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The Cumberland Islander May 28, 1926

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
"'uiflrv       T.._. >..
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With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 22.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH .COLUMBIA FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1926.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
COMMEMORATE 30th
ANNIVERSARY OF HOLY
TRINITY PARISH CHURCH
On May 30th, Trinity Sunday, there will be commemorated the thirtieth
anniversary of. ihe Parish Church of Holy Trinity.   It was ln October of
1894 that the Idea Hist took root ot building an Anglican Church In Union,
as Cumberland was first called.   A meeting was convened by the Rev. J. X.
Willemar with Dr.
Lawrence as chairman, the result of
which was a resolution to go ahead and
solicit subscriptions
for the Building. It
seems that great Interest was shown in
the project and the
contract was awarded to Messrs. Grant
and   McGregor   for
{1,573.00.   The plans called for an extensive building, the first unit to be
Chancel.   It  waa  found, however, that Cumberland  did  not grow as had
been anticipated, and so the present building, as shown In the photograph,
remains  much  thc  same  as  It  did  when  constructed  thirty  years  ago.
When the Rev. Franklin Watson was
Vicar several interior alterations were
carried out, Including the removal ot
the screen  which   was   utilized   for
Altar rails, the pulpit, etc;  ho was
also responsible  for the addition of
the tower.
Mr. Wlleimar was appointed as the
first Priest-ln-chnrge, and carried on
the work regulariy in spite of many
difficulties.   It is interesting to note
that this pioneer of Church work in
this district is still living, having his
residence at Sandwick and leading an
active life In his garden at the ripe
old age of 85.   Another Item of Interest  ls  to  note  that  the  original
name was Trinity Church, the word
"Holy" being added some nine years
later.   In 1909 the idea of building a
Vicarage came under discussion and
the present residence resulted.   The
parish Hall was erected during tbe
Incumbency of the Rev. F. Comley,
. who, with his wife, did such splendid
work during the "flu" epidemic.
It has been felt that the thirtieth
anniversary   of   the   Parish   Charob
should be made an occasion of special
Interest, and so the following services
have   been   arranged    for   Sunday.
There will be a Celebration of the
Holy Communion at 8:30 a.m., when
lt ls hoped thc Bishop of the Diocese
wlll  officiate.    Owing  to  an  Ordination Service being held at St. John's
Church, Courtenay,  in  the morning,
there will be no service at Holy Trinity.   Rev. F. Comley will preach at
the Ordination service.   The special
Commemoration service will be held
in the evening at 7:00 p.m. when tbe
Bishop will preach.   There will also
be present the Archdeacon of Columbia, and old vicars of the parish in
thc   persons   of   Revs.   Comley   and
Bischlager.   Letters of regret ut their
inability to attend have been received
from Revs. Christinas and Willemar.
The Parish of Holy Trinity Is an
extensive one. taking in as It docs
Bevan,  Royston.   Union   Bay  as   far
south  as   Bowser,  and   Denman   aud
Hornby Islands.
TENNIS CLUB TEA HELD
Last Wednesday's afternoon tea,
under the auspices of the Cumberland
Tennis Club, was held at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham.
First Street. In spite of the extremely showery weather there was an excellent attendance. Next Wednesday's
tea will be given by Mrs. J. Conway,
at her home, Dunsmuir Avenue.
BIG DANCE TONIGHT
There will be a big Elk's Dance
tonight, Friday, in the Ilo-llo Ball
Room, immediately after the showing
of "The Beauty Shop." Dancing until
2 a.m. to first class music. Gents,
75c; Lndics, 25c. Be sure to visit
the show, commencing at 8:15, and
stay for the dance. You will be assured of a really good time.
Loss In Big Courtenay Fire
Estimated To Be $50,000
Blaze Subdued With Help of Cumberland Fire Brigade
Hard Surfacing
Part Of Fourth St.
Mr. W. P. Beaven, assistant District
Engineer of the Department of Public Works, in a communication addressed to the local City Council at
Its regular meeting last Tuesday
evening, offered to hard surface the
upper part of Fourtli Street (presumably tho two blocks from Maryport
Avenue on to thc Courtonay Road)
for the sum of $150.00, the work to be
carried out In connection with the
hard surfacing of the road from Cumberland to Courtonay. The Council
felt that the offer was a generous one
and Instructed the Clerk to forward
a letter of acceptance to Mr. Beaven.
Desire Cessation
Of Petty Thefts
At Cemetery
At the reguest of the Medical Board
the Islander has been asked to appeal
to certain adults and children of this
City aud district to discontinue their
petty thefts and depredations at the
Cumberland Cemetery. We have been
told that several complaints have
been received from local residents to
the effect that lt is well-nigh Impossible to keep such things as flower
receptacles at the Cemetery for more
than a few days, for, even though the
receptacles be of little or no Intrinsic
value, they are either deliberately
broken or actually removed from the
plots.
Tbe Islander, as well as the Medical Board, would appreciate the Immediate cessation ot such petty acts.
It Is unfair to those who are endeavoring to keep green tbe memory of
departed relatives and dear friends.
Hospital Board To
Take Charge Of
Isolation Hospital
Mr. E. Pickard, secretary of the
Board of Management of tho Cumberland General Hospital, wrote the
City Council at Its Inst meeting to
tho effect thnt tlie Board would lie
pleased to take charge of the Isolation Hospital aud asked thnt the City
Council   draw   up   a bill of sale its
Cumberland United
Champions Of
P.C. League
Due to the defeat of Ladysmith on
Monday last when Saint Saviours
trounced them eight goals to three,
Cumberland United can now be hailed
as champions of the Pacific Coast
league. Thc locals have one game to
play and have a lead of one point
over Ladysmith, but the latter team
has now played all Its games in the
league schedule. Nanaimo has still
two games to play but cannot possibly do better than get third place.
Congratulations are In order to the
Cumberland United players, who have
at various stages of the game during
Ihe past season been severely handicapped. George Graham, the peer of
centre forwards in British Columbia,
left halt way through the season to
play professional football ln the Eastern States and was followed a few
weeks afterwards by the captain of
the team, Tom Contl, who threw In
his lot with a San Francisco team.
Both positions were hard to fill and
the management ot the team was hard
put to know Just what to do. F. Ferguson, however, filled the centre-half
position very creditably, whilst the
pivot position was entrusted to Jock
Campbell, a youngster from Union
Bay, who, during the last tew games
gave promise of becoming a really
fine centre forward.
The residents of Cumberland were
awakened In the early hours of Tuesday morning by the insistent clanging of the lire bell, due to a hurry up
call from the neighboring city ot
Courtenay, where one of the worst
fires in the history of the City was
raging. The loss is estimated roughly as between $50,000 and $60,000,
mostly covered by insurance.
The fire started about 1:15 a.m.,
and when first observed was burning
briskly on the wall between Jeff Han-
nay's confectionery shop, and Blunt
& Ewart's garage. There is a continuous line of wooden buildings on
this side of Union Street, and when
the fire first spread into the garage
It at once became a question of saving any of the buildings on the one
side of the street.
The Courtenay and Cumberland lire
brigades succeeded in Isolating the
blaze on lhe east side, but It burnt
clean through to the corner on the
other side, destroying the Farmers'
Produce building and the Overwaitea
Company's premises, with all their
stock.
The nature and extent of the damage was as follows:
Blunt & Ewart, garage, damage
about $25,000, insured.
Jeff. Hannay, confectionery store,
with dwelling rooms overhead, damage $5,500, Insured.
Overwaitea Company, groceries,
$6,000, not Insured.
J. Urquhart, building. $5,000. partly
insured.
Miss E. II. E. Johnson, milliner and
ladles' wear, stock recovered, some
damage.
Farmers' Produce (Clarkson and
Rockwell) butchers, building and
stock destroyed, insured.
Modern Shoe Co., stock damaged
by water.
F. R. F. Biscoe, building badly damaged.
J. Aston, shoe repairs, stock damaged.
John .MacKenzie, ladles' wear, stock
damaged by water.
CHILDREN CHIEF FEATURE
IN MOST SPECTACULAR
PARADE FOR MANY YEARS
Miss Mutsuye Aida
Buried Wednesday
The funeral of the late Miss Mutsuye Aida, whose sad death occurred
last Monday evening, was held from
the family residence Wednesday evening, Interment taking place In the
Japanese Cemetery, Courtenay Road.
Miss Aida, who was in her fourteenth year, was a pupil lu the class
of Miss I. McFadyen In the Cumberland Tublic School, where she made
many friends among her classmates
and their parents, as well as distinguishing herself In her various studies, especially writing. She had been
ill only a short while before her death
I which occurred In the Cumberland
Hospital, nnd the news that she had
passed away came as a great shock
to her friends.
Six Japanese school mates acted as
pall bearers at the funeral, which
was attended by a great number of
friends of the family, both Japanese
and Occidental. Acknowledgement of
the following floral tributes Is grate-
folly made: Wreath from the teaching
staff, of the Cumberland Schools and
one .'from the Cumberland School
classmates of Miss Aida, flower basket from the teachers and pupils of
the Japanese School, flower basket
from the Mothers' Association of the
Japanese School, wreaths and sprays
from Josie Berghiner, Aldcn Francescini, Norman Frelone, Beryl Hudson, Slgeml Maruya, wreath from Mr.
and Mrs. D. Hunden nnd family and
one from Mr. and Mrs. S. Davis and
family, as well as a large number of
anonymous tributes.      '
Large Number Of Friends Pay Last
Respects To Late R. H. Robertson
Donate Free
Transportation
To Royston
The management of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., through
the kindness of Mr. T. Graham, hns
made a donation to the Sports Fund
In* the form of free transportation to
Royston to those going to Qualicum
on the special train. The special will
leave Courtenay at 8:15 a.m., Royston
at 8:30, Union Bay at 8:45; Bowser
at 0:30, Dunsmuir at 9:40, Dashwootl
at 9:52, and will arrive ln Qualicum
at 10:00 a.m. The Canadian Collieries  train  will  leave  Cumberland  ln
soon as possible.   The Isolation Ho:
pital has always been under the Juris-! Plenty of lime  to  connect   with  the
diction of the Council bul nt a meet- i "l'ociol  at  Royston   (the exact  time
Ing held recently It was decided to  Will be given out to the children at
ask the local Hospital Board to take
charge and Mr. Plckard's letter was
in response to this request.
thc schools Just as Boon as possible).
