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The Cumberland Islander Nov 12, 1926

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Array X,
«
THEV CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIFTH  YEAR—No. 46.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA     FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1926.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Impressive Service
Held At Sandwick
Memorial Cairn
WHO    IS    TO    PAY?
COURTENAY. Nov. 9—The celebration of Armistice Day here ou Sunday
snw some sixty veterans of the district assemble at their headquarters
In the city preparatory to marching
to the memorial culm at Sandwick.
While thc cx-servlee men, under Mr.
H. E. Ault. a former sergeant-major,
were assembling, tlie Courtenay band,
led by Jlr. H. E. Murray, played "Land
of Hope and Glory" and other selections. The Courtenay Girl Guides, all
looking very smart nnd under the
leadership of Miss Rossiter, wore
joined hy lhe Royston contingent with
Mrs. Illngrose ln command. The
Brownie Troop under the care of Mrs.
R. L. Ramsay also joined the parade
and tlie Courtenay B. P. Scouts were
led by Scout-leader Paul Beavon.
The memorlul service at tlie cairn
at Sandwick opened with the placing
of wreathes by Agnes Sutherland and
Gladys ldiens for tlie Guides and the
Scout leader. Four guards In uniform
wcre stationed one at each corner of
the monument. Messrs. Bersey, Sldgwlck. Catchpole and Brock, who stood
with arms reversed and bowed heads
during tlie ceremony. On nrrival of
the clergy, the hymn "0 God our help
In ages past" was sung. The Hev. 13.
0, Robathan. of Cumberland, led In
prnyer, whicli was followed by a minutes Impressive silence. The lesson
taken from the eighth chapter of Deut.
was read hy the Rev. W. Alexander
of St. Georges United Church. Courte-
Readers of the Islander will have
noted in last week's Issue that the
contract for transporting the Trent
Road pupils to and from the Cumberland Schools was announced as having been awarded to Mr. P. McNlven.
This fact was printed under a misapprehension, for it is not entirely the
truth. Two tenders were submitted,
and although Mr. McNiven's seemed
to have the support of the whole
Board, the contract was not definitely
awarded until a committee of Trustees Wm. Henderson, J. C. Brown and
A. MacKinnon could look over the
trucks of the respective applicants
nnd award the contract as they saw
fit.
However, the Islander has been Informed from a reliable source that
Trustee MacKinnon, secretary of the
Board, has told Mr. McNlven that his
tender has been nccepted, despite the
fact that the remaining two members
of thc above committee have not as
yet intimated that tbey favored awarding the contrnct one way or the other.
Mr. McNlven Is ln a quandary. He
is told by one trustee that he has
tbe contract, and two others stoutly
assert, and rightly, that he hasn't, lf
he hasn't yet been awarded the contract, well and good; but if he lms,
the question "who ls going to pay?"
naturally arises. "Certainly not the
School Board." say Trustees Brown
and Henderson, until the contract is
awarded by the committee as a whole,
as authorized at the last meeting.
nay, and was followed by the singing
of "Eternal Father Strong to Save."
The memorial address rendered by the
Venerable Archdeacon Laycock was
impressive. His theme was recollections and thanksgiving. He went
back to the fatal fourth day of August
1914, recalling the outbreak of hostilities, with the shock which it had
meant to many, others finding lt al-
(Continued on Page Five)
a*esesaMsaea£=s-s=a=*'MH^
Through The Telescope
keSS£S£3!3SSSaM=83S3SafeSSSS=a:
Being a Commentary on Current Topics
By E. 0. R.
Hon. W. Sloan In
Motor Accident
South Of Royston
COimiENAY, Nov. 7—Late yesterday afternoon a Studebaker car containing the Hon. Wm. Sloan and a
companion from Nanaimo, when
sighting a car coming in the opposite
direction, bail the misfortune to get
■lore or less in a cross-way position
on the highway to the south of this
city. .Mr. A. C. Cole, the driver of the
other cur. n Ford, was returning to
Union Bay and was unable to avoid
a collision. His car went head Into
the side of the Studebaker, both cars
being badly damaged. Mr. Cole received an ugly cut on the wrist which
severed nn artery, and but for his
knowledge of first aid might have had
a very serious result. The parties
returned to Courtenay where Mr.
Cole's injury was attended to and the
cars taken to the Corfleld Motors for
repairs. It is understood that Mr.
Sloan nnd his companion were going
on a hunting trip.
$105 RAISED
FOR POPPY
DAY FUND
ARMISTICE HAY
AMI WHAT IT HEAK8
•Archdcaco.n Laycock, In his admirable address at the Memoroil Service
neld nt the Sandwick Cairn last Sunday afternoon, gnve a graphic illustration of the true meaning of Thankfulness. Hc could vouch for the truth
of his story ns he was conversant
with the facts. It seems that there
was a man whose face was so disfigured by injuries received in the
war that he became almost repulsive
to look upon. He. poor chap, could
not fall to notice how people turned
away from him when they saw him.
and this knowledge naturally hurt.
One day It happened that he was
present at a gathering where there
were many people amongst whom was
a little girl. There was. of course,
the usual revulsion at his appearance
and tbe little girl noticed, too, how
the people seemed to avoid blm.
Presently she went up to her mother
nnd asked her if his appearance was
caused by the war. On being told so
she nt once snld: "Mother. I would
like to go and kiss that man." and
she promptly did so. In this Illustration we find something nf lbc true
meaning of gratitude, It wns what
the mail hnd suffered and what he
had gone through that appealed to
that little child heart. She had no
enro for appearances. The other
people would undoubtedly have felt
sympnthetle nud sorry, but tlielr feelings did not find expression In action.
Eight years have passed by since
the news Hashed ovcr tbo wires thnt
tlie war was virtually ut an end.
Actually in the line there wns very
little jnllllcatlnn. It wus so hard to
realize that the grim horror of It all
hnd had "linls" written lo It. The
writer was on tbc outskirts of Mons
when word came through thnt the
battery wns to remain In Us present
position until further notice, nnd that
there would bc no more tiring. Later
on that evening billets had been
found In lhe little hnmlet of Ilarve-
lcs-VIUe. n few kilometres enst of
Mons, and a day or two later each
man wns handed n postcard on which
wns the signature of the Burgomaster.
On the postcard, written In French,
are these words: "In the name of the
inhabitants of llurve we pay our
homage of profound gratitude to the
gallant soldiers of the llritish armies
who hnve freed our dear community
from a long Iniquitous nnd brutal
occupation. On the 2'lr'l August 1914.
at 10:30 a.m.. we snw the brave English come In Contact With the enemy
nnd on November 11th, 1918, nl Ihe
same hour the soldiers of a brilliant
Canadian     Division     dislodged    the
Bochcs from our locality and drove
them to the other side of the canal,
where hostilities ended tn favor of
the Armistice. The remembrance of
the British oflicers and soldiers Is
engrnven on our henrts."
Armistice Day has. through an Act
of Parliament, become linked with
Thanksgiving Day, which many believe to be a pity. Thanksgiving Day
is a day set aside, not in gratitude
for the victories of war, but for tlle
crops aud natural resources and all
other blessings which come to us.
Armistice Day Is quite different. It
commemorates what many believed to
be the day on which ended "the war
that was to end all war." To many
thousands it annually brings hack
the memory of a husband who gave
up his life, or a brother who has ever
ranked ns "missing," or a sweetheart
who has never returned. It ls a day,
as the Archdeacon snld, of Recollection ns' well as Thanksgiving. It Is
therefore a debatable point whether
the day should he spent lu plcnsure
alone. In London this year the enjoyment tnkes place on November 12.
whilst the 11 tli was commemorated In
a way befitting to the occasion. In
this way the feelings of no one arc
hurt, and those who suffered bereavement nre the better able to bear their
sorrow.
It ls not nlvvnys possible for everyone to tnke part In the two minutes
silence which is gcncrnlly observed on
Armistice Hiy, so the Canadian
Legion arc to be commended for
nrruuglng a short service to he held
at thc Memorial Arch on Sunday at
12:15 p.m. This will give all who
can, or who are Interested, thc opportunity of showing Ihelr gratitude, not
only to thoso who fell, but to those
who suffered loss through the
bereavement or Injuries in the Great
War. The words ot that Immortal
poem/ "In Flander's Fields," still
ring out tlielr challenge. They are
as fresh and Inspiring as they were
on tlie day on which they were written In a little dugout "somewhere
over there."
"To you with falling hands wc
throw the torch. Be yours to
hold It high. If you break faith
with us who die, we shall not
sleep though poppies blow in
Flander's Fields."
Surely If we are "to keep thc faith"
with those who fell, lt Is our duty
as well as our privilege to remember
in gratitude their names, and to carry
on in tiie effort to promote a better
understandlng between the nations of
the world and among ourselves.
COURTENAY, Nov. 7.—Poppy Day
In Courtenay saw the Girl Guides
busy with the red Ilowers on the city
streets from 8 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Their
efforts realized $105 for the Poppy
Day Fund. Under the direction ot
Mr. G. H. Capes, secretary of the local
branch of the Canadian Legion, and*
their captain, Miss Edna Rossiter, the
girls worked in two-hour spells. The
poppy sellers were: Dorothy Hames,
Dorothy' and Agnes Sutherland, Dorothy and Eileen Cokely. Eileen Clark,
Katherine Capes, Katherine Fitzgerald. Margaret Brown, Alice Hurford,
Beatrice Catchpole and  Mable Dack.
