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The Cumberland Islander Sep 25, 1925

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Array CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
rd
With which is consolidated the Cumberland Hews.
FORTZ.-FOURTH YEAR—No. 39.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA    FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1926
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Mother And Four Children Perish
When Flames Destroy Home
NANAIMO, Sept. 21.—Trying desperately to save the lives of her four
little children when the house was In
Ilames, Mrs. John Hunter of South
Wellington, six miles from Nanaimo,
was burned to denth nt 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, her charred remains being
found huddled up on what had been
the stairway, with her four little
ones hugged to her as closely as possible, all burned and charred beyond
recognition.
Ten minutes before, the father and
Mr. James Brown, who was visiting
the famll for the evening, had left
for the store, where Mr. Hunter went
lo purchase Q package of tobacco. As
he made his purchase, he heard the
iire signal blowing nt the mine, and
without waiting for his change, rushed out and towards his home. It
was only a hundred yards away, but
he hud a steep hill to climb, and as
ho came to the top he heard his wile
scream: "Help!  Fire!"
P.U.■hing on, lie arrived only in time
li sec Ihe whole building wrapped In
flames and falling to the ground. Mrs.
Hunter had been calling from an upstairs window, and lud then evidently
rushed lo the roar of thc room and
gathered up her children in an attempt to make her way downstairs.
The victims:
.Mrs. John Hunter, aged 27, native
daughter of Nanaimo ami daughter of
Mr. nnd Mrs. Wm. Sheppard, Soutli
Wellington; Isohel, aged 3; Dorothy.
7; Dona 11; Lillian, two and a half
years.
Neighbors limbic (o Check Flumes
Dozens ot neighbors rushed to the
scene, but there was nothing they
could do except to rake what was left
of the remains from the still fierce
embers and look after the stricken
husband and father.
The origin of the Ure Is almost certain tn have been the explosion of a
gasoline lamp, which was In the kitchen.
The house was only n four-room
structure, two rooms downstairs and
two up. The children were In bed ln
one of the upper rooms. Tlie stnlrs
led from thu kitchen to the upper
store.,, making a bend half way up.
It was there where the angle of the
stairway had been that the remains of
the mother nnd her little girls were
found. Charred pieces of bedclothes
still adhered to some of the children
and lt is thought the mother had
wrapped the smaller one in the bedclothes and was carrying her down,
wilh the other children clinging to her
when they met the smoke and fumes
from the kitchen and wero overcome.
Family Suffers Mini)  Fiiliillflcs
In 1921, Mr. Hunter lost his father
and brother in Ihe South Wellington
mine, when the latter was flooded,
and several other lives lost. Shortly
after his mother died In the same
village.
Mrs. Hunter's mother, who lives
only a few hundred yards away, as
soon as she knew her daughter's
house was on Are, rushed towards it,
but on arriving at the top of the
steep hill, was told that all was over,
and that her daughter and grandchildren were all burned. She collapsed, and was carried to her home,
where she remained unconscious for
some time. Today she ls Buffering
from shock and Is under a physician's
care.
Miss Lou Sheppard and Mrs. Stockand, of Cumberland, are sisters of
Mrs. Hunter.
PARENT - TEACHERS
MAKE PRESENTATION
Nearly two hundred parents and
school children gathered In the Anglican Church Hall Friday evening last
to watch the ollicial presentation of
certificates and medals won by Cumberland pupils during the last June
examinations. The meeting was arranged by the Parent-Teachers' Association, through the good olllces of
Its president, Mrs. Q. K. MacNaughton, and was the climax to that which
the Association has been striving for
during the past Ave years it haa been
ln existence—a real get-together of
all parent"; and teachers so that the
various smull difficulties could be
smoothed out and everyone work together In closer harmony, for union
Is strength.
The program of the evening was
very well arranged, being carried o«t
In the following order: 1. 0 Canada,
2. Address of welcome and remarks
by the president, Mrs. 0. K. MacNaugh
ton; 3. Vocal solo by Miss Marlon
Brown; 4. Report on school garden
competition by Mr. Apps and address
and presentation by Rev. Hood. Jean
Dunslre and Sam Williams had the
best gardens and divided first prize
between them, second prize going to
Alex. Mossey; 5. Report on attendance of parents at P.T.A. meetings
and presentation of class prize by
Rev. Butler. Miss MacKinnon's class
fJrshnm   list venr's winner  wo"  tho  ueautlful  VitsXA, her pupils
Graham, last years winner  havjng the  h|gheBt number ot pf-C.
Tennis Trophy
Changes Hands
Monday last saw completion of the
men's singles tournament for the
championship of the Cumberland Tet*.
ills Club when Morton Graham and
Hector Stewart clashed ln the final
round.
of the cup In the same series, was un
able to keep his hold on the silverware, Stewart taking the match 6-1,
3-6, 6-4. The rules of the competition require that the cup be won by
the same person two successive years
before It becomes his permanent possession. Dr. R. P. Christie was the
first winner of the coveted trophy
when It was put up for competition
in 1922; A. R. Stacey carried off the
honors in 1923, M. Graham was the
winner In 1924, and now Stewart has
It for 1926.
ents attending meetings during the
past three months; 6. Instrumental
selection by Mr. W. Jackson; 7. Address und names of entrance gradu-
(Contlnued on Page Two)
COMOX PASS ROAD
WOULD COMPLETE
ISLAND TRIANGLE
The Victoria Chamber of Commerce
is advocating and wlll encourage
round the Island tours next summer. The proposal Is that steamers carry passengers up the West
Coast to Port Alice and up the East
Coast to Hardy Bay. There is a
short road connecting these two
places. Tourists travelling up the
coast would be taken from Port
Hardy to Port Alice by motor and
travel south on the West Coast Boat
to Victoria. Those going north on
West CoaBt would be transported by
motor from Port Alice to Port Hardy
and south to Victoria along the East
Coast. Certainly circling Vancouver
Island by this method would be a
very pleasant outing for there is not
a prettier water trip than that from
Victoria north by the inside passage.
The /oad connecting the two most
important communities at the northern end of the Island is being completed this year.
The proposed road through Comox
Pass when constructed wlll open up
greater possibilities for the encourage
ment of tourist traffic than that connecting Port Alice and Port Hardy.
It wlll be the third side of the triangle
embracing Parksvllle, Courtenay, and
Alberni, making a motor tour of the
mid-Island zone possible and. giving
pleasure seekers an opportunity to
connect with the steamer at Alberni
on the West Coast and at Comox or
Royston on the East Coast. And the
road through Comox PasB will open
up a section of the Island whose
■scenery is unrivalled.
Many of the wholesale business
and manufacturers send their representatives regularly to Comox Valley
nnd Alberni. Some of them come
here every two weeks. Every one
of them knows what a time saver the
proposed road would be to them. If,
as business men Bay, time ls money,
they must support tbe proposal to
connect this district with Alberni by
the Ihort route.
T. D. Coldicutt, Conservative
Candidate For Comox-Alberni
Outlined Aims And Objects
Social Evening
Benefits Girls' Club
A very enjoyable evening was spent
In playing cards and dancing at the
home of Mrs. J. D. Sommerville,
Camp, on Friday evening last, September 18th.
Mrs. Sam Robertson was the fortunate winner of the first prize in whist
while Mrs. J. Irvine held the consolation. The proceeds of the evening
wcre donated to the "Pet-a-Plece"
Girls' Club of the W.B.A.
To Hold Whist
Drive And Dance
'THE GREAT DIVIDE"—
THERE'S NONE GREATER
SYNOPSIS
Three drunken marauders attack an
Eastern girl who has been left alone
In a cnbln on nn Arizona ranch. One
buys her from the others nnd forces
her Into marriage. Then they fnce
the problem of "The Great Divide;"
the chasm that stands between her
puritanical standards and his lawless
desire.
THK CAST
Ruth Jordan   Alice Terry
Stephen Ghent  i... Conway Tearle
"Dutch"   Wallace Beery
Philip Jordan   Huntley Gordon
Dr. Wlnlhrnp Newbury, Allan Forrest
"Shorty"   George Cooper
Polly Jordan   Zasu Pitts
Lon   William Orlamond
THK STORY
Ruth Jordan, a romantic nnd Idealistic girl, reared along strict. Purltan-
(Coutlnued on  Page Two)
The Cumberland Badminton Club
wlll hold a whist drive and dance In
the Anglican Hall on Wednesday,
September 30th. The committee In
charge of arrangements Is working
hard to make this social a magnificent
success. Everybody welcome. Whist
8 to 10. Dancing 10 to midnight.
Refreshments served. General Admission SOc.
NO DANCE SATURDAY
Enthusiastic Delegates Are
Unanimous In Nominating
Neill To Carry Standard
Promptly at four o'clock on Wednesday afternoon tbe convention that
had been organized for the purpose of
nominating a candidate to represent
the Independents In Comox-Alberni
constituency ln the general election to
be held on October twenty-ninth was
called to order. Mr. A. McKinnon,
of Cumberland was elected chairman
and Mr. Thomas H. Carey of the same
town was appointed to the office of
secretary.
Nomination of a candidate was proceeded with at once, Mr. R. U. Hurford, of Courtenay and Mr. Navey of
Royston, were out for the honor of
proposing Mr. A. W. Neill, but the
Courtenay delegate beat his rival to
the job. Mr. Navey, good naturedly
allowed Mr. Hurford to make the
nomination, contenting himself with
being the seconder. They spoke in
eloquent terms regarding the work
Mr. Neill had done for the constituency, both addresses being filled with
eulogistic comment.
Mr. Neill was called to the platform.
Before  he  began  his  short  speech.
someone espied Mrs. Neill sitting in a
cornerfietr the front of the ball She
was called to the platform and aB
she took her place beside the nominee
he turned to the meeting and said:
"I suppose you expect me to do a
John Oliver and kiss Mary Ellen!"
When the tumult subsided he added:
"but I am going to fool you and reserve that for another time." Mr.