The local train will also connect with j
the special at Royaton In the evening.]
The funeral of the late Mr. R. H,
Robertson, who died In the Cumberland General Hospital on Wednesday,
May 19th, was held on Sunday last
from the family residence, West Cumberland, for Interment In the Cumberland Cemetery. A great number
of friends of the deceased and bis
family were in attendance and members of Benevolence Lodge No. 14,
K. of P.; and Loyal Order of Moose.
No. 1662. turned out en masse. Rev.
E. O. Robathan, vicar of Holy Trinity
Anglican Church, conducted tlie services at the home and graveside, in
addition to the beautiful service of
the Knights of Pythias. The pall
bearers, all old friends and co-workers of the deceased, were Messrs. II.
England, J. Struthers, O. W. Clinton,
R. Shaw, ('. J. Parnham and F. Dalby.
Tho following floral tributes are
gratefully acknowledged by the family: Wreaths—tbe Family, Benevolence Lodge No. 14. K. of P., Pythian
Sisters, Loyal Ortler of Moose No.
1662, Mr. and Mrs. J. II. Robertson
and Helen, Mrs. Gen, Robertson, Nettle and George, Mr. and Mrs. John
Thompson, Mr. nnd Mrs. Geo. Clinton,
Cumberland Oleemen, Miss Brown,
General Hospital ond staff, Mr. nnd
Mrs. T. H. Corey and family, Mr. and
Mrs. T. Bennett nnd Bill, Mr. and Mrs.
E. L. Saunders, Canadian Collieries
Ltd., Mr. and Mrs. T. Oraham and
family, Board of Management of the
Cumberland Hospital, Dr. and Mrs.
A. J. Taylor and family, Mr. and Mrs.
W. Duncan antl family, Mr. and .Mrs.
F. Dillman, Mr. and Mrs. M, Broderlck of Nanaimo, .Mr. and Mrs. E.irl
Fletcher of Nanaimo. Mr. and Mrs.
H. Creech and family, ot Victoria;
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Odgers, Nanaimo,
Sprays- Mr. and Mrs. D. Walker.
Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Robertson, Dr. tt*.
Bruce Gordon, .Mr. and Mrs. Biggs.
Merrltt; Air. and Mrs. R. .Mellado.
Penticton; Mr. and Mrs. Chris Brown.
Mr. and Mrs. A. (.'. Locklinrl, Mr. and
(Mrs. Holcomb, Seattle; Mr, and Mrs.
J. Gillespie, Victoria; Mr. and Mrs. J.
Lockner. Mr. and .Mrs. J. Walker, Miss
Alice Watson, Mr. and Mrs. T. Bates,
Jlr. and Mrs. M. Williamson, Mr. and
.Mrs. A. Bradley.
Crosses—Cumberland and Union
Water Works Co., Mr. and Mrs. J.
Emily, .Mr. and Mrs. C. Whyte, Mr.
and Mrs, J. Damonte, Mr. and Mrs.
T. H. Mumford, Hospital Board of
Comox.
Appreciate Friendly
Feeling
Although the residents of Cumberland do not fully realize It, they are
held 111 very friendly rcgurd by the
Japanese  of  this  City  and  district.
Relations between the two races her;
In   Cumberland   have   always   been
amicable and the Japanese have ever
placed a high value upon lhls friendship, but until the present have remained silent upon the subject.   The
sad death last Monday of Miss Mutsuye Aida, however, has broken this
silence,  and   several prominent  Japanese, In an Interview with an Islander representative yesterday afternoon,
told sincerely Just   how   much   this
friendship means to their race—lt Is
appreciated   to  an  enormous  extent.
| Miss Aida. a fourteen year old Cutn-
| berland    scliool    girl,    made    many
i friends In this city by her cleverness
, at school and pleasant manners, and
Ion (he news of her deatli her many
J Occidental friends showed their sympathy  and   sorrow   by  vlslls  to  the I
family residence, floral tributes, nnd!
attendance at tlie funeral.   Never be-j
fore In  the  history nt Cumberland,
• we were told, hnve Occidentals shown
j this Interest In the Japanese and wo |
I were  given   to  understand  that  the j
latter appreciate this friendly spirit!
I more than words can tell.
"The best ever"—this wns the general concensus of opinion amongst
young and old alike when Empire
Day, 1926. came to an end, and so
it was too. In the first place the
weather surprised and delighted
everybody by being flue, and this
went a long way to make success out
of the splendid nnd varied programme
which bad been drawn up by the
organizers. Early In the morning
there were many anxious little faces
peeping out of windows to see if thc
sun was shining, and a heap of satisfied sighs were heard in the many
homes where children were getting
ready for the big parade, for the
skies were blue and old Sol was right
there with the goods.
And what a day it was! And what
a parade! Children dressed up in
strange costumes, so that their own
Mothers would not know them, costumes depleting the Pioneers of B.C.
or illustrating the different sciences
or countries. A group of little dandles, with top hats neverything, Including even swagger canes. An
Alexander Rag time band of youngsters playing "Oh, it aint gonna rain
no more, no more," (and it didn't
tliat day), anil a cheerful but now
unrecognizable nurse disguised and
seated behind a rather fractious mule
Then there were the floats. The Boy
scouts drawing a truck on which was
shown a Camp scene, with a cheery
looking chap flapping thc Jacks, and
making the mouths of the onlookers
water; the "Beauty Shop" was there
in all its glory, singing and making
merry, whilst the Rebeccas bad a
very pretty float, this being the Royal
Stage of H. M. the May Queen. As
the parade followed the line of route
the spectators gave generous applause |
as this or tliat particular group caught I
their fancy.
On reaching tbe football ground the
children* sSrut'smrgB and performed
the May Pole dances In front of the
newly elected Queen and the retiring
Regent, who were seated on a platform in front ot the grandstand. The
Scout formed a Guard of Honor, and
added an additional touch of color
to the scene. The retiring Queen
made a very happy little speech in
which she thanked her subjects for
their loyalty, and asked that they
would support her successor In the
same way during the ensuing year.
Upon the new Queen taking her seat,
the pages and Maids of Honor kissed
her hnnd in allegiance. After the
newly elected Queen had spoken the
scouts gave three cheers and a 'tiger"
for her Majesty. Following this ceremony the sports programme was
carried out.
People had come In from everywhere.   Denman  Island,  Union  Bay,
Courtenay, Royston, and as far south
as Nanaimo were all represented, and
Cumberland held up Its head In a Just
and legitimate pride as it welcomed
in these friends, from outside points.
Tlle greatest credit must be given to
the various committees for the excellent way In which tlie programme
was drawn up and carried out, for
everything passed off without a bitch
and to the general satisfaction of all.
The success of Empire Day this year
should encourage an even more ambitious programme for 1927.
The Beauty Shop
Played Twice To
Capacity Houses
Tuseday and Wednesday of the past
week saw the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, taxed to Its utmost to accomodate the huge crowds attending tho
showing of "The Beauty Shop." It Is
safe to say that this play is absolutely
the best that hns ever been attempted in this district, before, and Cumberland theatre-goers will have an
opportunity of witnessing this marvellous play tonight in tlic Ilo-llo
Theatre. Mr. C. W. Lewis, who is the
genius so freely talked about since
the showing at Courtenay. will again
be In charge und tliis gentleman's enthusiasm aud magnetic personality Is
assurance enough tbat the show tonight will go over btg. You can obtain tickets at the Lang Drug Store;
reserved seats, $l.oii, and general admission  will be 75c.
The cast Includes upwards of sixty
people who have been training faithfully for the past two weeks in an
effort to present to the people of tho
district tlie very best Comedy ever
seen here.
Mr. Lewis Is so well thought of In
Courtenay that during the performance on Wednesday evening, along
with Mrs. Lewis a presetitntoin was
made In the form of a case of silverware.
Miss May Hughes left Tuesday for
Victoria where sbe will commence
training In St. Joseph's  Hospital.
KING'S BIRTHDAY
A special Holiday Dance will
be held In the Imperial Pavilion
at Royston ou Thursday,' June
3rd. Special Vancouver Orchestra In attendance.
Don't forget the "Serennders"
on Saturday, May 29lli.
Local Boy Scouts Making
Plans For Annual Camp
It was a delighted bunch of boys who gave their Troop yell on the football grounds on the morning of Mny 24th. The yell was the result of the
announcement that'their decorated float had won first prize, and bad thus
been the means of adding a very welcome $25 to their funds. At a meeting
of thc Troop Court of Honor held on Tuesday It was decided to go ahead with the reorganization of patrols, and tlie following
were elected as Patrol leaders: George
Brown to the Eagles, Dick ldiens to the
Owls, Andrew Brown to the Heavers, nnd
Frank Read to the Bears. Archie Hick was
nominated as Correspondent, and William
Brown as Sccretary-Treasurci, During Iho
next month the main subject will be thc
coming summer camp, It has heen suggested thut the camp be held on (he Waal Coast
lu the vicinity of Toflno, Clayoquot Sand, where there are excellent oppor-
eunities for enjoying the out of doors life. Efforts will be made to raisu
further funds in order that tho cost to each boy may bc reduced to as
low a ligure as possible. The Wolf Cubs arc expecting to go to Denman
Island for a week sometime In July.
No moro boys will be accepted for
either tlle Troop or the Pack until
further notice, as patrols and sixes
arc full.
MR. ROBT. HALCROW
PASSED TO LAST REST
The many friends of Mr. Robt,
Halcrow will be sorry to bear of
his death, which look place suddenly ut the home of his daughter
Mrs. Robt. McKnight. Vancouver,
on Thursday, May 27th, al 2:00
p.m.
The remain! wlll be shipped to
Cumberland for burial In the
family plot. Funeral arrangements   will   lie  announced   later.
TWO HOCKEY GAMES
TO BE PLAYED ON
SATURDAY AFTERNOON
In nn effort to stimulate enthusiasm
in the nobis same of grass Itockey,
two gumes will In- played on tho
Hon cut ion Ground, Cumberland, on
Saturday afternoon, the Aral commencing at 8:30. It Is hoped that a
large crowd will turn out to view
these games and encourage tlu- various players, who, whilst not yet experts, are showing a great deal of
promi.se. A collection will be taken
at the games Which Will bs devoted
to paying for the equipment purchased some time ago. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY. MAY 28, 1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY.  MAY 28, 1926.