!~    WEDDINGS       f
* . it
llkhnrils - Bntemaii
Miss Irene Bateman and Mr. Dave
Richards, former residents of Cumberland, at present residing in Seattle,
are receiving congratulations of their
many friends on the occasion of their
recent marriage, which took place in
Seattle. A short honeymoon was
spent in Vancouver by Mr. and Mrs.
Richards, being guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Robt. Strachan, former residents
of this city. • ■
Cox - Lewis
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lewis, of
Cumberland, announce the marriage
of their daughter, Gladys, to Mr.
Charles J, Cox, of Seattle, on Monday,
November 1st.
The ceremony was performed at the
home of Mrs. Thomas Sacher, and
after a short honeymoon Mr. and Mrs.
Cox will make their home in Seattle.
Cumberland Eleven
Maintains Lead
In P. C. League
A penalty kick, converted by Billy
Marshall in the last few minutes of
tiie game, gave tbe local intermediates
the victory over West Coast United in
a league game played on the local
grounds Sunday last. The game was
hard fought from start to finish, tbe
visitors being very unfortunate. They
should have had a substantial lead hy
the aid of two penalty kicks, both of
which Malt (Sewart saved.
The West Soast boys have a very
fine, wel (balanced team and only the
l excellent work of Farmer, Weir, Marshall. Dickie and .Matt Stewart saved
the locals from being two or three
I goals down at the breather. The
(visitors scored in the first few minutes of ,tlie game, GHiHon equalising
! witli a magnificent first time effort.
| From then until half time the game
, see-sawed back and forth, with the
I West Coast boys missing a penalty—
| given against Bickle for handling.
| The second half was a repititlon of
the first, both goalies finding plenty
to do. Matt Stewart saved his lines
when he left his position to meet the
rushing forwards of the visitors, who
had beaten the backs easily. Matt
literally took the bal] oil' the centre
forward's toe. saving a very dangerous situation. A few minutes later a
penalty was given against Weir for
hands, Stewart stopping the bullet-
like drive. Referee Jones blew his
whistlo for an infringement against
the visitors and the danger was
cleared.
The homesters pressed strongly and
during a meloe in front of the goal a
penalty was given against the visiting
defense. Marshall scoring the winning
tally a few minutes from time up.
For the visitors, tlie defense played
magnificently, whilst their half-backs
are about tbe best Intermediate middle line seen here for some time.
The home team was best served by
Stewart, .Marshall, Bickle, Farmer and
Weir. The forwards did not combine
as well as formerly, due, no doubt, to
over anxiety,
Aid. W.Douglas
Failed To Bag
Sleeping Cougar
COURTENAY, Nov. 7— For the purpose of constructing a temporary dam
at the outlet of Douglas Lake, three
thousand feet In the mountains above
Courtenay, a party consisting of Mr.
C. S. Wood, B. Dennis and B. Towler,
with pack horses, left Thursday. They
were accompanied to the top of Quartz
Creek mountain by Aid. Wm. Douglas
and Mr. C. W. Shannon, who returned
the same day. While making a reconnoitre at the top of Quartz Creek, Aid.
Douglas spotted a cougar some live
hundred feet below, sleeping on the
rocks. He had Ave shots at the big
cat with his revolver, hut lt was hardly to be expected that the animal
would be anything more than scared
with this weapon at the distance. The
construction party expect to complete
their work by Monday.
BASKETBALL  MEETING
A meeting of the Cumberland Basketball Club will be held at 7:30 p.m.
In the Athletic Club on Sunday, Nov.
21st. All members are requested to
be In attendance. Important business
to be transacted.
CUMBERLAND PLAYS AT
COURTENAY SUNDAY
.•Yoveltles  galore!—Moose Carnival
liimce, Friday, December 10th.
CRIBBAGE
PASTIME IS
BOOMING HERE
In Cumberland, crlbbage appears to
be running badminton a close second
for popularity during the present
season. Last year one or two crib-
bage games were played witli Union
Bay, but no efforts made to organize.
This year clubs from Union Bay and
Bevan, with two from Cumberland,
have formed; the delegates from these
clubs meeting In the Athletic Hall on
Thursday evening last for the purpose
of electing officers and drawing up a
schedule of games. Officers chosen
were as follows: President, C. Hitchens; vice-president. E. T. Searle. of
Union Bay; 2nd vice-president, R.
Gibson. Bevan; secretary. T. Robertson, Cumberland. Two members of
each club wlll bo elected to form an
executive.
President Hitchens , explained the
aims and objects of the Crlbbage Club
and regretted very much that a club
had not been formed at Courtenay.
However, with four teams in the
league, a series of very Interesting
games Is anticipated.
Following is the schedule: (games
to start at 7:30 p.m. In each case):
Nov. 16.—Men's Club vs. Union Bay
at Cumberland.
Nov. 17.—Cumberland Club versus
Bevan at Cumberland.
Dec. 1.—Cumberland Club vs. Bevan
at Bevan. Men's Club vs. Union Bay
at Union Bay.
Dec.   21.—Men's   Club   vs.   Bevan   at
Cumberland.
Dec. 22.—Cumberland Club versus
Union Bay at Cumberland.
Jan. 12.—Cumberland Club versus
Union Bay at Union Bay. Men's Club
vs. Bevan at Bevan.
Feb. 2.—Cumberland Club vs. Men's
Club at Athletic Club. Bevan versus
Union Bay at Bevan.
Feb. 22.—Cumberland Club versus
Men's Club at Cumberland.
Feb. 23.—Bevan vs. Union Bay at
Union Bay.
Armistice Day
Commemoration
Service Sunday
Armistice Day. Nov. 11th, was observed hy a short service of commemoration held In Holy Trinity Church,
and after the bell was tolled the two
minutes ot silent prayer wus kept by
those present. Owing to the difficulty
which many have In nol being able
to observe Armistice Day ns thoy
would like, the Canadian Legion have
arranged for a short service to be
held at the Memorall Arch on Sunduy
Nov. Hth, at 12:15 noon. The local
Scouts and Wolf Cubs will bc present
under Assistant Scouler Frank Martin
and the local band wlll hc In attendance under Ihe direction of Band-
mnster Jackson. The service wlll be
very brief, not lasting more than half
an hour, nnd if thc wenther Is not
favorable   will   be   held In tho hull
Tbo lesson nnd prayers will he read
hy Hev. E. O. Robathan, Vicar of Holy
Trinity Church, and the address will
he given by Rev. J. Hewitt of lbc
Cumberland United Church. Wreaths
wlll he lnld around the Memorial Arcli
by the local Veterans nnd other organizations.- It Is hoped that all who
can will make the effort to be present
at this service, which will especially
commemorate those men who left
Cumberland and who gnve their lives
In thc Great War. A cordial Invitation Is therefore extended to everyone
to be present, and particularly those
Veterans of campaigns other than thc
Great War.
The High School gossips arc considering why the boys nre so religious lately.   Ask Rosie, he knows!
Second DIvIkIoii League Standings
Goals
P. W. L, D. F. A. Pts
Cumberland    4   3   0   1 13   4   7
Courtenny   4   8118   6   6
West  Coast   (J... 4   2   2   0 14   4   4
Qualicum   4   0   4   U   2 23   0
Cumberland will Held thc following
team against Courtenay in a second
division league game at thc farming
centre on Sunduy: Stewart; Bickle
and Marshall; Little. Fanner. Weir;
McLeod, Gibson, Campbell. Stevenson
and Walker, with Somerville. Auchlnvole and Juckson as reserves. The
game starts at 2:30 sharp, so the
above players are requested to be at
the itoyal Candy Store nt 1:30.
A meeting of the Cumberland Intermediate Club will ho held nl 7:30 o'clock Sunduy evening In the Athletic
('lull. All members ure requested to
attend.
Hayseed Ball
Novel Feature
Here Was Success
In keeping with the unusually good
times held at varying intervals by the
Welsh Society of Cumberland, was the
hayseed ball in the Ilo-llo dance hall
last Friday. The crowd was one ot
the largest seen in the big hall for
some time and the expressions of
approval heard on all sides as to the
manner in which the dance was conducted were a great tribute to the
Welsh folk of this city.
Although Cumberland is far from
being what one could call a farming
centre, yet the numberless impersonations of what usually pass as "hayseeds" gave the impression that the
farming industry here was as common as mining. "Comical" does not
begin to describe some of the costumes, and the judges, in awarding
the following prizes, had a bigger task
than they had bargained for:
Best group: Mrs. Mi Stewart, Mrs,
J. Robertson, Mrs. A. Farmer, Mrs.
W. H. Cope and Miss H, Lockhart;
be.st couples: Mrs. S. .Miller and Mrs.
S. Davis, Mrs. J. D. Davis and Mrs. T.
Eccleston, Sr.; best ladies: Miss P,
Sehl and .Miss I), Wilson; best gents:
H. Stewart, H. Robertson, E. Tre-
hearti; best cow girl: Miss Dawson.
Mrs. Spooner and Miss Williamson
were the winners of the spot  waltz.
Jimmy Walker's Paramount Orchestra was heard to advantage lu the
latest dance selections, and during a
lull in dancing the Welsh Society
.served refreshments that have never
been surpassed. .Many novelties und
amusing decorations kept the huge
crowd iu excellent humor.