Neill then In a short, pointed speech
told of the work of a representative
at Ottawa. He thanked those who
had assisted In the campaign four
years ago and was glad to see so
many who had taken part in that election still supporting him. He took
that as a sign that they believed he
had made good. (Voices, 'you have.')
Representatives were present from
Sayward to Wellington and many of
the delegates made short speeches,
but net one word of adverse criticism
was heard'during the entire meeting.
The afternoon meeting adjourned at
six o'clock for supper, after which another session was held at which a
party platform was promulgated.
ANNUAL MEETING OF  BASKET
BALLERS TO BE HELD SEPT. 30
The executive of the Cumberland
Football Club wish to announce that
there will he no dance this Saturday
evening, the Ilo-llo Hall having been
previously engaged by a private party.
Tho regular dances wlll be resumed
the following Saturday, September
3rd.
Mrs. Thomas Graham and Miss
Janet Graham left Sunday last for
Victoria and other Pacific Coast cities where they will spend a two weeks'
vacation.
Mrs. G. Ker McNaughton
tin Heads Parent-Teachers
Agaii
Tho nnnunl meeting of the Cumberland Parcnt-Tenchors Assoclntlon
was held In the 'public School huilding on the evening of September 21st,
when tho work of the previous year
was reviewed.
Of notable interest wns the reading
by the president of an article published In the "Dollneator" written by
Dr. Angelo Pntrl. This article lays
great stress on the Importance of the
work which can be accomplished by
the Parent-Teachers Associations, He
gives the following suggestions: Denl
with grounds and equipment first.
Take up Instruction  Inst.      Examine
the buildings and the grounds. Are
they large enough? Are they clean
and sanitary? Are they attractive?
Is the plumbing In first class order?
Consult the principal as to school
need, he will ask nothing for himself
but only for the children. Are the
children nnd teachers happy? If
not, why not?" Remember a cheap
education Ib the poorest investment
ii community can make.
Tlie order of the business of the
meeting was ss follows:
Minutes of previous monthly nnd
annual meetings were read and nc-
(Contlnued on Page Two)
In order to make arrangements for
the coming season, Alex S. Denholme,
last year's president of the Cumberland Basketball Lengue, has called
the annual meeting for next Wednesday evening, September 30th, at 7:30
o'clock sharp in the Lecture Hall of
the Athletic Club. Everyone connected with last year's league and any
one else Interested In the game of
basketball are earnestly requested to
attend.
Last season was probably the besl
the game has ever enjoyed In ('umber-
land but there is no reuson why the
league should not be much bigger this
year and Its popularity with the fans
considerably Increased. Several suggestions, with this goal In mind, have
been advanced by interested ones in
thc city, one being affiliation with the
B. C. Amateur Basketball Association. There is no doubt that this
would give local players a chance to
play in much faster company as the
winners In the men's and ladles' sen-
the public school wlll also be approached with the view of forming a
public school league, the games to be
played off in the afternoons so that
they will not interfere with the other
teams' practice hours and playing
nights.
The play-off system, as Inaugurated
last year, Ib certainly the best course
to follow again this season, and a
much longer playing schedule could
he arranged than was the case last
year. Printed player forms, for registering and transferring, would also
eliminate much of the discontent evidenced by most of the teams last winter.
Formally announcing his entry into
Federal politics, Mr. T. D. Coldicutt
accepted the nomination as Conservative Candidate for the Comox-Alberni
Riding, opposing Mr. A. W. Neill, the
present member.
The convention was held at Courtenay on Friday last and Mr. Coldl-
cutt's name was the only one In nomination. The district was well represented^ over fifty delegates from all
corners of the riding being in attendance. Many prominent members
of the party were ln attendance and
addressed the gathering. Those
speaking included Mr. R. H. Pooley,
Mr. Mike Manson and G. H. Morden
of North Vancouver.     Mr. Coldicutt
Badminton Season
To Open Thursday
The Cumberland Badminton Club
will commence their playing season
on Thursday evening next in the
Anglican Hall. The executive committee are sparing no pains this year
to make it the banner year for Badminton. New members will be heartily welcomed at the Court in the Anglican Hall on Thursday evening. Anyone Interested in the game is also In
vited to drop round to the court ou
any of the play nights. No charge
will be made for spectators. The
dues for the season are the same as
last season, with the exception that
members must provide their own
rackets. Even under the new ruling
the Cumberland Badminton Club will
still hold the name of being the lowest priced club on the Pacific Coast.
Westminster Team
Play Here Sunday
Cumberland United will have as Its
guests this Sunday In a Pacific Coast
League fixture the United team of
New Westminster. The game Is called for 2:00 p.m. sharp.
The locals will field lhe same team
that wus so successful last week
against Nanaimo Veterans; Walker.
Mortimer and Contl; Monagh.-iu, Ferguson and Brake; Bannerman, Plump
Fowler, MacDonald and Hitchens.
Certificates To Bel
Presented Shortly
The St. John's Ambulance Association, of Cumberland, will hold a monster whist drive and dance In the Ilo-
llo Hall on Friday evening, October
9th, when It is proposed to make presentation of all certificates, medallions, and other prizes won by the
various teams at Nanaimo some time
ago. Special prizes of high value
wlll be given for the successful winners at cards and for the dance the
services of a first-class orchestra has
been secured.
The admission price has been set :it
fifty cents for ladles and seventy-five
cents for gentlemen. Refreshment
will be served.
WELSH SOCIETY TO
HOLD WHIST DRIVE
NOTICE
To our many patrons—We are
pleased to Inform you that we are
now the sole agents for Dr. Middle-
ton's Ironized Bread in Cumberland.
It can be obtained from our .stoic or
delivery wagon on and after Friday,
lor leagues would play the winners September the 25th. We feel sure that
of thc same division In Nanaimo and our many patrons will greatly oppre-
then, If successful, would play In Vic- elate this, bread with tho health glv-
toria. | Ing qualities.
It has also been suggested that a MAROCCHI BROS.
huge opening carnival dance be held. | —,	
the proceeds to be divided among the BUCKLEY BAY Mil I
different teams for their expenses.     ,
Mr. Denholme has proposed a sen-' NEARING COMPLETION
lor men's league—any age; and nn In-: 	
Icrmedlate men's league—under 21 The sawmill being built nt Buckley
years. The same Is proposed with flay, five miles south of Union Bay by
,.,,.,, ...     ' „    Ihe Ira Crowe Company Is fast near-
the ladles leagues but both arc really ,ng completion. It Is expected to cut
contingent on the number of teams en- twenty thousand feet a day and the
tered.     For tills reason It Ib hoped equipment is of the most modern type.
Hint both saxes will lie well renresent- A wh"rf wl" R!'° bc bullt "° """ "hlD
Hint tiotti sixes mil tic wen represent   n)i,n|s ()f Umu„ rany |)e nul||c  ,,v
ed nt the meeting.     The principal of water.
Under the auspices of the Welsh
Society of Cumberland and district,
a whist drive and social wlll bc held
in the War Veterans' Hall on Monday
evening, October 6th, commencing at
7:45 o'clock. General admission 25
cents.     Everybody welcome.
was not able to be present at the convention but the Conservative organizer Mr. Merrifield, who was present,
stated that he was authorized to say
that If Mr. Coldicutt was offered lhe
nomination he would accept.
The candidate elect was In Cumberland on Tuesday evening and met
a large number of supporters of the
Conservntlve party. He gave a brief
outline of his acceptance of the nomination and declared he would do his
utmost to further the interests of the
district. He also said In the course
of a spirited address that he was attached to those who favored British
bonds within tlie empire, but that Canadian Interests ought to be dominant
In Canada, and the building up of
Canadian Industries would stop the
flow of emigration of our young manhood to the United States.
Whilst Mr. Coldicutt Is a new comer
to the district, he has vast interests
here as It Is only two months ago
that he bought the control of the
Union Stage and Taxi Co., operating
autos over this end of the Island. Mr.
Coldicutt Is a Welshman hy birth and
has lived In B.C. for the past 28 years.
He was for 9 years an Alderman on
Ihe Burnaby Council and 10 years
president of the Board of Trade, 3
years a police commissioner. His
business career has also been a Very
successful one. He founded in the shad
ow of a huge transportation corporation, the Blue Funnel line of auto
cars running between Vancouver and
New Westminster—said to be the flrBt
motor transportation line In Canada.
At the present time Mr. Coldicutt's
headquarters ure In Nanaimo but we
are given to understand he is negotiating for a home In Parksvllle where
he Intends to reside. During his stay
In the district last week Mr. Coldicutt made quite a good impression
and the many expressions of confidence extended to him augurs well
for Ms success at the coming election.
There will be a public meeting tonight, Friday, at the Community Hall,
Comox at 8 o'clock and on Tuesday,
Sept. 29th a public meeting will be
held at the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, when Mr. Coldicutt and Mr.
Leon Ladner, M.P., for South Vancouver, wlll give addresses.
TRUSTEES AND BOARD
CANNOT DO BUSINESS
—$500.00 FINE
The following Is an extract from
the .Municipal News of British Columbia, in their September Issue:
The scliool board of nn Island Municipality recently held a turbulent
meeting. The secretary bad ordered paid several accounts before submitting them to the board. Two of
the four trustees had signed the
vouchers before payment. When this
difficulty had been disposed of by consent, mie of the trustees objected tliat
tlle secretary had himself sold a small
order to the board contrary to tlle Act
The secretary expressed the opinion
that the Act did not contemplate such
small sales as the one in question and
moved that the hoard ratify the sale
miller the circumstances. He had
difficulty In getting u seconder until
the chairman seconded bis motion.
There was further discussion as to
whether the chairman hud the power
to second a motion but finally it was
decided that he had the right to do so
anil (he motion was carried.
While this matter has been satisfactorily settled the points raised may
lie nt Interest to other school districts.
Section ts of the Aci gives the chairman the right to vote and places him
nn equal footing with the other members. Section 131. however, provides
thai a trustee who enters into any
contract with tiie board shall Immediately vacate his position and imposes
a maximum line of fSOO.fJO for his offence. Any sale Is a enntrnct regardless of the amount of money paid
over. There Is no provision for the
ratification of ills act hy the hoard.