EMPIRE DAY The success of the Em-
AND CIVIC PRIDE pire Day programme was
(or should be) an encouragement to us all. The weather of course,
helped to make it a success, but even had it been
wet, the day would have been a pleasurable one,
owing to the excellent arrangements made by the
various committees. These gentlemen did not
spare themselves and their efforts met with a
generous response, as will be seen by the long
list of contributions. Empire Day is essentially
the Children's Day, and Cumberland may well
feel a pride in the growing youth which paraded
her streets and contested in the field sports that
da^. There is such a thing as CIVIC PRIDE.
This pride comes from a development of the
Character of the child life in a community, and
a development of the character of the community
itself. The outward evidences of this character
will be often seen in the pride which a city takes
in its streets and boulevards, and the citizen in
his garden. A marked step forward in developing this civic sense of pride has recently been
made in the improvements on the school grounds,
where the children are encouraged, even if only
on a small scale, in the art of town planning.
This will not be without its effect in the years
to come, and there is no reason why Cumberland
should not take its place eventually as being
amongst the prettiest towns in British Columbia,
The Empire Day Celebrations gave witness to the
material which she has at her disposal for this
purpose. With the right directing forces and
the necessary encouragement, Cumberland may
look forward to a bright and happy future. It
will depend though, a great deal on the pride she
takes in herself and which the citizens take in
her.
STAY-AT-HOME   Dollars that stay at home too
DOLLARS- much never help business in
any community. Once upon
a time, so runs an ansient tale, a dollar decided
that the safest place for it to be was in a chimney. It argued that nobody in search of hidden
wealth ever would find it amid the soot and dirt
of a chimney. And so it hid itself away. And
the days rolled on and the weeks passed and soon
years began to accumulate. One day the house
was torn down and amid the ruins somebody
found the old stay-at-home dollar. It was so
changed by the flight of years, so besmirched
with accumulated dirt and so discolored that nobody seemed to think it worth very much and
finally in a moment of doubt it was thrown away
and lost forever. This story may not be wholly
true. Nevertheless there is that to stay-at-home
dollars that is true. Money that is hoarded up
and never put into circulation loses its value. In
fact, there comes a time when it is valueless.
A dollar isn't worth anything at all tied up in a
stocking and hidden away. Its value is apparent only when it is spent or exchanged for something of value.     All the gold in the world would
n't be worth the taking if it could not be put to^
some serviceable use. The particular thing
that is needed for business right now is for the
stay-at-home dollars to get on the job and get
into circulation. Commerce will thrive and industry prosper and men will have work when this
becomes a reality.
STEP LIVELY The average man never wakes
up to the value of time until
he is forty. Then his observation of what the
other men of his own age have done while he was
loitering through the golden days of his life
stings him into a realization of what he has
wasted. We leave childhood with a reasonable
expectation of forty or fifty years of life. To
the boy, that period seems almost an eternity.
At twenty-five we feel that there is ample time
for joy-living before we settle into our life pace.
At thirty and thirty-five we begin to doubt a
little whether our accomplishments are what
they should have been, and at forty we know we
are delinquent. From forty to fifty, if there is
anything worth while in a man, he is struggling
to make amends for his wasted years. Then,
if ever, it comes to him that life is shortening up
for him, and that he must crowd his business or
his profession if he is not to be classed as a
failure.
GIVE 'EM AWAY Along about this time of
the year with spring cleaning about done, useless articles about thtf'home
keep bubbling up to annoy one. You have been
thinking for some years that you would discard
the old sofa, or an old chair or two, but have not
gotten your own consent to do so.
There are a lot of discarded garments in the
closets. You have taken them out a dozen or
more times, and started to give them away, but
came to the conclusion that they were a little too
good to dispose of; you were afraid that thsy
might "come in handy" and have hung them
back upon the hooks.
The garret is full of stuff you have laid away,
thinking perhaps at some future time you would
get it out and have it varnished up or painted
or repaired and use it. But you failed to do so.
The same thing applies to a good deal of "trash"
in the cellar. In fact, everywhere about the
house are useless articles, useless as far as you
are concerned.
Give them away. Don't harbor all of this
needless stuff any longer. It will do you no
good.     It will do someone else a world of good.
There is hardly a well-to-do home in this
town but is harboring a wagon load of things
that would be of great benefit to others, which
will never be used in the home in which the
things now repose. All of us have more than
we need—and more than we use. Clean up and
clean out and thereby give your self more room
and somebody else more comfort.
But how people love to hang on to useless
articles! Just stop a moment and go over in
your mind the number of things about the place
you will never use again. Old clothes, old furniture, old cooking utensils, old pictures, old bric-
a-brac crammed into every nook and cranny.
Perhaps there are some old wedding presents you
have been harboring all these years. They were
no account when you received them, years and
years ago, and their value has not increased with
the years. Give them away. In all the history
of the human race no one has been driven to the
poor house through giving away things they did
not need. No one has suffered for want of the
discarded things about the house.
Cumberland
Just
Received
Just received the newest styles
In Ladies Summer Dresses in
Novelty Silk Crepes, Spun Silks,
Rayons & Striped Broadcloths.
Exclusive Patterns in the newest Novelty Fabrics and Broadcloths in Dress Lengths.
NEWEST MODELS IN C. C,
LA GRACE CORSETS
Non   Lacing   Corsets,   Elastic
Girdles, Corselettes, Brassieres
.Special values in stout figure-
Corsets.
Venus   Silk   and   Chiffon   Silk
Hose in all shades.
EUCHARISTIC CONGRESS
CHICAGO, JUNE, 1926
The Greatest Event in the History of the Catholic Church
in America
0. 5. Bys. TO OPERATE SPECIAL
TRAINS FROM WKSTKHN
CADADA
Of unusual Importance to Roman
Catholics is the 2Sth International
Eucharistic Congress In Chicago, III..
June 20th to 24th next.
The Church dignitaries ure duly appreciative of the efforts made hy thc
Canadian National Hallways, who
have arranged to operate special
trains to and from the Congress, and
have also made reservations tor several hundred people in good hotels
at a reasonable expense, and ask their
people to make application promptly
for the necessary sleeping car accomodation. Tho Church authorities were
consulted prior to arranging the train
service so that the proper departure
time from the various eenlres would
he ensured.
Those who desire to use tho regular service have the prtvll go of
' travelling on the through train which
is operated during tho summer season
from Western Canada lo Chicago.
Any agent of the Canadian Nalion.il
Railways will lie pleased to give you
further particulars nnd complete all
arrangements.
22-24
J4- TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOU CHARLIE  DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Holel
at 9*00 a.m. every Kundny nnd
meets  boat  at   I'nlon   n»Y-
BLUNT
and
EWART, LTD.
We  are doing business
as usual, in the old
B. & K. Building
just across the bridge
USED CARS
WE HAVE SOME SPECIAL BARGAINS IN
GUARANTEED USED CARS, INCLUDING
SEVERAL FORD TOURINGS, DODGE DELIVERY,
FORD SEDAN, AND CHEVROLET TOURINGS.
Phone 61
Phone 61
Silk and Broadcloth Slips and
Bloomers.
Newest Novelties in Ladies
Neckwear.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPiT
SPECIALLY CATERED TO I
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND  SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Mrs. H. McDonald
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER
All Work neatly and promptly
executed.
For terms, apply
Residence of Mrs. F. J. Dalby,
New   Townsite.   Dunsmuir   Avenue,
CUMBERLAND
PHONE  160
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Mon.-Tues., May 31st and June 1st
Wednesday, June 2nd
A TALE OF MURDEROUS MOORS AND RED-BLOODED ROMANCE
WILLIAM FOX frescnts
WINDING
STAI
from ikt norit ly
K.I.W. MASON
■with
EDMUND LOWE
ALMA RUBENS
WARNER OUND
HAM HAMILTON
EMILY FITZR0Y
CHESTER CONKUN
J«*unoiyJUUAMUMOniE
JOHN GRjrriTH WWH--C**.
Thursday, "Girl from Montmarte"
**   Next Friday and
Saturday
2ggHfflSEjaMariaL.^^,-jui« FRIDAY, MAY 91, 1M«.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PUT
lour Vacation Money
Into a
Real Trip
Educational
to        Tour I
GREAT BRITAIN
HOLLAND
BELGIUM
SWITZERLAND
PRANCE
$425.00
Leave Montreal Friday, July 9,
on Ss. Athenia. Returning arrive Montreal August 21 on (is.
Auranla.
—ALL  EXPENSES
Montreal to Old Country
and   return  to  Montreal
More than 45 days away from
home—motor  sight-seeing,   rail
and  water  trips.
g Operated hy Canadian National Railways In connection witli \
I the Cunard, Anchor-Donaldson Steamship Line, thereby Insur- I
\ Ing a successful handling by responsible companies. /
IT'S  THE  TRIP  OF  A  LIFETIME
Get full Information and plan at once
k-Vtl-aOlM!
E. W. BICKLE
Agent
Cumberland
Telephone 35
PASSENGERS FROM
WESTERN CANADA
WILL LEAVE VANCOUVER BY THE
"CONTINENTAL
LIMITED," JULY 4.
ON THE RETURN
HAVE CHOICE OF
ROUTES FROM
MONTREAL.
ALL RAIL DIRECT
OR VIA TORONTO
OR LAKE AND RAIL
(AT A SMALL AD-
DHTONAL  COST).
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
' At Reasonable Prices.    •
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
"The Radio Detective"
PAGE THREE
->
CHAPTER  IX
.FOOTPRINTS! •
KENNEDY,   Ken,   Easton. and   I
hurried down the path from the
Gerard House to the Boy Scouts'
camp, Eagles' Nest.   We did not see
no tongue to put lt Into words. Still,
lie was bound to tell lt.