SUCCESSFUL F. O. E.
SOCIAL EVENING HELD
Tlie whist drive and social evening
held under auspices of thc F. 0. of
Eagles on Tuesday evening Inst was
a magnitlcent success, a targe number
of members', their wives and friends
being present. Thc prize winners in
the Whisi drive were: ladles' first.
Mrs. W. Beveridge Jr.; ladies' second.
Mrs. J. Quinn; gentlemen's lirst, Mrs.
J. Davis (substituting); second. Mr.
D, Stewnrt.
After refreshments had been served
a grand musical programme was
rendered hy the following well-known
local artists: Messrs. It. Goodall. J.
Stewnrt. W. Jackson. Ed. Morris. 11.
L. Bates. II. Tappin. Gomer Harding.
Alex Fowler, Sam Jones, R. Robert-
Vets' Masquerade
Was Attended By
Huge Throng
The Slogan, "bigger, brighter, better than ever," which the local Vets
adopted for their annual Masquerade
Ball, held last night in the Ilo-llo
hall, was certainly lived up to. The
spacious hall was packed to capacity
and in addition to tiie large number
of masked dancers, a huge throng of
spectators was on hand. Many beautiful and original costumes wero ou
display, and the task set for thy five
judges was no sinecure. hi almost
every instance tlielr decision was a
popular one. Just before the grand
march started, tlie judges, Mesdames
Wheeler, .Miller and Baker, witli Mr.
C. Wilson and Mr. W. Jackson, were
called upon to*declare the winners
of the prize waltz, and unhesitatingly
chose Mrs. L. Francescini aud her
partner. Mr, \V. McMillan. L'pwards
of $150 was given in prizes for the
best masked lady or gent in costume,
and ihe judges' decision in the various tasks sot them was as follows:
Best dressed lady, Miss M. Browu,
matron of the Cumberland Hospital,
and herself a veteran of the Great
War. having seen service in ;he "Pot."
The prize for the best dressed gent
went to Fred Donnelly; best national
lady, Miss A. Hoffeiuz (Canada); best
national gent. Ci. Euta (Japan); best
sustained lady, Mrs. S. Hatfield as a
witch; best sustained gent, C. M. Morrison, (R. 0. M. P.); best comic group,
Mesdames Covert, L. Frelone, S. Miller aud S. Davis; best comic lady,
Miss J. Eccleston; best comic gent.,
Dave Hunden; best clown, L. Scavardo; best hobo, J. Casanave; best local
advertising character, Miss 0. Richardson ( representing the Islander);
best (lower girl. Miss M. Richardson.
At the conclusion of the judging the
drawing for the spectators' tombola
prizes resulted as follows: No. 177,
Mrs. A. Henderson; 12!', Mr. Shepherd,
KM. Miss B. Baird; 31. Miss E. Carey;
46, Mrs. Weir; 46. Miss Slant; 25, Mrs.
Heaps; 32, Joe Whyley; 50, unclaimed. Holder of ticket no. ,511 can obtain
prize by applying to tbe secretary,
Mr. Fraser  Watson.
Al this point of (he proceedings u
large number of the Courtenay Vets
under the leadership of R.S.M. Baker,
arrived on a surprise visit. They had
left their own entertainment at
Courtenay. just to come over to say
"cheerio" to tlie local vets. TUeir
visit was much appreciated, and after
a few stunts on the floor of the hall,
the Courtenay vets invited the Cumberland vets into a huge circle and
join them iu singing "Auld Lang
Syne." Dancing was continued until
3:00 a.m.. to music supplied by Jimmy   Walker's    Paramount   Orciiestra.
Thus ended the 1926 celebration of
the local Vets, and it is safe to say
that last night's affair was about the
best tlie locals have put on. The
committee worked hard and are to
be congratulated on the thoroughness
I with which (lie 192U Armistice celebration was carried off.
ARMISTICE SERVICE
AT HOLY TRINITY
The service at Holy Trinity Church
(Anglican) on Sunday at 7 p.m. will
take the form of a special Armistice
service, and a cordial invitation Is
extended to all to be present.
son and C. Newman, and Mesdames
Tweedhope, Bradley. Formsby, Anderson and Dauucey.
It is tbe intention of tbe local aerie
to run one of thsee functions at least
I once a month.
THE C.H.S. "CHRONICLER"
(Cumberland
• L. a,
SH0KT DEBATE WAS
DKCXABED A DRAW
The third inter-class debate this
week was meekly contested between
first year ami matric. The subject:
"resolved tliat ancient nations were
more heroic than modern nations."
was Indifferently debated. Pardon,
we forfgol to mention the debaters.
Tbey   were   .Mary  (iazzauo  and  Jack
MacLean  for  the  affirmative,  while
on the other hand Jessie Brown and
Irene Bates supported tlie' negative.
The Judges" verdict was a tie, 1214
points eacli. Although second year
was in favor of ihe affirmative, yet
we consider tbe Judges' decision as
final. Tlie debaters bad none of the
tire and enthusiasm of former orators
heard in the same class room; there
was no aggressive Hill nor eloquent
J. O.; they hud not even the spirit of
a broken-down plough horse. Tbe
only commendable feature was its
merciful shortness. The editor sold
he would remind matric if tbey once
moiV suffered defeut, though they did
not lose, yet so saddened Is be by the
result that be considers retiring to a
monastery. There was no actual rebuttal and both sides confused modem and ancient heroes. Yet In justice to both classes we must not omit
to mention (hat the subject for de-
bato was given only the day before
and also both classes bad considerable home-work, especially matric.
High School)
Editor
I A pupil of C. 11. S. has been summoned to defend himself against a
most   extraordinary   charge,   namely
1 that nf knowingly and willingly working too hard—a charge, we may safely
say, without precedent in the history
of the Schools. He is to be tried by a
muck trial next week. Eminent
counsel, Jessie Grant, wlU act for the
defense, and l.ehunl Harrison will he
Crown prosecutor. Alastair MacKinnon will be the judge. Oh well, such
things happen in the best regulated
High  Schools.
Say.  Lai.  hope  you  make a  more
efficient   Judge  than   your  colleagues.
We wonder If the debaters woke up
to find themselves asleep?
EDITORIAL
In  the  dim  dawn  of the  Neolithic
' phase of our ancestors and even the
Palaeolithic phase, men and sub-men
; waged the ceaseless struggle for life,
armed with spears and club. To-day
tlie age-old struggle goes on, but in-
' stead of spears ond club, man uses
education and a trade as his weapons.
Thus it may he seen that a sound
education to-day is indispensihle to
lhe boy or girl who aspires to a
career and wishes to wage a successful battle witli life. The world of today is a comical world; it demands
efficiency and lhe necessary education
for such.   How  often  do we see on
; advertisement  demanding   the  oppll-
I cant  hove a  High  School education?
! Such an education is tbe stepping-
stone to a better position and success,
I (Continued on Page Two) PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 192C.
CHANGE Autumn is in the air. Hallowe'en
and Thanksgiving have gone and
Christmas lies just ahead. Yellowed, dried leaves
are falling, falling, the annuals have ceased to
bloom and droop beneath the killing frosts.
Alius! that the day of the morning glory and
hollyhock speeds so swiftly. The balsam tosses
its snowy banners to the winds and the bitter
sweet is being gathered and carried into the
homes to give cheer and remind us of the summer
that is gone.
Of course there are some pleasing things on
the reverse side of the picture. But we hate the
cold. We can't help hating it—the cold winter
is somber aud cruel. We exult with Autumn as
she sits on the granary floors or walks the painted
hills. We rejoice in the fullness of the harvest.
We respond to the beauty of ripening corn, with
pumpkins gleaming like spheres of ancient gold.
Pleasure and satisfaction are to be derived from
the throbbing pulsations of summer at its best.
Splendor glorifies the landscapes. Poetry and
harmony breathe in the warm winds and the
fragrance of passing flowers. The fairy hazes
and mists of Autumn day by day sway nearer.
As true children of the sun, we love the summer
and its passion of realization. If one have health
and is self-sustaining, he may find pleasure in the
red glow of the winter fire. There is a tonic in
frosty air, music in the tin-tinnabulation of bells
on snowy roads. But these pleasures cannot
compare with those of the warm, sweet, sensuous
summer, with the breath of flowers, the chorus of
birds, for summer is the golden season, the season
of beauty and melody and love's fruition; it is the
season when we are fain to follow the fairies and
dryads into cool forest aisles, to seek inviting
waters, to lie in ferny brakes, listening to melody
heard too seldom by dulled mortal ears.
haggle over the telephone, but that instrument
affords too easy a method of bringing an inconvenient dialogue to an abrupt and unsatisfactory
termination. We smile with satisfaction when
we see a woman going about with a market basket doing the buying for her home. She gets
better goods and much more for her money than
the lady who sits down at the telephone and
orders her meats and ■groceries without any regard to quality or price. Saving something out
of your allowance does not depend so much on
what your man slips you each week out of his
pay envelope, as to what you save in the way you
spend it. Taking anything the merchant sends
you, at any price he sees fit to charge for your
order, over the telephone, is not an economical
way to buy your supplies. Take the old market
basket and go to the store yourself. You will be
surprised at what you can save in this way.