Cumberland United Head
Pacific Coast Soccer League
The small crowd attending Ihe soccer game nl Nanaimo on Saturday
afternoon last when Cumberland met
the Veterans In a Pacific Coast League tilt, brought home the fact, that
so far as the senior tennis are concerned, the round ball gume Is n dead
issue In tho Hub City. It is n great
pity that the famous Nanaimo City
team was allowed to disband. Surely
whatever grievances were responsible
for the present stato of affnlrs In the
soccer world of Nanaimo could have
been adjusted, without letting a team
that would, undoubtedly have been
one ot lhe greatest drawing cards in
. thc province of B.C. sink Into oblivion.
However, lhe fact remains and whnt
support tlie Veternns arc losing
amongst  n certain  class, thc junior
' soccer tenuis are the gainers, as good
j sized crowds are always in attendance
1 at their games.
' So far as the game of Inst Saturday went, there wns only one team in
. It and Hint as the score indicated, was
not the Veternns. thc locals banging
il goals through to the Vets one.
I A few minutes from the commencement of the game, Fowler had n glor-
; Ions ohBhce to score,  but  shied  the
I (Continued on l'nge Five) PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1925
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
ALDERMEN ATTEND   	
VICTORIA CONVENTION
COURTENAY, Sept. 2.—Owing to
the absence of several of the aldermen and Hie city clerk, who are attending a meeting of municipalities
lu Victoria, the regular meeting did
not take place on Monday evening.
The aldermen attending from Courtenay are Messrs H. Cooke. J, McKenzie. E. I.. Macdonald, Among the
subjects to be put forwurd Is the matter of the collecting of licenses within Ihe towns by the municipal authorities,   particularly   the   beer   par-
v    *X1"   Vi,.    «> -.   ...
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
lour licenses. The delegates from
Courtenay are also going In the Interest of better roadB.
"TRUCELLA" SKIPPER
WEDS ROYSTON GIRL
COURTENAY, Sept.   24—A   pretty
wedding wits solemnized at the Angli-
I can  Church  at   Sandwick   yesterday
: afternoon when Dorothy, only daughter ot Mr. and Mrs. Charles Simms,
of Koyston. became tlie bride or Capt.
j Richard   Porrltt,  eldest  son  of  Mr.
] and   Mrs.   W.   Porrltt   of   Vancouver.
; and  formerly  of  llridlington.  Yorks,
Englnnd.
|     The bride, who entered the church
i on her fathers arm, looked charming
I in  cream  silk  witli  bridal  vici  and
I orange   blossom   coronet.      She  car-
i rled   a   lovely   bouquet   made   up   of
roses, Hllies of the valley, carnations
and real white heather from a friend
In Scotland.     Miss Forrest, the brides
maid, was very pretty in coral pink
silk crepe, and carried a bouquet of
pink carnations.     Mr. Harry Simms,
the   brides   brother,   supported   the
bridegroom.     Mrs. Simms. gowned iu
black silk luce, was escorted by her
younger son, Mr. Thos. Simms.     Mr.
Wright Porrltt, father of the bridegroom was also present.
The service which was choral was
conducted by the Rev. J. W. Flinton
and opened with tlle singing of "0
Father, All Creation . . " MrB. Percy
Sadler rendered a solo "Loves Coro-
. nation" und the bridal party left the
little church to the strains of Men-
jdelsson's Wedding March, played hy
Mrs. Geo. H. Pidcock. The church
which was full of friends of the bride,
had been daintily decorated by Mrs.
Hargood Ash and Mrs. J. Idlens. After
the wedding service a reception was
held at the home of the bride's parents ut Royston.
The wedding cake, a gift of Mr. ami
Mrs. Venubles of Courtenay, wus
greatly admired and was a prominent
feature of the table. It was the
handiwork ot the donors and in honor
(Continued on Page Five)
"THE LIGHT OF
WESTERN STARS"
"THE GREAT DIVIDE"—
THERE'S NONE GREATER
(Continued From Page One)
PARENT - TEACHERS
MAKE PRESENTATION
(Continued From Page.One)
atlng class by Mr. Apps. Mrs. T.
Banks, chnlrmun of the school trustees, presented the certificates to the
successful pupils, 25 in number. Miss
Norma Parnham responded; 8. Vocal
solo by Miss Etta Hood; 9. Mr. Shenstone gave a report ou and names of
the matric graduating class while Mr.
A. MacKinnon presented thc certificates.     .Miss Sadie Brown responded;
10. Vocal solo by Rev. E. Roboth.au;
11. Presentation ot the Canadian Collieries gold medal to Toshlo Kajiyama, who headed the matric class
in the final examinations. On behalf of Mr. Thomas Oraham, who was
unable to attend through illness, Mr.
John Sutherland made the presentation.* The Japanese youth fittingly
responded; 12. Selections by the
school band under the leadership of
Mr. H. E. Murray; 13. Refreshments.
The clash between desperate outlaws and the law-abiding element in
Ihe vast cattle country of Southern
Arizona provides the parallel of destruction and progress in the building
of the West, and is brought out in a
colorful, romantic manner ln "The
Light ot Western Stars" the Paramount screen version of the Zane
Grey novel of the same name, which
comes to the Ilo-llo on Friday and
Saturday, Oct. 2 and 3.
When Holt, renowned tor his exploits in the cattle country, makes a
vow during n rollicking spree to marry the first girl who alights from the
Irani-continental train at El Caion,
lie little dreams of the exciting adventures that are to follow.
For across the mountain range.
terror has descended upon the peaceful town of Miramonte — terror
wrought by Noah Beery, who has ridden in with his bandit followers to
pillage and slay. And Holt is to
come to death-grips with Beery over
the girl, Blllle Dove, who happens to
arrive at the time of Holt's madcap
vow.
GAIETY THEATRE
COURTENAY, B.C.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPT. 25 AND 26
Reginald Denny and Laura La Plante
IN
"THE FAST WORKER"
CHILDREN 25-f)
ADULTS 50c
This Is the auspicious beginning of
the dynamic plot which sweeps along
to a pulse-stirring climax through an
amazing series of melodramatic situations involving gun-fighting, kidnapping, cuttle-rustling and daring deeds
of heroism.
Particular Interest attaches to the
marvelous outdoor settings inasmuch
as the entire production was photographed in the mountain and desert
country of Arizona.
ical standards In Boston, accompanies
her brother, Philip, his wife, Polly,
and Dr. Wiuthrop Newbury, a childhood sweetheart ot Ruth's, to Arizona.
One night when Ruth is alone in the
cabin, three drunken marauders are
attracted by the light ln the window.
They see Ruth, and, becoming en-
flamed with nasslon, gamble to possess her. Stephen Ghent Is the victor. But the other two, Shorty, a
Mexican, and Dutch, are dissatlfied.
So Stephen buys her from the former
for a claim of gold nuggets and fights
the latter.
After forcing her to write a note
to her brother telling him that she
Is to be married, he takes her to the
next town, where the Justice ties the
knot. Despite her pleas, he conducts
her to his mining camp.
During the first three nights of their
ride across the desert, Ruth visualizes her husband as the lover she. had
always dreamed of. But he, ignorant of her fine moral ideals, tears
down with his passion the ideal she
has woven about him. Stephen's,
mine yields rich returns, but, obsessed with the thought that she has been
bought by gold, the girl refuses to
accept any of the money. She
weaves baskets ln order to earn enough money to repay Stephen for the
chain of nuggets he had given the
Mexican.
Meanwhile, her brother, and Dr.
Wlnthrop Newbury, And her and induce her to return with them to the
Jordan Ranch.
Several months later, Stephen, still
Idealizing her, seeks her at the Jordan
ranch, where he makes one last plea.
She answers his entreaties by throwing at him the gold chain of nuggets
which she has purchased from the
Mexican. Whereupon she becomes
hysterical and suddenly lapses Into
unconsciousness. Through a driving
storm, Ghent makes a desperate effort to reach the village and the doc
tor. When the doctor's horse falls
from under him, Stephen nobly gives
the doctor his -mount, leaving himself
In dire peril,
A son is born to Ruth. And a week
later, Philip tells her how Ghent had
risked his life in order to get the doctor for her. To explain the reason
for her horror, Ruth tells Philip the
conditions of her marriage. Enraged.
Philip levels his gun at Ghent, who
Is In the next room, and fires. The
bullet goes wild nnd Ghent coming to
Ruth says, "There's one thing you
ean't take trom me—that's the man
you've made me." With that he plods
hlB way down the trail with bent
shoulders. Ruth calls to him to wait
and catching up with him, says, "Our
meeting brought forth all thnt was
strong and goad in you, all that was
weak and petty in me. Can you forgive mo?"
"The Great Divide" will be shown
at the Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland,
tonight (Friday) and Saturday, Sept.
25 and 26.
MRS. G. K. MacNAUGHTON
AGAIN HEADS P.-T. ASSN.
(Continued From Page One)
BUILDING
MATERIAL  OF  ANY  DESCRIPTION
Call and See Our Stocks Get Our Figures
EDWARDS LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
Mill Street, Courtenay
Phone 17 P.O. Box 62
MONDAY & TUESDAY, SEPT. 28 AND 29
SHIRLEY MASON
IN
"THE STARDUST TRAIL"
CHILDREN 15*r>
ADULTS 35«?
Wednesday
and
Thursday
September 30
The Man
Who
Came
Back
Children 15«?
Adults 35
Dry Cleaning
Did you ever stop to figure that when you send a
suit or dress to the cleaners, you pay for the cleaning,
not barely removing the spots or patches of dirt?
This practice might improve the appearance of
your suit, but does not get to the real injurious particles of dirt and grease imbedded in the material.
In our method your clothes are washed in pure,
clear gas until every spot of grease and dirt is removed, then they are turned over to experienced hands,
shaped and pressed on one of the latest steam garment
pressers.
Try Us Once, We Guarantee Satisfaction
The White Laundry & Dry
Cleaning Company, Ltd.