Craig had Just discovered the point
wbere the footprints of Laddie's paws
began to be mixed with the other
prints.   Laddie   jumped   nnd   barked
tt V —"=-*•■* -•-"-■ -,.- »<u ,,ul nut,: a»,iuia. i-iuiuie jumped nnd barked
Hank, who had slunk back of some [ as much ns If he would have ,aid
bushes and was watching us closely, "I'm glad you're here-but can't you
congratulating himself on his prompt- see what happened?" He caught ho d
ness ln making his getaway. I of Kennedy's coat In  his  teeth   an
We   soon   reached   the   camp,   for ! began trying to pull him '
Craig was anxious. |    „n„,„_   ,   jj,    ,     .
"Someone's been here!" cried Ken. *'JUST a n.o„o„?0>K ..WL ,
"Look at our radio-smashed. I'll I Cnie "I hpiZ ' "' c,!u"fo"ei*
bet it was.Hank.   But how are you* S.75. „ ,kA0U1' d°B is tr-*'lnK
ever going to hang it on L™ 'a dmlic" " 'g'   Let'" g'Ve ',lm
Laddie had Craig's coat In his teeth
ever going to hang it on him?
"It looks to me, ralher,' considered
Craig, " as if there had been a fight.
That camp stool is overturned."
We begun a hurried search.
. "Well,   there's   nothing   up   here,"
decided Craig after his hasty search.
"Let's go down the trail to the shore.1
- -.. ■ ....^ .. vuu, ,11 ins teem,
pulling him eagerly,   Kennedy moved
with the dog.
Laddie seemed to understand.   Ho
realized nt last tllat Craig understood
j what he was trying to tell.   He ran
' ahead,  stopped,  turned,   and   gave  a
~,        ,,    ,    ,     ,      •*—•*•" *■"*= „.,u,c.    ; luiefld,    stop
We climbed down tlie precipitous i iOVOU3 b„,.,.
side of the sand cliff on the height Swlftlv we fnllnw»H ,1 i
of which they had located Eagles'! ra„ „ ,i! 1 ff°ffj l, d°B* aS "e
Nest overlooking the Sound. From j ""ijl '' *\' 1° de"«" ' , ,
it one could get a wide sweep of VVe s onne.l ?». i " B '"""J"0"*
this arm of the Sound between th ! wlnts ta r'h« .,„'.i"<!cfd„*V('re f°°'-
headlands. Around one headland o 82?" sTori'\ ?"a ,?"d h('JAsurelj'
the west we might, if we had strained ..„,* \u^L **£ "i"6, '';","?' a
our eyes, have seen a converted scout 'jaw '   JL     r ,"" ,WC
cruiser  disappearing.   Thai,  had   we  ,".1°   si., s  ft,,  .J™, ",e ,?°y
oni^tnowi, it. carried with It a mys-  go™' ^1^ p°K
"Hello!''exclaimed Craig almost as | T^^l^t^nTt ^VTmiT
soon as   we had   reached  the  sandy ' ,„0\ a "ttIe
8h*TootprYntsl"   'cried' Ken    bendln. i   ,°" Wf followei1 tMe,n to ■"■• w»"""s
no?'neWoVh0 ^   « « I "fT KW JEW
snoes. IndeC(I   beon  a (Ie9pernte  ,m(1   Ioslng
Craig was down on his hands and
knees examining them almost like a
hound.   "All mixed up!" he muttered.
struggle. Down near the water's edge
converged    the    tracks    of    Laddie.
  -  »>■•    "» „luiteacu. i Laddie had been on the job.   But he
"You can't moke much out of these."   had   uot   been   able   to   prevent   the
"Hello, Laddie boy!"   It was Ken.  carrying off of Dick.
OVOriOVed.  as   fl   Mile   s-niin,!   nt  vrtlon,        .... .    	
overjoyed, ns a tiiie sound of voices
bis collie came briskly running up
the beach.
Ken palted his head. But Laddie
had other business. His keen canine
Instinct seemed to scent out among
us tlie sleuth. He wagged his tall
furiously ln recognition of his young
master, but lie had a story to tell and
^
Your Summer Ally
The long-distance telephone service is your summer
ally. It enables you to telephone ahead for reservations when you are travelling. It keeps you in
touch with home and business when you are away
on vacation.
Don't forget the special night rates in force after
8:30 p.m.
P.P. Harrison, M. L. A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Ofllce
Courtonay Phone  258
Local Olllce
Cumberland Hotel lu Evenings.
Telephone   115R   or   24
"See that?" Kennedy was pointing
to a spot in the wet beach sand where
a boat had been beached and flushed
off by a sailor whose tracks still
showed.
Kennedy shaded his eyes and gazed
off Intently over the water.     There
was not u sign of anything that gave
even a clue.   I do not know what we
would have done if there had  been.
"Shanghaied!"     exclaimed     Ken.
"That's what they did to Dick— they
shanghaied  lllm!"
There was a shock  In  the  words
I even though in our own minds we had
been convinced of thc same thought.
Craig  looked  from  the  prints  on
j the wet sand out over the sea, then
i considered  a moment and  turned to
jKen.
"Ken, run up to the house. Ask
j the cook for some paraffin, tlle cakes
of it, such as she melts to cover
jelly In glasses when she preserves
and put things away for the winter."
"Yes. sir." Ken kas off on n lope,
running a few steps, walking a few
more, running and walking alternately, the scout lope that enabled him
to cover the longest distance in tlie
The "GEM"
least   time   without   putting  himself
out.
While Ken was gone Kennedy sent
me up to tlle camp to get a skillet
while he and Easton  started a Ore.
By this time Ken had returned with
the paraffin.   The skillet was hot and
Craig placed a couple of the  waxy
cakes in it.
Then   he  lifted   the  skillet of  hot
wax   nnd   strode   swiftly   down   the
beach. We followed quite In the
dark as to what he intended doing.
Before a clear impression of thc
foot of a man he paused, poured out
a film of the wax into It and waited.
Now I saw what his intention was.
Kennedy wanted a reproduction. The
wet sand was. like a mold.
However we were doomed to disappointment. The hot wax seemed to
dry it out to quick. The sides caved
lu too soon and we had nothing.
Kennedy was not to be discouraged.
He selected another print further toward the water and tried again. This
time it succeeded. Next he selected
a damp aud very clear impress of tiie
shoe of Ihe girl. This one reproduced
perfectly, Kennedy removed the two
paraffin prints from their sand molds
and studied them. They were perfect. This would make a pretty ready
Identification,
"Ken! Where's Dick? Isn't he
wilh you?"
We turned at the half frightened
voice. It was Mrs. Gerard. She
must have seen Ken enter the kitchen
or she must have sensed something
wrong.
None of us dared to speak to Dick's
mother. Instead, we all turned to
Craig to explain.
.Mrs. Gerard must have read lt on
our faces. She saw the prints on
the sand, Dick's and the others, and
Laddie's. Here was Laddie. The
others had gone. She did not need
to be told.
Her face blanched.There were tears
forming In her eyes as Craig sought
vainly to reassure her. In an Instant
Mrs. Gerard restrained herself. This
meant a light—to save and get back
her boy.
She cupped her hands over her
mouth and cried out over the water,
"Dick! Dick! Dick!
Ken, always manly, was the first to
her side. He took her hand. "Mrs.
Gerard, don't worrv! We will get
Dick back."
Laddie   started   licking   Mrs.   Ger-
aril's hand, and she mechanically pat- '
ted tbe head.   Laddie wagged his tall,
turned, went ahead a few paces and
stood still.
lt was Ken who caught tile significance of the action. There, on the
wet sand, still just out of reach of
the tide, was an arrow roughly dug
with a foot as It was dragged along.
Dick Iiad left a parting message. The
arrow was pointing to the west, and
his foot had jabbed a rough barb on
Its head to make it plain. Now I
could recollect a scout cruiser din-
appearing around that headland.
We looked at each other, for the
moment, helpless. West! Where
was Dick?   Who was the real head
of this desperate Radio Gang?   Who
was  this  mysterious  gun-moll?
(Next week:   "Broadcasting")
ILO-ILO CHAPTER PLAY
CONTINUES TO EXCITE
Spel'bound with terror at the
gleaming eyes of the man known as
the "Owl," and fainting at the feet
of this merciless scoundrel in the
dark cellar of the deserted city, while
her friends, who might huve been her
rescuers, are lighting a losing battle
against superior numbers—thla is the
tense situation that marked the end
of the lost chapter of "The Winking
Idol" nt the Ilo-llo Theatre, and will
mink lhe beginning of the next ex-
ciling episode to lie shown at tlie
same thentre next  Wednesday.
William Desmond Is Ihe dashing
hero of tliis picturization of tiie celebrated novel by Charles LU. Van Loan.
Il Is an adventure-mystery tale of the
old frontier in which while men
struggled and schemed to gain the
secret of Ihe hidden gold of the extinct Aztec race, of which only one
remains.
Francis Ford directed the picture.
Eileen Sedgwick plays the leading
feminine role.
POLICE   GET   BIG   HAUL
The exciting adventures of the
Pathe .serial "Into the Net" are
brought to an end at the Ilo-llo next
Monday with the showing of the last
chapter. No other serial lias possessed (he samo entertainment qualities
as this, which was directed hy George
R Seitz and featured Kdna Murphy
and Jack  Mulhall.
Its story of a gang of crooks engaged in kidnapping, 'gambling, smuggling and murder has heen told from
the angle of the polico. who worked
ceaselessly to round up not only thc
members of the gang but the men
who patronized the resorts, thereby
making such law-breaking methods
profitable to the crooks.
Jim:    "Who was that peach I saw
you with the other night?"
John:    "That   wasn't   any   peach;
she was a grapefruit."
Jim:    "Why  grapefruit?"
John:   "Why,  I  -squeezed  her and
she hit me in the eye."
*    *    *
Teacher—'Can    you    spell   'avoid/
Jakey?"
Jakey—"Sure,   teacher,   vot   In   de
void?" PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1926.
AUCTION SALE
For the Rev. J. H. Hood at St. George's Manse,
Cumberland.
MONDAY, MAY 31st
at 2:00 p.m.