A TIP TO THE The high cost of living has
HOUSEWIFE been attributed to many and
varied things, but in our humble opinion one of the greatest causes for high
prices lies in the fact that so much of the present
day marketing is done over the telephone. If the
housewife would go back to the bargaining days
of her mother, she would soon put a big dent in
the inflated figures.   It is, of course, possible to
GAMBLING The habit of playing bridge for
money is growing rapidly and is
now spreading to the smaller communities. It
has long been known that in the larger cities
some of the women's bridge clubs have become
genuine gambling contests. Now we find that in
many of the rural communities the ladies are
actually playing for money and a great many of
the small town bridge clubs are playing for prizes
bought with the proceeds of an assessment on
each member at each meeting. We suppose the
bridge-crazy feminine.of the species has to do
something now that she refuses to bake and iron
and even sweep in her own home. When the
ladies started their little afternoon euchre clubs
in the years gone by, the men smiled and said,
"Of course, it's all right. You girls ought to play
a little." But we insist that gambling is not
play. In a real game there is nothing to be lost
but the game itself, which never hurts. One
does not have to be bribed to play. Where a
monetary consideration is'injected into the game,
the whole motive of the action is changed. One
is now jeopardizing, perhaps, the support of her
family, or plans and hopes for the future, or obligations to her community, or her associates.
Instantly the play spirit takes flight and anxieties
and ambitions become dominant, which ruin and
destroy the whole purpose of a real game.
We are old-fashioned enough to believe that
a half dollar and an afternoon spent at the church
thimble bee is of more benefit to the community
than an afternoon spent playing bridge for a
prize in which you have a half dollar invested.
TELEPHONE 19
CUMBERLAND
Linen Table Cloths
IRISH   DAMASK   TABLE   (LOTUS,
with napkins to match, of very lino
quality & finish, in attractive designs
Prices (Tablecloths)
from  	
$3.00
BREAKFAST TABLE (LOTUS. r,2 by
GO witli colored borders,
Special nt 	
$1.75
QUITE SO!
In London recently two men were
discussing advertising.
"Great stuff, those electric signs we
have on Broadway," said the Yankee.
"Do you know, there's one that is a
block long and has 250,000 electric
bulbs in it."
"How many?" exclaimed the Londoner in surprise.
"A quarter of a million."
"A quarter of a million!" exclaimed
the Londoner.   "Say, old chap, don't
you think that's a bit conspicuous.
BUNKERED!—
Said a medical man: "I was house
surgeon to a well-known asylum, and
one day had some difficulty in getting
a telephone number. The operator
said something which I did not quite
like. I asked, 'Do you know to whom
you are talking?' 'No,' came the
| voice over the wire—'but I know
where you are!'"
It isn't the mountain ahead that wears you
out—it's the grain of sand in your shoe. Be
master of your petty annoyances and conserve
your energies for the big worth while things.
BUREAI SCAHKS nml Centre Plecon
trimmed  with  lace and
insertion;  each ..
$1.50
EMBROIDERED Itl NNKItS & (Hiiro
I'teces—a pretty aBsortmeiit ot rose
patterns,
each 	
$1.25
Curtain Muslins
MARQUISETTES In plain and lace
edge, white ocru and cream, ul line
quulity and dainty designs, very ser
viceable, from per yard,
35^ to	
$1.00
MADRAS—Beautiful shades of colored
Madras and absolutely sunfast. *)ij
inches wide, per yard   500
THE C. H. S. "CHRONICLER"
(Continued from Page One)
The person who does not possess a
good education is doomed to years of
unremitting toil; true there are exceptions, but they aro exceptional
people. Even a ditch digger can
build a better ditch with a knowledge
of geometry. The uneducated have a
restricted   horizon   of   thought,   they
blunder through life ignorant of its
wonders, their minds stagnant. As
regards tlie boy or girl who desires
no education or calling—Fools! They
regard higher "eddlcatlon" with contempt, their sole ambition is to work
for a few miserable dollnrs a day and
to acquire manly "virtues." They are
chained to years of ceaseless toil,
they even have not taken the trouble
to  be  proficient  in   their  trade.   We
live but once. As the Inexorable
years pass on, they find themselves
in the decline of life—derelicts on its
high seas. They wore irresponsible
iu their youth but when helpless old
age arrives, they are still forced to
toil for a miserable wage to sustain
life. It is then, and then only, when
face to face with the real struggle for
life, they realize "if only" is sadder
than "It might have been."
SCMMS—Plain, spot and bar. 40-lns.
wide, per yard    50<"
Plowing Contest
Wednesday, Nov. 17th
ON MR. HURFORD'S RANCH, UNDER AUSPICES
OF AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY
TRACTOR AND 2 FURROW GANG PLOWING
1st PRIZE 45-gal. DRUM GASOLINE
2nd PRIZE  10-gaI. DRUM OIL
FORDSON TRACTOR (Agricultural)  $66»
OLIVER 7AXX GANG PLOW   $150
USED FORDSON TRACTOR   $350
USED 16-inch BRUSH BREAKER PLOW  $100
USED (HORSE) KIRSTIN STUMP PULLER $100
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
Phones 46 and 182 Courtenay, B. C.
AKT SILK  MADBAS—Come  in  Art
Silk gold material, nicely finished, 4:
inches wide,
special, per yard ..
$1.50
Making Good in Western Canada
CRETONNES—Come in a wide range
of  bright colors,  smart designs  am
good quality, 3(i-ins. wide,
per  yard  	
50c
CASEMENT CLOTH in Rose & Green I
cross bar patterns, in medium weight i
drapery, 54 inches wide,
at per yard 	
$1.25
S!£^*aS^waSBWrtK*«tt«»^
r*      k ,- .■""   «. ..' *A.V!
'■■■■■ -A*;.* ■*■ V .v y\'.:VV**v'*A' :.-.
wxMwMwmi.
FLORAL CHINTZ—A fine range of
pretty floral patterns lo choose from.
36-lns. wide, special at per yd. 50<?
HATH   TOHELS-
Towels,  22  by  42
bjg and spongy,
special at 	
■Novelty   Bordered
assorted  borders.
$1.25
Every Woman
Deserves One
The SMP Roaster is a fine time saver. You put
the roast or fowl in the oven. The router does
the rest, bastes, roast j to perfection. It roasts with
very little shrinkage, thus savmf dollars every year.
None of tbe tasty meat juices aie lost; all the rich
flavor is retained. Besides you can buy cheaper
cuts, for it makes cheap cuts taste
like choice ones.
The cloae fittini cover keept all tbe
cooking odora and the irraae f naida thai
raaatar lh( amcll of cookint doesn't All
the bouac, ind the oven ia kept aweet
■ nd clean. Beat of all, it cleana out In
iffy after the roaetina. Theae are
. ndid veaaela. Price lie, to »J.S0
according to ajae and fioiih. Sold io all
hardware storca.
. *■'. 5 ;■; .*;.* '■ s n 're ™ 55 55 *si >j}i e 531535 335 55.35 'xsm tWBm
NOVELTY EIDEltOOWX-A fleecy
material for Bath Robes and Dressing
Gowns; new designs in dark or light
colors, 72-inches wide,
per yard
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire,    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture arid Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
.' -.-ai'ffiffi'ft'-fli'fii'OiiQifflffii*^^
aEg^^^iS,—,3131—i^a^-ir.i*^^^ —
KEEP ALIVE THAT CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
l. goathern Albarta, where John CoarlltS Battled. '1. Mary,
ttha at lha ar' nt 12 yeara carad for a family of tiix. 8, llavr
Xriimm, Htarr Krutnm and Tom Cocrlili anil Ihe nnlo itwncrl hy
Dave  Krnmaa.
John Coerlitz was in the Russian Imperial Army
J when the Czar still ruled. He was a musician
and a farmer and while he played in an orchestra
hc was happy and content. Later hc went Jo his
farm, a mountain retreat in the east of Russia near
Scratta. The municipality was crowded, the land
allotment small and profits the same. John Coerlitz
was successful but not content.
There came a letter one day from his cousin who
had come to Canada in 1900. It told of the vast
stretches of prairie lands, of good jobs with hinh
wages, and of how he had come to Canada not knowing a word of English yet had had no trouble in finding work.
"Why don't you come, John, and make money too,
and get ahead in this new country," the letter ran.
Coerlitz was single und inspired with new hope left
Russia and joined his cousin. He did not buy land
at once but went to work in the Canadian Pacific
Railway's roundhouse and began to save. During
this time he married one of his own country women
and joined his cousin in Southern Alberta. Land
was cheap anil a good start was made. Naturally
there were hard yenrs at first; new land to break and
a house nnd barn to save for. With thrift this was
accomplished.
Five children wcre born to John Coerlitz and his
wife, three boys and two girls. While the last was
•till a baby the mother died and John Coerlitz faced
life with five motherless children in a new country.
With courage characteristic of pioneers of the land,
.Mary, the oldest girl, but twelve years of age, stepped
in and took charge of the household. They had a
small organ which Coerlitz played and taught Mary
to play.
Years passed. That is over eight years ago now.
Mary is herself murried to Dave Krumm, a.prosperous
son of a Russian pioneer who settled in the West 29
years ago.
Tom, John Coerlitz's eldest son, is interested in
engines' and recently bought a second had tractor and
went to different farms breaking land. He intends
to buy a grain separator, which with his engine, will
complete his threshing outfit. Hc will likely pay for
it with this year's wages.
