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The Cumberland Islander Jul 17, 1920

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Array Provincial Library
!0p
With which la consolidated the Cumberland News.
 ^_	
r**;
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUM^A, SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1920.
t
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
H. S. FLEMING ON
PROPOSED STEEL MILLS
PROMINENT BUSINESS MEN OF CUMBERLAND AND
DISTRICT ASSEMBLE TO HEAR PRESIDENT OF THE
CANADIAN COLLIERIES DISCUSS THE STEEL PLANT
CONTEMPLATED AT UNION BAY.
The City Hall was well filled on Tuesday evening when a large
gathering of members of the Cumberland Board of Trade and
other prominent persons assembled to meet Mr. H. S. Fleming,
President of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, and
hear his remarks concerning tho proposed steel plant at Union
Bay.
Mr. G. W. Clinton, President of the Board of Trade, occupied
the chair, and amongst those present were noticed Mayor Dr. R,
McDonald, Thomas Graham, Thos. Mordy, J. W. Cooke, Charles
Graham, Marshall, AT C. Lymn, James Dick, Norman Hawkins,
Dr. G. K. MacNaughton, T. E. Bate, W. Gordon, F. D. Pickard, W.
Willard, J. Sutherland, C. -H. Tarbell, A. McKinnon, T. H. Mumford, P. P. Harrison, Frank Dallos, Ben H. Gowen, W. Johnston of
Parksville, T. Rickson, H. W. Gowgin of Victoria, as well as a
party from Courtenay including E. H. Hicks-Beach, J. Rickson
and Ben Hughes.
The chairman briefly introduced Mr. Fleming to the gathering,
who on arising said he was not a speaker, and did not come to give
a set speech, but would like a free all round talk. He reminded his
hearers that the last time he was here, some years ago, he had
told them that the success of the town and the company depended
upon co-operation. They had been a get-together, which had
proved successful on both sides.
Coming to the main topic of the evening, he said there were
people who would put up a steel plant provided they could find a
market for what they produced. It seems that when people speak
of the consumption of steel on the coast they have in mind the
total of every kind of steel, which would-be everything from pocket
knives to blooms. A steel plant itself made just basic things. Now
I am trying to find out how much would be taken on the coast. For
instance, how much pig iron could be used in foundry work? How
many billets and plates and how much structural iron could be
sold? A steel plant to start with, said the speaker, had got to
have a market for 250 tons a day. The steel business that starts
here has got to stand on its own feet—once it gets started.
The people ln England, said Mr. Fleming, are going to look out tor the
best location. I am trying to get them to locate at Union Bay. I consider
that the best place lu the world,   t Applause.)
How much land can we get? How much wlll it cost, asked the speaker.
Any little attempt at a hold-up would cause the English people to look with
disfavor on Union Bay.
On the meeting being invited to Join in tlie discussion and ask questions,
Mr, Bate said he would like a little insight as regards getting raw material—
could it be got within, say lull miles?
Mr. Fleming, in reply, said they could get ull they would ever want.
It has beeu stated, to my surprise, he said, that magnetite ores, of which there
are large quantities on this coast, wore not suitable for furnace work and did
not produce a pig iron from which steel could be made. That is simply
Ignorance. The Cornwall ore deposits iii Lebanon County. Pennsylvania, are
magnetites and have beeu operated for years, producing a high grade of iron:
aud there arc a dozen more magnetite deposits In the United Stutes of which
the same can be said. The ore Is somewhat harder to reduce lu the furnace,
but it has been done, is being done, and wlll be done. There was no lack of
limestone, another Important requisite, and no lack of coal—the best steam
coal on "the Pacific Coast. s
Mr. Clinton asked if the Orient would be a likely market.
To a certain extent Mr. Fleming thought It would. However, lie was not
figuring on that but on the home market—from San Francisco to Alaska.
Mr. Hawkins asked what Mr. Fleming thought of tho possibilities, to
which the latter said, as a mild guess, lie considered there was a market
in Washington, Oregon and California. There was no appreciable amount
of ore In either Washington or Oregon. If they got that market and became
established It would add considerably tu tlie success of the Industries ami
prosperity of the Island. The Dominion, or Province would have to stand In
the gap, if thero was a gap, until they became established. The speaker
emphasized the importance of using the raw material here and turning it
Into finished products. If we liave--bre here we should use it ourselves, snld
Mr. Fleming.