Duly Instructed we will sell by auction all the well-kept House-
Hold Furniture and eft'cets as fullows: Dining Room Suite of
Six Onk Chairs, Leather Seats; Extension Table; Particularly
line Buffet with large bevel plate Mirror; Three Basket Chairs;
Oak Occasional Table; Oak Arm Chair, Leather Seat; Small
Bookcase; Number of Pictures; Throe Lino Rugs, i) x 12, 9 x 9,
and 6 x II; Good Sideboard; A .Mantel Clock; Two Kitchen
Tables; Kitchen Chairs; Small Rocker; Three Double Beds;
Springs and Mattresses; Three Quarter Bed, Spring and Mattress; Oak Bureau with largo oval bevel plate Mirror; Two
small Mirrors; Several pieces of Silverware; Heater; Cooking
Utensils; Crockery and Glassware; Number of Fruit Jars and
Sundries.
Terms: CASH.   Further particulars from Auctioneers
HARDY and PEARCE
Real Estate AUCTIONEERS Insurance
Phone 10 Courtenay
W.ASKA
Skagway
and Return
All  Outside Staterooms
with
Mot and Ccld Running Water
Good Accommodation Available for Sailing
June 14 and July 12.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
Agent. Cumberland, B. C.
Telephone 35
MANN'S BAKERY
The home of high class cakes and pastries.
Large and varied selection.
Freshly baked daily.
APPLE, RAISIN, and PINEAPPLE PIES.
BUNS, BISCUITS, COOKIES, SCONES, etc.
Try some "Golden Brown Doughnuts" for Saturday's
dinner.   The kiddies like them.
Cream Rolls, Cream Cakes, etc., dainty looking and
delicious tasting.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
s
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address—     _ Opposite the Drug Store.
tEE
■3SEEE3S
Winners In Empire Day Sports
Boys (J to 7 years, "ill yards—1, Arnold Bonora; 2, Willie Coombs; 3. Will
Hunden.
Girls G to 7 years, 50 yards—1, Edna
Williams; 2, Bettv Smart; 8, Edith
Williams.
Boys 7 to S years, 50 yards—1, Pete
Bono; 2, W. Slaughter.
Girls 7 to 8 years, 50 yards—1. Eva
Martin; 2, Chiyoko Suglmoro; 3, Winona Booth.
Boys 8 to 9 years. 50 yards—1. Hlro-
mitsuo Saito; 2. Victor Curtain; 3,
John Robertson.
Gills 8 to 9 years, 50 yards—1, Alice
Brown; 2, Margaret Westfield; ;:. Margaret  MacMillan.
Boys 9 to 10 years, 75 yds.—1, H.
McLeod; 2, John Bannerman; '■'., Edwin James.
Girls !) to ID years, 75 yds—1, Nan
McKinnon; 2. Margaret Westfield; 3.
C. Gibson.
Boys 10 to 11 years, 75 yds.—1, Jno.
Coombs; 2, II. Westfield; 3, H. Bonoru.
Girls 10 lo 11 years, 75 yds.—1, M.
Partridge; 2. Joy McKenzie; 3. Audrey Gear.
Boys 11 to 12 years, 75 yds.—1, 0.
Hold;  2. C,  Davis|  3. li. Waterfleld.
Girls 11 to 12 years. 75 yds.—1, Gi
Falrbalm; 2, .Muriel Partridge; ::. 11.
Mobley,
Buys 12 lo 13 years. 100 yds.—1. T.
C U N A R  D
fc   ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM  MONTREAL
To l'ljmouth-Clicrbonrg-Lontlon
Ausonla June 5. Alaunia June 12
To Liverpool
Auranla Juno  I. July 2, 30.
To Belfast and Glasgow
Aihenla June 11. Letitia June 2.".
FROM NEW YORK
To Queenstown and Liverpool
Carinthia June 5.     Samaria June 12
To Cherbourg nnd Southampton
Mauretania June 9, 30. July 21.
Aqultania June 1(1. July 7. Aug. -1.
Berengaria June 23. July 14, Aug. 11.
To Londonderry und Glasgow
i California June 5. Caledonia June 12.
To I'lyinoutli-l'hcrbonrg-lfnnibUTg.
Andania June 30, July 31, Sept. 2.
FROM BOSTON
To Qneenstown nnd Liverpool
Samaria June  13.    Laconia June 27.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers
Cheques at lowest rates. Full information from local agents or Company's Offices. 022 Hastings St. W.,
Vancouver, B. C.
FRESH MILK
Delivered to all parts of
the   District   twice   daily.
PHONE  ORDERS
receive prompt attention.
Phone 127-M
HUNT and STEWART
FARMERS &  MILK DEALERS
Oyama;  2. T. Asao;  3, Tadao Doi.
Girls 12 to 13 years, 100 yds.—1, G.
Falrbalm;"2, A. Watson; 3, K. Prior.
Boys 13 to 14 years, 100 yds.—1, N.
Hayashl;  2, J. Watson;  3, J. Perez.
Girls 13 to 14 years, 100 yds.—1, B.
Westfield; 2, E. Conrod; 3, J. Free-
bum.
Boys 14 to 10 years, 100 ydB.—1, N.
Hayashi;  2, A. McLeod; 3, N. Hill.
Girls 14 to 16 years, 100 yds.—1, D.
Kerton; 2, Edna Gear; 3, D. Hames.
Boys 18 to 18 years, 100 yds—1, H.
Gibson;  2, N. Hill; 3, Bob Osborne.
Girls 10 to 18 years, 100 yds.—1, E.
Gear; 2, J. Freeburn; 3, B. Westfield.
Egg and Spoon, 14 to 15 years—1,
Anne Watson; 2. J. Freeburn; 3, J.
McWhlrter.
Boys Sack race—1,  H.  Calnan;  2,
| Roy Hamilton; 3, George Watts.
I    Girls shoe scramble—1, E. Conrod;
j 2. .Marion Ball; 3, Anne Carney.
|    Boys relay race—1, Team consisting
' of Norman Hill. A. Brown, B. Osborn,
H. Conrod;  2. team consisting of J.
i Watson, O. Reid, T. Dol, G. Brown.
I    Girls relay race—1, Team consisting
! of B. Westfield, J. McWhlrter, J. Freeburn. E. Conrod;  2, team consisting
! nf Kitty Prior. Lorna Osborne, Katli-
! Mine  Brown, Muriel Partridge.
Boys 3-legged race—1, T. Nakano
and T. Asao; 2, K. Kaga and N. Hayashl; 3, N. Hill and T. Doi.
Girls 3-legged race—1, B. Westfield
and J. McWhirter; 2, Dorothy Gordon;
and Sadaka Iwasa; 3, Joy McKenzie
and Irene Oyama.
Girls potato race—1, Annie Watts;
2. Edna Read;  3, Barbara Westfield.
Boys Wheelbarrow race—1, J. Watson and A. James; 2, B. Brown and
J. MacLean; 3, A. Welsh and Boh
Osborne.
Girls Skipping race—1, Muriel Partridge; 2, Joy McKenzie; 3, Dorothy
Gordon.
Tug of War (teams of 6 boys)—1,
G. Horwood, N. Hill, A. Cooper, K.
Kaga. J. Watson and T. Oyama; 2,
U. Osborne, T. Dol, L. Bortholdl, V.
Tomassi, Takeru Kaga, Yoshio Kaga.
Boys pillow fight—1, Chas. Fraser;
2, Tom Coombs; 3, Frank Read.
Running High Jump—1, H. Cliffe;
2, H. Watson and T. Little.
'    Running  broad  jump—1,  N.  Hay-
lashi;  2, C.  Sutton.
I    100 yard dash—1, Charles Sutton;
1 2, Leslie Dando.
I Married ladies nail driving contest
j—1, Mra. F. Slaughter; 2, Mrs. S.
Chapman.
i    Girls nail driving contest—1, Marion Brown; 2; Edna Gear.
]    Cumberland High School boys 100
[yard dash—1, Leslie Dando; 2, Nobuo
Hayashl.
Slow bicycle race—1, Reggie Swan;
2, Lawrence Edwards.
Old Men's race—1, J. 6. Jay; 2, J.
Boffey.
Grass Hockey game between Cumberland and Courtenay High School
girls' teams resulted in a scoreless
draw.
Men's  100-yard  dash—1,  J.  Sheas-
green;  2, D. Bannerman.
• Men's high Jump—1, W. Auchlnvole;
2, H. Cliffe.
Men's 220 yards—1, J. Sheasgreen;
2, Charles Sutton.
Men'sl-mile—1, A. Dick; 2, R. B.
idlens and H. Watson.
Boy Scout relay race—1, Eagles
Patrol.
Cub relay race—1, Greys Patrol.
Special prize to High School Girls
In relay race won by team consisting
of Minnie Harrigan, Edna Gear, Sadie
Brown and Jessie Brown.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBEltLAN», B. C.
Excellent euislne—
for reservations Phele 11.
Comfort  and   Homelike  etrvioe.
28   rooms,  elsctrleeUr  hwted.
R. TiTaM, Uuacer.
THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 120
A REBUS
Two  words  which  denote  what  old
Shylock will hold
On your house or your land, ere he
lends you his gold,
Enjoined, name a being who wanders
from home,
And in  many strange climates may
sojourn or roam,
But  where'er  he  may  be,  in  town,
country or strand,
He call never exist In his own native
land.
Puzzle No. 121
Rory O'More. the discoverer of luck
in odd numbers, made it a rule to
"bring up" just 21 pigs each season.
He divided the happy family Into 4
groups so each pen contained an even
GAS
Try
OILS
Henderson's  Garage
FOR SERVICE
We handle Firestone Tires and have secured the sole
agency for Gutta Percha Tires.
Cylinder Honing and Repairs of all Description.
THIRD STREET, CUMBERLAND.
GAS OILS
BE
We'll Make Your Old Car
PERFORM   LIKE   NEW!
e
|M.n'1'5
When your car loft ihe factory it had plenty of
power, pep, speed; It gave you mileage. The cylinders were round and the pistons fit perfurtly with
a thousandth of an inch or so clearance. Hut now
after twenty or thirty thousand miles, your car
lacks its original power, pep and speed; it does
not give you the mileage it once did. Until recently tho only satisfactory remedy for oval cylinders
was re-grinding, but now with the Hall Cylinder
Cone we don't havo to take the motor out of the
chassis if the motor has a removable head, the
job is perfectly done in a few hours. We can give
you a 100% reconditioning job that we can absolutely guarantee—at a substantial saving of both time
and money. Bring in your car; let us give it the
old   time  power,   pep,   speed   and   mileage.