TELEPHONE 157 COURTENAY
Our delivery calls in Cumberland Mondays and Fridays
or leave parcels at Spooner's Barber Shop.
tSUSIBIBU
DOROTHY MACKAIU  < OCOH6E OdRlBN in
Tut MAW WHO CAM tACKl  nu.uAt._ft inttAL nteetutrmt
-"Si ■ygja,'s|g|si@jgjia|gj5JS)
I
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCT. 2 AND 3
.Samuel Hopkins Adams' Great Emotional Novel
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual Tuition in
SHORTHANT - TYPEWRITING — BOOK KEEPING
BUSINESS METHODS
New Location Opposite Corfield's Garage.
The dramatic picture of a young girl
wife who had a strong desire for life,
i'or the pleasures* that youth demands
and who was shackled by the conventions of her husband's moss-backed, prim relatives.
Every wife, every girl who will be
married, must at some time face this
struggle with her husband's family.
You will want to know how to overcome this obstacle to your happiness.
The answer is here.
"SIEGE"
A QUESTION AND ANSWER FOR EVERY GIRL WHO IS OR HOPES TO BE
MARRIED.
ADULTS SO*?
CHILDREN 25*J>
Buy McBryde's Bread
 Purest and Best
And Patronize our ICE CREAM PARLOR—
The Coolest Spot There is in Town.
OUR SODA FOUNTAIN
must please.    If for any reason you are not pleased
with a drink at our fountain do us the favor to ask
the dispenser to serve you with a second drink.     It
will be done without cost.
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND ICE CREAM PARLOR
COURTENAY, B.C.
OUR MOTTO 181	
Fair to our Patrons; Fair to our Employees; Fair to
ourselves.
cepted: Financial neimrt was read
and accepted, as were the reports
from the conveners ot the various
committees, that of the Rev. Mr. Butler being both Interesting and Instructive. A motion wus carried thanking
Mr. Sutherland for a stove.
The  President,   Mrs.   G.   K.   MacNaughton, then read her report which
was   ruther   lengthy   nnd   went   Into
great dctaii.      The salient points of
the report ure as follows:     The president extended thanks for loyal support by the members of the association, especially to Mr. Apps. v-ho has
spent o good deal of time in the work   ,
of the  association.      Mr.  Apps  was
thanked for his work on thc social
committee,  which  at times operated
under difficulties.      Rev.  Mr.  Leversedge. Rev. Mr. Butler, Dr. MacNaughton nnd Mrs. Banks were thanked for
their help.    The president culled the
uttentlon of the meeting to the fact
that some of the teachers have foregone social engagements in order to
be able to attend meetings.     Passing
on  she  dwelt  on   Ihe  duties  of the
parents in connection with the Parent-Teachers work.     It is their duty
to attend meetings and to take an active Interest In lhe work of the association nnd to get a first hand knowledge of how the school Is being conducted.
In regard to Manual Training and
Domestic Science, in her opinion, lt
Is very desirable that these subjects
should bc included in the school curriculum.     The association lind work-
' ed to that end but so tar they had
not been successful.     Next the president outlined the duties of the various  committees,   dealing   with   the
grounds  committee  at  some  length.
The Importance of organized recreation was paramount.     As organized
play increases, delinquency decreases.
In three years in the city of Cincinnati It had been found thnt ns a result ot organized   recreation,   delinquency had decreased sixty-seven per
cent.    The grounds committee has a
wide scope aud can accomplish great
things If keen and zealous.     An appeal for new members was made by
the president  and  suggestions  made
as to how best they might be secured.
The president thanked  the principals and  teachers   for   courtesy   to
school visitors also to Messrs. White,
Sutherland,   McLellan,  Mumford  and
Mesdames Clinton and McKinnon for
spcclnl  services  and  kindness  rendered.     In conclusion she declared all
olllces vacant.
The meeting then proceeded to elect
officers for the-coining year, who nre
as follows: President. Mr. G. K. MacNaughton; 1st vice president, Mr. 1).
McLean; 2nd vice president, Miss T.
Gallivan; secretary, Mr. J. Sutherland
press correspondent, Mr. R. .1. Selfe.
The meeting then adjourned.
TAXI TAXI
Safety and Comfort
Day or Night
CAR  SERVICE
24 TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel
at 8:00 o'clock every Sunday
morning and meets boat at
Union Bay.
TOURING PARTIES CATERED
TO AT REASONABLE RATES
ASK FOR
Charlie Dalton
TAXI
TAXI FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
$10,000.00 IN PRIZES
ELECTION   DATE   OCTOBER   29th.
HOW MANY VOTES WILL BE CAST?
A Five Thousand Dollar Cheque would look good to
some reader of The Cumberland Islander.
The Cumberland Islander has joined with The Family Herald
and Weekly Star, ot Montreal, ln a most interesting contest in
which Ten Thousand Dollars are offered in cash prizes.
The date of the Federal Election Is set for October 29th, next.
At the last Federal Election out of a total voters list of 4,435,310
names only 3,119,306 votes were cast.
How many votes will be cast in the Federal election to
be held October 29th,
Prize List—A Total of Ten Thousand Dollars
To the subscriber who sonds the correct estimate—
the sum of Five Thousand Dollars  $ 5,000.00
To the subscriber who sends the nearest to correct
estimate—the sum of Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars   $ 2,600.00
To the subscriber who sends the second nearest to
correct estimate—the • sum of One Thousand
Dollars    $ 1,000.00
To the subscriber who sends the third nenrest to correct estimate—the sum of Five Hundred Dollars $    600.00
To the subscriber who sends the fourth nearest to
correct estimate—the sum of Two Hundred
Dollars    $    200.00
To the next ten subscribers who send the next nearest correct  estimate—Twenty-Five Dollars  each |    250.00
To the next twenty-five who send the next nearest
correct estimate—Ton Dollars each   $    250.00
To the next Blxty who send the nearest correct estimate—Five  Dollars  each    $    300.00
A total of  $10,000.00
100 PRIZES IN ALL
NOW READ THIS OFFER
The subscription price of The Family Herald and Weekly Star
has been reduced from Two Dollars to One Dollar a year.   The
subscription price ot The Cumberland Islander ls Two Dollars a
year.
We now offer a full year's subscription to both papers for only
Two Dollars and will allow each subscriber the privelege of
making two estimates ln Ihe contest.     All subscription arrears
due The Cumberland Islander must be paid up.
The contest closes nt this olllce on Thursday, October 22nd ns
all estimates must reach the Family Herald before October 29th.
now is Vour opportunity to win
FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
Leave Your Order at The Cumberland Islander
THE UNHOLY THREE
BY TOD ROBBINS
Published by arrangement with the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Pictures Syndicate   '
PAGE THREE
voices,  their  pointing  fingers,   their  mister? Why,   you  ain't   fierce!
curious  eyes—all   filled   him   with  a j You couldn't hurt nobody, could you.
nauseating hatred hard to bear.'    At ■ mister?"
the sight of them, he felt tempted to j    Something slipped   the   spring   in
spring forward, to dig his finger-nails j Tweedledee's brain, and yet his body
Pf
SYNOPSIS
Tweedledee, a dwarf performing In
a sideshow, seeks to be taken seriously but his heroic Intentions only provoke laughter. He decides to enter
upon a life of crime, murder If necessary, to satisfy his ego, but because
he Is lacking in commanding voice
nnd physique lie seeks to enlist the
nld of his companions, a ventriloquist,
known as Echo, and a giant strong
man, Hercules.
INSTALMENT t
"Echo" lifted his beautiful girlish
face; and In his large, luminous eyes
the light of excitement was flashing
brightly. "Yes, we will go," he said,
"nnd I wall take my little friend
here." He touched the demon with
a caressing hand. "He will point out
our path for us, for he Is wise—terribly wise. But listen, and I'll tell
you a secret." He bent down till his
lips touched the dwarf's ear. "He's
a thelf, and he stole my brain from
me. Yes, that's it—that's the reason
I have him beside me day and night.
I caught him at It, and I've held him
ever since. Sometimes he tries to get
away, and then I seize him thus." He
plucked the little demon off his should
cr with a long, thin hand, and held
it suspended In the air. "Now you'll
hear him choke.    Listen!"
Then the mouth of the little wooden demon opened, and from It came t
horrible choking sound, Intermingled
with Inarticulate words and gasplni
groans.
."Ah! you hear?" said Echo." with
his head on one side. "Well, well,
it's enough. I must not kill him.
What would become of my brain then?
It would be silent; it would no long-
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YOU   DESIRE  TO   BRING   RELATIVES   OR
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Full Particulars may be obtained and Complete Arrangements made through E. W. Bickle, Agent,
Cumberland, B.C.    Telephone 35
TAR CAR
Mason's Taxi
24 HOURS SERVICE
At Very Reasonable Prices
I meet all trains end boats.
A few cents extra will bring
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See Geo. 'Mason
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
CAR CAR
er tell me what to do. I would be
worse off than Hercules. Well, well,
Imp, go back to my shoulder. I've
punished you enough today. But tc
steal by brain! O, you sly one, you
sly .one. Be good, now, and answer
when you're spoken to."
"I wlll. I will, O Master." said the
little wooden demon in a weak trembling voice.     "Just try me, Master.''
"Very well! Why Is a repent nut
sinner blessed  In  the eyes of God?"
"Oh. Oh!" cried the demon with a
knowing roll of his head. "I should
know thut, Master, I should know
that."
"You should.     Then answer."
The Imp luid a wooden finger beside his wooden nose, and leered at
Tweedledee. "Because he has so
much to tell, O Master."
Well answered, my brain. We
must go now, for the people are coming.     Good-bye. Tweedledee."
"Come to my room tonight Echo,*'
said Tweedledee. "We have our
plans to make."
"And shn'n't I come too?" growled
Hercules in sorrow. "Surely nv
friend is not angry with me?"
"Yes, angry, angry," said the dwarf.
'You're so hard to rouse, so hard to
change Into a man. But com.*. 1
will be glad to see you. Yes. the
crowd Is gathering. Ah, how I hate
them all!"
As he finished speaking, people began to drift through the tent door.