Mr. Harrison asked how tlie 8-hour day would affect the steel plant, and In
reply Mr. Fleming said a steel mill goes on 24 hours a day seven days a week.
The really successful steel plant Is one that works 24 hours a day. They
muBt work* on Sunday. If they ceased work the furnaces would cool off and
the cost of coal necessary to bring the bent up again would be groat.
Mr. Tarbell: If a steel mill starts In, would It be an inducement for other
plants to start in?
Mr. Fleming said there was already one In Vuneouver. Undoubtedly there
would he inducements (or many kindred industries to commence. 150,01)0 tons
of tinplate was used in the province, being shipped from tlie east. It this
could be produced here it would save tho heavy freight charges. A steel mill
here would mean twenty or thirty other industries. Everybody should work
for It—I am doing my bit, said the speaker.
Mr. Clinton thought Union Bay was the best place for the steol plant
But they should complete the products hore and ship them away. It would
help Cumberland considerably'. Then, speaking 111 a complimentary manner
to the guest ot the evening, he said Mr. Fleming had been one of the best
friends Cumberland over had. You came here and with your officials you
built houses and helped make Cumberland a better place to live In. What
you have done for this city the citizens think you deserve great credit. We
believe you will put the steel mills at Union Bay. On behalf of tbe Cumberland Board of Trade I thank you for coming here this evening, said the
chairman.
Mr. McKinnon:  As one of those who were here when Mr. Fleming visited
Cumberland before, when he urged co-operatlon, I am very pleased to see
how things are prospering.   We wish him every success and we have no
doubt at all that he will put the steel plant at Union Bay.
(Continued on Page Two)
. J. BOWSER SPEAKS HERE
ON TUESDAY EVENING NEXT
The leader of the Opposition in the Provincial House, Hon. W.
J. Bowser, will be the principal speaker at a big meeting to be
held in the Ilo-llo Theatre on Tuesday evening next. Mayor
D; R. McDonald will occupy the chair.
In view of the near approach of the provincial election and the
prohibition referendum, considerable interest is being evinced in
Mr. Bowser's visit. The meeting'is open to all, ladies being
especially invited to attend.
On Wednesday Mr. Bowser proceeds to Campbell River to attend
the annual meeting of the Comox Central Conservative Association at the Willows Hotel. ft
s
HON. W. J. BOWSER
Who will address a public meeting b Cumberland on Tuesday.
5044 Names on
Voters'- List
Time  for  Receiving  Registrations Has Been Extended
to End of Month.
The Provincial Government has extended the time tor placing names on
the new voters' list until the 31st of
July. This will enable those who
have so far neglected, or been prevented, to register their names, to do
so and thus have a citizen's say in the
selection of the government, as well
as a vote on the Prohibition referendum, in which everybody is keenly
Interested.
Up to last evening the very satisfactory number of 5044 names had
been forwarded to District Registrar
John Baird for the new list. This Is
just double the number ot a week ago,
and should good progress still continue for another couple of weeks a
fairly complete list of persons entitled
to vote wlll have been compiled.
The list will positively close on the
31st of this month.
SPECIAL MEETINGJFJMA. TUESDAY
■ Mr. C. J. Bunbury, secretary of the Cumberland Branch of the
Great War Veterans' Association, announces that a very important
meeting of the local is to be held on Tuesday evening next at 7
o'clock sharp. Every member is urgently reguested to attend as
business of great importance is to come up.
Warning to
Motor Drivers
That portion of thc public who
drive cars and have thc welfare of the
city streets at heart are requested to
be courteous enough to elimlnntc rock-
less driving, which Involves jamming
on of brakes suddenly nnd the consequent tearing up of the street surface.
A second appUcation of oil Is needed
to complete the surfacing. Tills application takes place (10 days after the
first.
