all our patrons and friends the Compliments of the Season and the Sincere Best Wishes
for the New Year of 1925.
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
'*«*^*^P«*.^^
HOCKEY PICTORIAL
Second Edition
The second edition of the Hockey
Pictorial ls on the market, more complete and up-to-date than the original
edition, which was received with such
acclaim by followers of the gnat winter sport. Most favorable comments
have been passed upon the publication
by sport writers the continent over,
and tbe general opinion as expressed
by players and scribes ls that no more
comprehensive or handsome book in
the sporting line was ever printed. A
feature that should possess a marked
appeal not only to puck-chasers of the
present, but to old timers, are tlie
many group pictures of champion
teams, dating back to the early history of hockey. The new edition not
only contains the history of hockey In
Canada, but covers the history of the
game In the United States also, with
300 handsome engravings of Canadian
and American teams, and Is right up
to the minute in every respect. Any
further Information pertaining to the
book can be obtained by writing to
the Hockey Pictorial, 84 Victoria St.,
Toronto, Ont.
NOTICE
For Sale—414 acres of land on the
Royston Road Joining Mr. Leighton'*
Dairy Farm, 12x20 cabin on It. small
garden cleared. Price $225.00. Apply W. C. White, Cumberland. Phono
92R. S2.
Do You Know?
IHAT nlne-lcnths of the grouchy
sour-faced people in the world ore
SUr-iach sufferers? If llio*c pcopls
would go to their PniB Slore and
get A Jlacka?e or Jo-To thc world
would be a brighter, happier place.
Jo-To stops all stomach misery ln
two minutes.   All Drug Stores.
PRESBYTERIAN XMAS TREE
A lolly gathering enjoyed the Sunday Scliool Xmas Tree of St. George's
Presbyterian Church which was held
last Monday evening. The basement
of the church was festively decorated
and there were plenty of goodies for
all. Old fashioned Christmas games
were indulged in aud tlle evening pass
ed Itself most happily for all in attendance.
SALE OF WORK
The C.G.I.T. Club of Grace Methodist Church will hold a sale of home
cooking in the Church Class Room
on Saturday. January 10th, from 3 to
6 p.m.
Betty Qjmpson and Elliott Dexter
in 'Tha Fast Set*
A Pirimount Picture
Now showing at the Ilo-llo Theatre,  Cumberland, Friday  and
Saturday, January 2 and 3.
Two Shows Nightly.
It PAYS lo DEAL at LANG'S
11
Social and Personal
The many friends ot Mrs. F. J. Dalby will be pleased to learn that she is
rapidly recovering from her recent Illness nnd was able to return home
from the hospital on Wednesday,
*   *   *
Frank Potter, who has been spending the holidays with his parents in
Cumberland, returned to Vancouver
today to resume his studies at tho
University of B.C.
Bridge Hostess
Mrs. G. K. McNaughton was hostess
at a bridge party last Wednesday evening giveu ln honor of Miss Loggie
of Vancouver.
Dr. Bruce Gordon   returned
Vancouver on Monday.
from
Mr. George Michell of Tacoma,
Wash., arrived In town last Friday.
*   *   *
Miss Isabelle Mollard, of Albern!,
was a visitor to Miss Flora Piercy of
Comox, over the week-end.
Miss K. Richardson returned to
Vancouver on Tuesday morning.
Miss G. Oliver left for Victoria on
Tuesday morning.
* *   *
Jack and Jerry Bryden are returning to Victoria Saturday morning after spending the holiday  with their
I grandparents Mr .and Mrs. C. H. Tarbell.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. James White ot Powell River are spending the holiday as
guests ot Mrs. T. Bennett.
* *   *
Miss Margaret Bannerman returned
to Cranbrook on Friday morning.
Entertains at Dinner Party
Mrs. G. K. McNaughton entertained
at  dinner  last  Saturday evening  ln
honor of Mrs. A. C. Fraser of Vancouver. After dinner the guests were ! Francisco on Friday morning,
entertained at bridge, at which Mrs. *    "   *
E.   H.   Hicks   carried   off   first   prize
After spending two weeks holiday
in town Dr. C. R. Drader left for Snn
THE MODERN "CALLING CARD"—
A NICE BIG BOX OF
CHOCOLATES
Just a nice box of chocolates, your hat and your coat;
that is the correct visiting apparel for men. Now you
are fully equipped to call on the lady of your choice and
you are sure of meeting her deepest approval the minute she gets here eye on that fine box of chocolates.
If you are going to call on her this evening be sure to
take a box along. She will appreciate you all the more
for your thought fulness.
Lang's Drug Store
—THE REXALL KODAK STORE—
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
honors.
* *   •
Mr. and Mrs. H. Peters of Vancouver are visiting Mr. and Mrs. John Bonnie, the parents of Mrs. Peters.
