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The Cumberland Islander Feb 11, 1922

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Array Provincial Lihrwy
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
U
With which .Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR—No. 6.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1922.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
School Board Estimates
Amounted To $24,000
Trustees' Figures Adopted by Council—Question of New Heating
System for Old School Laid Over—Mr. Harrison Retained as
City Solicitor—City Estimates Take Up Considerable Time
of City Fathers.
His Worship Mayor MacDonald was in the chair and there was
a full attendance of aldermen at Monday night's meeting of the
City Council, when the estimates of expenditures as set by the
Board of School Trustees were presented. This year the estimates
amount to $24,897.50, which is an increase over last year's estimates, ?22,110. However, the trustees ^exceeded the estimates
last year, and a total sum of $25,364.37 was handled by them in
the course of the year. Some of this was money derived from the
poll-tax revenue.
The trustees' figures were closely scrutinized by the aldermen
and after full discussion, on motion of Aid. Parnham, seconded by
Aid. Pickard, a motion was adopted that the council pass the
estimates as presented, except of the heating plant, that to be left
until later, when the government will be asked to assist.
New Hospital Needed.
In   discussing   tho   estimates,  Aid.
Thomson  thought some steps should
School Estimates.
The following is the detailed estimates supplied by tbe Boar dot School
Trustees:
(Salaries   $18,620.00
Janitor     2,100.00
Medical Inspection       200.00
Secretary       160.00
Fuel       860.00
Water        150.00
Light         2B.O0
Instalment on grounds      600.00
Levelling and fencing      360.00
Repairs          300.00
Supplies  1       600.00
Insurance        202.60
Seats, desks and blackboard     300.00
Transportation, Royston       120.00
Total ordinary expenses.... $24,397.60
Estimate for heating plant, hot
water, $6200, or it considered more advisable, the hot air furnaces could be
renewed at a cost of about $1000.
Mr. Wlllard wrote that the storm
water was running from Third Street
into the yards of hiB premises, causing inconvenience to his tenants. This
matter was referred to the Board of
Works.
Bills and Accounts.
Telephone Co., service     9.60
Islander, advertising    27.60
Printing    136.67
R. E. Frost, supplies      7.25
Repairs to Fire Truck    37.70
Supplies for Fire Dept     8.40
Canadian Collieries, coal    16.60
Returning officer  -    26.00
Hargreaves & Smith      1.20
Premium on City Clerk's bond..    6.00
Auditor's fee     36.00
City Clerk $ 60.00
City Teamster  120.00
Chief ot Police   110.00
A recommendation was received
from the Police Commissioners that
the Trades Licence Bylaw and Traffic
Bylaw be revised and brought up to
date. Alter discussion, further consideration was laid over until next
meeting.
The Cumberland & Union Water
Works Co. Ltd. notified the council
that the charge per hydrant would be
$10 each per year. They also asked
that the council make a reduction in
the $70 licence fee now charged the
Water Company.
' The aldermen considered the charge
a reasonable one, considering the taxes
paid by the company, and a motion
was carried that the rate be accepted
and the company notified that the
trades licence fee will be dealt with
when the Licence Bylaw is revised.
Communications.
The Liquor Control Board communicated with the council to the effect tbat
the date for dealing with rebates on
licences paid by hotelkeepers would
expire on March 31 next. The city
clerk was Instructed to attend to the
matter.
Mr. Harrison Retained as Solicitor.
The reply received from Mr. P. P.
Harrison In connection with the request of the council for his conditions
to act as city solicitor, was read and
discussed, and on motion his proposal
was accepted. This calls tor tbe payment of $200 per year.
The Memorial Hall Lot.
The deeding of the Memorial Hall
lot to the Returned Soldiers' Friendly
Society was again up for discussion.
Mayor MacDonald reported that he
and the city clerk and a committee of
the society had held a meeting, and
the latter were quite agreeable that If
the society became defunct or fell below a membership of five, or In default ot payment in taxes, that the lot
would revert to the city.
On motion of Aid. Beveridge, seconded by Aid. Parnham, a motion was
carried asking the society to draw
up the agreement to this effect and
submit it to the council.
Committees' Estimates.
" The Mayor asked the various committees to submit their estimates for
work during the current year, whleh
were as follows:
Aid. Thomson, chairman of the
Board of Works, said their estimated
expenditure would run about $2000, as
per the report submitted at last meeting.
Aid. Bannerman, for the Fire Wardens, said their estimated expenditure would call for about $1000, made
up of $760 for alterations to the fire
hall, of which the Fire Brigade would
pay half; moving hydrant, $70; painting all hydrants, $30; new hydrant at
Fourth and Derwent, say $125; Fire
Hall 'expenses, $350.
• The Light Committee, said Aid.
Bickard, figured their ordinary expanses at about $100, for replacing
fixtures in different parts of the city.
He mentioned that the Bavlng to the
city under the reduced rate would
amount to about $112 this year.
be taken towards providing a fund
for the erection of a new hospital.
The one now in use is old, out of date
aud uneconomical. He thought the
government would do something towards It, if approached.
Aid. Parnham quite agreed with the
necessity for a new building, but
thought the present time Inopportune.
Mr. Mordy Biiul the matter had been
discussed by the Board of Directors of
the hospital, and the president, Mr
Charles Graham, wanted the matter
laid over for the present, though the
matter should he kept in view.
CORRESPONDENCE
To the Editor,
Cumberland Islander.
Sir,—1 wonder if It Is possible to
prevent children from scribbling their
names, etc. (the etc. often being a
wonderful tribute to the mental processes of the Cumberland Juvenile)
with colored chalks all over tbe War
Memorial Monument.
One would think that between tho
returned soldiers and public Interest
in the monument generally, that this
could be stopped.
TIIE ARCHITECT.
"THE SHEIK"
The Picture That is Crowding
Houses Wherever Shown is
Here Friday and Saturday
The most talked of picture of the
past year, "The Sheik," Is being
screened at the Ilo-llo Theatre Friday
and Saturday. It Is a picturizatlon of
the book, which the whole country's
rending. tieorge Melford has turned
it ipto a motion picture, bigger even
than the book. With Agnes Ayros as
the girl and Rudolph Valentino as the
Arab chief who captures her, "Tho
Shiek has drawn the largest crowd of
people that ever attended any performance In the history of entertainment.
In New York City, 112,620 saw "The
Sheik" In one week.
In addition to this special feature,
there are the usual comedy reels and
"Mutt and Jeff."    There   will   be   a
matinee Saturday at 2.30 p.m.
Amateur Nlglit Monday.
The management of the llo-Ilo Is
starting an amateur night, when some
of tho best of local talent will perform. Cash prizes will be given lo the
performers getting the most applause
from tho audience. The first prize is
$5.00, the second $;i.U0 and the third
$2.00.
A full programme of pictures will
be shown also, consisting of Alice
Lake In "Over the Wire," and comedy
pictures. The, amateur performance
will take place between the first and
second shows.
CITY BAND WILL GIVE
CONCERT AT BEVAN
Special Train Will Leave Cumberland at 6 o'clock, Returning at 8.15
The. Cumberland City Band will give
one of their popular concerts at Bevan
on Sunday evening next. The committee of the Uevun Athletic Club have
granted tho use of the hull for that
purpose. A good programme has
been drawn up for the occasion, and
In addition to the band numbers, several vocal artists will also assist. TITe
programme ns arranged Is as follows:
1. "Route March," Band.
2. Grand selection, "A Day Wi' Rob-
hie Burns," Band.
3. Song, Mrs. J. Balrd.
4. Overture, "Iron Count," Band.
6. Cornet Solo (triple-tongue), Mr.
H. Murdock.
6. Song, Mr. Sam. Hatfield.
7. Selection, "Gem of Scotia," Band.
"   8. March, "Swinging Along," Band.
The concert committee has arranged
for a special train to leave Cumberland station at 6 p.m., returning nt
8.10.   Tho concert starts at 0.45.
WHIST DRIVE AND
DANCE NEXT WEEK
On Friday night of next week the
Women's Auxiliary of the G. W. V. A.
will hold another of the series of fortnightly whist drives and dances, whicli
are becoming more popular each time.
Last week there was a record attendance, $43 being cleared above all expenses,. In the whist drive tho winners were: Pii-Bt lady, Mrs. Parkinson,
consolation, Mrs. Marpole; first gent,
Mr. P. Monte; consolation, Mr. Pilling.
Chas. Parnham       Important Soccer
Now Fire Chief    Game On Sunday
Mr. Banks Retires After Fifteen
Years in the Position—28
Members on Roll
A meeting of (he Cumberland Volunteer Fire Brigade was held on Monday
night, when the principal business was
the election of officers.
Fire Chief Bank declined nomination and Deputy Chief C. J. Parnham
was elected to fill the'Important position. Much more responsibility now
attaches to tills office than previously,
as the new Fire Act gives wide powers
to the Fire Chief. On the City Council
ratifying the appointment he practically assumes the duties of Fire
Marshal, under Mr. Thomas, who was
here a couple of weeks ago.
Fire Chief Parnham will have the
hearty co-operation of every member
of the brigade, as be Is liked by all,
and his executive ability will be a decided asset to tho position.
Mr. Baiiks now holds the position ot
Honorary Chief. It Is greatly to Mr.
Banks efforts that the Cumberland
Fire Brigade is in ils present efficient
slate, both as regards the members
and equipment He has been active In
tiie organization since its inception In;
the early days ol' Cumberland, and for
15 years held the position of chief.
The brigade lias a membership of
20 at present, and two applications.
The meeting passed a hearty vote of
thanks to Mr. Banks for his splendid
services to file organization.
Officers Elected.
Firo Chief—C. J. Parnham.
Deputy Chief—J. Cameron.
Captains—A. Thomson (re-elected),
U. Grant (re-elected), Frank Slaughter
and Fraser Watson.
Drivers—J. Cameron, C. Grant, R.
Thomson and A. Thomson.
Secretary—A. MacKinnon, (re-elected).
Distribution of Fund.
Regarding the disposition of the
money collected for the men after the
recent lire, the meeting decided to
divide the remainder equally among
the members after certain claims had
been paid.
Annuul Masquerade on March 17,
The annual masquerade ball will be
held on the night of St. Patrick's Day,
March 17.   Arrangements are now in
hand to make this a big success.
Cumberland United to Play the
Ladysmith Team on the
Latter's Grounds
A lecture that will create great interest, purtclularly as being a sequence
to the very able one given here recently by Pro. Schofield, will be given
in the Lecture Hall of the Cumberland
Literary aud Athletic Association on
Saturday, February 25. This lecture
will deal with life on the earth from
the very earliest ages, millions of
years ago, from the early shell-fish to
(lie later and higher forms of life.
Ladles are Invited to attend this
lecture and no doubt the hall will be
crowded to capacity.
HEAD OF ROYAL ARCH
MASONS HERE SHORTLY
Grand First Principal Morrison
Will Make Official Visit
Early in March
Information lias been received by
officers of Cyrus Chapter No. 10, that
Most Excellent Companion D. H. Morrison, Grand First Principal of the
Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons
of B. G., will pay an official visit to
tills Chater on March 14.
Later In the week there will be a
re-union of all the Island Chapters at
Victoria. Last year the re-union took
place In Cumberland, when a large
number of visitors attended.
Installation of Officers.
The installation ceremony of Cyrus
Chapter No. 10, G. R. ot B. C, took
plnce__rcccntly, when officers for 1922
were duly Installed. Very Ex. Comp.
T. H. Carey; G. S. S. of the Grand
Chapter of B. 0., performed the cere-
mony of installation, and was assisted
by Very Kx. Comp. W. R. Griffiths, of
Nanaimo. as Director of Ceremonies.
Ex. Companion B. Jones occupies
Ihe position of First Prlncipul Z. The
other officers are as follows:
Ex. Comp. T, Mordy, I.P.Z.