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzle with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
rE^r
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good service,  reasonable charges.
King George Hotel
BEST GROCERIES
| LOWEST POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
1GROCERYSTORE
Cor. Kill and Dunsmuir.
I Phone 122 Cumberland
number of pairs and one odd pig.
Can you show how Rory placed his
21 porkers in four pens so that each
contained an even number ot pairs
and an odd one?
Puzzle No. 122
Use a four-letter word, rearranging
the same letters each time, ln each
ot the blank spaces, and make good
sense of the following rhyme:
A old  woman on bent,
Put on her and away she went;
 she cried, as she went on her
way,
How are we going to today?
Puzzle No. 123
Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Jones were
selling aples on the same corner.
Mrs. S. was selling hers at the rate
of two for a cent while Mrs. J. sold
a smaller fruit at three for a cent.
Then Mrs. S. was called away and
she turned her affairs ovcr to Mrs. J.
who undertook to conduct both businesses ns a joint account. She combined lbc two stocks, containing a
like number ot apples, and dlsjosed
ot them at the rate ot five apples tor
two cents, which appeared to be the
right thing to do. However, when
Mrs. S. returned and their accounts
were balanced It was found that the
cash was just 7 cents short of what
their receipts would have been had
the women disposed ot their stocks
separately, at the original prices.
Nov, who can tell how many apples
were disposed ot In the Joint account?
Puzzle No. 124
Entire, I am capital,
Curtail me and I am still capital;
Behead and transpose me and
I am looking for capital.
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
In this column next week.
Answers to Last Week's Pussies
No. 115—The speculator's holdings
were worth $12,800 before the decline.
The $1,598 represented 799-800 of H
of his stock before the disastrous
foot of tape showed.
No. 116—The word NOVICE.
No. 117—Five 12-Inch candles maybe manipulated to serve the three
lodgers without waste tor six nights.
No. 118—LYNCH plus ARM minus
CHARM plus LASS plus OX minus
LASSO equals LYNX.
No. 119—The winning candidate received 3,000 votes, the second man
2,400 and the third, 1,800.
 T
USEFUL RECIPES
BUTTERSCOTCH LAVER FIE
This pie differs trom the ordinary
kind, in that It Is made up like cake.
Caramelize one quarter ot a cup ot
granulated sugar in an enameled ware
saucepan, over a slow Are. Watch
carefully and stir so that It docs not
"catch". Cream together one quarter
supful butter and one third cupful
flower. Add one cupful brown sugar,
three egg yolks, well beaten, and one
half teaspoonful salt. Add two cupfuls hot milk and the caramelized
sugar. Place In an enameled ware
double boiler which will insure the
delicate color and flavor ot thia
creamy Ailing. Stir constantly until
thickened.
Cut three rounds about a quarter
of an Inch thick ot a flaky pastry to
fit the bottom of the pie plate and
prick well with a fork. Bake In a
hot oven until delicately browned.
When tbe pastry and filling are
cool, put the pie together like a layer
cake with filling on top also. Cover
with a meringue made ot the three
egg  whites  beaten  with  alx table-
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
HSS
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/,-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
IES ASSORTED
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
PROGRAMME OF EVENTS IN UPPER ISLAND
SCHOOL SPORTS
Commencing 10:30 a.m., June 3rd. at Qualicum. AH schools
in the Inspectorate may enter ONE CONTESTANT for each
event or ONE TEAM, as the case may be. Please notify the
Secretary, Mr. Jack Fouracre, as soon as possible that your
school is entering and give the probable number of pupils you
QUALITY
-   WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
For the best quality
MEATS
plus service at reasonable prices
it pays to deal at
Wilcock Bros.
WE DELIVER ANYWHERE
A trial will be appreciated.
ICE FOR SALE IN SMALL OR LARGE
QUANTITIES
NOTE—We do not solicit orders under any business
name other than our own.
Lumber
In every sorts of building material*,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOM,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIID FLOORING!,
AND    FURNISH INO»
WE DELIVER TO ANYWH1M IN SHORT
NOT1CB WITH UKASONABLB OHAROIB.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 1I4X Courtenay
PHONES
.{
Ofllce: 159 Cumberland
EE
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
will have entering the sports as the Qualicum Committee wishes
to provida tea or milk to drink with the lunch which ^ach con
testant must provide. There will be stalls on the grounds to
serve refreshments, etc., at moderate prices to the general public.
There will be Challenge Cups and medals for prizes. The
Championship Cups will be as follows:
1. Champion High School—Colonist Cup.
2. Champion Public School of 5 divisions, or more—Eagles Cup.
3. Public Schools, 4 and 3 rooms—Malkin-Pearson Cup.
4. Champion 2-room Public School—To be secured.
5. Champion 1-room Public School—To be secured.
Other Cups are— PUBLIC SCHOOL
Boys' First Aid—Comox Argus Cup.       t
Girls' First Aid—R. Kaplansky Cup.
Boys' Relay. Girls' Relay.
Strathcona Trust Drilli—Lang Cup.
Tug of War—To be secured.
Boys i/> mile—R. Kaplansky.
Boys' 440 yards—G. E. Apps.
HIGH SCHOOL
Boys' First Aid.        Girls' First Aid.
Boys' Relay. Girls' Relay.
Tug of War.
The Championship Cup3 are for Annual Competition. The \->
mile and 440 yards Cups are won outright. All others are for
Annual Competition. The Committee will decide whether or
not they will become the property of the scliool when won three
times. Donations of $2.50 for purchase of silver medals are
required from possible sources. The Challenge Cups will be
awarded by allowing each school points os below:
a. All events entered count one point for the School.
b. First prize counts three points.
c. Second prize counts two points.
d. Third prize counts one point.
The Tug of War is excluded in computing points.
The events are—
HIGH SCHOOL SECTION
BOYS
1. 100 yards.
2. 220 yards.
3. 440 yards.
4. % mile.
6. Relay 440 yards.   Team of 4.
6. 3-Legged, 50 yards.
7. Run, Hop. Step and Jump.
8. Running Jump.
9. High Jump.
10. First Aid:
11. Tug of War.   Team of 8.
GIRLS
1. 100 yards.
2. 220 yards.
3. 440 yards Relay.   Team  of 4.
4. 3-Legged, 50 yards.
5. Egg and Spoon, 25 yds. return.
6. Skipping. 100 yards.
7. Nail  Driving.
8. Running Jump.
9. Baseball Throw (roll not counted)
10. First Aid.
11. Thread Needle, 50 yds. and return,
Boy and* Girl.
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
131R —PHONE— 131R
COURTENAY, B. C.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Fu". information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing the Department ot
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land BUltable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner ot the Land Recording Division, ln which the land applied for
ia situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must bo occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of 810 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
ApplicaUons are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timbcrland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of llrst-class (arable) land Is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land 82.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lauds In given In llulletVi
No. 10, Laad Sorles, "Purchase and
I,caso of Crown Lands."
.Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conch,ions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as bomesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the lirst year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding G40 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and tho range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued bnsed on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers.
campers aud travellers, up to ten
head.
MR. THOMAS RICKSON
HOST AT INFORMAL
DANCE AT WESTVIEW
PUBLIC SCHOOL SENIOR SECTION (12 and over).
BOYS
1. 100 yards.
2. 220 yards.
3. 440 yards.
4. M  mile.
5. Relay 440 yards.   Team of 4.
6. Three-Legged,  50 yards.
7. Physical Drill Contest, open to a
group of Ten with teacher. Ages
of pupils may be above or below
12, either boys or girls or both.
8. Hop, Step and Jump.
9. Running Jump.
10. High Jump.
11. First Aid Team of 5.
12. Tug of War.   Team of 8.
GIRLS
1. 100 yards.
2. 220 yards.
3. Relay 440 yards, Team of 4.
4. Three-Legged, 50 yards.
5. Egg and Spoon, 25 yards return.
6. Nail Driving.
7. Physical Drill Contest, open to a
group of Ten with teacher. Ages
of pupils may he above or below
12, either boys or girls or both.
8. Running Jump.
9. Skipping 100 yards.
10. Thread Needle,  50 yds.,  Boy and
Girl.
11. First Aid Team of 5.
12. Baseball Throw (roll not counted)
PUBLIC SCHOOL JUNIOR SECTION (Under 12 years).
BOYS
1. 75 yards.
2. Wheelbarrow,   50   yards.     Grasp
between knee and ankle.
3. Relay 220 yds.   Team of 4.
4. Sack Race, 60 yards.
5. Three-Logged, 50 yards.
6. Physical   Drill  Contest  combined
with Senior Section.
GIRLS
1. 75  yards.
2. Sack Race, 50 yards.
3. Relay 220 yards.   Team  of  4.
4. Three-Lcgged, 50 yards.
5. Egg nnd Spoon, 25 yds. return.
6. Physical   Drill   Contest   combined
with Senior Ejection
7. Skipping, 50 yards
8. Thread  Needle,  50  yards  return,
Boy and Girl.
9. Baseball Throw (roll not counted)
There were about 20
and   besides    enjoying
their favorite pastime were shown tlie
district by motor ns far as tlie roads
would    permit.     Tho    visitors    were
by almost every resident of the com-1 local bowlers
munlty.   The dance was held in the  in   the  party
new store premises, music was provided by a Wlidwood Orchestra, and
dancing, with Mr. Thomas McGuigan
as master of ceremonies, continued jbanquctted at thc hotel
until after midnight. Many were In
attendance from Powell River and
some friends came up from Vancouver
and across the gulf from Courtenay.
Since coming to the district Mr.
Rickson has made many friends and
the hospitality he showed on the
evening of Empire day has shown
what the public may expect in dealing
with him when his store is ready for
business.
LARGE ATTENDANCE AT
MYRTLE POINT DANCE
POWELL RIVER, May 26.—West-
view Is an adjunct of Powell River.