The circus was over. Outside tlie
band could be heard playing, and the
spielers barking. Tweedledee's two
friends hurried off to their respective
platforms, and took their accustomed
places. , The one sat surrounded by
heavy weights, sledgehammers, Iron
belts; the other by Innocent blue-eyed
dolls, In whose company the wooden
demon appeared more diabolical than
ever.
Tweedledee sat gloomily staring nt
the gathering crowd, at the men in
holiday attire, at the tittering women,
at the round-eyed children—yes. nt
the children, for these he hated nm-t.
They were caricatures of himself.
These little brainless beasts hud bodies like his own. And because of this
he was treated like them. To bc a
man, and yet to be treated like a child
—that was Indeed terrible! And they
'would grow, these children; they
would grow and come back some day
to laugh at him. But he?—why, lie
would always stay the same. Even
now he felt that they knew this; he
felt that they exulted lu the knowledge of the future—In the knowledge
that they grew larger year by year.
in the knowledge that some day as
tall men and women they would come
back and laugh, as their fathers and
mothers were laughing now. Yes. he
hated   them   most.      Their   piping
Into their soft flesli. to hurl them to
the ground, to stamp them into unrecognizable bloody heaps.
At the very thought, Tweedledee
seized the arms of his toy chair with
a Convulsive grip and held himself
down.     It grew warmer In the tent,
worked as smoothly as a machine.
"I'll try," he said grimly. Barely
were the words out of his mouth, before he kicked out with all his force
straight Into the child's face. He
felt the toe of his shoe sink into
lomethlng soft, and then, with a cry
, *..  ... ...c itmi.   nuiueunng son, anil then, with
R was ss though these people, this of savage joy, he leaped back. At
herd of swarming animals, were suck- last lie would be taken seriously.
Ing the precious air through their And he was. For a moment the
great, gaping mouths; were taking it people, crowded about his platform,
from Tweedledee. His breast rose were as silent as statues. Even the
and fell; he leaned back, sick and ' child was silent till he felt the blood
dizzy; and he felt that his over- j running down his face. Then he
strained nerves were giving-way. | screamed; and, as though this scream
Now the spieler was herding tho : brought the others to life, they mut-
people together, was marching them tered among themselves and drew
about the side show from one freak : back. But not so the father. Red
to another, wns pointing out the (from anger, he handled the howling
strange malformations of them nil— ! boy to his mother and leapt forward,
was holding them up to ridicule of the | In an instant he had seized Tweedle-
iniili.      He   was   before   the   Human ] dee,  and   was   raining  a   shower  of
---•       ..„„    ..v....t,    uia    iiiiiu.u
Skeleton—Tweedledee's especial en
emy—and, strange to say, the West
Indian   took  a   certain  pride   In   his
     .- a,   «   ouuwer   OI
blows on his tiny body—savage blows
which quite convinced the dwarf that
he was taken seriously.    Through-all
  - . —   ..»o miven seriously.       1 liroilgll .'ill
shrunken body—a pride that some-1 the pain of them, a strange exultation
times nearly drove the dwarf to , filled him; and he struggled In the
frenzy.       Standing   erect,   like   the j other's grasp like a little demon, using
lengthy shadow of a man, he returned the smiles of the people; then, still
smiling, he bowed and sat down. The
crowd passed on.
"Here we have Fatima, ladles aud
gentlemen!" cried the pleler; and that
mass ot purple, painful flesh lumbered to her feet. "Fatlma, ladies and
gentlemen!,  the  human  pincushion—
   ,—»„«.«..— | mc iJiauiiriii. naa seized the father of
The fattest woman ln the world! Ain't ■ the child, and, with a single effort of
■ihe a fine, big girl?     How would •• I hi.    ••■■-■ •■■-
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
When you are In need of a
Plumbing * Heattaf lifli«r, Im
R. RUSHTON
Phone 114 Phone 111
Courtenay or Cumberlud
Your  needs   will receive  Immediate
attention.
ihe a fine, big girl? How would you
like to call on her some night, and
hnve her sit on your knee?"—this to
a smiling young man In the crowd—
•'You would, eh? But s-sh! I
mustn't talk like that. The Human
Skeleton will hear me. He and she
are soul mates. That's tbe reason
they sit here side by side. Look at
her blush! Ain't, she too cute? Well,
itep this way, ladies and gentlemen;
itep this way! Here on our right is
Hercules, the gigantic man from the
N'orth. Watch him bend those horse
shoes In his hands! Watch him
break that iron chain across his chest
Here we have the one and only Hercules, ladies and gentlemen—the one
and only Herucles."
And so it went, until the crowd had
nearly circled the enclosure and now
itood before Tweedledee's platform.
i'he dwarf rose slowly to his feet,
ind stood staring at the white ring
if faces. His nerves were on edge.
He felt its though his body were u
.nass of throbbing wires, as though at
hand, foot and teeth In his defense.
Hut suddenly he was rescued—suddenly two mighty arms bore his assailant away.
Hercules had come to the assistance
of his friend. Tearing through tlle
crowd as an elephant tears through a
garden of shrubs, he had leaped from
the platform, had seized the father of
Ihn    „1.MJ J ..•
his arms, had thrown him out on th;
door of white, upturned faces.
And this was not all. Some spring
had also slipped In the giant's dull
brain. The plodding beast was a
plodding beast no longer, for it had
tasted blood. Thc machine hnd gone
mad.
Hercules in that Instant became terrible. His face turned crimson; the
veins stood out on his forhead like
fat, twisting worms; his teeth grated
together; and flecks of foam gathered
about the corners of his mouth. For
a moment he stood thus—Ills great
, corded fists held high above his head,
his bloodshot eyes staring wildly at
the crowd before him—and then, with
the Inarticulate roar of a wild beast,
he charged down upon them.
All became pandemonium. Hoarse
shouts and shrill screams filled the
tent, intermlngeld with the dull
sound of blows falling on bodies. Men
ran from him like rats; and, like
rats, they were trampled down—exter.
minuted.      The  dwarf danced  about
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any moment some strange spring his platform from sheer joy. "Kill
.vould he set in motion—some spring [ them, Hercules!" he screamed. "Kill
[hat  on   tiie   instant   would   release > them all."
these wires and start them trembling ! But now other figures appeared on
and writhing in his brnin. | the scene—strong, silent men. acro-
"Herc we have Tweedledee. ladles ' bats, athletes, drawn by the shouting
and gentlemen!" began the spieler In j They sprang on the glnnt. They
his -hoarse voice—"Tweedledee, tho seized him about the arms, the legs,
king of the pygmies! We found him j the shoulders. He went down be-
in the wilds of Africa ruling over a neath a living mass of men, ns a great
large nation of his kind. We had bear goes down beneath n pack of
some difficulty In capturing him, hid- dogs, only to rise again and shake
les and gentlemen, for he's as fierce them off. Bleeding, dishevelled, he
as a tiger and twice as strong." I tossed   men   about   as   though   they
Through the laughing of the crowd were rag dolls. At last a rope was
came a child's shrill voice. "Oh, lift! brought, and he was entangled In It.
me up. Papa," It said. "Lift me up, Falling to the ground, he was bound
please; I want to see the funny little fast. He lay full length, as harm-
man!" .' less as a bundle of fagots.
A tall man In the crowd lifted tho j And then the crowd breathed again,
littfe boy In his arms till the child's They began to examine their wounds,
face was nearly on n level with Tweed Five senseless forms lay oti the
ledee's. The dwarf glowered at It. trampled grass; nnd among the rest
and clenched his hands. Surely tlie : few had escaped unscathed. Even the
spring was giving away* at last. All Human Skeleton had a badly dlscol-
the wires began to tremble nt once. ' ored eye. As he passed the mo-
How he hated this thing that was : tlonless figure on Ills way out of the
pushed at him—this stupid little tent, he kicked the helpless giant in
beast with sticky   hands   nnd   dirty; the ribs.
race, with staring eyes and drooping ; Tweedledee saw this nut of the cor-
lips—this disgusting caricature of j iter of his eye, as he was being car-
himself. rled noiselessly away, during the fray
"Oh  Papa!" piped tho child, "he Is I by Echo, and marked It down on the
funny'lookln'!     Why, he ain't as big I P«ge» of his memory,
as me!      Won't you grow no more, I (To Be Continued.)
Our Motto:
-QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. SjnnoM
Proprietor
MANN'S BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
SEE OUR WINDOW
Specially Made for Saturday's Selling
Something Different
Delicious Cream Puffs, Cakes, Rolls and Buns.
Golden Brown Doughnuts, wholesome and nutritious,
just what the kiddies like.
Meat Pies and Sausago Rolls, once you try .them, you
always prefer them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed—Orders Delivered
Phone 18 Cumberland, B.C.
Lumber
In every torts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
8HIN0LB8,
KILM DRIBD PLOORUfOI,
AND    rURNISHINOS
WE DBLIVBR TO ANYWHBRB IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHAROBS
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PtiAMna imkx M",: •*»«*,»"*»»r
PHONES 1^,. 1H 0MttiMj,0
t
V. C. T. Co. Ltd.
>
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
Commencing Wednesday, August 12th, the company* freight  boat   will   leave   Vancouver  each
Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
DELIVERING COURTENAY FRIDAYS
Way Points—Baynes Sound, Thursdays
VANCOUVER'COURTENAY TRANSPORTATION
Phone 144 COMPANY Phone 144
Chas. Simms, Agent
E. L SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give tht best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONC 160
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1926
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,  SEPTEMBER 25,  1825
its own and neighboring communities—than any
other paper has ever come.
The successful country weekly confines itself
very largely to the home field. It gives its subscribers that which the daily cannot furnish. It
is close to the lives, the ambitions, the triumphs
and the disappointments of the people of its community.
GROUNDS
FOR
DIVORCE
THE Cleanliness, it has been said, is next to
CLEAN Godliness. A dirty individual is neith-
TOWN er clean spiritually nor mentally. Dirt
makes for ruin, physically, mentally,
morally. This is as true of a town as of an individual. The dirty town, the town full of rubbish, of untidy houses, of muddy streets, of unsanitary conditions, is non-progressive materially,
morally and educationally. Neither moral nor
material advancement flourish in dirty, unkept
dwellings or in unkept towns.