Another good thing to remember is
that turning Is supposed to be done
at street Intersections and not In the
middle of the block. Drivers who forget this are liable to find It brought
to their notice ln a rather unpleasant
manner, since there is a local bylaw
protecting the city on this point.
Matriculation
Examinations
Results of the matriculations examinations were received in Cumberland
yesterday by Mr. A. McKinnon, secretary of the School Board.
Junior Matriculation.
Alice Colman, 106 (completed).
Ida McFadyen, 1103 (passed).
Marjorie Mordy, 582 (passed).
Findlay Stewart McKinnon, 533
(passed).
Carrie Richardson, 556 (suplemen-
tary).
Foon Steu Wong, 507 (supplementary).
Dunsmuir Avenue
Good progress is being made towards completing the work ou Dunsmuir Avenue and ln the course of a
few days It will opened for traffic
Automobile drivers are particularly
requested to use discretion when' driving on the oiled portion, taking care
not to damage the surface, as It will
be some time before it will be In shape
for hard wear.
Whilst the workmen engaged in tlie
work of putting the "Turvla" on the
avenue Inst night about 9.30, tlle
"Tarvia" lu the holler apparently
boiled over, causing an Immense
blaze. For a few moments tho workmen hud the "wind up" und commenced to throw dirt on the blaze In
un endeavor to extinguish It. Suddenly one of the gang called for Ihe
lire hose which was laying close by to
be connected up and turn on the water.
Tbey soon had thc blaze out, but the
dense volumes of smoke permeated the
whole atmosphere.
One of the workers got in tlie way
of tlie stream of water just as It was
turned on, getting the full force right
on the rear end.
CANa-VDIAN COLLIERIES
EMPLOYEES' PICNIC
Great interest is being aroused in the annual picnic of the
employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., which is
to be held at Royston on August 14. An organization meeting was
held at the beginning this week when committees and officers
were elected to see that the affair is a complete success.
A meeting of all committees is called for Sunday morning at
11 o'clock, when it is hoped to get a good start on the preliminary
work.   The complete list of officers and committees is as follows:
Hon. President, Jas. M. Savage. Hon. Vice-President, Thomas Graham.
Director of Ceremonies, Charles Graham. President, Robt. Walker. Secretary,
Chas. O'Brien.   Treasurer, Jno. D. Davis.
TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE—H. L. Bates (chairman), H. Bunchauan,
A. R. Westley, A. Matheson, L. Fraiiceschinl.
RECEPTION COMMITTEE—D. R. McDonald (chairman), Thomas. Graham,
Charles Graham.
REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE—George O'Brien (chairman), Bob Robertson, W. Devoy, W. Wier, S. Cameron, T. O'Neil, T. Eccleston, H. Buchanan,
Alex. Brown, S. Robertson, Jim Boyd, Jno. Horbury, Chas. Walker, Joe Taylor,
Dave Ford, Wm. Beveridge, Thos. Watson, Jack Williams, Sam Jones, W.
ilillls, E. Mumford, D. Haggard, E. C. Dunn, A. J. Fouracre.
PROGRAMME COMMITTEE—H. G. McKinnon (chairman), Robt. Brown,
Jas. L. Brown, Pete Reed, Jno. Quinn.
SPORTS COMMITTEE—Jas. L. Brown (chairman), Jas. Quinn, Bobbie
Brown, Preston Bruce, E. H. Kay, Dan Stewart,. John T. Taylor.
GROUNDS COMMITTEE—Andrew Pollard (chairman), Ed. Nancy, Pete
Reed, Sam Fraser, J. Smith, Mickey Williamson, Arch Lockhart, R. Turnbull,
P. Harris, W. Wilson.
William Swanson
Loses His Life
Body of Well-Known Miner Was
Found in Puntledge River
on Monday Last.
William Swanson, an old-time resident on the Island, lost his life by
drowning in the Puntledge River, near
Bevau, about three weeks ago, his
body being found ln the river on Monday afternoon last.