Ex. Comp. B. S. Abrams, 2nd P. H.
Ex, Comp. A. C. Dunn. 3rd P. J.
Ut. Ex. Comp. C. J. Parnham, S. E.
Comp. J. Walton, S.N.
Comp. A. E. Jeffrey, P.S.
Comp, T. Rickson, S.S.
Comp, It. E. Stevens, J.S.
Comp. Hen II. Gowen, M. 4th V.
Comp, E. Mugtord, M. 3rd V.
Comp. M. Williamson, M. 2nd V.
Comp. B, n. IMokard, M, 1st V.
Comp. J. Raid, Tyler.
Comp, .1. Cnmpboll and Comp. C. F.
Smith, SlewnrdB.
RALLY AN I) SMOKER
TOR EX-SERVICE MEN
AND THEIR FRIENDS
A rally and smoker for ex-service
men and their friends will be held by
the O. W. V. A. on Saturday, In the
Memorial Hull, commencing at 7.30
o'clock, A i plendld programme of
music, etc., has been arranged by
Comrade Harry Jackson and the Entertainment Committee.
Refreshments and smokes aplenty
will be provided and all ex-service
men and friends are cordially ipvited
to attend and iiavc a good time.
Admission will be by programme.
50 cents each,
BADMINTON CLUB WHIST
DRIVE AND DANCE WILL
TAKE PLACE TONIGHT
The whlsl drive and dance to be
held tonight (Friday) under auspices
of the Cumberland Badminton Club
promises lo lie a most successful
affair. Visitors from tho Courtenay
Badminton Club are coming up In
force (probably to give ihe Cumberland players tlle "once over" before
issuing the much talked of challenge).
The hall lias been tastefully decorated
tor the occasion. Whist start promptly
at 8 and dancing at 10. Music for the
dance will ho supplied by Mrs. U. E.
Frost, Mr. W. A. Owen and Mr. Plump.
The Cumberland United soccer team
travels to Ladysmlth on Sunday morning to meet tho last-stopping Ladysmlth eleven. The management of
ihe southern learn are leaving nothing
to chance, and are reported to be
fielding their strongest possible team.
There is keen rivalry between the two
leanis, as both Jimmy Strang aud
Andy Home, both former members of
the Cumberland team, are now with
Uidysmtlh.
The following players will make the
trip, the actual team not being picked
until just prior to the game: Boyd,
Campbell (cap)..), Stewart, Irvine,
Conti, G'Donnell, Hitchens, Milllgan,
Sutherland, Plump, Apploby, Brewster
and Harrison.
The result of the game will be published on the bulletin board at Jim
English's pool room as Boon as received.
PROFESSOR WILLIAMS
LECTURES HERE SHORTLY
BOARD OF MANAGEMENT
WILL MEET NEXT WEEK
The Board of Management of the
Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association will hold a meeting on the
evening of the first day the mines are
idle. The meeting will be held in the
lecture hall at 7 o'clock. Important
business is to be transacted.
BIG DANCE ON TUESDAY
IN THE ILO-ILO HALL
The Knights of Pythias, Benevolence
Lodge No. 14, will hold a big St. Valentine dance in the llo-Ilo Hall on
Tuesday night. Mr. P. Monte!s Orchestra will supply the music, and refreshments will be served.
VALENTINE TEA ON
TUESDAY AFTERNOON
The Ladles' Aid of Grace Methodist
Church will hold a Valentine Tea on
Tuesday afternoon next, in the school
room, from 3 to 6 o'clock.
Sale of Work In March.
At their usual monthly meeting on
Wednesday last, the society decided to
hold a sale of work at the end of
March. Further Information will be
given later.
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
BALL IS POSTPONED
At a special meeting of the Women's
Auxiliary of the General Hospital it
was decided to postpone the ball until
later date. It was Intended to hold
the ball during the third week of this
month, but the time was rather short
for preparation.
A typographical error crept Into the
balance sheet of the auxiliary published last week. The total receipts
should have read $1060.70.
JUNIOR FOOTBALL TEST
MATCH AT UNION BAY
SATURDAY AFTERNOON
The Junior football test match between No. 2 and No. 3 teams will toko
place at Union Bay on Saturday after-
uoou. For the convenience of those
Inking part in the game an auto bun
hns been engaged, whicli will leave
tho Post Office at 1.30 o'clock sharp.
The teams to take the field are as
follows:
No. i Team—Fouracre (H. S.), Roh-
crtsoSi (B.), Walker (C.I, Marshall
(U. B), Mitchell (C), Fielding (B),
Auchinvole (U. B.), H. Strachan (C),
Keenan (B.), Watson (H.S.), Searle
(U. B.).
No. 8 Team—Boffy (C), J. Stevenson (H. S.), H. Stewart (H. S.), Williams (B.), Johnstone (U. B.), Lock-
hart (C), Parks (B.). JoneB (H. S.),
Altken (B.), Michell (H. S.). Frelonl
(C),
Mr. Jones, referee
BASKETBALL LEAGUE
MEETS TUESDAY NIGHT
A meeting of the Comox District
Basketball League will he held in tho
Athletic Club hall Tuesday evening
at 7.30 sharp. Everyone Interested la
asked to attend as several Important
matters are to be discussed. One of
these Is bb to whether, or not another
round will be played. All interested
are invited to attend.
NEW MEAT MARKET
STORE NEARLY FINISHED
Mr. A. W. Riglor, the contractor for
flic now store being erected on the corner opposite the Post filcc for Camp
bell's Meat Market, haB made quick
progress with the work. It Is now al-
moBt completed and the butcher will
shortly take possession.
Board Of Trade Starts
Drive For 100 Members
Lively Interest Manifested at Meeting on Wednesday Night—
President Sutherland Wants to Make it a UK) Per Cent. Live
Organization—Many Residents Said In Be Buying Commodities in Courtenay—Charges That Prices Too High Here.
• If the Cumberland Hoard of Trade had been more or less quiet
of recent months, maybe it was only resting, for it certainly "came
back" with a whoop on Wednesday night, and started off the year's
activity with every evidence of doing good work. Mr. John
Sutherland was elected president, and on taking the chair; he at
once promoted a drive for 100 members. Matters of importance
dealt with were the inauguration of a better mail service, the high
freight rates, the county judgeship, and, a question that brought
on a warm discussion, the matter of residents going to Courtenay
for goods.
"Owing to the Council Chamber bo- McCarthy, A.  C.   i.yum. T.   II.  Mum
ing occupied by the Court of Revision
the meeting was held In the Flro Hall.
Mr. A. MacKinnon, president, occupied the chair, and there were alBo
present Messrs. J. Walton, secretary,
A. C. Lymn, F. A. McCarthy, S. Davis,
Q. W. Clinton, L. Slovene, P, P. Harrison, W. Gordon, W. P. Symons, J.
Sutherland, A. J. Fouracre, J. W.
Cooke, R. E. Frost, B. W. Bickle, Dr.
E. R. Hicks and Dr. O. K. MacNaughton.
The minutes of the previous meeting
were read and adopted and the financial statoment ot Mr. T. II. Carey,
treasurer, read, aB follows:
Cash on hand, Feb. 1921 $109.67
Roceipts for 1921   140.00
Total  $249.67
I
Expenditure for 1921 $188.80
Baiance, cas hon hand    60.87
Protest Against High Freight Hates.
A resolution forwarded by tho B. C.
Lumber aud Shingle Manufacturers'
Association, Ltd., was read and freely
discussed. This referred to the high
freight rates prevailing on lumber,
especially since the big increase went
into effect in September of last year.
It waB shown that the present high
rates are mainly responsible for the
stagnation In the lumber, shingle and
logging industries, aB well as affecting adversely other industries.   -
Freight Is 71) Per Cent, of Cost!
The startling statement was made in
the communication that no less than
60 per cent, ot the total cost to the
retail dealer at prairie points was
freight rate, aud further east it went
to 70 per cent, and over.
Tbe association asked that the old
rates be restored. The meeting ap
proved of the resolution and endorsed
It.
It was pointed out by one speaker
that these rates were responsible for
the closing down of the mills and
logging camps on the Island, as orders had to be refused.
The Mall Service.
A communication from the Courtenay Board of Trade re tbe mall service, and suggesting that an auto mall
service from Nanaimo to instituted,
brought on a long discussion.
It was pointed out that the present
mall service Is the worst wc have had
for years. There Ib only three up-
traius a week, and oven those do not
connect with the Vancouver-Nnnaimo
steamer, except on Wednesday, this
improvement taking place thlB week.
While the S.S. Charmer brings up mall
she 1b not allowed to take any back.
The present service Is causing great
Inconvenience to the public generally.
On motion of Mr. Harrison, seconded by Mr. Sutherland, It was decided
that tbe secretary be Instructed to
write to the Post Office Inspector and
to Mr. A. W. Neill, Ml'., In an endeavor to have sonic Improvement
made in the service.
Want Judge to Heslde in l'ountv._
The president brought up the question of the recently-appointed county
Judge, who resides Iu Victoria. Mr.
MacKinnon Bald thlB waB a very great
Injustice to this district, and was very
awkward In legal work.
It was pointed out that the County
of Nanaimo embraces all of Vancouver
Island and adjacent Islands except
Victoria and suburbs, and that It was
upon representations made from this
district tbat Hie appointment "f a
second county Judge was made.   The
other Judge  resides at  Nanaimo   1
comes here once a month to hold COUI'l
sittings.
Notwithstanding the fact Unit both
the Dominion and Provincial Acts
provide tbat tho Judge shall reside in
the county to which he Is appointed,
this gentleman lives down In Victoria and Is not available to this district. Thus- we are as badly oil
now as wo were B0 years ago in tills
respect. The inability ol lawyers In
the Coniox district being unable to gel
applications signed by a Judge without
a long delay, often leads to rank injustice being perpetrated by unscrupulous persons.
On motion of Mr. Clinton, seconded
by Mr. Sutherland, it was decided that
a committee he appointed to take steps
to have the Junior Judge reside In this
district.
I'.lccllnn of Officers.
In calling for the election of officers
President MacKinnon said that four
regular and three executive meetings
had been held during the past year, as
well as two banquets, which he
thought wusn't bad for this community.   The election resulted as follows:
President—Mr. J. Sutherland.
Vice-President--Mr. W. P. Symons,
Secretary—Mr. J. Walton, re-elected.
Assistant Secretary — Mr. .1. W.
Cooke, re-elected.
Treasurer—Mr. T. H. Carey, reelected.
/Executive Committee -Messrs. F. A,
lord.  L,  S.  Stevens,  S.   Davis,  It. E.
Frost and Dr. E. It. Hicks.
On tailing the chair. Mr, Sutherland
thanked the members for tho honor.
and said he would do bis best lor the
welfare of the Board o( Trade, and was
sure he would have the hearty cooperation of all t lie members. Mr.
Sutherland saw no reason why much
good work should not be done this
year. He said lie was in favor of
monthly meetings, as there were a lot
of things to lie dealt with,
In recognition of the large amount
of work, especially correspondence,
done by the secretary dining tlie past
year, the meeting voted him tlie sum
of $25.
Drive for 100 Members.
Mr. Sutherland said lie would llko
to see a drive for 100 members made.
He also mentioned that tlie Associated
Boards of Trade of Vancouver Island
would hold their annual convention
here this summer, uud he would like
the local Board to hold a banquet aud
get-togelher meeting on that occasion.
The suggestlou was approved bv
those present aud Mr. Sutherland
named tiie secretary, Mr. Lymn, Dr.
Hicks ami Mr. Davis a coinmlltce to
work to tbat end.
It was also decided to hold a meeting on the second Tuesday of each
month, In the Council Chambers, at
7.30 p.m.
Buying (hit of Town.