John Coerlitz, the father, is proud of his family's
achievements in Canada. Hc has a good farm all paid
for and well stocked, and a fine car. And he has the
assurance of a bright future for himself and his
family who are growing to maturity with enterprise,
intelligence and health as their priceless assets.
VR1VJITE
Greeting Cards
for Yuletide rttr.embrar.ee
are a .source of extrerhe pleasure to the
receiver, instilling in the heart the thought
that "I am not forgotten." To the sender
thc result attained is more than worth while.
The Design Is-
a matter of Individual lastc, yet there
are so many different 'designs from
which to choose that no one need bo
dissatisfied. We arc agents for tho
leading card manufacturers of Canada, who will either print Ihe cards
or leave them blank, if the latler
course ls decided on the printing Is
done right here In Cumberland lu the
olllce of
Nearly Everuone--
has friends or relatives ln the "Old
Country" to whom they invariably
send some small gift. What could be
belter for this purpose than Greeting
Cards? Order early to be In time for
Christmas mails; just phone 35 and
our representative wlll be pleased to
call and show you our samples, or If
you nre passing our olllce drop In and
ask to see thc different designs.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
j|'**Si-te^W***»»53M«Q»^^ lift
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1826.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK
Jack Holt in" The Blind Goddess"also
THE STOW OF A COWARD WHO MADE THE SHADES
OF HIS FIGHTING ANCESTORS STAND UP AND CHEEBv
'J
'<"* 'wiumtox
Presents
mis
jSSbotm"
Cowmil orhrminlhcWitk OpenSptlca t
Monday, November 15
^1 ■*:.»op*^,°'
Tuesday, November 16
Rod LaRocque and Dorothy Gish
in "Night Life In New York"
Wednesday and Thursday Nov. 17-18
Josie Sedgwick in "Daring Days "and
«T*«rr*j3)
af 8JA9 ,^tj,
i    ^<*^A,'*"^i'*ilW->':'
Friday and Saturday November 19-20
"Yellow Fingers" with Olive Borden
also Conway Tearle and Anna Q.
Nilsson in
, Coming, Thursday, November 25
The Dempsey-Tunney Fight
Movies
Attractions for the
Coming Week
Gaiety Theatre
•^ c"Sji»'Sji"Sj*
ARTHUR TRAIN NOVEL
BASIS OF NEW FILM
Arthur Train's exciting novel of
contemporary New York life, "The
Blind Goddess," has at last reached
the screen via Paramount and the
directorial chaperonage of Victor
Fleming. Jack Holt, Esther Ralston,
Ernest Torrence aud Louise Dresser
are featured at the head of a large
and competent cast.
The mock pageantry of the law and
the unequal struggle between right
and wrong form an interesting and
powerful theme for this new' romance
drama, which comes to the Ilo-llo
Theatre Friday antl Saturday of this
week. November 12 and 13.
The  story,  In   brief,  portrays   the
thrilling romance of a young prosecuting attorney,  who  is  forced  to
sacrifice the girl he loves to adhere
lo his Ideal of duty.   The action U
laid in a background that ranges from
1 the mini routine of the criminal court
j to  the  smart  social   atmosphere  of
! Fifth Avenue's exclusvle homes.
]    Every sequence in "The Blind God-
| dess" is said to be a climax In itself,
i and each sequence as it Is unfolded
leads  up  to the  tremendous  court-
! room  scenes   where  Esther  Ralston,
daughter of Torrence. the murdered
i political  boss,  demands  the  life  of
J Louise  Dresser, the woman  charged
with the crime, who later proves to
he her own mother!
fallen In love with her guardian. The
shock of finding out who and what
she really Is, when she overhears the
captain teMIng Saina's history to the
I girl he loves, is too much for the
girl—and she turns native with a
vengeance.
It Is a role that brings out all the
hidden store of tremendous dramatic
power In this talented little actress
—and gives her the opportunity to
show her great versatility In emotion
acting.
Ralph Ince is cast in the leading
male role. Others in the cast are
Edward Plel, Claire Adams, Otto Ma-
tieson, and Nigel de Brulier.
FRESHIE'S A "LITTLE YOU'
TRYING TO BE A "BIG I"
Those boyhood days when going lo
college was greater than going to
Congress, and you'd rather he Right
Tackle than President were bound to
he one day chosen by Harold Lloyd
for glorification by his particular
brand of wfiolesome comedy. And It
has happened in "The Freshman,'
heralded as his very best comedy,
regardless of which one you choose
as your favorite.
"The Freshman" Is making Its de-
hut at the Gaiety Theatre tonight and
will be shown also ut the matinee and
evening performances tomorrow. In
It Lloyd, playing his first college boy
role, Is seen as a "little you" beginning his first year with "Big 1"
ambitions and being Immediately sat
upon and razzed within an Inch of
his young, high hopes by everyone
except pretty Peggy. She believes
that, while he is certainly acting like
a boob, he has more spunk in his
little linger than anyone else in the
school. And, before all the shooting
and shouting's over, he Justifies Miss
Peggy's opinion!
Jobyna Ralston Is again leading
lndy. Others ln the cast are Brooks
Benedict. Hazel Keener, Pat Harmoir,
James Anderson and Joe Harrington.
Jack Daugherty, celebrated screen
hero, has experienced In his short
lifetime more thrills than befall any
three oilier men. He has climbed
from a speeding automobile to an
overhead airplane, dived from forty
and fifty feet heights Into shallow
water, engaged In hundreds of fist
fights all for lhe delectation of movie
audiences. Rut his greatest adventures occur In 'The Runaway Express'
which comes to the Gaiety Theatre
next Wednesday and Thursday, Nov.
17 and 18th. Blanch Mahaffey wlll
he seen opposite Daugherty,
OLIVE BORDEN HAS
HER GREATEST ROLE
IN "YELLOW FINGERS"
WAR DEALT DEATH
BLOW TO ROYALTY
mi* 'saiiiraej noiJisny a*qou *oh
generations of traditions behind them,
and empty cupboards before them,
were humbled, while war barons and
war vultures grew fat on the profits
of the war, Is brought poignantly to
light In one of the season's most col-
lossal screen dramas, "The Greater
Glory," which will be shown at the
Ilo- Ilo Theatre next Friday aud Saturday, Nov. 19 and 20th.
"The Greater Glory" Is the work of
June Mathls, master mind of the
screen. Miss Mathls is responsible
for "The Four Horsemen," which was
the means of bringing Rex Ingram
and Rudolph Valentino to the fore.
More than a year was spent on the
production of "The Greater Glory."
The picture Is an adaptation of the
celebrated novel "Viennese Medley,"
by Edith O'Shaughnessy, wife of the
American Ambassador at Vienna.
The story is a poignant history of
the fortunes of a fine old Viennese
family before, during and after the
war. The picture Is startling realistic. The greater part of the scenes
recorded are authentic and actually
took place in the once gay Austrian
capital.
The large cast of "The Greater
Glory"-ls headed by Anna Q Nilsson,
Conway Tearle, May Allison, Ian
Keith, Jean Hersholt and Lucy Beaumont. More than twenty other players of note have supporting parts, and
the "extra" parts number about 1,600.
An immense avalanche tearing ruthlessly down the side of a mountain
is one of the spectacular scenes in
the film version of Temple Bailey's
novel, "Peacock Feathers," which Is
coming to, the Ilo-llo Theatre next
Wednesday and Thursday, 17 and 18.
Cullen Landls and Jacqueline Logan
have the leads.
Admirers of Josie Sedgwick are to
be afforded the chance of seeing their
favorite Western star In one of the
best things she has done. It ls entitled "Daring Days." and Is to he
screened at the Ilo-llo next Wednesday and Thursday along with "Pen-
cock Feathers."
EX-WIFE SAVES EX-HUBBY
One of the highlights In "Forbidden
Waters," Prlscilla Dean's new Metropolitan  picture  at  the   llo-Ilo  next
Monday and at tiie Gaiety Tuesday,
Is when a divorced wife learns thai
her ex-husband ls caught In the meshes of a pair of clover schemers and
lo save his fortune she frustrates the
carefully laid plans ot the plotters.
The story Is unusually funny and
thrilling, with Miss Dean ln the role
of the ex-wife.
Olive Borden, lovely little Fox star
who has reached the top of the list
of film luminaries In one great leap,
has the greatest role of her screen
career In "Yellow Fingers," her first
starring vehicle for Fox Films, whicli
comes to the Gaiety Theatre Wednesday and Thursday of next week, and
to the Ilo-llo on Friday and Saturday.
In this gripping story of the South
Seas .Miss Borden Is cast as Salnn.
ward of "Brute" Shane, a sea captain.
She has grown up in ignorance of the
fact that she is a half-caste, and has
AUTHENTIC PICTURES
OF BIG FIGHT COMING
Followers of thc fistic art have i
real treat In store for thom on Nov.
25th. when the Ilo-llo Theatre will
screen the only authorized and
authentic pictures of the recent battle
In which the crown worn so long by
Jack Dempsey was toppled from his
brow by Gene Tunney. These pictures nre thc real thing, showing In
detail every blow from the flrst gong
until the end of the fight thirty-nine
minutes later.
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Harold Lloyd
in
"The Freshman'
MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 15TH
TROUBLEwmtVIVES"
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER Kith.