Tbe actual cause ot drowning will
probably never be known, for there
were no witnesses to the tragedy. It
ls quite certain that he was accidentally drowned, for he was known to
have been an ardent fisherman and
for this purpose had built a cabin close
to the river where he spent most of
his tiniu lishing- when he w«-i not
working. Three weeks go he left
Bevan for his cabin, according to bis
usual custom, but not returning to
camp within a few days his friends
became anxious and visited the cabin,
only to find the place empty. Alarmed
[or his safety a search was at tince instituted, which resulted in the finding
of his lifeless body in the river a short
distance below his cabin.
Mr. Swanson was a native of Caithness, Scotland, and was 55 years of
i. He was familiarly known as
"Wlngy," owing to his having lost a
hand iu a mine accident some yearB
ago. For the past thirty years he had
resided In Nanaimo and vicinity and
had many friends In Nanaimo and
Cumberland and other parts of the Island. Tbe deceased was a widower,
his wife having pre-deceased him some
18 years ago. One of his sons, Robert,
was killed in action In tbe great war.
He ls survived by one son, Charles,
and two daughters, Mrs. Bull of Duncan and Mrs. Poison, residing In Vancouver; also two brothers, residing in
the province, Robert of Vancouver,
and Sinclair of Nanaimo, and two Bisters, Mrs. Trudell of Cedar and Mrs.
Tljniuas Gordon of Nanaimo.
Mr. Sinclair Swanson came up from
Nanaimo to take part In the search,
and took charge of the body, which
was prepared for shipment at the undertaking parlors of Mr. T. E. Banks
mid shipped to Nanaimo for interment
Orangemen Had
Good Celebration
Hold Church Parade on Sunday
and Social Gathering on the
Glorious Twelfth.
A large number of local Orangemen
turned out to the church parade on
Sunday evening, which was held ln the
Grace Methodist Church. Rev. Geo.
Kinney, took tbe service.
The celebration on Monday ls 'said
to have been the best ever held by
Orangement In this part of the Island.
The celebration took the form of
speeches and a social in tbe Orange
Hall. Among those present was a
large contingent from Courtenay.
Rev. Geo. Kinney gave a stirring address on the principles of the order,
sketching the history of Orangeism
and what It stood for from the Battle
of the Boyne down to the present day;
and many other leading officials of the
local lodges contributed good speeches.
A musical entertainment had been arranged, in which the bagpipe selection
by Mr. Munro of Courtenay gave great
pleasure.
During the evening Mr. Taylor was
presented with a pastniaster's Jewel
in recognition of the great services he
had rendered to the order while he
held the chief office.
Tbe ladies of the Cumberland lodge
served refreshments, which were much
enjoyed.
CUMBERLAND PLAYS
CELTICS IN VANCOUVER
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
FARRIS VISITING COMOX
Attorney-General Farris is leaving
Victoria on Monday on an auto trip,
combining business with pleasure.
While making a tour of the Island be
I will visit the   soldier   settlement   at
I Merville.
919 NUT-BARS IN WINDOW
The guessing contest conducted by
"Kelly" of the number of nut-bars
heaped in his woudow came to an
e id Thursday night. Kelly was kept
Iiusy sorting ovcr the hundreds of
guesses put in the box. The correct
number was 1)19, which number was
put in by K. Brown, who gets the
large box of chocolates; the second
; uccessfnl guess, 920, was '"guessed*
by Mrs. Hill, and tbo third by "Duck,
who wrote 921.
The local football team today plays
the Celtics III Vancouver. Cumberland
wlll be minus the valuable services of
both Wilkinson and Harrison, who
received Injuries in last Saturday's
game.
Motor Accident
Courtenay Road
A motorcycle rider going to Courtenay Sunday night came to grief as
the result of trying to avoid a cart
driven by a Chinaman who was on the
wrong Bide of the road.
It appears the Oriental, seeing the
motorcycle approaching, turned his
cart toward the other side, but it was
apparently too late, as the rider, in order to avoid u collision wns driven Into the ditch, he being badly bruised
and scratched and his suit considerably torn.
REV.
W. LEVERSEDGE
LOSES HIS FATHER
.Much sympathy Is felt for Rev. Mr.
Leversedge iu the bereavement ho has
suffered through the denth of bis
father In England. The rector of Holy
Trinity Church received word on Saturday that his father hud passed nway
on June 11.