Mr. Bickle started a very lively dnT-
cusslon when he brought to the notice
of the meeting the repeeloil rumors of
20 or 30 residents ot Cumberland going to Courtenay for groceries aud
other goods. Ile said that sugar, for
lustauce, was selling much lower iu
Courtenay than Cumberland, whilo
wheat was selling at a dollar a sack
less down there, and a better grado
supplied. Mr. Bickle said he was only
reciting wiiat lie had been (old, but
conditions wore becoming alarming.
The fuel oil question and peoplo buying out of town were tilings that hit
Cumberland very hard,
Mr. Sutherland said (here was a rato
war on in Courtenay between certain
concerns, and they were selling some
commodities, such as tea and sugar,
below actual cost. It was not legitimate business. The local merchants,
he said, were fully alive to tho condition, but It was a very dilllcult one.
Courtenay, he said, bad the. edgo on
Cumberland in freight rates, as tho
merchant down there could get freight
from Vancouver at $3,no a ton, while it
cost the Cumberland merchant $S to
$10 a ton.
Regarding the price of wiicat, said
Mr. Clinton, there was- a rato war on
betweeu the Comox Creamery and the
U. & IC, and Vancouver Milling and
rain Company. The last two firms
were selling away below what the
Creamery could. No doubt if they put
Creamery oul of business Ihey
would raise their rates.
The question of early closing also
came up, some maintaining that this
s one reusou for a lot of trade going to CoUrtenay.
On the oilier hand, some merchants
<aid some of their lies! customers related In the Courtenay district
Mr. A .1. Fouracre, who raised a
laugh by saying he Was tlle only working mail present, said he would lik-j
some of Hie merchants to be at the
pithead and hear what the men said
tboul prices in Cumberland. He said
15 wenl to Courtenay iasl week for
goods, hceiiuie they claimed they could
buy very much cheaper than in Cum-
lerlond He though! it was up to the
lUSineBS men lo do something, as it
i getting to  lie b  bsHous  question,
tic money should tie kept circulating
n Cumberland,
Deliveries Increase Costs,
One man Bald Courtonay people hail
'emarked thai they came here for
mod. becauf t ih ■■ gol better Bervh e
mil treatment. ThlB brought a reply
'i-oin Mr. Symons. who said the dc-
Ivery service was responsible for the
itgli prlcos. He could sell liis meat
!u in 26 per cent, cheaper- and make
aore money If ho could eliminate th t
lollvory system.
COURT OF REVISION
A meeting nf the Court of Revision
if the City Assessment Koii was held
n the Council ChatnberB on Wednesday night, with Mayor MacDonald in
tin- chair, and all the aldermen iu attendance.
The roll wii.s gone through Item by
item, and a few changes made in tho
amount assessed. The buildings having been destroyed by fire, the amounts
assessed for improvements on tho
properties of Mr. R Hallo;, and Mr. D.
Kllpatrlck were struck off. The Improvement tax against Mr. Maxwell's
property fin Dunsmuir Avenue waa reduced $200, nn this old building had
been assessed too high. Mr. E. W,
Btcklo's assessment was reduced from
$8000 to 1'i'uoo, Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
February ii, 1922.
Minister of Mines Blames Fuel Oil
For Lessened Demand For Coal
Comments on Those Having Little to Cain By Change Should Discard Coal in Favor of Foreign Oil—Accidents Now Down to
Minimum—Firs! Aid and Mine Rescue Work Praised.
In a n\ iew of the mining industry of the province for 1921, the
Hon. William Sloan, Minister of Mines, touches on the serious
effect the \uc of fuel oil is having on the coal mines of the province.
Part of hi.; review is as follows:
There is no doubt that in the last few months the competition
of foreign fui .-oil has had a detrimental elfect on the demand for
British Cult ia coal. Ulna oil was short and high in price, coal
was reciuin c r most of those uses to which the liquid fuel had
been applied. Oil-burning vessels were converted into coal-
burners, oi' rtl buildings were provided with steam-furnaces,
and the &. ties of Vancouver Island, as well as of the eastern
sections ot the Province, were kept working at full capacity, giving employment to all who would work, and circulating capital for
the further development of this and other industries.
With the presence in America (if oil in greater quantity than the
home market of the United States can absorb, the producers
naturally have been n aching out for other markets. That they
should come to Canada, cloo at hand, and a considerable consumer, was to be expected, but in the case of British Columbia,
where there is so much unemployment and where capital is needed
so seriously for the development of natural native resources, it
would appear to he a matter warranting comment that so many
of those who «ill not make substantial material gain by the
change have oi'ce more discarded British Columbia coal in favor
of foreign oil.
The nature of this competition is further emphasized by the
fact that fuel >il is now quoted in Vancouver at $2.75 a barrel,
whereas lesj Mian two years ago it was difficult to obtain at any
price, and the lowest quotation given when available was $3.50 a
barrel. Ordinarily it is estimated that it takes three barrels of
oil to equal one ton of coal in heat-producing values.
The great importance of tho coal- j Western Fuel Corporation ol Canada,
mining Industry on Vancouver Island
can be appreciated when it is considered that between 4000 and 5000 employees of tbe companies mentioned
find continuous employment underground and on tho surface under in the Crows Nest Pass coalfield the
normal conditions, the year through, mines have worked steadily, although
During lOil the conditions can hardly the periods during which production
be considered to have been normal be-1 took place to the limit of possibilities
osod down from the end of Feb-
•uary until July, and the Pacific Coast
''ual Company, which employed 280
unployees during L920, lias been Idle
luring the year 1921.
cause the demand for coal has been
quite Irregulnr, ,-o mu h so that the
Harewood Mine   at   .Nanaimo,   of the
have not been extended. The Nicola-
I'rlnceton field also has seen consider-
ible activity  and  some   areas   have
g
3-. ic T-;...jjMtt:ir
WHO IS YOUR
SHOE MAN?
People, don't be foolish and buy cheap shoes. There
is no such thing as a cheap shoe. Buy the better
makes of shoes, and your shoe, bill at the end of the
year will be just half what it would be if you bought
the cheap shoes—they make for Dry Goods and
Grocery Stores.
Buy the kino ' hat are made for a real Shoe Store—
you will find tl at there will be a big difference.
SPECIALS
Donv Ion White Rubbers $4.00
SPECIAL SALE OF LECKIE SHOES
Litt' -    ■ nt's, sizes 8 to 10<'« $3.25
Youths'   sizes 11 to 13V<>  $3.95
Boys, sizes 1 to §\'-> $4.75
Red Stitch
-I A PER  CENT.  REDUCTION  ON  ALL  SHOES
1" IN STOCK.   COME IN AND SEE THE GOODS
Cavin's ShoeStore
Agent for SLATER'S STRIDER
"The llc'st Good rime for .Men and Women"
BUY "CHUMS" FOR THE CHILDREN
Lfpttrj.-j MJi
been subject to development, the results of which promise to be of first
Importance.
It is interesting to note that In the
north there are Indications that coal
.nines will he opened up that will fur-
<iier strengthen the position of the
province as a producer of coal, one of
.lie lirst Industrial essentials. A seam
\s being opened up in the district bordering on the Telkwa River that is
described as containing exceedingly
high-class steam and domestic coal.
Following are the general production figures for 1021 by coal areas, the
i stums for the month of December being estimated; together with those of
1020, which are given for purposes
Dl! comparison:
Assuming that the output for December equals that of November, the
total output for the province during
11121 will be 2,024,1100 tons, as against
ill output of 2,000,774 tons In the year
1920.
Vancouver island.
  1,09S,254 tons
  1,033,500 tons
Kust Koiitcnay.
  796,500 tons
  847,389 tons
Mcoln-Princeton nnd Telkwa.
21   194,000 tons
20   151,130 tons
1920
1021
1921
1920
IL0-IL0
■IB
Canadian Collieries—     1921
Comox     420,354
South Wellington....   82,700
Extension      209,870
1920
455,914
90,309
190,405
Total   718,930   742,628
Western Fuel   599,000 626,633
Nanoose     48,500 32,500
ranby   266,817 201.5S9
Pacific Coast       — 94,904
East Koolciui) District.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company—
1921       1920
Coal Creek   431,680   431,783
Michel     290,122   265,592
Corbin       74,773   161,014
Nicola-I'riiieclon i'isrtlct.
1921 1920
.Mlddlesboro       73,310 87,602
Fleming Coal Co    34,886 32,122
Coalmout       72,089 8,983
Princeton     13,114 20,717
Telkwa        — 1,400
I FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Feb. 10 & 11
1   The Most Talked of  Picture
I In The Year
1   From  the  Book  the whole
1  Country is
I  Reading
1     112,625
|    PEOPLE
saw
THE
SHEIK
j   in one week in
New York
IN ALL THE HISTORY OF ENTERTAINMENT NO  SUCH  RECORD HAS EVER
BEEN MADE.   YOU WILL NEVER FORGET "THE SHEIK!"
EDUCATION!
HOW WILL YOU FINANCE IT?
The education of your boy or girl is an important
matter and they should bo given every chance.
Open a Savings Account today, add to it regularly
and the balance will help to ensure their future.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- ?15,000,000
J. ORAINOElt. Manager,
=55
While from these production figures
it will be seen that there is an estimated decrease of 72,OU0 tons as compared with hist year's production, it
should be remembered that the figures
for 1920 are the corrected figures and
[he output submitted for 1921 is likely
to be reduced when the annual returns
are made.
Very Few Accidents In Mines.
Thirteen fatal accidents occurred in
1921 in connection with the mining
industry, ten of whicli happened in
coal mines and three in metalliferous
mining. This is considered a remarkably fine record in a comparative sense
and one which the Minister of Alines
who has been consistent in his efforts
to provide adequate safeguards for
lives of those working underground,
i:i especially proud. The ten coal mine
totalities, figuring on the basis of an
employed force of 6,500 in and around
coal mines, shows a ratio of 1.54 per
1,000, against 2.67 per 1,000 in 1920
and 2.03 in 1919.
When, in 1919, it was reported that
there had been only twelve fatal accidents in the coal mines of the province
in that year, It was pointed out that
the record had never before been
equalled in the coal-mining industry
of British Columbia, and that it had
been paralleled but once in twenty-one
years. This was in 1905, but in considering the statistics of that year it
must be remembered that there were
little more than half as many men employed then in and around coal mines.
But while the record of 1919 was
better than any of the past, everything
considered, that of 1921 stands by itself, a new mark, and the result of
stringent regulations, strictly enforced, as well as the earnest co-operation of the coal-miners and others
directly affected. The same comment
applies to the metal mines.
It is worth noting that during the
past year the regulation, the effect of
which has been the removal of practically all (lame-lamps from the coal
mines of the province, has been enforced. The electric lamp, a much
safer as well as a better means of
illumination, has been introduced ami
i from all reports appears to be mosi
. popular.
J While, however, no suggestion for
'the prevention of accidents to underground workers has failed to receive
the best attention of the Department,
it has been recognized that the occupation la hazardous, and that us long
as there is mining there are likely to
be some mishaps. Tbe endeavor to
improve and keep up to date in pnim
of equipment and efficiency of mint
rescue branches has never beet
(allowed to slacken. Much lias been
accomplished through the training
stations established in the different
coal mining fields, the action of the
collieries iu obtaining modern mine
rescue apparatus, and in the policy
of extending support to competitions
in mine rescue work. There are today
In the province over BOO holders of
mine rescue certificates granted by the
department to those wbo have taken
a course of training in this work.
There arc installed at the coal and
metalliferous mines and government
stations in the province 130 sets or
mine rescue apparatus and forty-five
resuscitating devices. There is one
mine rescue apparatus for approximately every forty persons employed
underground and one resuscitating do-
vice for about every 175 employed underground at coal mines. Over 10 percent, of the underground employees in
coal mines of the province hold mini
rescue certificates, and nearly 15 per
cent, of the total employees have
passed examinations in first aid work.