If any town or city is ambitious for advancement, or if even a few of its men and women are
ready to devote their time and energy to the betterment of the community, the surest way to
achieve success is to clean, encourage the peopli;
to beautify their homes and their yards, stimulate
a love and a pride in their homes and in their
towns, repair the tumble-down yard fences, paint
up, make things as clean outside as they should be
inside, and then that community will look up mentally, morally and materially.
No community which does not clean up and
paint up, which does not do its best to have clean
streets and clean yards, has any right to look up
and face the world.
It might be said a dirty town makes a dirty
people; a dirty people makes moral and material i tive people, you won't
dirt and decay. It is the duty of all men aiv
women to make their homes and their home towns
just as clean and attractive and beautiful as possible.     He who falls short in this respect falls
short of his duty to God and man,
what else he may do.
A great deal of hot air is being issued upon the marriage question.  A
large part of the popular novels and
magazines deal with these infelicities.     They do not seem to think people are in-*
teresting unless their lives are all tangled up by
the eternal triangle."     They give the impression
that most people pick the wrong wives and husbands, and that wedded homes are generally in a
3tate of upheaval.     The very apt remark was
recently made that the "modern novel is neurotic,
erotic and timmyrotic."
How unreal this all seems to the people of the
rural districts, where most folk live in peace and
harmony in their homes. Oi course, divorce is
common nowadays. But with the great mass of.
hard-working people, when it occurs, it is usually i
for one of the more serious faults, like infidelity,
desertion and cruelty. The law has always rec-l
ognized these as good causes for divorce. But
it is in high society among temperamental and
nerve-strung people, that divorces are sought for
a wide variety of causes, many of them trifling,
and where there is serious unrest in the married
state. People of this type do not have enough to
occupy their minds. They spend too much
thought and time in follies and flirtations; they
have too much idle time to brood over slights and
indifferences. Many marital quarrels develop
that never would occur among hard-working persons. Among the great mass of industrious, ac-
(ind many claiming that!
is  *           "''*" '    '--*'"-•- *
marriage is a failure. Two people toiling together for a common end, year after year, generally get along well. They are bound together
by ties that grow stronger each year.     They
it matters not have no time to get morbid or think too much.
THE PLACE
WE WANT
TO FILL
The country weekly is the home
paper, fit to go into the home and
to be read by all members of the
family, when they gather around
the hickory-wood mosquito smudge on the front
verandah of the small town home on summer
evenings, or as they sit around the base burner of
the little farm home sittin' room of cold winter
nights.
There are other newspapers with larger circulations, but it is doubtful if any other has so
much influence with its subscribers. The family in the small town and on the farm is in accord
with the aims and service of the good country
paper.
Despite the tendency of the city paragrapher
and of newspapers in general to ridicule the country paper, there is little doubt that in many ways,
the country weekly is the best paper printed. It
comes nearer to fulfilling the purpose for which
it was established—that of telling the news about
CROSSING
BRIDGES
One day at a time conscientiously
lived will keep the eyes bright and
the cheeks round and rosy. Don't
begin to worry about things clays beforehand. It
will be time enough when they happen. It is the
dread of what may come, not what is, that makes
one old before the time. If you lie awake half
the night worrying about something that is going
to occur the next day you will be far less able to
face bravely and work out the problem than if you
had made and thought of something else until
sleep came. It is not half as hard as it sounds
and it will grow easier every time you try it.
Troubles always look heavier when you lie awake
at night. Perhaps, after all, the disaster will
not befall you, or will be less awful than you anticipated, and just think what a lot of unnecessary
wrinkles you have worried into your face. Remember the old, old man who said to the youth,
"My son, I have lived a long time and I have had
an awful lot of troubles, most of which never
happened."
Ask For and See
That You Get
Comox Whole
Wheat Flour
At All Grocers
Comox Creamery Association
CREATOR OF THE "SCARLET PIMPERNEL" IN QUEBEC
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
(IT-aftr rlghl) Tha eldeet member and tha ybianffcet af tha
Aaaelln family lUIni In tht oldaat heuee In Qmhax. Wnnu
left) Raronaaa Orciy with tha Aaaelln family. 'Lower) tha two.
handraal-nnd-fi'tr-raar.old Aaaelln Farm Houaa at St. Pamlll*.
■ear Ua D'Orleana, Juat o-otatde Quebec.
Daroness Orczy who in visiting Canada in order to
secure local color for a new romance which she has
In mind, has already written 32 novels in addition to
"The Scarlet Pimpernel," of which three and a half
million copies have been sold and which has been translated into fourteen languages. Of recent years her
books have become very popular in Japan. Although
her novels are now sold at the rate of over a thousand
copies a day, the publishers were at first slow to
recognize the popularity of her appeal and "The Scarlet Pimpernel" was refused by no less than twelve
publishing houses.
Although she lias chosea the English language as
her medium, the Baroness Is by birth a Hungarian and
aid not learn English until she was fifteen. Her
father to whom Liszt dedicated one of his Hungarian
rhapsodies believed in giving his children "an education which would enable them to earn their own living
if necessity arose, and the Baroness therefore trained
for and passed the London matriculation examination
io as to qualify as a teacher. She also studied art,
but eventually chose the less prosaic career of a playwright and novelist In which she has achieved a phenomenal success.
This is her first trip to the continent but Canada
has always appealed to Baroness Orczy as a land of
great wheat plains and rugged mountains with a climate not unlike that of her own native Hungary.
While moat of her stories have dealt with the romantic
periods in French or English history, ah* has occa
sionally taken modern themes as for Instance tn her
story "The Emperor's Candlesticks" and she Is particularly interested to see the influence of new conditions ln a new country upon European races.
Her favorite author is Joseph Conrad, who like
herself learned English as a foreign language although he eventually attained a greater mastery of
that language than any English writer of his day.
While seeking local color in the vicinity of Quebec
City, Baroness Orczy came across one of the oldest
houses In the province—the Asselin Farm House,
which is two hundred and fifty years old, and is In th*
tiny old-world village of St. Famille, in lie IVOrleani,
just outside Quebec. The Baroness quickly mad*
friends of the Asselin family and waB fascinated by
their beautiful heir-looms. In the picture showing
the interior of the ancient house, the oldest surviving
member of th* family is seen with her great-grandson
to whom she loves to tell stories of thc stirring
romantic days the old province has passed through.
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, ' unreserved, surveyed
Crown landB may be pre-empted by
llritish subjects over 18 years ot age,
ant] hy aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
given ln Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can he obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria. B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only hind suitable - for pgricultural
; purposes, and which is not timber-
' land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
j teet per su-re west of the Coast Range
anil 8,ouo feet per acre east of that
j Hauge.
j    Applications   for   pre-emptions   are
to  be  addressed  to the  Land  Com-
I missldner of the Land Recording 1)1-
1 vision, in which tlle land applied foils situated, and are made on printed
forms,  copies of which  can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
;    Pre-emptions must be occupied for
; five   yenrs   and   improvements   made
| to value of $10  per  acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before n Crown Grant can lie
. received.
|    For more detailed information see
the    Bulletin    "How    to    Pre-empt
I Lund."
; PURCHASE
Applications nre received for purchase ot vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timherland,
'for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class 'arable) latui is $5
por acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre.. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given In Bulletin
No. 10, *Land Series, "PilVChttoe and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sltc.i on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
muy he purchased or leased, Ihe conditions Including payment cf
sturapage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres,  may be  leased  as homesltes,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
erected ill the first year, title being
obtained   after   residence   and   improvement   conditions    aro    fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   and   industrial   purposes areas not exceeding C40 acre*
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under  the Grazing  Act the  Province is divided into grazing districts
and  the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits nre issued based in
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
j P. P. HARRISON
I   BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
I NOTARY PUBLIC
I CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
Fleece-Lined
PENMANS Fleece-lined under-
wear gives the utmost protection against bitter weather—
against colds and chills. And today
it affords greater protection because
it is a 192S garment—with all the
snug comfort and long, hard wearing
qualities which the most efficient
manufacturing methods can produce.
Alk tor Pc-imaiu Fleece-Lined No. IT.
Made ia both Two-piece and Union Suits.
UNDERWEAR
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
I
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   service.
26   rooms,  electrteallr   hMt*d.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservation* Ptaentj II.
R. TATM, Manager.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKKKIF1EM),   Proprietor
UOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,  1925
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
P
ILO-ILO THEATRE
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
S0|EEIEIEI1IEIEH3MHS^q!M
Friday and Saturday, September 25th and 26th
BIGGER, SWIFTER, MORE ENTHRALLING THAN THE STAGE  PLAY
Reginald Barker's Production of
"The Great Divide"
With Alice Terry, Conway Tearle, Wallace Beery, and Huntly Gordon
CHILDREN 25<> ADULTS 50.?
EHaiEHSI^^
Monday and Tuesday, September 28th and 29th
ADULTS 35.*
CHILDREN 15<*
James A. Heme's Famous Melodrama of New Engb.nd and the Frozen North, Beautifully brought to the screen.
"HEARTS  OF  OAK"
With Hobart Bosworth and Pauline Starke
4 Romance of man frbwt tfageHamids) aroai'mn mountain of fire
#
Weds.
and
Thurs.
September 30
and October 1
toith
(Jpny,the km frdu\\e,the dog
in
TEETH
di red-blooded drama qfthcWcft
6y Clinton H.Stagg &■ Virginia Hudson BnghtmaiK
dynamic drama
of a dog's
devotion
ggg < IIILIIHEN 15*>
ADULTS 3Stf
WSMtMSMSlWSSSSSMcLVMiii
Friday and
Saturday, Oct
2nd and 3rd
CUMBERLAND FOOTBALL
CLUB HEADS PACIFIC
COAST LEAGUE
(Continued From Page One)
ball yards over the cross bar. All
through the first half the game was of
a listless nature with the Cumberland
team missing chance after chance,
whilst the Veterans were very rarely
In the Cumberland goal, Walker only
being tested once. Just a few minutes before halt-time, Toots Plump hit
the cross bar with a hard drive.