"FORBIDDEN WATERS" with  PRISCILLA  DEAN
Wednesday
Thursday
November
17 and 18
DOUBLE
PROGRAM
EXPRESS
mm*
K*™**"* WW *7V»  •      s  " J- i*.
or—fl* *   -V   . <■ *   gS &    >
Gene 'Wii"hh mmntiHr nortl afMwnlwr in the South Sea Iffcr
OLIVE BORDEN PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1926.
a |5  C^-.TC^^PatJTM^«3
CUMBERLAND
TAILOR
MEN'S and LADIES' SUITS
MADE TO MEASURE
Through  years  of  experience  we
know   how   to   fit   you,   how   you
should wear your clothes—and we
are ready to serve you.
CLEANING     —     PRESSING     —     REPAIRING
We arc specialists in this line and guarantee your
Clothes to look like now when returned.
E. Aida, Merchant Tailor
Dansmuir Avenue
Cumberland
a -•■■:-   ■*   ~   -,:':•.i  + .-.I.-A* .!.■•■:   A.-.A-,;.       •■.,*■;.   .;.  v^A^g;,/
1      BIG SALE  ' I
'$. Commencing SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30th, on %
^ . . 1
Electric Irons, Liberty    I
%  Hotplates & Lamp Shades |
~th      Onlv seven BERSTED Irons left to clear at ea...$4.25    M
if
LIBERTY HOTPLATES, to dear at each .. * <■•■    ®
Any Lamp Shade, to clear at each
3.00
.75
Cumberland Electric Lighting
| Co" Ltd* I
%   Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each j
|   THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 215
In describing'his experiences at a
bargain sale. Smith says that half oi
his money was gone in just thirty
minutes, so that he had pennies where
he hnd dollars before, nnd but half a3
many dollars an before he had pennies.   Now. how mucli did he spend?
Puzzle No. 216
Take a garden implement, add the
letters E R, subtract n horned animal,
add a little hotel, subtract the letter
N and the resulting letters will spell
SPAIN,
Puzzle No. 217
.Miss Ann was only 5 years old,
And scarcely yet was able
Upon my lirst, as 1 am told.
To reach nhove the table.
Vet she my second took, queer soul.
And for mi other reason
Than that mamma refused my whole.
Until another season.
Puzzle No. 219
Despite his annual* rebuff, the crlck-
ett dropped In upon the ant at the
end of harvest time and broached the
subject" of a small loan to tide over
the season. Said the ant: "Do you
think to find me a foolish   fellow      of your  self-inflicted
troubles.   I admit you are a 	
little chap with a charming voice and
a   mind, albeit you are somewhat of a   and     in
your speech.   Why you let the springs
of industry lie   in the	
season; when there is   work
for all of us I   understand.
You must  that misery and
  are invariably   upon
Improvidence. Nevertheless, I shall
not be entirely   to your appeal.   On the way out of my garden
you  may  stop at  the     and
slake your thirst.
Can you complete the ant's homily
by placing lu the blanks appropriate
words ending In "ant'?
Puzzle No. 218
Hans brought over a case of drinks
which he expected to sell for Jltl.SO.
After he had sold ten bottles the custom oflicers. who believe that duty
pomes before pleasure, consumed one-
third of the remainder in appraising
its value, so that Mans realized ln all
but $Ki.2il. How many bottles did lie
import?
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to tlie foregoing, wlll appear
In this column next week.
Answers to lust Week's Puzzles
No.    210—Lowell,   Milton,   Homer,
Byron, Pope, Key, Hunt, Dante, Willis.
No.   211—COWL  minus  OWL   plus
RABBIT minus BIT equals CRAB.
No. 212—If there aro sixteen players in the contest and the winner
must  then play with the last year's
I champion for tlie new championship,
i the chances are .11 to 1 against any
j one of the flrst players winning from
tbe old champion.
i    No.   213—Electric  eels  eerily  eyed
| Evelyn.
I    No. 214—Learn. Whoop, Mother, Six,
! Skate, Sell.
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
I
I
■**.
This is a Iva-in. valve i'or use on domestic hot water jpj;
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused j^f
by ranges and tank heaters. M
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by U.i-   if III
ierwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Muni-    itl 18
A "WHISKY OF QUALITY"
MATURED IN CHARRED
OAK CASKS
THE ONLY METHOD BY WHICH "QUALITY"
CAN BE IMPARTED
Do we realize what an interesting
I place the Post Offlce is in a commun-
lity?   Have we ever thought what it
j would mean to us If the Post Offlce
| were suddenly removed and that In
future we would have to do without
one?   Go down to our own Post Offlce
with a telescope under your arm on
any  evening and  you  will  at  once
grasp what an important part lt plays
in  the life  of a community.     Here
there gather day by day the young,
the  old,   and  the  middle   aged,   and
they   all   come   with   one   purpose.
Presently the General Delivery wicket
j wlll open and the news or parcel that
! has been long awaited wlll be handed
' out.     Eager  little hands,  and some
, none too clean at that, will be thrust
into  mail   boxes,  and   the   contents
I pulled out.   If one is observant there
will  be   noticed  on  some  faces  the
look of disappointment as they turn
away from the wicket empty-handed,
' or wait until the last possible moment
| to see if there wont be something put
I Into the box.   Then one will see, too,
j the look of pleasure which will light
l up the face of one who haa in his
| hand   a   long   and   eagerly   expected
letter.   Presently the lucky recipient
will be reading the lines in the privacy of his home; maybe the letter Is
from an old mother to her son, or a
boy to his girl, or from one pal to
another.     Some  of  the   letters  will
contain sad news and some glad, and
many possibly will contain bills!   Bc
that as tt may, there is something of
"that touch of nature which  makes
the whole world akin" in the atmosphere of a post ofllce, for through Its
channels there come and go the secrets, the thoughts and the heart throbs
of a community in which we all play
our part, either collectively or Individually.
■^     cipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection
i
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.   W
Limited. M
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.   M
iANN'S BAKERY
QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
—SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY—
Lemon and Custard Tarts, Cream Lemon Slices,
Delicious Appetizing Dainties,
also
Doughnuts, Scones, Meat Pies, etc.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
™3E
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
[PiM1**![«'•:■ zmMMMM
Jimm'y Walker and his
'Paramount' ORCHESTRA
—NOW OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENTS—
Orchestras supplied for all occasions including old-time dances
Phone 153L & 17M Cumberland   or   48L Courtenay
11 nl fitgiiiiiLii i&i(ji .affiifiiin; is ta &-iSjWBWaT^^^air&'^^^sii-iri ahiffiKi
3
i"; §ji»'*  : '.■=-;.: ■,*   :.W;r,u,-jiij'ra*n".      Vrf'I'.!!}!''•& se.r;6-'"!¥''*iry!'r!!'f!l'JT!J!!Si!2l';
You Can 'Phone
To Kamloops Now
A  long-distance telephone service is now  available
between Kamloops and coast points.    Ask
"Long Distance" for the rates.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
fe>      Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
f'?r,Tfrr.*>rt,^*^ IS'
irnnsmin
runiTriffi Sffiffini'tfffil
NEW SCHOOL AT
WESTVIEW OPENED
WITH SOCIAL EVENING
I'OWEU, RIVER.—Westview's new
two-room school has been completed
and to celebrate the event a grand
social dance was held on Friday last,
when three hundred people attended
from Powell River and surrounding
district. Thc little red scliool house,
now fallen into disuse, has served its
purpose after ten years of useful service. Its place having been taken by
an   ultra-modern  huilding,   the   con
tract for which was awarded to Mr.
N. H. Heavenor early tn the year.
Among the guests of the Westvlew
School Board were many ofllelals of
the Powell River Company, Mr.
Michael Manson, M.L.A., Mr. R. Bruce,
Provincial School Inspector, and Mr.
W. P. Bevan, Provlnclal Government
Engineer for the district, all of whom,
ln addition to Dr. Henderson of the
Powell River School Board, were
called upon by Mr. George Clapp, the
senior member of the Westvlew School
District, to make short addresses.
These were all eulogistic of the progress made in tho direction of Bchool
improvement In recent years.
The new building has been erected
at a cost to tho school board of $4900
and Is equipped with a modern furnace. There are two rooms with a
sliding door between, so that the entire floor space can bc utilized for
' social gatherings and religious services  when required.
The school board comprises MrB.
M. E. Mllnes. secretary-treasurer, and
Messrs. Geo. Clapp, Hugh McPhalen
and Harvey Cumber. The building
committee Included Messrs. H. McPhalen. J. Harper and Wm. McGuigan.
A short time ago an entertainment
committee of eight members was selected and is comprised of Mesdames
Wm. McGuigan, Fred Dawson, Felix
Van Vleet, A. Fraser, and Messrs. H.
McPhalen. Wm. Gibson, Thos. Peck
and Albert Waldren.
The ladles of thc committee were
responsible for the refreshments and
they were assisted by Mrs. Robert
Thompson, Mrs. Joe Parker and Mrs.
Oledale. Decorations were in the
school colors—red, white and blue,
and were very attractive. Material
and flags were loaned for thc purpose
by Mr. J. McLeod of the Avenue
Lodge, tlie Powell River Company's
Welfare Department and Mr. J. Harper, to whom thanks of the committee
have been extended. To Mr. Joe
Parker, of Westvlew Garage, thanks
are also due for the extension ot his
private lighting system to the school
road.