The Department of Mines has been
successful in reviving interest in first
aid work. Training in this work ia
the various mining centres hns resulted in the passing of examinations
by over 1,200 mine employees. One
striking vindication of the attitude of
the government to this worthy form
Extra Two-Reel Comedy
"A GAME LADY
"Mutt and Jeff"
99
Matinee Saturday at 2.30. Bring the Kiddies
Usual Saturday Night Dance, 9.30 p.m.
Amateur Night Monday, Also
ALICE  LAKE  IN  "OVER THE  WIRE" ATS I)  COMEDY  KEELS
COME AND APPLAUD FOR YOUR  FAVORITE  PERFORMER
First Prize, $5.00 Second Prize, 93.00  Third Prize, $2.00
if instructional activity is the fait
,l\at last vear teams representing the
Canadian Western Fuel Corporation of
Nanaimo, and the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited of Cumberland,
won very high honors in the Canadian
.National First Aid competitions under
he auspices of the St. John's Ambulance Association.
In the open contest for the Monti-
xumbert Cup, No. l team, first aid. of
i lie Canadian Western Fuel Corporation! scored a higher percentage of
points than any of lis competitors nnd
.o obtained Ihe Canadian champion-
hip. in the lirst aid contest for
iiiiiors' teams, the award being the
Coderro cup. No, l first aid team, Nanaimo, secured lirst place, while tbe
second place went to Hie Cumberland
lirst aid team. In recognition of this
splendid performance the winning
[cams were awarded special medals by
the Department of Mines, nnd the
Canadian championship learn was
assisted to make ihe trip to St. Louis
to compete In the International competitions, when they were among the
highest In score and won general laudatory comment.
The standardization of methods of
training In the use of mine rescue apparatus, as well ns of the instrument
itself as far as possible, has been one
of the objects of the .Minister of .Mines
for soveral years. He made the suggestion, following a deplorable fatal
occurrence In Washington State coal
mines, to the United States Bureau of
Alines. The result was the cnlling of
an International Conference to discuss
ihe points rnlsed. This took place at
St. Louis, Mo., and British Columbia
wns represented by Mr. R. Strachan,
Senior Mines Inspector. Committees
nave been appointed to make further
investigation and the question is to bo
further discussed ut an early date.
Youth (who is under the impression |    The  women's basic wage   in   New
that he has  Impressed the waitress, South  Wales has been  reduced two
who   is   looking   absent-mindedly  nt shillings, to forty-one   shillings   per
him):  "A penny for your   thoughts, weei.
Gertie'"
Waitress: "I was just wondering if Dr- A- w- Wakefield of Lake Megah-
you were a steak pudding or a boiled Uo, Que, will be a member of tho
rabbit?" British Mount Everet expedition.
HIS IIKIIMiK LESSON
"My wife and her two sisters undertook to teach me bridge last night."
"Did you learn anything?"
"Oh, yes. I learned flint skirts ore
to be worn longer, that tho Browns
ire on the verge of getting a divorce.
;ind that you can make a perfectly
duck salad out of tomatoes, pineapple
and gooseberries, or maybe It was
prunes." February, U, 19^-
TBE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
&
Three
FIRST   ANNIVERSARY AND
STOCKTAKING SALE
W'E have just completed our first year's business in Cumberland, and take this opportunity of thanking our numerous customers for their kind and liberal patronage,
and we intend by right prices to merit a continued and  increased  amount  of  support,
jj.  Realizing that the buying public of this city were paying too high prices for their local
purchases in certain lines of merchandise—particularly the cash buyers—we put prices
1 on from the start that enabled us to meet Mail Order competition and satisfy the buying
public.   In consequence our business has been increasing from month to month, enabl-
', ing us to turn over our stock rapidly, and at the same time to replace linos sold out at
(the lowered prices.   So that we are now able to sell goods at 50 per cent, less than you
were paying a year ago.
rpii   n    J f\ Pi       1    we are offering goods at still further re-
| Q tvCQUCC vJlir OlOCK ductions.   Compare them with other Sales
j | and you will spend your cash with us.   No
Old Stock or Shop-Worn Goods for Sale.   Below are a few of the lines we have on Sale,
which will give you the idea at once that our prices are TIIE LOWEST.
Prices Below Are Good Until Further Notice
HEN'S BLACK OVERALLS-
Per pair 	
, MEN'S WORK SHIRTS - In Black and
White Stripes and Khaki.   On Snle
MEN'S UREY MILITARY FLANNEL
SHIRTS—Regular 13.50.  On Sale for
MEN'S 1IRESS SHIRTS-With or without Collar.   Reg. $2.60.   On Sale for..
MEN'S BLACK SATEEN SHIRTS -
Regular $2.60.   On Sale for	
$1.50
$1.25
$2.50
$1.45
$1.75
MEN'S UNDERWEAR
FLEECE-LINED  UNDERWEAR—        djl  AA
Penman's, per garment   «PA.Uv
STANTIELD'S HEAVY SILVER GREY UNDER- •
WEAR—Regular $2.50 per garment.  (PI   PA
On Sale at   wl.uU
STANFIELD'S HEAVY  RIB- Regular d»1  OP
$2.00.   On sale, garment .'.   VJXtUU
MEN'S BLACK SOCKS— P prs. Ol   AA
On Sale at   O for wl.UU
MEN'S HEATHER SOCKS—British make.   PA_
Regular $1.00.   Now  0\l\s
MEN'S (JREY WORKING SOX q Prs.
On Sale at
tor
$1.00
SPECIAL BUY IN MEN'S TWEED
SUITS
Just Arrived lor Spring—Sizes Sti to   fljl17 PA
42.   $35.00 value.   Half price   •Bl I tO\J
PULLOVER SWEATERS
"Pride ol the West"—Pure wool, in different shades
anil colorings.    Regular $7.50.
Sale Price  '.	
$4.50
Boys' Department
_ -Priced In this sale d»P AA
$1.50
60 BOYS' SU1TS-
as low as 	
BOYS' TWEED PANTS-Bloomor
style.   Priced trom, per pair 	
A SPLENDID RANGE OF BOYS' SWEATERS—
lirltlsh and Canadian makes; button and pullover i    "
to ! 	
BOYS'SWEATER COATS fl»1   QP i
Values to $4.60, now.... wl.t/U
BOYS' WORSTED HOSE-Heavy ribbed,   PA_
all-wool.   On Sale, per pair  0\J\/
BOYS' RIBBED HOSE-Wool finish.   Regular 50c
PerPB,r'  3^  $1.00
ler styles.   Regular $2.50   (PI   PA up (PO
i $3.50.   On Sale at «Dl.dU  to «£
$2.95
up I
to
On Sale at .
Hosiery Department
LAMES' LISLE HOSE—In
Brown and Black.   Reg. 50c O for   3)J..UU
75c
LADIES' ALL-WOOL BLACK CASHMERE
HOSE—Reduced to 	
LADIES' ALL-WOOL HEATHER MIX-     QP_
TUBE—Regular $1.25 per pair, now «7«Jl/
MISSES'   AM)   CHILDREN'S   BLACK   BIBBED
HOSE—All slzus  Q Prs. (gl   AA
Sale Price   O for   «D1.UU
87-INCH FLANNELETTE-
In White' and Colors	
-.5*2 $1.00
SHOE   DEPARTMENT
This is where"experience counts! We were buying and selling Shoes before some of
those who talk Shoes had started going to school. We handle only the best makes; every
pair that we sell is backed by our guarantee of "your money hack or a new pair if not
satisfactory.''
Men's Shoes
SEN'S STRONG WORKING SHOES- (JP PA
In Black or Brown.   Reg. $7.50 for  tDO.uU
MEN'S   HIGH-CUT   10-INCH   WORK   B00TS-
Solid leather. Regular $9.50 pair.        (P£? PA
Sale Price    WU.dU
MEN'S FINE DRESS SHOES—In Black and
Brown Calf, Goodyear welt". 0 4 QA (PP
Reg. $0.50 and $7.50. On SalcU>*»«7Uj «DU
60 PRS. LECKIE PIT SHOES-Thls Is the improved Pit Shoe, with a stronger shank extended at a uniform thickness right through to the
back of the heel. No kick on this &n AA
Shoe now.   Regular $7.50 value for  «DO.Ulf
A Full Line of LECKIE SHOES for Boys
and Girls in Stock
SEE  OUR WINDOWS   FOR  PRICES
Boys' Shoes
SEE Oil! NEW SOLID LEATHER SHOE FOR
SCHOOL HOYS—A dandy for hard wear; sizes
1 to 5.   Regular $5.50. <PQ AA
Now only     «DO.«/U
ANOTHER LINE FOR TIIE SMALLER BOYS—
Sizes 11 to 13. (PA QP
On Sale, per pair     tDiltVO
New Prices'on Rubbers
MEN'S RUBBERS reduced to   »l.!!5
LADIES' RUBBERS reduced to   $1.00
MISSES' RUBBERS reduced to   85c
CHILDREN'S RUBBERS reduced to   75c
ON OTHER LINES NOT MENTIONED
BASKETBALL
GAMES SATURDAY NIGHT
7 P.M.—Presbyterian   Boys   versus
Methodist Boys.
8 P.M.—High School vs. Methodists.
High School 26, Methodists 10
The High School and Methodists
came together In the lirst game of
Saturday night's programme In a
Coniox Basketball League fixture. The
game was hotly contested, although
the odds were strongly In favor of the
High School boyB before the toss up.
The MelhodiKtH relied on close checking lo save the day for them, and almost succeeded In their purpose in the
first half, whence the scholars were
only one basket ahead. •
From the very outset of tho second
half the sutdeut squad took a tip from
their opponents and checked up, with
deadly results to the churchmen, while
the scholarly quintette rattled up a
score that sent the nopes of the
Methodists a glimmering.
In tiie concluding half Tools Lewis
could not Hud the basket at all, whilst
the superior shooting uf both Jock
Btevonson and Burns of the Cumberland High was plainly evident. The
tally ended with 26 to the High School
team and 10 to the Methodists.
HIGH SCHOOL—Burns (6), Stevenson (12), Donald Wat,on (4), Cyril
Michell (4) and Mom 3oinery Hood.
METHODISTS—To its Lewis (8),
Reg. O'Brien, Stevens n, Hudson (lirst
halt) and Bert Wile x  (second half).
Charges Prepaid on all Mail Orders
Model Clothing & Shoe Store
Opposite the Post Office Cumberland
Change of Ownership
I hereby notify the public of Cumberland and district
that I have purchased the General Hardware Business
conducted by Messrs. Hargreaves & Smith, and will
take possession Monday morning, February 13th.
I will endeavor to give the best service and satisfaction to all my patrons, and will sell goods at the
lowest possible prices.
Watch for Salvage Sale
As soon as my goods salvaged from the recent fire
can be removed and marked, I intend to put on a Big
Salvage Sale, when splendid bargains will be available,
as these goods must be cleared at any price.
Trusting to be favored with your patronage.
K. (Tommy) NAKANISHI
Successor to Hargreaves & Smith
Dunsmuir Avenue
Phone 31
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
OF FIRE BRIGADE
In response to a request from the
City Council, tho following financial
statement for the year 1920 and 1921
was supplied by Mr. MacKinnon, sec-
relnry of the I'lie Brigade:
Eur Ihe Yiur 1112(1.
RECEIPTS.
Balance on hand  1 13.09
Masquerade  hall  237.00
Collections,  Chinatown    88.00
Collections—City   111.00
Total  $454.6!)
EXPENDITURES.
Musqiierndc Ball  $188.00
Supplies       08.70
Repairs      47.08
Total $303.78
Balance   $150.91
For lilt- Year 11)21.
Balance on hand, January 1921. $150.91
Masquerade ball 346.95
Collections—
Chinatown     105.00
City -  144.50
Japanese   195.00
City of Cumberland    30.00
..$972.36
..$273.79
..    78.60
30.00
..   60.49
T. K. Hanks, expenses In Victoria    25.00
Sundries      2.50
Ceo. Mason      10.55
Total 	
EXPENDITURES.