* *   *
Mr. Robert Patterson left Thursday
morning for Nanaimo, where he will
spend the holiday with friends.
♦ *   *'
Miss Charlottee Jaynes of Nanaimo,
arrived in the city on Friday last and
is visiting her grandfather Mr. T. Horbury.
• «   •
Mr. and Mrs. N. O. Klbler, of Vancouver, arrived in Cumberland on Friday and are guests at the Cumberland Hotel.
* *   •
Miss Olive Ottrey, of Vancouver, arrived In town on Saturday and will
spend a few days, the guest of Mrs.
H. B. Bernstein.
* *   *
Miss Mordy left on Friday morning
last for New Westminster where she
has accepted an appointment on the
teaching staff.
• •   •
Mrs. A. C. Fraser who has been visiting Dr. and Mrs. E. R. Hicks returned to her home In Vancouver on
Tuesday morning.
* t   .
Miss   Blanche   Dando  returned   to
Vancouver on Tuesday morning after
spending the Christmas vacation with
her parents Mr. and Mrs. C. Dando.
t   *   .
Miss M. O'Neil, formerly of the Cumberland teachnlg staff, and now of
Vancouver, ls visiting in town as the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Carey.
• •   •
Miss Agnes McKulght of Vancouver
has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
Marpole and will return to her home
In Vancouver on Saturday morning.
* •   •
Miss Hilda Watson has been spending the holiday with her family ln
town and will return to Penticton on
Saturday morning.
• *   •
Miss, A. Loggie who has been the
guest of Dr. and Mrs. McNaughton
over the holiday will return to her
home In Vancouver on Saturday
morning.
* •   *
Miss Lizzie Walker and Robert
Walker Jr., left on Wednesday morning's train, for Nanaimo, to spend
New Year's, the guests of Mrs. Agnes
Bllnkhorn, Five Acres.
• »   *
Miss Roberta M, Anderson of
Hnzolton, B.C.. will return to her
home tomorrow morning after spending the holiday with her grandfather,
Mr. T. Horbury, and fnmlly.
• *   *
Misses Charlotte and Francis and
Dick Jaynes returned to their home In
Nanaimo this morning. They have
liecn spending a few days of the holiday with their grandfather, Mr. T.
Horbury.
• •   •
Entertains for Mrs. Fraser
In honor of her sister, Mrs. A. C.
Fraser, of Vancouver, Mrs. E. R.
Hicks entertained at four tables of
bridge on Monday evening last Mrs.
O. W. Clinton first, and Miss Hilda
Watson second, were the prize
winners.
| Mr. Gordon Mounce returned from
! Seattle on Thursday to spend the New
! Year's holiday with his parents Mr.
! and Mrs. H. Mounce.
Family Celebration
The home of Mrs. George Brown,
Maryport Avenue was the scene of s
jolly family gathering on New Year's
Eve. There are In the neighborhood
of forty-five members of the Brown
family Including sons, daughters and
grandchildren; there is also one great
grandchild, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
C. Hitchens. There were many
friends of the family present also
which made a very large gathering
for the welcoming of 1925. Music
was supplied during the evening by
Messrs Goodull, Dewar, Stewart and
Jackson and every moment of the evening was highly enjoyable to all.
Saturday Specials
BARGAINS
95c.
BARGAINS
For Saturday only we are putting on some extra special
95<f> Bargains
REMEMBER SATURDAY IS 95«? DAY AT
MATT BROWN'S GROCERY
Horse Shoe Salmon, 5 tins for 95<J
Sliced Pineapple, 4 tins 95<>
King Oscar Sardines, 5 tins for 95<*
Van Camp's Pork and Beans, 7 tins for 95«?
White Wonder Soap, 14 cakes for 95<>
Canned Vegetables, Peas, Corn, Beans
and Tomatoes
O TINS FOR "DC
 New Navel Oranges	
4 Dozen for - 95*p
 Jelly Powders, Assorted Flavors	
3 Pkts. for 1 doz. for
95c
[
]
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
UNION BAY NOTES
At Home
New Year's Day being the official
reception day of the American Consulate, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Clinton were at home to a large number of
friends. The house was appropriately decorated with the stars and
stripes. Tea was served by Mrs. L.
W. Nunns assisted by Misses M. Tarbell, J. Graham and C. McKinnon.
Among those who attended were:
Captain nnd Mrs. J. C. Brown, G. R.
Brown, Miss Brown, Mrs. E. W. Bickle
Miss Edith Bickle, Mr. G. Bryden, Mr.
J. Bryden, Mr. and Mrs. H. Bryan,
Mr .aud Mrs. Curwen nnd son, Mr. F.
J. Dalby, Mr. V. H. Dalby, Mr. and
Mrs. L. H. Finch, Mr. and Mrs. J.
W. Frame, Dr. W. Bruce Gordon, Mr.
and Mrs. T. Graham, Miss Janet Graham, Mr. A. T. Heyland, Rev. James
Hood, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Jeffrey, Mr.