Some would call it Joyceville; others
think JlcGuigan's Comer sounds as
sweet and though .Mr. Rickson is not
guilty there are those who would call
it Rickson's Triangle. It matters not
how much romance one weaves into
the choosing of a substitute name for
Westvlew. it was "Joyville" on .Monday night, the 24th Instant, for then j POWELL RIVER.—Members of the
Mr. Thomas Rickson. who will shortly. Vancouver Lawn Bowling Club paid
open a business house, was host at a visit to Powell River over the week-
an informal dance that was attended end nnd enjoyed competition with the
POWELL RIVER.—Saturday night
the Community Club at Myrtle Point
camp of the Bloedel, Stewart & Welsh
camp held one of their monthly
dances. It was well attended, many
persons going to the camp from
Powell River. Some went by launch
while others took an evening stroll
over the trail from the present terminus of the highway. Four o'clock
saw the Riverites back home after
having had one great time.
CABINET MINISTERS
VISIT POWELL RIVER
LAWN BOWLERS VISIT
mums
AGE IN CASK
IS THE ONLY  "AGE'
COUNTS
THAT
cmify,
AGED IN OAK CASKS
aafflBM'Mra'Wffi^^^
POWELL RIVER, May 27.—Powell
River was honored this week by a
visit from four Provincial Government cabinet ministers, included In
thc .Ministerial parly were Hon. A. M.
Manson, Attorney General; Hon. J.
D. McLean, Minister of Education; '
Hon. W. H. Sutherland, Minister of
Public Works, and Hon. T. D. Put-
tullo. During their stay here the
Ministers made an inspection of the
paper mill and were shown over the
new wing which will be in operation
at the end of June or early in July.
It Is understood that the Hon. Mr.
Pattullo has signified his intention of
being present when the machinery
now being installed is ready to operate, when It is hoped to have him
take part In the ceremony that will
probably be held.
POWELL RIVER PERSONALS
POWELL RIVER.—Miss Dorothy
Creech, of Prince Rupert, is spending
a vacation as the guest of her grandfather. Mr. Charles Watson, and
friends.
Mr. Douglas McKcIlar made a business trip to Vancouver on Monday
last.
Thc American Steamship, "Hollywood." called this week and took on
a cargo of naper.
R. Kaplansky, of Vancouver, visited
Powell River on Tuesday and Wednesday.
TO LEASE OK FOB SALE—87 Acres
of Land near Royston. For further
particulars apply P. O. Box 502,
Cumberland . t.f.n.
I BARRELS    FOR    SALE—Apply    at
McBryde's Bakery, Courtenay, B.C.
tfn
Low Fares
Summer Excursions to the East
On sale dailv, May 22nd to September 15th.     Final
return limit, October 31st, 1926.
Winnipeg   djirr aft    st. paul
DULUTH «P I D.DU      MINNEAPOLIS
Toronto $118.05 Chicago $90.30
Ottawa  $132.25    Montreal  $1.37.05
Moncton  $152.20   Saint John  $152.20
Charlottetown  $156.85    New York  $151.70-
Quebec  $116.10
Halifax  $157.75
Boston  $157.76
(War Tax additional)
Fares to other destinations on application
Routing via       a^***^ff\ Routing via
Prince   Rupert      WVjEyaia (*r«*t Lakes
$13.00      VflWraa       $10.00
additional to •UjaaPpll        additional to
cover meals and       TtfTtvUSaH     cover meals and
berth. ^gflP^ berth.
Cumberland, B.C.      E. W. BICKLE      Telephone 35
WANTED—We want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1052 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.     l.f.n.
BABtfS
OWNa
SOW
ftrBabif
Wtu
'A'S.jA'*'1
gft
PROVINCIAL PUBLIC
WORKS DEPT.
Bituminous Surfacing, Island
Highway & Cumberland  Road.
TO MOTORISTS    During the preparation of the above  mails  for. and
pending the application of thc surface, drivers are reauested to travel
at  a speed  not   exceeding   twenty
miles per hour.
P. PHILIP,
Deputy Minister and
Public Works Engineer.
Victoria, n. C.
May 116th, 1X6. ■<■• .>;;
BMBBBWBilaOTIaMWlWIfleTOaWa
Giinjberlarjd I
'"    Uni I'I      **•   I
un rj vnt.i   ruiommiHH
ACCOMMODATION THK rest 1
3 Cnmmercl,
giH.a'Jquarltr
Roona  Steam  Healed
I
Wa MEltHIKIEI.I),  Prop.        1
'siBiaiBisiBEiarsiBisiaiaisiBiBM
A PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1026.
News of Interest
From  Sutherland's
This week we have received some
new Trlcoline suitable for Ladies'
Dresses. They come in stripe effects
and will make pretty dresses. Price
$1.50 per yard, 3(i inches wide.
New Broadcloths -An express shipment of novelty stripes in tliis mos!
serviceable material, two qualities to
choose from, either of which will give
you the utmost satisfaction for your
money.   Prices $l.-*0 and $1.25 yard.
NniiK'lieck liiili'isllps—Two dozen
new Nahi check Underslips in shades
of pink, blue, fawn and while. A real
good quality and made In full style.
Price $1.00 each.
ltremlclotli Slips-Most of the wanted shades, In a nice quality of cloth,
Price $1.50 each.
(renin Laces—We have some new
laces which have just arrived and
are very much In demand these days.
Three widths. Prices 86c, BOc, and
75c per yard.
l>niKH Trimmings- Some colored
trimmings have just come to hand,
and comprise the very latest shadings.
Mark Iitistr<i Rompers—For baby
we have just what every mother will
want. Mack Lustre Rompers made
very full, and of a good quality, sizes
6 months to 2 years, and the price
is only  $1.25.
>'ew Press Goods—Rayon Crepes.
Voiles, and many other new materials suitable for summer dresses; we
have a very large choice of material
and  would sugest  your  inspection.
Ladies Art Silk Hose—fWe would
remind you of this popular line, and
the many colorings we carry in stock,
and  our  leader  at  .$1.00  per pair.
At Sutherland's
PASTOR HONORED ON
EVE OF DEPARTURE
At a social evening in Grace United
Church Wednesday evening, the congregation bade farewell to their pastor, Rev. J. R. Butler, and his wife
and family, who left this morning.
(Friday), for Falkland. B. C, where
Mr. Butler will take over the ministerial duties of the United Church.
There was a large number present
Wednesday evening and a most enjoyable time was had. Dainty refreshments were served hy the Ladies
Aid, and recitations from Mrs. Geo.
Richardson, Mr. Alex. Henderson and
Mr. Butler were greatly appreciated.
Mr. Henderson brought about the
real purpose of the gathering when
he presented Mr. Butler, on behalf
of the congregation, with a fine club
bag. and Mrs. Butler with a beautiful set of cutlery. Both feelingly responded, Mr. Butler speaking of the
pleasant relations existing between
himself and congregation here in
Cumberland and his regret at having
to bid farewell to his many friends.
He hoped that the United Church iu
Cumberland would have a lino future
under its new pastor. Rev. J. R. Hewitt, who will arrive here next Thursday.
Lieut.-Col. Charles W. Villiers, Gen- j
eral manager of the Canadian Collier-'
ies (Dunsmuir), Ltd., accompanied by |
Lady Kathleen, arrived in Cumberland
on Thursday evening after spending
a short vacation in Victoria and
Seattle.
Miss Ella Henderson, of Granby,
was in Cumberland over the holiday.
She was the guest of MIsb S. Brown.
Miss Louise Pironi, of Vancouver,
Is the guest of Mias Mary Picketti, of
Pendrlth Avenue.
Personal Mention
CAMPBELL RIVER NOTES
.Mr. E, Haines, ot Victoria, was a
visitor here for a few days recently.
A "Brownie Tea" Is to be held on
the Annex grounds on Friday, May
28th. Everyone come and support
lhe little order,
The many friends of Mrs. Cecil
Joyce, of Valdez Island, will be sorry
lo hear that she is at present very ill
In St. Joseph's Hospital at Comox.
Mr. Urewer, of Victoria, was a visitor to Campbell Itivcr for a few days.
Ho is en route North.
Mrs. L. Titus, of Seattle, ls at present at Buttle Lake where she intends
to reside tor the summer In her residence there.
Tlic following are a few names of
Ihose registered at Forbes Landing
over the week-end: Mr. and Mrs. Hogg
of Victoria, Mr. and Mrs. Setchell of
Victoria, Mr. and Mrs. Alex. McDer-
mend of Victoria. Mr. and Mrs. C. P.
Klrkland of Bellingham, Wash., Mr.
and Mrs. Crimslon of Denman Island,
Mr. It. Graham of Denman Island, Mr.
L. Crimston of Glasgow, Scotland.
Mr. H. It. Evans, of the Department
of .Marine and Fisheries, ls expected at Campbell Lake, Forbes Landing,
within a short period, with 50,000
Kainloop trout eyed eggs. The Kam-
loop trout eyed eggs planted last
year and the year previous, show
rapid growth, weighing up to 1% lbs.
Mr. H. B. Frlele, of Seattle, owner
of the yacht 'Tuckahoe," called in at
Campbell niver on Sunday. He is
now on his way north.   Mr.
Mr. Jim Anderson, of the Provincial Police force, with his wife and
family, left Courtenay this week for
Prince Hupert, Mr. Anderson having
been appointed to that district.
A delightful little Bridge party was
held at the residence ot Dr. and Mrs.
Hicks on Friday evening, the winners
of the prizes being Mrs. Shortt and
Mrs. Stevens, aud Messrs Tarbell and
Robinson.
There wlll be an Informal "Parlsh-
at-home" held In the Vicarage Garden
on Saturday afternoon between the
hours of 3:30 nnd 6:00 p.m., when
members of the congregation of Holy
Trinity Church are Invited to be
present.
Mrs. H. S. McCune and son, Billy,
of Seattle, were the guests of Mrs. H.
Farmer for tlie past week.
Miss Ethel Jones, of Nanaimo, is
visiting hor sister, Mrs. H. Devlin of
the New Townsite.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Bennle ,of Nanaimo,
with their sons, Larry and James,
wcre the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H.
Devlin over the holiday.
REV. J. R. HEWITT, B.A.,
WILL BE NEW PASTOR
The Rev. J. R. Hewitt, B.A., of
Duncan, ls expected to arrive ln this
city on June 2nd or 3rd to take
charge of the Cumberland United
Church which was organized on Tuesday evening by the amalgamation of
St. George's and Grace Uulted Churches, and if the enthusiasm manifested
at this initial organization meeting ls
any indication ot what might be anticipated for the future the Cumberland United Church will make a very
strong contribution to the religious
and social life of the community.