Masquerade ball	
Smoker  	
Firemen, care of hall	
Badges
City Nurses 4, W. H. O. Club i\M
Iu tiie concluding game of Satur
day night, Freddie Dallos' fast travelling quintette settled their long-Btand-
ing argument with the girls of the
We Help Others Club of the Methodist
Church. It was another of those
tussles filled with thrlllB from the
opening toss-up. This was the first
ladies' game staged before the Cumberland fans this season, and It was
beyond doubt one of the nioBt exciting
games seen In the district. At times
It resembled a rugby match, with/as
many eager bauds reaching for the
ball, and again a inob of scrambled
red and white middies would be piled
in a heap in search for the ball. It
was usually discovered when little
"Tiny" Bannerman uncovered it after
the crowd permitted her to come up
for air.
Taken as a whole It was a good
lively exhibition of basketball for two
ladies' teams, and the score; 4 all, was
a fair Indication ot the play.
In the first halt the ladles of tbe
pain-soothing profession had matters
much their own way. Fanny Strachan
not only distinguished herself by finding the basket but was the best player
on the floor, while Miss Helen Reece
notched another two points for the
same team. At the end of this period
the score was tour to nothing In favor
of the Nurses.
- In the second half the Methodist
girls replaced Lizzie Henderson tor
Beatrice Mitchell. They overcame their
stage fright and went in to win the
game. Miss Mitchell was the most
aggressive player on the floor, sticking to her guard like a leech, keeping
her opponent out ot mischief. Beatrice
Bickle started the ball rolling for tho
W. H. O. Club and netted two points.
The ball was mostly in the vicinity of
the Methodist-objective in this halt,
the Nurses' guards not being as effective as Iu the opening stanza.
Beatrice Bickle then brought the
grandstand to its feet by caging a
pretty shot and tying the score JUBt
three minutes from time. Both Beatrice
Bickle and Beatrice Mitchell starred
for the W. H. O. Club, while Fanny
Strachan and Vivian Aspesl were the
best in the Nurses' five.   The teams:
CITY NURSES—M18B68 Jose Balas-
no, Fanny Strachan (2), Ellen Reece
(2), "Tiny" Bannerman, and Vivian
Aspesl.
W. II. O. CLUB—Misses Bontrlce
Bickle (4), Madge Fouracre, Hazel
Mounce, Irene Bateman, Lizzie Henderson (first half), and Beatrice
Mitchell (second half) .
While there were several heroines
In the game, the hero was "Toots"
Plump, who officiated most satisfactorily In the capacity of referee, as he
also did in the first gome ot the evening.
NOTHING DOING.
'Mandy, I thinks 1'se gwine to put
on my bes' clothes and go down to de
theayter tcrnight to see de chorus
ladles dance."
"Rustus, listen heah. If dat am whut
yuh thinks, then yuh'd bcttah thing
agin. Niggah, yuh ain't gwine to put
on nothln' to go no place no time to
see nobody do nothln'. never, nohow
an' not at all.   Yoes yuh understan'7"
A Judge was trying a caHc In which
there was a dispute about a water
right. As he had Just partaken ot a
hearty luncheon, and counsel's argument was decidedly long-winded, be
began to nod suspiciously. All at once
the lawyer thundered out:
"What we wnnt, my lord, Is water."
"Very little In mine, please; very
little In mine," said IiIb honor, starting up suddenly.
Total   $489.93
Balance  $482.43
Smash Your
Cold To-day
Give it a knockout blow with a lew
doses of
Buckley's Bronchitii Mixture
Tried and proved by over 200,000
people.  Positively Guaranteed to give
relief.        40 Dosmi lot 76a
Sold br all dninhta
•r br aail tram
W. ». IkMi>, Until*. 14! Matail. II.
Sold in Cumberland by
R. E. FROST
BULK TEA
3 LBS.   FOR $1.00
New Zealand
BUTTER
45c. per lb.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
■■■111
Bargain Prices in
FURNITURE
For 30 Days
ALL LINES REDUCED TO MEET PRESENT-DAY
EARNINGS
DRESSERS—Ranging from $16.00 and up.
EXTENSION TABLES—From $14,00 and up.
BEDS IN A WIDE RANGE—Prices from ?9.00 up.
COIL SPRINGS at $10.00 and $12.00 each.
FELT MATTRESSES from $10.75 and up.
UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS—Priced at $10.00 and up.
CARPET SQUARES at Sale Prices.
CUPS AND SAUCERS at $1.20 per \U dozen.
GOOD SERVICEABLE RANGES from $70.00 and up.
CALL AND INSPECT THE GOODS
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
M
SPECIALS AT GORDON'S
D ' C   'i.     ^ shipment of Boys' Suiis
DOyS    kjUltS   just arrived, sizes 24  to 35.
No better value this side of Winnipeg.      d»Q P7P
We will sell these for speedy clearance al «P*> • ' tl
Ladies' Hose
LADIES' UTILITY HOSE—In Brown,       d»-|   nr
Dark Grey, White and Tan.   Per pair      tP 1 %L fJ
LADIES' SILK-AND-WOOL HOSE—       fa-t   JTA
In White and Black and ('orcl Tan.   Pair «|) 1 .OU
Get the habit-
Buy here and save money
W. GORDON
Phone 133
ISN'T IT TRUE, iUioIosb flattered, Mint bc
  UhmiM desire to admire
Tbe Brownn had bought a new rug. session, Mrs. Brown led
a bright, brilliant green,   Mr, nud Mrs., front mom
Henry came to call nnd were voluble
iu tlieir praise of It.
The next morning Uttle John Henry,
aged four, appeared nt the Brown's
front door and asked to Bee the new
rug.    Rather bewildered, but never-
John thrUBi hie hand
etp, gi avi ly walked abo
ci Itically surveyed the
"Huh," he finally gn
make me sick!"
small a boy
her new pos-
liim into (lie
into bis pock-
tho room and
■ITU covering,
od,   "it   dor.'t Tow
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
February 11,1922.
THE GU^SERLAKQ ILSANDER
Published every Saturday iuonii.ig at Cumberland, B. C.
HOWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. QOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 11)22.
NEW LIFE IN TIIE BOARD OF TRADE
It ia plea' '. record tlle new life instilled into the
Cumberland of Trade at tbo meeting on Wednes
day night. Tho Hoard has got away to a good start on
another year's activity and it is to be hoped that the
enthusiasm manifested will continue. No doubt one reason
for the lack ol Interest by members has been due to there
being no regulni meetings. The policy of holding meetings when some official fell sufficiently aroused to call one
—provided he could persuade other officials to take action
—naturally resulted in lessened Interest and life in the
Board.
Under the presidency of .Mr. John Sutherland, and the
co-operation of other officers and members, the Board of
Trade should bo a live institution. Mr, Sutherland's lirst
act on taking office was to appoint a committee ot members
to mako a drive for 100 members. Ills action is worthy of
every commendation, and it is now up to the citiaens to
back up the proposal am! boost for the objective.
There are many things concerning tin; welfare of Cumberland and district" it can lie dealt with by a live body
—and results obtained if .they go after thorn sufficiently in
earnest.
THE TRAIN AND STEAMER SERVICE
Commencing this week an improvement has been made
in the steamer service between Vancouver and Nanaimo.
On Wednesdays the Patricia makes connections with the
up-train, so that passengers and mail can now make tiro
through trip in one day, Instead of having to lay overnight
In Nanaimo or go to the great waste of time and money
In making the Vancouver-Victoria trip and spending alt
day on the train. Why the Canadian Pacific. Railway cannot arrange the schedule so that the steamer would make
connections on Mondays and Fridays as well, as was formerly the case, is not apparent. Perhaps they prefer the
people to visit tiie Capital City on their way home. Certainly the company would get more revenue, but It's very
poor business. The old corporation policy of "the public
be damned" would appear to apply very aptly to the
present "service" to this district. For instance, a letter
posted in Vancouver on Sunday afternoon reaches Cumberland Wednesday night!
EXORBITANT FREIGHT RATES
The startling statemenl s made on no less an authority
than i)i" II C. Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers Association, Ltd., that 60 per cent, of the cost of a carload of B.
C. lumber to a prairie retailer is made up of freight rate.
Further east the cost goes up to 70 per cent, and over.
Thus If a retailor buys $400 worth of lumber it will cost
$600 in freight to get it to his yards. This state of affairs.
it true, is outrageous, and the Dominion authorities should
lose no time iu putting an end to it. No wonder business
Is In a state "' stagnation with freight rates of this nature
to contend wit': It is generally conceded that the big
railway corporateins do pretty nearly as they wish, hut
we had no idea that they had such a stranglehold on the
country as the present instance indicates.
MANUFACTURERS SHOULD ADVERTISE
This paper is always ready to boost the made In B. C.
product, and has never missed an opportunity of urging
loyalty to the home manufactured commodity. We believe
ihe buyer and the consumer should always give the preference to an article that represents a local or a provincial industry. But we do think it is time that the British
Columbia manufacturers were aroused to a sense of their
duty to the newspapers, without expecting those loyal
papers to carry on an indefinite advertising campaign free
of cost. The home merchant never dreams ot expecting
lis home paper to boost his wares without cost. Why,
then, should the larger factories and plants of B. C. expect
I'ree exploitation. It costs money to run a newspaper.
The readers are entitled to general news, not propaganda.
And Die advertising columns serve two purposes: To furnish a revenue for the upkeep of the paper and a medium
of conveying a message by persons with something to sell.
if it is not news of a general nature, it is advertising.
What flic editor wants Is news; he knows its news value.
What Ihe other fellow wants to get In Is advertising,
usually, without any particular news value.
For months we have cheerfully done our best toward
aiding the "Made in B. C." campaign, and bellevo it is
:\ good thing. But we do think It is time that the manufacturers or the province awakened to the tremendous
power of judicious advertising.
GREAT BRITAIN AGAINST NARCOTICS
Some American newspapers accuse Great Britain of being responsible for a large amount of the narcotics produced and smuggled into the United States, and that she
iakes a leading part in forcing opium on China and India.
I'he facts are directly contrary to those statements. In
India the opium trade is a government monopoly, and as
such, now carefully governed and controlled. Gradually
the acreage under the crop Is being diminished to meet
July the most essential and legitimate needs for this drug.
In proof of tills it can be shown that in 1907, 488,548 acres
were under the crop, and in 1924 (the last year for which
silastics are available) only 146,000 acres were devoted to
the opium poppy. In 1913 the opium export to China under
treaty, was completely stopped, and no further exports to
that country are any longer allowed. This utterly disproves the wild statement that India Is forcing opium on
China, or in fact, on any other country whatsoever. The
difficulty is to resist the demand from outside, now that
tlle production has so greatly decreased.
In any other form of traffic in narcotics Great Britain
lakes no part. In fact, far from being a partlclpater in
this terrible trade, she Is most concerned In suppressing
the illicit traffic wherever it exists. In fact, whenever
smuggling of narcotics on British ships can be shown it
is immediately reported to the home authorities and drastic
measures are taken against the owners of the vessels,
notwithstanding whatever action may have been Independently taken against the Individual smugglers. Thus it
will be evident that Great Britain is working to the suppression of the drug traffic all over the world, as energetically as any other foreign power.
The proposed international narcotics conference at
Washington is timely and to the point, for it cannot fail to
demonstrate, even if it does nothing else, how unjust and
unfair are criticisms of Great Britain's associations in this
trade.
THE NON-RESIDENT JUDGE
The liquor legislation Is a wonderful thing. For Instance, in Quebec If a wife wishes to dispense with her
husband's company all she has to do is to commit an
offence against the Liquor Act. Then he Is arrested, tried
and sentenced, while nothing out of the way happens her.