The Patricia Orchestra, of Powell
River, provided music. The inaugural social will be followed by similar
events every fortnight during the
winter and lt is safe to say that the
success of last Friday's entertainment
bus been the means of assuring success for future socials.
.PURE BEER.
The Friendly
Beverage
Pure beer adds to your well being and
your enjoyment of life. Order it by the
case from any Government Store—have
it always on hand for youi table and for
the entertainment of your guests. British
Columbia beers are healthful and invigorating
BEERS, such as are made by thc Amalgamated
Breweries of British Columbia and distributed to
the people by the bottle at the Government stores
and by the glass in Licensed Premises, contain only
enough alcohol—4 Y> per cent.—to stimulate the digestion,
while their content of vitamins and valuable vegetable
extracts and mineral salts are of the highest worth in
fortifying against the dangers of low vitality and illness.
Drink pure beer in thc Winter months, when heavy
foods and too much "indoors" lower vitality.
Amalgamated Breweries of British Columbia, in which
arc associated Vancouver Breweries Ltd., Rainier
Brewing Co. of Canada Ltd., Westminster Brewery
Ltd., Silver Spring Brewery Ltd., Victoria Phoenix
Brewing Co. Ltd.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. if.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
Impressive Service
Held At Sandwick
Memorial Cairn
(Continued from Page One)
most Incredible, followed by thc impression that such a war could not
last long. He referred to Captain
Reeves, a reservist who was then
living in the district, telling how he
had cabled immediately offering his
services and had received the reply:
"Yes, come immediately." He had
left the next day. The Archdeacon
referred to the Bishop of Dijons' book
on Rheims Cathedral, giving a graphic description of thc Igniting of the
scaffolding by a German Incendiary
shell, the wonderful example of the
French nobility In rescuing the men
wounded in battle, many of whom
were Oermans, from the architectural
classic which was being used as a
military hospital. He told how the
cross on the cathedral had been Illum-
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
mated when the hurtling roof had
fallen into the vault of the "building
—a sign of suffering, sacrifice, hut
victory. He spoke in words of deepest sympathy for those men who returned disabled in body or mind, and
quoted in.stunces of lessons of gratitude for those who served in the great
conflict. His address was brought to
a close with the words, "God so loved
the world that he gave his only he-
gotten Son that whosoever believeth
in Him should not .perish but have
everlasting life."
The Rev. A. W. Corker, of Comox,
conducted the short service which
terminated with the blessing. After
the singing of "God Save the King,"
tho "Lust Post" was sounded hy Mr.
Les.  Moody, bugler.
"Trial By Jury"
COURTENAY, Nov. 10.—The enter-
Ininnicnt committee appointed by the
Comox Agricultural Association mot
In Courtenay on Thursday afternoon
when it was decided to put on a "trial
by jury" In tho Agricultural Hall on
the 24th of-this month. The case will
be a breach of promise action followed by a dance. Some of those
taking part are Mr. G. W. Stubbs, Mr.
Alan Pattlnson and Mr. Bob Sutherland, and Miss Barbara Duncan, Miss
Isabel Moncrleff, Miss Margaret
Sutherland and Miss Eileen Clark.
This will be the first of a series of
entertainments by a committee composed of Messrs. A. Pattlnson, D. M
Isenor, Mrs. Walter Brown and the
secretary. Other activities of the
Association will Include a series of
lectures to be arranged by tlle educational committee composed of Mr.
R. Hurford, .Mr. H. Allherry, Mr. W.
Perrey, Mr. R. Halliday and Mr. N.
Pritchard.
ing made lo the golf links at Comox.
Twelve more acres are being cleared
preparatory to laying out additions
to the links.
The pile-driver has been busy in
the Courtenay River for the last few
days, putting In the foundation piles'
of a crib for the Courtenay Lumber
.Mill capable of accomodating two
scows at low water.
Surveyor L. S. Cokely ls at work in
connection with the widening of the
lanes in the city.
Some beautiful specimens of live
silver foxes from Mr. Frank Stevenson's fox farm at Grantham have
been on exhibition in two of the local
stores during the week.
Messrs. John Sulton, L. R. Cliffe
and Ted Cliffe are oil* on Tuesday to
Northern Alberta in quest of big
game. They expect to run Into moose
and perhaps a grizzly before returning.
Mr. and Mrs. A. I). Gregson and
Juck entertained their young friends
at a bon-flre party on Saturday night
at Arilen lu memory of Guy Fawkcs
Day.
COURTENAY LOCAL NOTES
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION "FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
EAT McBRYDE'S PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT
BREAD AND LIVE IN THE PATHWAY OF
HEALTH
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
COURTENAY, Nov. 8— Mr. Frank
Lefeaux, of the Cunard offices In Vancouver, was a visitor In I own at thc
aflPafVII'PV GTrtPI? I week-end, looking up local agents.
-UIVl/VsEilV Ul V/I\Xi     Mr E Uoyd left on Slltu„lllv wlth
his daughter, Nina, en route for England, where they wlll spend a few
months' holiday. They escorted Miss
Annie MacDonald as far as Vancouver.
Cumberland     Considerable Improvements are be-
Cur. .jib nnd Dunsmuir.
Phone 122
Dcmpsey-Tunney Fight Pictures at
Courtenay, Fri.-Sat., November 26-27
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
windows, Doons,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES
(Night calls: 134X Courtenay
(Offlce: 159 Cumberland.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PltE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens ou declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing the Department ot
Lauds, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied tor
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "flow to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase ot vacant and unreserved
Crown land., not being tlmberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of llrsl class (arable) land Is J5
por acre, and second-class (grazing)
land 12.50 por acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands ln given iu Bullet***
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may bo purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln the first year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits aro available for settlera,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead.
EDWARDSBURG
H0WN
BRAND
CORN SYRUP
Hot onlv &
Wonderful flavor
but unusually
Wholesome as well
Tht   CANADA   STARCH CO., LIMITED-r/IONTREAl.
T<J
Scouts and Cubs will parade at the
Parish Hall at 12 noon on Sunday.
Nov. 14th, lu order* to attend the
Armistice Day service to be held at
the Memorial Arch at 12.15 p.m. under
the allspices of the Canadian Legion.
Those who have uniforms are asked
to wear them, Assistant Scouter F.
.Martin will be in charge of the parade.
The usual meeting of the Scouts
Will take place on Tuesday evening
in the Hall at ti o'clock sharp Scouts
are requested to be on time as the
Hall must be vacated by 7:15 p.m.
Pyramid work, etc.
Last Friday evening the Scouts tried
their hand at erecting human pyramids aud considering It was (he first,
effort the results were remarkably
good. The troop will be fortunate in
the future In having lhe assistance of
Mr. Jackson, who has offered to help
out lu Physical Culture work and also
In giving lectures on map reading.
On Friday, Nov. tilth, the Camp Fire
Singsong will lake place, to which
all parents and friends arc cordially
Invited. A jolly good evening is expected and something quite novel in
the way of entertainment. Community singing will be one of the big
features. Mr. Percy Stevens will be
enrolled as an honorary Scout of the
Troop and Mr. Joe Idlens will be
presented wilh a Swastika Thanks
Badge. If a lantern can he obtained,
some splendid slides featuring Scout
work In its different phases will be
shown. If there are any who would
care to help ln the way of providing
refreshments, please bring or send
same to (he Parish Hall next Friday
evening. As it is nut the policy in
(he Scout movement to appeal for
funds, a collection will be taken up
during the evening to help pay off
some old debts of long standing.
WANTED—We want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1052 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.     t.f.n.
WANTED—To hear from owner of
good Farm for sale. State cash
price, full particulars. D. F. Bush,
Minneapolis. Minn. 44-48
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good service,  reasonable  charges
King George Hotel
The "OEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 50c
Children's hair cut any style 35c
24 TELEPHONE-
-100
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Car   leaves  Cumberland   Hotel
nt 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets   boat at  Union   Bay.
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland, II. C.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone 15 Pbone IS
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
P.P. Harrison, M. L. A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Offlce
Courtenay             Phone  258
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone  11511  or  24
PUPPIES FOB SALE—Purebred English Springer Spaniel puppies. Parents good hunters and prizo winners, Males, $20.00; females, J15.00.
Apply Box 111, Union Hay. 48
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS    |
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND  SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   -   -   Proprietor PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1826.
SPECIAL DISPLAY
OF UMBRELLAS
THIS WEEK WE HAVE ON VIEW ONE OF THE
LARGEST SHOWINGS OF UMBRELLAS, COMPRISING AN ASSORTMENT THAT WILL GIVE
PLEASURE TO ANYONE DESIRING A SMART
UMBRELLA.
Ladies' Umbrellas
Colored Cotton Taffeta, tape edge, with Celnica tips and ferrule,
flood choice of new handles.   Price, each   $3.50
Colored Sllk mixture, tape edge, 8-rlh stubby style, tips and
ferrule, Navy, purple, red, green and brown. Good assortment
of new bundles.   Price, each   .$:{.!).">
Colored Sllk mixtures, tape edge, 10-rlb stubby style, tips and
ferrule, The new colorings, and a good selection of handles.