R. C. Lang, Miss A. Loggie, Mrs. Keller, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. McDonald, Mrs.
G. Kerr McNaughton, Mr. A. McKinnon, Miss C. McKinnon, Mr. and Mrs.
T. Mordy and son, Mr. and Mrs. T.
H. Mumford, Rev. and Mrs. E. H.
Nunns, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Nunnc.
Mrs. L. W. Nunns, Mr. nnd Mrs. C. J
Parnham, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Pickard, j
Mr. R. Shaw, Mr. F. Shaw, Mr. and
Mrs. J. E. Spicer. Mr. and MrB. C. H J
Tarbell. Miss M. Tarbell and Mr. and ;
Mrs. J. Walton.
New Partnership
Mr. Fred Pearse of the Lake Trail,
Courtenay has entered Into the business of Mr. George J. Hardy. Mr.
Pearse has had a great deal of experience In insurance work and will
specialize along that line.
Edward Searle, who has been spend
Ing the Christmas vacation with his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. 13. T. Searle,
returned lo Vancouver on Friday.
Miss Margaret Glover returned to
Victoria on Friday's train. Miss
Glover has been spending n short vacation with her pnrents ln Union Bay.
Mr. 11. Auchlnvole has returned to
Vancouver to resume his studies at
the Univeslty of B. C.
•Mrs. Arthur Wilkinson has returned to her home in Vancouver after a
brief stay with her mother, Mrs. T.
Hudson.
Mr. and Mrs. Cunllff. of Nanaimo.
have been the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas for the past few days.
Miss Bouchard left Union Bay on
Saturday after a short visit with Mrs.
A. Kyle.
Mrs. L. Little and daughter Mar;*,
spent the week-end in Cumberland,
the guests of Mr. and -Mrs. R. Abrams.
Mr. Peter Anderson left for Vancouver on Friday to undergo Chiropractic
treatment
Mrs. Smith and her two children
left for her home In Vancouver on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Harris, of Courtenay.
have been the guests of Mrs. A. Home
their daughter, for the past tew days. I
Miss R. Harrison, of Vancouver, is
spending a few days witli friends in !
Union Bay.
Mr. H. Searle, of Tacoma, returned .
home on Tuesday.     He has been vis- I
iting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. T.
Searle.
Mr and Mrs. R. Campbell are visiting their son. Mr. J. Campbell. Ill
Vancouver.
Mr. and MrB. H. Tappin and son returned to Ladysmith on New Year's
Day.
Miss Walker of Abbotsford, ls visiting her sister, Mrs. P. Renwlck, of
Union Bay.
The friends of Mr. A. (Sandy) Jack
will be pleased to learn that he Is progressing favorably In the Cumberland
Hospital. Mr. Jack received severe
injuries a few days ago when going
about his work at the B. S. £ W. Logging Camp.
On Wednesday afternoon a tea was
given by Mrs. Thomas in honor of
Miss R. Harrison of Vancouver. The
afternoon was spent at Court Whist
prizes being won by the Mowing:
Miss E. Brown, first; Miss I. Walker,
second; and Miss S. Walker, consolation. Among those present were,
Miss Dorothy Renwlck. Mrs. T. Fraser, Miss Edith Brown, Miss Ethel
Campbell, Miss Ilia Walker and Miss
Sarah Walker.
A very quiet wedding was solemn -
lzed oh Wednesday evening when the
Rev. A. Walker united in marriage
Annie, youngest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. S. Muschamp of Bayness Sound.
nnd Mr. Nordale Nelson, of Deep Bay.
The ceremony wns held at tlle home
of the bride's parents, only very Intimate friends being present.
THE GOOD ROADS PROVINCE
COURTENAY BOYS GET
4 PANTHERS IN 1 DAY
Logging Camps Will Re-Open
It Is anticipated that the camps of
thc Comox Lagging and Railway Company will be reopened about thc middle of the present month. The opening of the machine shops marks the
preliminary step towards actual operation.
Messrs Bob Cowie and Tom McQuillan of Courtenay have been showing
their skill as panther hunters of late.
On the day before Xmas the two
boys made a hunting trip in the neighborhood of Headquarters and brought
home one panther. Not satisfied with
this achievement on Tuesday last
they made a two days' hunting trip
Into Wolf Lake behind Headquarters
and with the favorable weather and
snow on the ground they and their
dogs were able to track and kill 4
more of the cats. This made five
panthers all told within a week which
Ib not a bad'record.
"1 feel shertsin I'm goln' to have a
row wl' m' wife. If zat woman gets
th' idea I'm 'tox'cated, ahe won't
lls'en t' reason."
Mother: "Those little playmates of
yours look rather common, Bobble. I
hope none of them swear."
Bobble: "Oh, some of 'em try to,
mother, but they sln't much good at
It"

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