On account of the large extent of the judicial county of All of whicli reminds one of the story of the lawyer who
Nanaimo, embracing practically the whole ot Vancouver was interviewing the prisoner. When the case was ex-
Ialand except the City of Victoria and suburbs, the Federal plained to the legal light,.he said: "But they cannot put
Government, through the repeated representations made by you in prison for that." To which the man replied, "but
people living In this district, appointed a second, or junior, they have."
Judge for this county, the large amount of legal business1 it appears that a Mrs. Ingram of Montreal, committed
la the district, ami taking into account the rather irregular an offence against the Quebec Liquor Act, that of having
means of cor mnlcatlon between the district and outside liquor in an illegal place and selling It. At the time the
points, wai ■ resident judge. offence was commilteed the husband, James Ingram, a
The situation, however, has not been improved in any sailor, was at his usual employment, that is to say he was
way by sui Ii appointment having been made, as the person'on the high seas and many miles from his home. On his
now holding that office resides in the City of Victoria, 140 return to Montreal he was arrested for his wife's offence,
miles dlstani from this district, and the senior county and sentenced to a jail term. An appeal was entered and
Judge resides at Nanaimo, 70 miles distant, In other words just the other day Mr. Justice Bruneau confirmed the
the district is in tiie same position as it was 30 years ago, judgment, and back to jail went Ingram to serve the
notwithstanding the fact that there now exists two judges remainder of his term.
for this county. I   The ruling of His- Honor was that under the Act a man
A further matter  which  is causing considerable com- may be jailed for a crime of which he has no knowledge,
ment Is the fact that the second judge recently appointed and to which he Is accessory neither before nor after the
reBides In the City of Victoria, whereas by both Federal and fact—provided the crime Is his wife's.
Provincial law he is bound to reside within the county     Who would not be a married womun under such cir-
for which he holds office. cumstances?—Toronto Saturday Night.
First Aid and Mine Rescue Notes
By the Canadian Colllorlei
(Dunsmuir) Lid. SI. John's First Ala nnd Mine1
Rescue Association.
Six men wero klllci n Hod as a
result of injuries In tho mines of tho
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.
last year. Four of these accident!
were avoidable It only ordinary cue
had been taken.
Thirteen men were nlso seriously
Injured last year. At least eight of
these accidents were avoidable.
Four of the falal accidents wore duo
to falls of roof and coal. The other
two were due to mine ears and haulage.
Eight of the serious accidents were
due to falls of roof and coal, two were
duo to cars and haulage, and the other
three were on the surface,
One of our precepts states that
every serious accident is a notice that
something is wrong." Let us find out
whei-'' tl al "something' and eliminate It. 'A'e shall welcomi any suggestion., from employees that might assist
In preventing accidents.
The safetj movement will not reduce
preventable accidents unless the cooperation of .ill is secured.
Less accidents means less suffering,
as well as greater efficiency and
greater earning powor.
Consideru! !.   progress was made in
the last two
and fatal a.
further reduc lor
operation of all
humane work.
SAFETY  PRECEPTS      |
* ■ 1 if
1. The prevention of accidents and
Injuries, by all possible means, Is a
personal duty, whicli everyone owes
not to himself alone hut also to his
fellow workmen.
2. Every incident Is a notice that
BOmothlng is wrong.
::. Cureless workmen are dangerous
in mines, or anywhere else.
1. II is better to bo safe than sorry.
5. Get the safety habit.
(i. Don't gamble with your life; you
might lose.
7. Remember that 50 per cent, of
the number of men killed In coal
mines are killed by falls of roof and
coal.
S. A timber in place is worth n
thousand on tho timber pile.
Carefulness will avoid many ac-
9
cidents.
10. Careful men are as a rule the
most efficient.
11. Warning signs are a reminder
that danger does exist. Obey the
warning.
12. Pules nnd laws are based upon
experience, There are good rensons
lor obeying them,
13. Nothing is a substitute for alertness and watchfulness,
II. Eternal vigilance is the price of
ars In reducing serious safety,
.its.   Why not make a      16. Nature's laws are no respecter
on this year?   The CO- of persons.
is  solicited   iu   this I o. O'BRIEN,
Safety Engineer.
Woman's Way
is lo delude herself that the need for
glasses-is everyone's but hers.
Possibly the Idea of wearing glasses
<loes not attract her, due to the belief
•lint they are necessarily disfiguring.
Before your sight Is seriously Impaled, come and see how flatteringly
we can (It you with our smart-looking
glasses.
Eyesight Specialist
Louis R. Stevens
Eyesight Specialist
fmSiSSSS$SSXSG$SSSSS$VraSSSSSS$$£SSS^V3Sfr
Annual    Stocktaking
CLEARANCE
SALE
IS NOW IN FULL SWING
And Continues For Seven Days More
Big Reductions In Every
Department During Sale
QQQQQQQ&QQQQQQQG&SQSQSSQWQQQQm&QQ®
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEP, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
For Quality
VENDOME
CAFE
Hot Tamnles      Fish and Chips
Sandwiches of All Kinds
Steaks and Chops
IVe I'll! I'll Lunches for Parties nnd
Dunces lit Reasonable Prices.
Hexes fur Ladles.        Upon All Mghl,
G.W.V.A. Notes
Meeting every Tuesday at 7 p.m., In
Ihe Memorial Hall. All ex-service men
are welcome.
Attention of all comrades Is drawn
lo the list (posted in the G.W.V.A
Hall) of ex-service men and dependents whose accounts on tho books of
the Department of Militia and Defence,
Ottawa, show credit balances.
There are approximately 1000 such
balances and payment has been with
hold because the addresses of those
concerned could not be ascertained.
"The Veteran" of February 4th com
menced the publication of these names
and each week n further list will up
pear. These will be posted In the
hall, Enquiries can be made through
any branch ot the G.W.V.A.
Don't forget tho Smoker and Rally
on Saturday night. A splendid programme has been arranged. See othor
notes for particulars.
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD      fafj f\t\
Any Length Required
'Say, cap'n," he said, as he stepped
timidly into the rickety old craft, "this
boat seems very shaky! Was anybody
ever lost In her?"
"Not tor my knowledge," refilled tin
boatman. "There was three men
drowned from her Inst Thursday, hui
we found 'cm all high tide, the day
after."
The finest laces In the world are
worth much more than their weight In
gold.
W. C.
Happy Valley
WHITE
Phone 9211
THKNT ROAD GIRLS' CLUB
Tho members of tho Trent Road
(ills' Sewing Club met at tho home of
Mrs. Hannay on Friday evening, and
at Mrs. Jones' home on Wednesday,
when very enjoyable evenings were
ipent. Donations to the club have
iieen made by Mrs. Myers, Mrs. Young,
Mrs. Logan and Mrs. Jones.
Comrades will lie glad to know that
(lie alterations to the upstairs of the
hall are well under way.
A recent Order-In-Councll has given
authority to the S. C. It. Dept. to give
assistance to necessitous cases among
distillled members of the forces who
are unemployed in tills nnd other districts. Comrades and others who know
of any such cases are asked to communicate wllli the local U. W. V. A.
Secretary, 202 Derwent Avenuo.
BEVAN NOTES
A dance will be held by the Bevan
Junior Football Club on Saturday
night in tbe Bevan Athletic Hall.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND ■ • B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
W M. M EH KI FIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. B. C.
A band concert will be held by the
Cumberland City Band In the Athletic
Hnll on Sunday, commencing at 0.46,
Mrs. Thos. Malpnss, who has been
visiting friends In Nanaimo, has returned home.
Mr. W. Weir has resumed duties af-
or his Illness.
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF
BEVAN BURNS' CLUB?
Guide:   "I   could   tell   you   things
ibout  this   cave   which   would   mako
four hair stand on end, sir."
Tourist: "1 don't think bo."
Guide: "You are very brave?"
Tourist: "No, I am totally bald."
All Men  Who Attended Recent llnn-
(Htet nnd Itnncc So Considered.
The Bevan Bums Club announces
tbat nil men who purchased tickets
for tiie club banquet nnd dance on
December 28 last, are considered
members of tho Bevan Burns Club.
Any Indies wishing to join tho club
may join the same by paying the fee
of 2r> cents for one year to tho secretary. Miss B. Bannerman.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONGS, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
Wood (or Sale
$7.00
DOUBLE LOAD
for 	
Cut Any Length Required.
CHAS. PEARSE
Phone 86F Happy Valley
A kiss Bponks all languages.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
"P o
February ii, 1021
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
Eat Bread in the Morning
Two or three slices of Bread
plain or toasted at breakfast
time is equal to double the
amount of other food because it
is more nourishing.
Bread is your Best Food—eat
more of it.
Start the day right with several substantial slices of Bread
—the bread that satisfies.
You will like the flavor of
HALLIDAYS BREAD
—the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Dnnimnlr Avenue     •     Cumberland
HOW ABOUT YOUR
BATTERIES?
Have they enough "Juice" or are
they pretty well run down with old
age? Recharging might save them,
ehT Or must you have new cells entirely? Better let us have a look at
your storage battery system and put
It In first-class shape, stopping those
Ignition troubles.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Klerstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
OHe* tm Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Notice
Pending erection of new
premises opposite the Post
Office our business is being
carried on in the Basement
of
CAMPBELL BROS..
STORE
where we will give you the
same service and satisfaction as in the past.
Phone 19
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Basement, Campbell Bros.'
Store
ASTHMA.
USE
RAZ-MAH
10 Smoking   Na Spraying-No Snuff
Jut Swallow a Capsule
RAZ-MAH Is Guaranteed
to restore normal breathing, stop mucus
{gatherings In tbe bronchial tubes, give
one nights of quiet sleep; contains no
kaHt-forminedrug. Jl.uuatyourdrng-
ffcrt'a Trial free at our agencies orwrlte
Templetoni,   M2 King W.,   Toronto.
Sold by R. E. FROST
THE LAUGH ON THE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Something along the line of the
famous advertisement written by Mark
Twain for the Hartford Accident Insurance Co., Is the following from an
American exchange:
The Insurance companies ure now
making accidents a pleasure. Mr.
Smith, the broker, comes down and
shows you a policy which Is so attractive that you can hardly keep from
going right out on the street and getting run over.
If you get killed you lose your life,
but you won't be out anything financially.
Of course, the life you lose Is single,
hut the money your-relatives get Is
double (double Indemnity).
If you are hurt in an accident they
will give you llfty dollars a week and
a homely nurse or twenty-five dollars
nnd a pretty one.
Their policies ure so wonderful and
offer such great benefits that a man Is
ashamed of himself if he doesn't get
hurt.
Some brokers advise you to take out
a trial policy and then go out and get
hurt, to see how promptly the company pays.
People used to worry about losing
their lives, but now if they get killed
the laugh Is on the insurance companies.
]        SAM HILL SAYS       f
* *
(Free Press Prairie Farmer)
Most men have discovered trying to
save money while owning a car is
about as impossible as storing water
in a sieve.
Here is a llttlo tip for the cynical
bachelors: It Is better to be the slave
of a good woman than to be the slave
of a bad habit.
The birds of the air may tuke no
thought for the morrow, but you will
observe they ace hustling like the
dickens for what they need today.
A bad temper may be concealed behind good looks. A girl who is a
thing of beauty is not always a joy
forever, the divorce records reveal.
Love, we are told, never counts the
cOBt, which probably explains why
there are so many no account marriages.
AN ALARMING CLOCK
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts ot District
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHAROES
TELEPHONE CO TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vondome Hotel.
Pa bought a big alarum clock;
He hates us to be late.
"And now," he  said, "you'll  rise  at
seven
Young men, instead of eight!"
He wound the clock up carefully
And set the hand to soven.
We fell asleep, but woke with shock
At twenty to eleven!
And rushing to our room, Pa cried,
'What's this, may I enquire?"