Hitchens also had tough luck with a
idagniflcent first time shot that was
charged down hy one of the defend'
ers. Hitchens claimed a penalty but
the referee decided otherwise. Hall
time arrived with Cumberland press
Ing strongly.
The second half opened In favor ot
Ihe Blue and Whites, as 5 minutes
after the kick off Plump scored. Right
from the centre kick the locals went
down. Dickenson, Routledge and
Hlndmarch having a most anxious
time. Relief only came to the harras-
ed defence when McDonald when In
a good position placed harmlessly
past. This relief was short lived as
the Cumberland halves playing brilliant ball, soon had the defence in
trouble again, Fowler scoring a nice
goal. For a few minutes after this
reverse the Vets played up and during
a melee In the Cumberland goal,
wherein Walker got out of position,
Sacki tilled the breach, stopping a
goal drive. The resulting penalty
was taken by Dickenson, with a bullet like drive he aimed for the cros3
bar, Walker saving brilliantly, the
ball going out to Brake struck the
left half on the arm, another penalty
being awarded, from which Dickenson scored. That was the end for
the Vets.
In the last 20 minutes the play became a trifle rough, Wilson and I
Glancy being the offenders, with Mor- j
timer and Contl giving more than they {
took. Three more goals were add- i
ed before the final whistle; one goal!
of Plump's being Just touched ln from
a beautiful corner by Hitchens. Fow
ler scored three goals and Plump two.
the final score reading 5-1 In favor of
the Blue and Whites. The whole of
the Cumberland team played good
football and at the present time are
a match for the best in the province
"TRUCELLA" SKIPPER
WEDS ROYSTON GIRL
(Continued From Page Two)
"THE FOOL"
The Story That Succeeded in
Spite of The Devil
of the bridegroom was ot* a nautical
design, with a tiny model of the
"Trucella of which craft the
bridegroom Is the skipper. The
many gifts were both beautiful and
handsome. Tlie groom presented hi:
bride with a very handsome dressing
case tn tortoiseshell. From the bride
the groom received a gold watch chain
The groom's gift to the brides maid
was a pearl studded gold boach. Many
other gifts were made whicli included
gifts to the soloist and organist. After
the reception Mr. and Mrs. Porrltt left
for a motor tour of the Island. In
future their home will he in Vancouver.
ANNOUNCEMENT
1/A^TMCnnMtBay
i, an i****** ■■;!?•
Wm i— tmfaw tam m* r
^       Wrka lot rrWlnCara Boot
IMaCi.fcM>U.fj(w«ttat«e
A woman ot Iron against a girl of
steel; a strong willed, hide-bound
Puritan in mortal strife with the
young wife of her weak-willed son.
This is the situation dealt with in the
Universal-Jewel production, "Scigc,"
from the famous novel by Samuel
Hopkins Adams, which comes to the
Gaiety Theatre Friday and Saturday
Oct. 2 and 3.
The battle eternal—between the
young wife and her husband's rela
tlves, who are bent on ruling her
home and her existence; this epic
struggle for the right to life aud liberty forms a tremendous drama, gripping in the extreme, with a climax
that Is thrilling beyond words In tlle
screen version directed by Svcnd Gade
the noted Danish director, referred to
by many critics as the greatest drams
of the year.
Virginia Valll and Eugene O'Brien
are co-starred in this production, in
which Mary Alden plays a distinguished characterization in the role
of "Aunt Augusta," dominant nnd
cruel, whose unbending will clashes
with the unyielding personality of the
clear-eyed girl of today.
Other noted players in the all-star
cast are Marc MacDermott, Harry
Lorraine, Beatrice Burnham and Helen Dunbar.
Saves $24 A Year
Cooking experts figure that the
SMP Enameled Ware Roaster will
save the average Canadian family
fully $24.00 a year in meat bills.
The secret .s, it roasts the meat
with very little shrinkage. Also, it
makes cheap cuts taste like the
best ones.
You place the roast in the roaster,
put on tbe cover: the roaster does
the rest. No basting required.
Every roast is perfectly cooked.
The cover 6ti cloee, io that cooking
odori cannot escape. Greaae can't spatter
out, which roeim a tweet clean oven.
Prieca range from 85c. to Si.50 each.
depending oo aiae and 6ni»b—and don't
forget the uviog of $24.00 yearly.
CrmmeTedJfiik
ROASTERS
SOU! BY MATT BHOIYVM
(IKOCKHY, CUMBERLAND.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 50c
Children's hair cut any style 35c
Auxwnnmililllllllllllllll-MfW///'/ •»'/*/
KEATING^
Skills m
a
•wunJOW^K
Uaa Imlf la dog kanaala—
rat into dag'•••at-to kill
LICE AND VERMIN
Daniel Gilchrist, the young curate
of a fashionable New York Church,
constantly asks himself: "What would
happen if n man tried to live his life
as Christ would have lived it?" He
earns the title "The Fool" because he
gives away his private fortune and refuses to preach sugary untruths.
Gilchrist announces his Christmas
sermon will deal with Capital. The
suave, luxury-loving rector warns
him not to offend the men of money.
Daniel's reply is so savage a sermon
that the angered congregation walks
out. His dismissal follows; his lovely
lluncee, Clare Jewett, hands him back
his ring and permits herself to be-
drugged Into loveless marriage with
"Jerry" Goodkind. the roue son of the
enormously rich senior warden.
Gilchrist thereafter makes his home
in his little mission near the waterfront, called "Overcoat Hall" because
the "down-and-outs" who go there
leave with Gilchrist's overcoat over
their thin rags.
Goodkind sends Gilchrist to his
mines as strike mediator . Jerry betrays Joe Hennfng. a drunken brute to
a coal checker and lures his wife to
.New York. Helming suspects Gilchrist. At a stormy scene in Good-
kind's mansion, Gilchrist settlement
plan is "turned down." He returns
,o Overcoat Hall. The housekeeper's
little daughter, Mary Margaret, Is a
cripple  wiio idolizes  the  preacher.
Iienning has moved to New York
to pursue his wife and "get" Gilchrist. He leads a mob In an attack on the mission. Gilchrist is being savagely beaten when Mary Margaret, who looks on through horror
stricken eyes, forgets her crutches
and makes her way, to his side. This
miracle awes all present and they
tall back.
"Jerry" Goodkind accuses Clare of
loving Gilchrist. He works himself
into such a frenzy that he falls, paralyzed. Clare flees to Gilchrist and
offers herself to him, hut lie puts
aside tlie temptation and makes her
return to her stricken husband.
Another Christinas comes to Overcoat Hall to find Gilchrist happy in
tlie calmness of victory, gazing ovcr
Ihe myriad twinkling lights of Manhattan with little Mary Margaret—
now wliollv cured—standing at his
side.
"The Fool" will be shown at the Ilo.
llo Theatre on Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, Oct. IB, 10 and 17 and at
the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, the
following Monday. Tuesday and Wed-
lesilay. Oct. 19, 20 and 21.
TOM MIX REALLY
RICH POOR MAN
Tugging idly at her hawser chains
in San Pedro Harbor, lies the good
ship "Miss Mlxit." Hoisted to her
main spreader is a blue flag which
proclaims to sea-faring men that the
owner is not on hoard. Spiders have
made niei ry spinning webs athwart
the door of a cozy bungalow on Catallna Island upon which is Inscribed
the name "Tom Mix."
"It's nice to own n beautiful yacht
and a summer home In the Pacilic."
declares Mr. Mix, "but It's better to
enjoy them."
Just now the William Fox star Is
sojourning In a desert camp In Inr
iway Utah, making "Tlie Deadwood
Coach." A short time nun lie returned from Northern California, where
the scenes tor "Teeth" were shot.
Dating still further hack, -Mr. Mix
spent, three weeks in the Mojave Des-
i*rt making "Tlie Heart Buster." Actual count shows tliat In the past year
Mr. Mix has enjoyed his comfortable
home In Hollywood seventy-six nights
'Teeth" is coming to the llo-Ilo Theatre Wednesday and Thursday. Sept.
30 und Oct. 1.
ntlmioi
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Friendliness
One of the qualities which add greatly to life is
that of friendliness, and there is no more friendly
medium of communication than the human voice.
That is one reason why the long-distance telephone is
appropriate for business and social purposes.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY       \\\
tllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllli PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND (SLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1925
New Fall Goods
Beautiful quantity Velveteen In shades Brown, Black and
Saxe width 30 Indies, tlic best dye, a lovely fabric for Ladles and
Girls' Dresses.     P.rice $2,75 per yard.
Invisible Check Poiret Twill, In Navy, Brown, Fawn and
Reseda, a new material for Ladles anil Girls' Dresses, fully B4
indies wide.     Price $2.75 per yard.
New Flannels, in Checks and Stripes and nlso in plain colors, a gooil selection to choose from, both in 30 inches and 54
inches wide. Flannels are very good for Fall and wlll be
greatly used.
Our Old Reliable English Tweed, has arrived In a shipment
just to hand. This line has always been one of our best leaders and our new designs as well as some of those we always
have had arc on view again ut the price, 95c per yard and the
width Is 40 Inches.
REVERSIBLE CRETONNES—
We have just secured four pieces ot n good heavy reversible Cretonne, which we consider extra value at 45c por yard.
The width is about 32 inches.
NEW MILLINERY—
In our Millinery Department we have a very large selection
of New Fall Hats and you wlll find the styles shown are right
up to the minute, nnd our prices are very reasonable. See this
department.
NEW FALL COATS—
New Couts are arriving from time to time, anil you will lind
some of the predominant colorings and the new styles are being
shown. Tiie prices are lower than last season. Let us have
the pleasure of showing you these.
KNITTING SEASON—
The Knitting Season lias arrived and witli it you will And
that we have laid In a very large stock of new wools. We
have some specially fine English Wools on view in good colorings, and we carry tlie Monarch line or Wools which is one ol*
the best.     Inspect our Wools.
Flannel Dresses, in shades or Rust. Green. Fawn. Saxe and
Grey, quite an assortment to choose from.