Mr. Hewitt is a graduate in Arts
from Manitoba University and in
theology trom Victoria Theological
Seminary, Toronto. He is a returned
man, having spent two years overseas, enlisting in the Divisional Signal Corps, and is a member of the
Masonic order. Previous to his pastorate at Duncan, Mr. Hewitt served
terms on three United charges, Anyox, Endaco, and Hazelton, und for two
Mr.  and   Mrs.  E.   S.  McNames,  of.
Vancouver, nre holidaying in the city, j J™" J"M ^IT",:.'..**. ^L ^I
the guests of Mr. and Mra. C.
Brown.
Mr. and Mrs. William MacFadyen,
of Vancouver, spent last week-end in
Cumberland, the guests ot Mr. and
Mrs.  N.  MacFadyen,  Dunsmuir Ave.
Mr. John Shortt, of Vancouver,
spent a few days in Cumberland this
week, returning to the terminal city
yesterday morning.
Miss Florence Sehl, of thc staff of
the Cumberland General Hospital, will
leave tomorrow morning tor Victoria
on a short holiday trip.
Rev. and Mrs. F. Comley are in the
City, the guests of Mr. and MrB. T.
H. Mumford. Mr. Comley Is a form-
er parson ot Holy Trinity Anglican
Church and Is here to take part in
the thirtieth anniversary commemoration  services next Sunday.
Rev. A. Bischlager.of Duncan will
Frlele is j he the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. Idlens
general manager of the "Nakat Corporal ion  Co." of Ketchican.
Mr. Frank Doland, of Seattle, one
of the members of the yacht "Tuckahoe," took seriously ill on Sunday
and was brought to the Campbell
itlver for medical attention. He was
rushed immediately to St. Joseph's
Hospital where he underwent an operation and is progressing favorably.
Mr. J. Lawler and Mr. Lome Higgins were visitors to Campbell River
over the week-end.
Dr. L. E. Page, of Vancouver, is a
guest of Dr. and Mrs. R. Zelgler this
week.
.Mr. and Mrs. James Forbes and son
of Campbell Lake, left for Vancouver
on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. S. Ritchie and son returned home from a visit to the States
on Sunday.
of Royston for the next few days.
He will take part ln Holy Trinity's
thirtieth anniversary commemoration
services next Sunday.
MAGNIFICENT CUP
WON BY CAMPBELL
RIVER CHILDREN
FOR THE BENEFIT OF
FIREMEN
"The Still Alarm," one of the
foremost pictures of the year,
will be shown at the Ilo-llo on
Monday and Tuesday of next
week for the benefit of the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Brigade.^
Buy a ticket from one of the
Firemen and help along the
boys.
presbytery. He is deeply Interested
In religious education and has specialized in young people's work. He will
commence his pastorate In Cumberland United Church the first Sunday
In June.
•   •   *
The Rev. James Hood, pastor of St.
George's United Church, who goes to
a church in Victoria, wlll preach his
farewell sermon in St. Georges. Cumberland, on Sunday evening, May 30.
ST. Ctijjft$B&
ORATED
Serves
the ,
feurbose oi
fresh snilh ana
cream, for its
simply >u*e
cfivt-tkiry
Useii   -.«,
wherever m
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. R. H. Robertson and family
wish to express their sincere thanks
for floral tributes and expressions ot
I sympathy in their recent bereavement
and to those who placed their autos
  : at our disposal.    Thanks   are   also
CAMPBELL HIVER, May 26.—The'tendered Dr. MacNaughton and Dr.
Campbell River and Valdez Island Hicks and the matron and staff of
children couldn't have had a more tue Cumberland Hospital for their
pleasant day than Monday, May 24th, j unfailing attention and kindnesses to
for their joint sports day.   Thc visit- " '      "'"** """**
iug competitors left Campbell River! 1" ">e Hospital,
wharf at 9:00 o'clock sharp, arriving'
at the sports Held at 10:30.   The parents also turned out in good order to
give encouragement to all the child- ]    Ml** and Mrs. E. Aida, (Cumberland
ren laklng part. Tailor), desire to express their heart-
Points were given as follows: three'.felt thanks for the numerous expres-
tor lirsts, two for Beconds, and one slons of sympathy and kindnesses
for thirds. The Campbell River child-(shown at thc loss of a loving daught-
ren won hy a score of 180 points to j er. Thanks are also extended their
Valdez Islanders 123, thereby winning j Occidental and Japanese friends for
a beautiful silver cup, to be kept In
their school until next year, when the . kind
same cup will again he competed for,
at Campbell  River. |
the late Mr. Robertson while a patient
CARD OF THANKS
the ben ut if ul floral tributes and their
' spite
COAST LEAGUE STAMIIMiS
Goals
Cumberland  -
Ladysmith  	
Nanaimo  	
Westminster .
St. Saviours ...
Varsity 	
St. Andrews ...
North Shore .
Victoria Vets .
P. W.
15 11
16 11
14 8
Hi 7
II 7
15 5
16
14
12
4 8
3 II)
1 11
attendance  at  the  funeral   In
of the Inclement weather, and
to Drs. MacNaughton and Hicks and
thc nursing staff of the Hospital for
their unfailing kindness.
USED
CARS
30
DAYS
Guarantee
Ford Touring, late model....$350
Ford Touring, less than 1
year old   475
Ford Sedan   450
Ford Light Delivery   125
Chevrolet Touring,
less than 1 year old.... 650
TERMS ON ANY CAR
Corfield Motors
Limited
Ford Dealers
Phones 46 and 48»
Court i-iiny
D. F. A. Pt.
2 61 25 24
1 42 25 23
2 38 23 18
4 41 30 18
1 32 40 16
2 26 43 12
3 24 30 11
1 22 28   7 i
0 21 64   2
AUCTION   SALE
E. Kclix Thomas, favored with instructions from the
Rev. W. T. Beatty (whu is leaving to assume his new
duties at Grand Forks), will sell all his excellent and
well-kept Household Furniture and Effects including
handsome dining room suite; bed room suites; vugs;
kitchen furniture, etc., on
Wednesday, June 2nd, 1926
Commencing at 1 ;4G p.m. at the Presbyterian Manse,
Lake Trail, Courtenay. For full particulars see the
posters or
E. FELIX THOMAS
AUCTIONEER
Phones 151 and 24L. Courtenay, B. C.
PROTECTION against
"runs" Is nothing new. But
Monarch Green Stripe gives
you double protection — the
Green Stripe and another "stop
run" a few inches below it.
Pure thread silk — for sheen;
fibre silk reinforcement — for
wear. Every newest shade. #1
—an example of the values in
all Monarch-Knit Hosiery from
75cto*i2.00. At all good dealers.
MONARCH SSffi
"*era;
4\
Hnd Offlcl
F*
Dunnvtlle, Ont
IrW^i^F'VFP^^VV^r^^F.-^^WP
Visit our
Ice Cream
Dept.
SERVICE WITH A SMILE
PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS
OUR ICE CREAM IS MADE FROM THE FINEST
OF RICH INGREDIENTS UNDER THE MOST
SANITARY CONDITIONS
Children delight in Lang's Ice Cream because
"IT'S PURE!"
"BEAUTY SHOP" Special Sundae 35«?
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
The Talk & Town
the
More than 800 people saw
THE BEAUTY
SHOP
In Courtenay on Tuesday and Wednesday Nights, and
more than 800 people declare it to be much the biggest
and best show ever seen in this district.
Ask your friend.who saw it
A Real Musical Comedy Staged and Dressed in
Metropolitan Style.
CAST    AND    CHORUS    OF    SIXTY    ARTISTS
TONIGHTONLY
Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland
Prices: 75c. and $1.00
Curtain at 8:15.
(Worth Double)
Try and get in]
Cumberland Supply   Co.
Rickson's Old Stand — Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland
You have only to walk into our Store to Save Money.
Our prices are the lowest in the District and
Our Quality excells.
SPECIALS FOR TODAY
3 tb. Family block Alberta Butter  $1.25
Brookfield*  Butter,  per  tb    .40
Cnadlan  Cheese, pel'  Ib    .80
ilulk Dates, 3  lbs. for     .25
Quaker  Tomatoes,  21/.','s 16
Quaker Corn,  per can   15
Heinz Tomato Ketchup      Si
G lb. tin Golden Syrup     ,55
Small White Beans, 4 lbs. tor     .25
AGENTS FOR SHELLY'S BREAD AND CAKES
Quick Quaker Rolled Oats      .81
Heinz Malt Vinegar, 32 oz    .46
Lux. 2 packages for     Si
Fcls Naptha Soap, per carton     .<•
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY CO.
Phone 155 P. O. Box 205
Miss Harriet Horbury left Thursday morning for Hazelton where she
will holiday for the next six months.
Mr. John Cosette and Miss Emma
Cosette, of Vancouver, are visiting
friends In Cumberland.
Among the out-of-town visitors In
attendance at the funeral ot the late
Mr. R. H. Robertson were Mr. and
Mrs. Holcomb and daughter, of
Seattle; Mr. and Mrs. J. Gillespie, of
Victoria; and Mrs. Louisa Bell, also
of Victoria.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Those wishing to journey to Qualicum on the special train leaving
Royston at 8:30 on the morning ot
June the 3rd. to view the school
sports, are advised to get their tlok-
etB In advance as the ticket selling
facilities at Royston are not enough
to cope with a large number of purchasers at one time. Tickets will be
on sale at Courtenay Station on the
afternoon of June 2nd. and ln Cumberland on the evening of June 2nd.
(time and place will be announced
to the school children during the
week). The return fare has been set
at 12.05 for adults and for children
over 5 and under 12 the fare will be
$1.00.   Children under 5 free.
Tho school hopes to provide contestants with transportation. Everybody else desiring to go are urged to
obtain their tickets on the evening
of June 2nd. The school boards of
Cumberland and Courtenay have been
enthusiastic enough to undertake the
necessary guarantee required by.the
E. and N. Railway. Back up their
faith by using the "sports special" on
June 3rd.

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