The cook came running in with fright,
"Land sakes!   And Where's the Are?"
The parrot shouted "All aboard!"
The baby screamed witli fright;
And still that wretched clock went on
Alarming till the night.
Our neighbor 'phoned the (ire brigade
A policeman broke the door,
And leaping into the house he yelled.
"What's all this racket for?"
He must have trod upon Ihe cut;
She shrieked in wild dismay,
And ; imping through the pantry door,
Upset ll.Q chlnu truy.
Alarm was spreading fur aud near;
It reached the chickens loo;
Ill-Haul cackles reached the'night
And "Cock-n-doo-dol-loo,"
Then Pa rushed out to find the OXO]
Tho dog set up a howl;
Then mother came ond took tho clock
And wrapped it in a towel.
We've nover seen the new clock since;
Nor dare to ask its fate;
And Pa still scolds us 'cause we lie
In bed till nearly eight.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second
and fourth Wednesdays of each month,
In the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially invited.
Edward Coram, Chief Ranger.
F. Eaton, Secretary.
F. Slaughter, Treasurer.
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
S.  DAVIS, DAur„ueir
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballers
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
Moil's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, onsurlng fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
G. W. V. A. IN FAVOR
OF AMALGAMATION
MODERN SOLOMONS
NO WATER THERE
A large sporting goods concern
shipped.to one of Its customers In the
country a water polo ball. In the
course of a week or ten dayB tho ball
was returned with the following nolo:
"We are returning for credit one water
polo ball shipped us recently. The
customer for whom we ordered thin
ball is dead, and whero he has gone
there ain't no f iter."
We hear a great deal nbout Ihe cost
of living, but I don't think tho Insurance companies have put up Ihe rates.
—Louisville Courier Journal.
They used to wear hoops for skirts,
but now they don't care a whoop for
skirts.—Washington Post .
The girl who paints her face practises art for heart's sake—Columbia
Record.
The average young girl knows entirely too much long before her education is completed.—Philadelphia lie
cord.
Every man makes a fool of himself
occasionally, but the w-ise ones are
those who don't make mistakes as often as the others.—Atchison Globe.
As a gcnernl tiling, when nny kind
of calamity befalls a married man, he
confuses the dute of It with his wedding anniversary In after years.—
Dallas News.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONEKY  STORE
Good Selection nl Pipes, Cigar and
Cigarette Holders.
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
James Brown
Cumberland
The Great War Veterans' Association of Canada since its inception has
been, and is, in favor of the amalgamation of all ex-service men's organizations in the Dominion. Let every
veteran who has the idea that the
contrary is the fact disabuse his mind.
Tiie G.W.V.A. from the day in April,
1317, when It was formed through the
amalgamation ot returned soldiers'
associations in all parts of the country, has sought to bring about complete unity, and It can be truthfully
said that the very men who today arc
strongest In the accusation that the
'paid olllclals' 'of the G.W.V.A. are
retarding amalgamation, are those
who prevented its accomplishment
upon ut least three speclllc occasions
during the past tivo years.
A moment's glance at the history of
ex-servlco meu'B organizations since
the lirst man returned to Canada from
the Gieat War, will bear out this
statement. As early as 11)15 the veterans of the Greut War had the Inspiration to organize. Small associations sprang up here and there, the
membership being composed largely
ot those disubled through wounds. In
order to ensure that cate and protection which hud been promised them
upon enlistment, the members of these
.'.mailer organizations became convinced of the necessity of unity. A
preliminary conference In Toronto In
the winter of l'Jlti-17 decided upon
April l'jl7 as the month for a general
conference, and Winnipeg as tbe place
of meeting—one of the reasons for the
latter being that it was the headquar-
teis of the one existing national veterans' organization In tbe Dominion,
the Army and Navy Veterans In Csu-
uuu. An earnest attempt was made to
nave that association the basis tor one
united body, but its officers differed
with the opinion of the majority of
those present on matters of policy, so
the Great War Veterans' Association
of Canada came into existence.
in the summer of 1918 a controversy
developed over tho question of ex-
service men organizing for political
action. The majority of the members
of the G. W. V. A. favored legislative
action In preference to direct intervention In the political arena, and
wrote Into the constitution at that time
a nou-partlzan policy. Those who disagreed decided to form another association.
In 1920 the cause of proper re-
establishment we greatly Impeded by
the variety of demands presented from
different sources to the Federal Government. Realizing the need for unity
the paid officials of the G. W. V. A.
t.who are today accused of retarding
amalgamation) approached the other
organizations with a plea tor union
of forces. Every veteran In Canada
knows how that advance was treated
—and they also know the legacy which
was left those who spurned it.
Officers of the association were
asked during the summer of the past
year to participate In preliminary
conferences to deal with the subject
of amalgamation. Instead of being
met in the spirit ot comradeship they
were subjected to abuse because they
would not throw the G.W.V.A. to tho
dogs us a preliminary to tbe formation of tbe united body. The Port
Arthur conference, which was held
preceding the Dominion convention of
the G.W.V.A., waB the first occasion
upon which definite Ideas were presented and discussed through which
amalgamation might be brought about.
And the basis for the discussion was
a plan presented by the paid officials
of the Great War Veterans' Association of Canada!
if tbe veterans of the Dominion,
other than those In the G. W. V. A.,
still doubt the attitude of tho association towards amalgamation, let them
read the following resolution passed
at tho Dominion convention last October, where more than 800 branches In
all parts of tho country were represented, cither directly or by proxy.
Only soven votes were recorded
against the resolution:
"That tills convention Is In fuvor of
a non-sectarian, nou-partizan federation of ex-service mens' organization
In Canada, so that by conjoint action
tho interests of those who have made
sacrifices in the Great War may be
protected and advanced, each organization lu such federation maintaining
ils own individual unity; and instructs Its Officers to take all possible
steps toward tbe formal Ion of such
a federation;
"And further, that such federation
may lead to ultimate amalgamation,
we authorize our Dominion command
to take part In any conference which
may bo legitimately arranged, with
such amalgamation In view."
IIIIIIIEil!
1 NEW REDUCED I
1       RATES J
|      Effective February 15th, 1922 1
H                            LIGHTING RATES §§
M    First 30 Kilowatt Hours  13c per K.W.H. |jj
S    Next 30 Kilowatt Hours  12c per K.W.H. M
M    Next 40 Kilowatt Hours  lie per K.W.H. §§
S    Next 200 Kilowatt Hours  10c per K.W.H. §§
H    Next 400 Kilowatt Hours    9c per K.W.H. M
||    Next 600 Kilowatt Hours       8c per K.W.H. ■
|    Next 700 Kilowatt Hours   7c per K.W.H. §§
|    Over 2000 Kilowatt Hours    5c pel K.W.H. §§
Minimum bill of $1.10.   Subject to Cash Discount of 3
10 per cent, if paid before the end of tbe month. If
Si
POWEH RATES p
\    First 50 Kilowatt Hours  6c    per K.W.H. B
!    Next 25 Kilowatt Hours  5VaC per K.W.H. §f
|    Next 25 Kilowatt Hours  5c    per K.W.H. §
Over 100 Kilowatt Hours  4c    per K.W.H. M
Plate Rate—No Discount. gM
Special Power, Sign and Window Lighting Rates. fl
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P.O. 314
Whereas celtain mischievously inclined persona have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
With to point out that It Is a serious offence to tampe- with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
^iilliilf
YOU are entitled to telephone service that is quick,
accurate and wide in its extensions. To give
the best service, this company is constantly improving and adding to its equipment. Its operating
methods are standardized. Your telephone service is
second to none. Your assistance and co-operation
enables us to give you intercommunication of tho
widest scope and highest obtainable efficiency.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
BsJi
Thos. H. Carey
FIKF.
ANI> LIFE  INSUIUNCE
Ciiiiilicrlund   II. C
MOUNT EVEREST LEADER
MAN OF GREAT ACTIVITY
Brig.-General Bruce Has Record
of Remarkable Attainments
Klhol: Wen do the strangest things.
Clara:  Yes;  I've oven known them
lo get senllinentnl on homo brew!
Brigadier-General Charles Granville
Bruce who, despite his 55 yearB, has
accepted the leadership of the ascent of
Mount Overeat, Is a man of remarkable attainments. He was shot through
both legs In Gallipoli and, as lie
describes the event, "lie rolled down
Ihe hill like a shot rabbit," but, being
an irrepressible optimist, lie recovered.
His personal strength Is such that
lie could at one time raise and hold
out nt arm's length a well-grown person ns ho sut In a chair. Stories of
ilia strength, his practical Jokes nnd
of other more serious exploits ore
common property throughout northern
India, where he has commanded n
Uhurka regiment for years.
ills passion has always been mountaineering, More than once he brought
one of the Ghurka's homo to England
with him. One ho took with him to
Switzerland, where tho Ghurka's un
canny skill In scrambling up ImpoB
slhle places produced groat shaking
of hcadB among tho Swiss guides, who
bad never before seen anything like It.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Ratting Good Car
CUT OCT THE  RATTLE—
Or rather let us do ft.   Wo know how to mako your car behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on tho subject if you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone8 Cumbciland P.O. Box 319
MINT ARTICLE SDKPAHTMENT
Mollle. who had administered the
culinary affairs of the household for
many years, was sometimes torn be-
Iween her devotion to her mistress
ind her loyally to the small son of tlle
house.
"Mollle," said her mistress one day
ifter n tour of inspection, "whatever
happened to Ihnsc line red apples I
bought yesterday?"
"Well now, ma'am," answered tlie
domestic, "I couldn't rightly say. but
If ye can find where me loaf of gingerbread Is, them apples would be
lytu' right ou lop of it."
PLATING SAFE
In spile of repeated warnlncs from
his father, Utile Bobby persisted In
Irlvlng nails Into blocks anil boards.
lie hud arrived al the play-at-car-
ponter stage.
One morning dad hoard Iho familial
OOUUdlng, and looking oul he saw
Hobby bury banging away -his little
sister Mary down beside him, apparently looking on.
"Haven't I told you. Bobby, that you
will mash your fingers If you drive
nails?" the failier asked.
"Yes. I know, dad, but Mary's holding the nail," Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
February 11,1922.
NEW
This week we introduce to you a delivery of Dress
Serges which shows a great decrease in price and a
good improvement in value. The quality is exceptionally good and the width is from 50 to 52 inches,
while the price is only $1.75 per yard.
We have'the above grade of Serges in Navy, Saxe
Blue, Brown and Cream.
Another Special Leader is a very fine Botany Serge,
one of the besi  in fact.   It's 56 inches wide, and a
>ally beautiful Serge, suitable for Ladies' Suits and
..-•esses.
New   Arrivals   In  Silk
Tn the belt shades, at reasonable price;.
Monarch Wools
A 1'    hipment of Monarch Wools, in a good assortment   -. colors, just to hand.
M
'A*' DRY GOODS
DRYGOODS
1/'■'   & GENT'S FURNISHINGS
THE PYTHIAN SISTERS
INSTALL NEW OFFICERS
This is a Christmas story, but it is
too good to keop. It concerns two
youngsters who wero lying In wait
for Santa Clans on Christmas eve.
Prom a vantage point they took turns
watching for the old gent, one remaining in bed while tho other was on
guard.
law him," was the excited but
low comment as the watcher rushed
to tiie bed and scrambled in. "He was
downstairs lilling our stockings.
"Where did he go?" from the one
lying down.
•lie ran upstairs and jumped into
bed with mother."
55SS
Your Boy or Girl May Send
The Family Name Down the
Ages by Helping Campaign
At the regular meeting of the
Pythian Sitsers of Benevolence Lodge
No. 9, the following officers were installed for the new term:
Mary Stant, Past Chief.
Esther Horbury, M. B. Chief.
Rosa E. Robertson, E. Senior.
Mary Beveridge, E. Junior.