SUTHERLAND'S
___■
Personal Mention
Mr. Frank Gagne, of Quathiaski
Cove, Valdez Island was in town on
Wednesday. He reports that good
progress Is being nnido on Valdez
Island with the work of replacing the
bridges that were destroyed by liusli
fire this summer.
Mr. John Gliinvllle of Campbell
River was a visitor to Cumberland mi
Wednesday.
Denman Islanders who visited Cumberland tliis week were A. H, Swan,
George DalzleJ and Harvey Piercy.
Mr. L. A. Hanna, of Port Alberni,
ex-Mayor of the thriving west coast
town, was a delegate to the Independent party convention on  Wednesday.
Mr. T. If. Wilkinson, provincial
manager of the Canadian Forestry
Assn., was a business visitor to Cumberland Thursday last. • Mr. Wilkinson made arrangements with tlie man
agement of the llo Ilo Theatre whereby a free moving picture show was
given In the afternoon, showing the
forest industries of Canada anil the
ease with which they can be demolished hy finest (ires. Tiie picture was
entitled "Forests Aflame" and was an
excellent lesson to tlie many children and adults wiio attended.
Thomas Craham, Jr., left Cumberland Sunday last, for Vancouver where
lie has enrolled in the University of
B.C.
Rev. E. 0. Robothan spent last
week-en,-! on Denman Island.
FOOTBALLERS' WHIST
DRIVE IS SUCCESS
NOTICE
All persons having books overdue,
borrowed from the Cumberland Publlc Library, are requested to return
same Immediately. 38-40.
Mrs. Arthur, of Hornby Island, was
a visitor to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Merrifield last week-end.
Mr. George H. Wychcrley left Monday morning on a business visit to
Vancouver.
The first of a series of whist drives
nml dances which the executive of the
Cumberland Football Club IntendB to
hold every other Wednesday evening
throughout the winter months was
held in the Ilo-llo Hall on Wednesday of this week and was a decided
success in every way.
Nineteen tables of cards were in
play, tlie prize winners being: ladles'
first, Mrs. J. Weir; consolation, Mrs.
I,. Frelone; gentlemen's first, Mr. J.
Dallos who won the cut from Mr.
Goodall; consolation, Mr. R. Bryce.
After cards the floor was cleared for
dancing, which was continued until
Iwelve o'clock. Plump's Orchestra
was In attendance.
Eureka Electric
Vacuum Cleaners
IMPORTANT   NOTICE
Up to and including September 30th, 1925 complete set of attachments supplied
FREE
with each cleaner.    Value $10.00 for
'resident of Canadian Pacini*   Hallway,   is   visitor1
with party ol* directors.
The Government of Canada and the two transcontinental railways will stimulate Immigration by a
new agreement, whereby
they become partners in
the collection, transportation, and distribution of
Immigrants. This has been
done witli a view to facilitating the movement,
and also doing away with
technical obstacles to the
admission of new people
existing under the former system.
The foregoing statement
vas made hy Mr. E. W.
Beatty, K.C., President of
the Canadian Pacilic Railway, who arrived In Vicloria Wednesday after-
loon with a party of directors on a tour of inspection of the Canadian Pacific Railway system.
The Crystal Garden was
visited, the president met
leading Victorians at a
dinner In the evening, and
Thursday planned to leave
by special train on the
Esquimalt & Nanaimo Ry.,
to see something of developments Up - Island
since he last had an opportunity of seeing the Industrial progress of Vancouver Island.
$65.00
$65.00
I
cash less 2 per cent.
Monthly Payments Can Be Arranged.
We would suggest to you—we would do more and
urge—that you do not delay ordering before end of
September 1925. We have set aside a certain number of machines to go out with free attachments—
when these are gone it is all off.
BUY NOW—SAVE $10.00 AND BE HAPPY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
LT.-GOVERNOR MAKES
LOCAL APPOINTMENTS
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
The following appeared in tho
British Columbia Gazette ot* September 17th, 1925:
His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor
In Council has been pleased to make
appointment as follows: —
August 2S*>lh, l!)2.*i.
John Conway, ol* Cumberland, to be
a Stipendiary Magistrate in and for
the County ol' Nanaimo.
Richard Murray McQusty, nl' Anyox.
to be a Stipendiary Magistrate in and
for the County of Prince Rupert, and
a Coroner In and for the Province.
September liili   1925.
Marjorie Evelyn Michel), ol Cumberland, to he n Notary Publlc in and
for tlie Province.
Thomas T. Taylor, of Powell Hiver.
Barrister and Solicitor, io be u Commissioner for Inking Affidavits within
the Province.
KEEP DATE OPEN
FOR SALE OF WORK
The Women's Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Anglican Church. Cumberland, will hold a Sale of Work in the
Anglican Hall on Wednesday, December 2nd. Full particulars will be
given inter.     Keep the dale open.
UNION BAY FRIENDS
, GAVE FAREWELL PARTY
FOR MRS. N. SEARLE
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pics.
DR. MIDDLETON'S 100 PER CENT
WHOLE WHEAT BREAD
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Union Stage
Co., Ltd.
Stages leave from the
CUMBERLAND HOTEL AND
WAVERLY HOTEL
for Nanaimo and all way points
at 8:00 and 9:45 a.m. daily.
TRAVEL BY STAGE
T. D. Coldicutt,
Manager.
IN MKHOIIIAM
KENNEDY—In loving menin
dear sister, Mabel Kennedy
parted this life Septembor
"This only those who have
tell
Tho pains   and   grief   ol'
farewell,
A beautiful sister, gentle an
.   A beautiful memory left  I:
Inserted by her loving bIsIi
V. Wyi-liei'lcy.
of in v
vlr- de-
■'. 1921.
ist can
,.-  hul
kind.
iliul."
!i -ssle
36,
Tile home of Mr. and Mrs. Formley,
Union Bay, was the scene of an en?
joyablc social evening Saturday last
in honor of Mrs. Norman Searle who
will reside in future in the city of
Vancouver. The evening was pleas-
anlly spent in playing Court Whist,
Mrs. Mugford being successful ln capturing lirst prize while Mrs. Bailo was
awarded the consolation. Following
cards dainty refreshments were served and Mrs. Searle was made the
recipient of several handsome gifts.
Those present were Mrs. N. Searle,
Mr. and Mrs. Bird, sr., Mr. W. Bird,
Mr. .1. Bird, Miss Bird, Mr. and Mrs.
Mugford. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn, Mr. and
Mrs. B. Geary, Mrs. Bailo, Mr. and
Mrs. Magnone alld Mr. and Mrs Bow-
an.
Mrs. Searle left for Vancouver last
Monday morning.
Shoe Polish
On your mho**
KOIt SAIE -Ford "Oenemolor" (coin,
blniitlon generator nnd starter) Ior
use lu noii-starter type Fords; complete   Willi   nil   nee--           Cost
$11)11. will sell lor J26.00,
Sundry amateur's spare Radio pans
cheap for quick sale. This Is n
chiince wliieh wlll nol ropenl itself.
About (SO of parts; will sell lot for
$115. .1. .1. Murphy, Headquarters,
Phone nl. :t,s,
Use Baby's Own
Soap. It's "Best
for Baby —Best
for You".
Lang's
Cream of Lilies
The Best On Earth For Chapped Hands
Try It And Be Convinced
PER BOTTLE
PER BOTTLE
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS To DEAL At LANG'H"
TURKEYS PLENTIFUL
IN PEACE RIVER
Encouraged by the outlet In Eastern Canada for the turkey raisers are
rapidly increasing their output. According to the observations of Mr. J.
H. Higgins of the Poultry Division of
the Live Stock Branch, who has recently visited the district as far north
as Peace River, the present season has
been a very favorable one for turkey
raising and that shipments east will
he heavier than in the past.
The turkey crop for the Valhalla
district alone ls estimated at between
three and four thousand birds and It
is thought that there should he a total output in excess of one hundred
thousand pounds of dressed turkeys
shipped from Grande Prairie tributary points tbls fall. In the past the
breeders from this section have ship
ped their birds live bul tills method
proved unsatisfactory and steps ore
under way to organize community
turkey kills this year.
Mr. Higgins further stairs that n
number of turkey raisers in ihe Pence
River district aro showing increasing
interest In lhe Improvement of their
stock and that many farmers made
enquiries concerning the purchase ol*
good gobblers.
CAM IT A IIIUIG NTOIII'
"What kind of a store Is Unit fellow
over at Toad Rock running?" asked a
motorist.
"Well, he has Ford parts for sale,"'
replied the attendant In the filling
station at Ten Degrees, "buys butter,
eggs and poultry, deals in real estate,
paints houses, marries folks in his
capacity as Justice of the Pence, runs
the post-otlice. sells slumps, hams,
molasses, Christmas Curds, etc.. and
takes boarders upstairs. I reckon
you'd call it a drug store.
CHEVROLET DELIVERY
Late  model.      All   good   tires.      Repainted.
FORD TOURING
Starter, Good tires, top and upholstery.
A snap.
Genuine Sale of
USED CARS
Sale ends Saturday, October 3rd, 1925.     This is a
Genuine Sale.     Every Car Guaranteed.     No reasonable offer refused.
$400
$275
$250
$350
$275
$625
$550
$165
FORD TOURING
Starter.   In good condition,
good buy.
This is a
OVERLAND TOURING
1920 model.   Good tires.   In A.l condition.
FORD TOURING
Starter.   In very good condition.   Good
tires.   New seat covering.    _
CHEVROLET TOURING
This is a late model.   All good tires, and
runs like new.
CHEVROLET TOURING
Late model.  This car has been privately
owned.
FORD TOURING
One man top.   Demountable rims.   Good
tires.
(j»/»r   FORD TOURING
In running order. (Not guaranteed).
Several Others, including McLaughlin Master Six Touring, McLaughlin "4" Touring and Light Six Touring.
VERY EASY TERMS ARRANGED, SMALL CASH
PAYMENT -
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
Dealers in
McLAUGHLIN-BUICK & CHEVROLET CARS.

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