Prices, each IS 1.5(1 and   $4.1)5
Our $5.05 Umbrella is a first class article that will give good
satisfaction, lt is covered with Sllk mixture, good quality, neat
corded border. 10-rlb stubby style, smart handles. A-most
desirable  Umbrella.      Price    $5.95
LADIES' SUIT-CASE UMBRELLAS—Good quality blaok Sllk
mixture cover, on a guaranteed suit-ease frame. The bottom of
this umbrella folds up and the handle is detachable, making it
short enough to lit any suit case.   Price   $'$.05
Wc have several lines of Umbrellas from $!i.!i5 to $0.50. Some
of the choicest designs of handles and pure sllk covers. All
umbrella suitable for any gift.   $5.05 to   $0.50
Girls' Umbrellas
We have two lines of girls chubby handle umbrellas, something
new and natty, just what any little girl would desire. The certainly make suitable and acceptable gifts for the girls. The
prices are $1.05 and  $3.50
FOR UMBRELLAS
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
The Women's Benefit Association
will have as tlielr guest thlB (Friday)
evening Deputy Supreme Commander
Mrs. Lora Baker, of California.
Thc event, ut Ilic  Sensonl—Moose
(iirnluil Dance, Friday, Dec. Illlh.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Lockhart have gone
to Vancouver for a few days, where
Mr. Lockhart will be under the care
of Dr. Crosby, the well-known eye
specialist. While at work Tuesday
Mr. Lockhart was unfortunate enough
to be struck in the eye with a piece
of flying steel, leaving a nasty Injury.
.   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. James Murray, Dunsmuir Avenue, leave tomorrow to attend the Dog Show of the Nanaimo
Kennel Club and where they will show
their two  Wire-haired  Fox Terriers.
¥       •       *
Mr. Hardy, of the staff of the Cumberland High School, spent the holiday week-end in  Vancouver.
* *   »
Mrs. R. Strachan Jr., nee Hazel
Mounce, arrived on Monday from her
home in Vancouver and will pay an
extended visit to her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Jlounce.
* *   *
Miss G. McFadyen, of the teaching
staff of the Cumberland School, spent
last week-end in  Vancouver.
Tiie Carnival of Carnivals—Friday.
December 10th.
LOCAL RESIDENTS
INVOLVED IN BREACH
OF PROMISE CASE
An interesting case will be tried in
Courtenay on the 24th inst. which
will involve several well-known and
respected people of Courtenay and
district. The scene of the trial wlll
be the Agricultural hall, and owing lo
unusual interest being taken in tbe
affair, bis Lordship, Mr. Justice Bean-
spiller, has ruled that admission shall
be by ticket only. Mr. Casey Twister.
K. C, is appealing for the well-known
and popular .Miss Pamella Pompom,
the plaintill; and Jlr. Mabo Sharper
will conduct the defence on behalf of
Mr. Clarence Cleincliowder, the defendant. The principals in the action
are both confident of success and have
arranged to celebrate the occasion by
holding a dance immediately following the trial, and are engaging a first
class orchestra. The Agricultural
Ladies Auxiliary are going to 3erve
refreshments. Advt.
Friday and Saturday, November 19-20
GAIETY THEATRE
Courtenay
The most moving, dramatic and powerful thing
ever seen on the screen. "Greed" is a challenge
to the public. It is a masterpiece
Gold! Gold! Gold!
TTISTORY'S pages are vivid with its glitter-
11 ing allure. The story of a beauty who
placed the lovt of gold above all else in the
world it one of the most astonnding stories of
real life ever filmed. The great film masterpiece comes direct to you from its Broadway
World Premiere.
ERICH VON STROHEIM^
production of
"MCTEAGUE^FRANK NORIUS
adaptation tut
JUNE MATI1IS auuc
ewch von stkohbim
The Fight tn Death Valley is
only one of the Big Scenes.
,^*tv?,*->v-.'--..i.TJS   -   --
'ii-.*/.IMSttf/r5,\.. "(aa?        -£;v*a\
..-■- -'  &■ *•"-: ■*..  *'*4'. ^.'■^'v*11-^''**?..
Every Saturday The Same
You will be missing a real good
time lf you do not attend the old time
dance to be held ln the Ilo-llo Hall
this Saturday evening from 9:30 to
midnight. It will be the same every
Saturday night throughout the winter—Old Time dances. Everybody who
goes speaks in glowing terms of the
good times.   Gents., 50c, Ladies, 10c.
EVERY   SATURDAY   THE   SAME
Mr. Geo. A. Tarbell, of the firm of
C. H. Tarbell & Son, will leave this
week-end for New York, sailing from
the big eastern port for a tour of the
world on December 2nd.
* •   •
The Misses Amy and Lottie Dallos
spent last week-end ln Victoria, returning to Cumberland Monday night.
* *   *
Mr. Leslie Merrlfleld lett Monday
last for Oakland, Calif., where he will
attend technical school for some time
to come.
* •   •
Mr. Stanley Mounce spent the holiday week-end visiting friends ln the
Capital City.
.   *   *
Messrs. Morton and Pierce Graham
returned Sunday last from a five-day
visit to relatives ln Victoria.
* •   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. Henderson, who
spent the Thanksgiving week-end in
the Capital City, returned to Cumberland Monday last.
* *   *
Miss Vivian Aspesy, ot the staff of
the Cumberland Public Schools, was
a visitor to Vancouver last week-end.
Improvements at the Anglican Hall,
Cumberland, have added greatly to
the appearance and comfort ot this
well-known rendezvous of the Men's
Social Club. Additions include a well
appointed kitchen, also ladles' and
gents.' cloak rooms. The hall Is also
headquarters for the Cumberland
Badminton Club and the Improvements Just completed have enabled
the badminton club to increase the
size of their court, It being now of
regulation length and width, 44 feet
by 20 feet.
The local badminton club has been
singularly successful this season, in
point of members enrolled, and we
understand that no more players can
be accommodated. The Club Intend
holding a social evening on the night
of Wednesday, November 24th.
POTATO SHOW WILL
HAVE OTHER FEATURES
Entries for tbe British Columbia
potato, bulb and seed show will close
November 17.
In view of the Increasing Importance of the potato, bulb and seed industry to this Province, It Is hoped
that all those Interested in the development of agriculture will endeavor to visit the exhibition, which wlll
be field in the Armories, Victoria, November 24 to 27.
This is an opportunity tor producer
and consumer to come together to
discuss matters of mutual Interest.
It is also an opportunity for the
farmer to acquaint himself with the
varieties most suitable for the market
and to learn the importance of good
seed.
The annual meeting of tbe British
Columbia Certified Seed Potato Growers' Association will be held during
the exhibition. A meeting Is being
arranged also to discuss plans for the
formation of a seed growers' organization for educational purposes only,
and not for marketing.
The British Columbia Poultry Association has arranged to hold an egg
show In connection with the show.
Twelve classes have been provided
for the eggs of hens, turkeys, geese,
ducks, Guinea and Pea fowl, together
with a special class for children.
All exhibits are to be donated to
the show and will be sold or auctioned
and the proceeds given to the solarium fund.
The Provlnclal Poultry Association
will present cash prizes and diplomas
In each class.   No entry fees will be
charged.
Agriculture,
from Mr. J. R. Terry, Department of
Pull  particulars  may  be  obtained
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REXAXL
V
SALE
Thurs., Friday, Saturday
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
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standardine (prrr
5  TUBE  RADIO   «P f V
Coast to Coast—No idle boast
400 Installed In Biltmore Hotel,
New York.
D.X. Engineering & Sales Co.,
Ltd.
20 Bloor St. W. Toronto
Cumberland
Com mere la
IjHe ad quarters
Rates
Rcaionable
Hotel
ACCOMMODATION IHE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
■IfelSJaEiaMSIBiaBISlBHlSIBlBiait
Good Cars
Use^
stas^asasasataeatataEasasatasaBataeaas
Buy
Where
Values
Are High
And
Prices
Are Low
FORD SEDAN
$800
FORD SEDAN   $400
(Both newly painted and overhauled)
Mclaughlin c touring .... $.175
chev. touring, 1923   $,325
ford touring   $250
ford touring   $150
overland 90   $100
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
Chevrolet, McLaughlin-Buick & Oldsmobile
Courtenay phone 61
Cumberland Supply Store
Rickson'* Old Stand Dunsmuir Ave.
A short story, well written, is enjoyable reading.   We
will tell our story through our prices—
enjoyable to read.
Blue Ribbon Tea, per tb  $ .75
Nabob Tea, per tb 75
Fresh Ground ColTee, per tb  55
Braids Best Tea, per tb 90
New Season's Currants, re-cleaned, per tb 15
Cranberries, per tb  25
Unwrapped Apples, per crate   1.75
Mcintosh Red Apples, fancy, per box 2.25
Canadian Cheese, per tb  30
Kraft Cheese, i/>-tb boxes, 25c; per tb 45
Choice Dates, 2-~tbs. for  25
Grapes, in best condition, per tb 20
Robin Hood Flour, 49-lb sacks  :.... 2.80
Local Onions, 5-tbs. for 25
White Swan Soap, 5 for 25
Sunlight Soap, per packet  25
Heinz Tomato Soup, 2 for 25
Heinz Pork and Beans, 2 for 25
Heinz Malt Vinegar, 32-oz. bottle for 48
Quick Quaker Oats (China)  45
Christies Soda Biscuits (bulk) per lb 20
Heinz Tomato Ketchup, 35c; or 3 for  1.00
Shredded Wheat, 2 for  35
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY STORE Phone 155
"Building tor Greater Service"

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