Amelia Miller, Manager.
Minnie Stewart, M. of R. C.
Hannah Watson, Protector.
Margaret Mitchell, Guard.
Mrs. John Thomson acted as installing olilccr. This lodge is making good
progress, now having a membership
of 55.
TOMMY NAKANISHI
TAKES OVER BUSINESS
On Monday morning next, "Tommy"
Nakanlshl, who lias purchased the
hardware business carried on by Hargreaves & Smith, will take possession.
Mr, Nakanlshl atatcs that he intends
to sell goods at a low price. A large
porUon of the stock in his old store
was saved before tlle flames which
i.urnt up the block reached it. These
goods will be put on sale very shortly.
TO SELL GASOLINE ON
CASH BASIS ONLY
Personal Mention
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., accompanied by Mrs.
Graham, returned from Victoria on
Monday.
Mrs. T. Mordy will not receive on
Monday, 13th lust. /
Mr. George O'Brien, Safety Engineer
if the Canadian Collieries, returned
from Ladysmith Friday.
Mr. T. E. Bute left for Vancouver
Tuesday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Burbridge relumed from Vancouver Wednesday,
where tlicy bad been spending a few
days.
Miss I.orna Dalby arrived home
from Victoria on Monday last.
Mrs. Thomas Graham will not receive on Tuesday, February 14.
Mr. Cotville Graham returned from
Victoria Monday.
Mr. J. Thomson, son of Mr. and .Mrs.
Duncan Thomson, lias returned home
after an extended visit to the Slates.
Mrs. W. Merrilield, who lias been
visiting in Vancouver, Is expected
home on Tuesday.
Mrs. T. Rickson lias gone to Vancouver for several weeks.
The management of the Cumberland
Motor Works announce that they will
go on a cash basis for gasoline, and
will adopt the ticket system now in
use throughout the province. -Users
of tickets will make a saving on the
prevailing price.
The management Is forced to adopt
this course on account of the oil company demanding cash on delivery, and
to eliminate heavy bookings.
"TALKS TO PROSPECTORS"
On Saturday of next week Mr.
Brewer, of Nanaimo, Resident Engineer, will give the first of a series of
'our "Talks to Prospectors," relative
to prospecting, rudiments of chemistry, geology and mineralogy, especially with regar dto coal.
The lectures will be held in the
lecture room of tbe Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association, and are
open to all interested.
Wl
tjas tat) proposed and accepted a* a,
Bo# a^fiirl$^acc%a4ucaij& jgL
„ ijame \<& bc^i> <&beb to titf^jSL
IW^Avcl) ewt tyteri\atwt)al
iflioi; c Qiijaba at}6 tt)c Cltiite6
#Mc*,ai)6fli<rt. - t)a$re$ohte&
teftrticate 1$ totVaMay*
@riu>t) <EduW)blaRo$5 aijft (flirt*
'Peace teague
<*tn*MM.rt*t mami* QUecwiO* & mjnim COUTtM*
Pr**h4*nt; „. .
Btrrwtiuy.,,. . . ,
'fWtfltys  taicf..
fetnttu uwrrfoar JJpA.taCfcotftMM
Copy of membership certificate which entitles a British
Columbia boy or girl to share in honor of creating a garden
at the foot of the Peace Arch on the International Boundary,
Children under twelve may give ton cents for honor card
and over twelve may offer twenty-five cents.
TlTTI/i L F. BEALS, living nt Mission City, B. C In the heart of th«
**■*  Ttk* - i all y berry country has answered the mil of Poare.
Lotti hns sent in a coupon clipped from The Vancouver Sun, requesting
her menal •-• hln certificate In the BoyB1 and Girls' Peace League and stating
that she attends the Mission City Public School, .
1      John /Jfiineu Reynolds, a very small boy, Is doing nil he can to further
world peacf*.
When John Joined the loajrue yesterday ho deposited with the secretary
iufflolent money for four other Utile boys tn bo enrolled. Ho requested
that four poor little buys bo plotted nut. ones that didn't have 10 cents
•piece, because In John's young nilml In the rmmmount thought that every
boy and girl should Join the Boys' and Girls' Peace League.
These two healthy and happy British Columbians are only a few of the
children who joined the league yeaterdny.
The call  has gone  out and  tho young crusaders  are  again answering.
A CA1/»E WOilTII WHILE,
The children who Join the newest crusade for world peace will leave behind'thern flower gardens, trim walks and evon tholr names will be preserved and remembered down the centuries,
"When they reach manhood and womanhood peace will be part of tholr
religion and  they »wIH preach  It throughout the world."
yesterdp.y the Widows', Wives and Mothers of Great Britain's Heroes
endorsed the movement
Mrs, J. C. Kemp, tho president, paid: "It Is going to Impress upon their
minds that they will have their part to do In continuing the peace their
aUtrs fought to\."
TUB HJCArr' ov      (    ill).
"Just a d.me li all I got," writes in someone who Is not a child, but
/wishes to help the league along, anyway.
"Don't know whore the next Is coming from. I'm with tho kldeMes for
the Peaot Park," tho letter continues, "and I wish them success/"
It II signed "A Friend of the Children," and In It there Is enclosed 10
"'children  of British Columbia are  raining  120,000  to  create the  Peace
f'ark.    Hundreds have  written  in  for  membership  cards  to the Secretary,
i7 Pender St. Wot, Vanoouver.
All children, of oil races nnd creels, mnv share In the honor of having
ithrlr full  names  written  on   the  roll,  to be  sealed   In  the  arch   for  th*
penuries to come. _ .,	
ANGLICAN YOUNG
"PEOPLE'S ASSOCIATION
Tiie visit to Cumberland of Rev. W.
Simpson, the Western Field Secretary
of the Anglican Board of Religious
Education, was the ralson d'etre of a
gathering of some thirty young people
in the Anglican Church Hall Monday
uvening last. After cards and refreshments, Mr. LeVersedge took the chair
anil in a few words said that he hoped
the occasion ot the visit of Rev. Simpson would mark the bringing together
of the young people of the church on
an organized baslB. Mr. Simpson's
mggestion of forming a branch of the
Anglican Young People's Association
,vas then unanimously supported.
The officers elected were: President,
Mr. G. Apps; vice-president, Mrs. G.
W. Clinton; secretary, Miss Blanche
Dando; literary convenor, Miss Viola
Campbell; athletic convenor, Mr. Val
Dalby; religious convenor, Mrs. Lever-
sedge; social, Mr. J. F. Hough.
The first meeting of the executive
was held Thursday evening in the
vicarage, when It was decided to start
a Sunday morning Bible class, the
flint of which will take place on Sun
day next at 10 a.m. The first social
evening, which will be given up
chiefly to further organization, will
be held on Friday evening of next
week, in the church hall, at 7.30.
GAZETTED NOTARY PUBLIC
Mr. T. H. Carey of Cumberland has
!ieen officially gazetted as a notary
public.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF AT UNION BAY
Week Ending February It.
Protective and Scow, New Westmin-
iter; Tyndareus, Tacoma; Waihemo,
Storm King, coastwise; Canadian Observer, Ocean Falls; Plunger and
icow, Bellingham; Daring, Qrainor
and Coutli, coastwise.
Ladies' Auxiliary of the
G. W. V. A.
Whist Drive and
DANCE
on Friday, February 17th
Memorial Hall
Cards at 8.      Dancing 10 to 12.
Refreshments Served.
Admission  50 cents.
This Damp Cold
Climate Requires
Good   Nourishing   Food
Food full of energy and vitality-producing elements,
especially at the mid-day luncheon.
A goodly dish of any of the following lines—
VAN CAMP'S OR HEINZ'S PORK AND BEANS
CAMPBELL'S SOUPS
HEINZ'S SPAGHETTI
—followed by a steaming cup of
'B. & B. No. 1 or No. 2 FRESH GROUND COFFEE *
will supply the necessary Quantity and Quality.
We carry a full Stock of Fresh
Fruits and Vegetables in Season.
Burns & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
HIGH SCHOOL CLUB
Last Friday night the High School
Club hail the pleasure of hearing an
address by Mr. Rose of the Engineering Staff of the Canadian Collieries
on the subject of "Geology." The
speaker made very clear the chief
classes of rocks and their method of
lormation, saying a good deal about
ho Comox coal field and its probable
irigin. Mr. Rose, by his genial manlier, showed that he understands a
iioy's viewpoint, and will always find
in appreciative welcome in the club.
WHO BORROWED THE
VETERINARY BOOK?
Some months ago Mr, Robertson,
druggist of Courtenay, In a case of
emergency, lent a man a veterinary
book entitled "Diseases and Remedies."
The borrower has overlooked to return the volume, ami the owner would
like the book returned at once, cither
to himself or care of The Islander.
AMATEUR BOXING
TOURNAMENT FEB.
25
An amateur boxing contest will be
held 111 the Union Hall on Saturday,
February 25. Local boys wishing to
compete are asked to send in their
names to Thomas Tapella by mail. It
is not necessary that contestants
should be members of the Cumberland Athletic Club, as all are able to
join up.
WEDDING
Terry—lloivilnll.
\ iinict wedding took place at the
Church of Holy Communion, Tacoma.
Wash., on Saturday, January 28, when
Kathleen Gertrude, second daughter
uf Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Dowdall of Roy-
Iton Station, Vancouver Island, became tho bride of Mr. Leo Bert Terry,
f the U. S. S. Edwards, San diego,
California. Rev. R, H. McGlnnls ofli-
dated,
The bride has many friends In Cum-
lerland, having lived hore as a child.
Mr, Terry Is a native of Rlson, Arkan-
, and during the war spoilt two
years overseas with flie American
Naval forces.
Mr. and Mrs. Terry will mako their
home In San Diego, Cal.
Ladies' and
Gent's  Tailoring
Alterations, Repairs, Finishing
and Pressing
EDWARD ROBINSON
Phone 121 Box 33
Muryport Avenue, Cumberland.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
MR. GEORGE O'BRIEN, SAFETY ENGINEER
will read a paper entitled
"Accidents and Their Prevention in the Mines of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., During 1921."
Wednesday, Feb. 22nd at 8 p.m.
It is hoped to have a large attendance at this meeting.
HELP WANTED
MEN   AND   WOMEN   TO   SELL   TO
women    In    homes,    rubber-lined,
waterproof Gingham Aprons for use
in the kitchen.   Can easily earn $14
dally  and more.   Rapid  seller and j .
ready  demand.   Send  75  cents  for [ _
sample apron and full particulars, j
Money     refunded     If   sample   re-
turned.    British   Rubber  Company, ]
232 McGIll Street, Montreal.        2-6 j
TO   CHEVROLET   OWNERS
Chevrolet l'urts Reduced In l'rlco
In conjunction with their reductions in the price of Coupes, Sedans
and F. 11. models, the Chevrolet Motor Company has now reduced the
price of Chevrolet parts, the reduction in some cases amounting to
50 per cent, of the former prices.
Take advantage of this, together with tho Winter Rates on Repair
Work, mid have your repairs done now.
Courtenay Garage
Phone 61-
Blunt &Ewart,Ltd.
USED CARS
If you are needing a used
car, wc have several mnkes to
choose from, at prices ranging
from $150 up. We guarantee
for three months all the used
Fords we sell.
List of Used  Cars   In  stock
will be sent upon application.
Corfield Motors
Limited
Ford Dealers
Courtenay Phone 46
RECORDS
For a few days prices in
all Departments will be
GREATLY REDUCED
SHEET   MUSIC
FROM TEN CENTS PER COPY
WE REPAIR PHONOGRAPHS AND SEWING
MACHINES—WORK GUARANTEED
Sewing Machines
FROM $3.00 PER MONTH
The
G.A.
Fletcher Music
CUMBERLAND
Co.
Ltd.
AND   ISLAND   FURNITURE   CO.,   COURTENAY

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