MEETING OF COMOX CENTRAL
Hon. W. J. Bowser, Leader of the Opposition in the Provincial
Parliament, and Mr. H. S. Clements, member of the Federal House
for the Comox electoral district, are expected to be present at the
annual meeting of the Comox Central Conservative Association to
be held at the Willows Hotel, Campbell River, on Wednesday next,
July 21, at 7 p.m.
Election of officers for the ensuing year and other important
matters afTecting the welfare of the province will be the principal
business. Mr. D. R. McDonald is president of tiie association and
Mr. E. W. Bickle is secretary. Two
THfi   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
July 11, 1920.
We received this week a shipment
.   of no less than
600 Pounds of Moir's
High-Class Chocolates
Including every variety and flavor
of   these    delicious   confections
Be sure and take home some of
McKenzie's Famous Ice Cream-
inside and out.
KELLY'S CAFE
OPPOSITE THE BIG STORE
CUMBERLAND
H. S. FLEMING ON
PROPOSED STEEL MILLS
(Continued from Page One)
C. C. M. Bicycles
A  DELAYED SHIPMENT
Specially Low  Prices to  Clear
Don't walk these hot days—ride a good bicycle—it
will bring you in close touch with the beach and other
cool, shady places.
THERE IS NO LUXURY TAX ON C.C.M. BICYCLES
THEY ARE A NECESSITY
We carry the famous "Perfect" C.C.M. Bicycles,
fitted with the new guaranteed "Hercules" Coaster
Brake—the brake without the side-arm—very simple
in construction, and guaranteed.
They come in both black and a pleasing shade of red.
PRICES:
$60.00 and $62.50
These are away below the prevailing prices, as they
were ordered a considerable time ago, but were late in
arriving.
P. O. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
Mr. Sutherland moved a vote of thanks to Mr. Thomas Graham, the
Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries, speaking very highly of the good
work Mr. Graham had done in knitting together the opposing elements in
Cumberland. He was always more than ready to help In any way possible
for the welfare of the city, said Mr. Sutherland.
Mr. Tarbell said he took much pleasure in seconding the motion. He was
keenly appreciative of Mr. Graham's good services on behalf of Cumberland.
Mr. Graham, in reply, said he almost blushed like a young bride at the
flattering remarks made by the two previous speakers. Whatever be had
done, it had been a great pleasure for him to do. He fully realized that he
could not do anything he Intended to without the co-operation of the people
of Cumberland. With your co-operation, said Mr. Graham, 1 can do much
better in the future.
Mr. Harrison said he had been 14 years In Cumberland, and Mr. Graham had
done everything he possibly could for the welfare of Cumberland. He bad
always acted In the right spirit. The same applied to Mr. Fleming, said Mr.
Harrison. He was very pleased to see them there that evening. The old
feeling of antagonism had been entirely dissipated and a feeling entirely
friendly now prevailed.
Mr. Willard said he had been n citlzon of Cumberland for 2ti years, and the
companuy seemed to be working together for the good of Cumberland. Wc
will be very pleased, said Mr. Willard, to back up your efforts.
Mayor McDonald said he was pleased to be present to hear what Mr.
Fleming had to say regarding the steel plant. He hoped It would be located
at Union Bay. Tbe company was doing many things to help Cumberland along.
We* have got more backing the lust two years than we ever have before.
Mr. Hicks-Beach of Courtenay said tlie people of that city were with Mr.
Fleming hand and foot in his efforts to place the steel mill at Union Bay.
You supply us with good coal, said the speaker, and we supply you with
better milk and'cream.   (Laughter.)
Mr. Rickson, also of Courtenay, said he hoped the finished product would
be turned out at Union Bay. He instanced a case where Courtenay bad lost
greatly by allowing its lumber to be shipped away to be finished at another
port.
Mr. Ben Hughe3 of the Comox Argus said it afforded him great pleasure to
hear that the steel mill was to be started on a business; bnsis. He laid particular stress.on this phase of the operations. He mentioned, Incidentally,
that there wa3 every possibility of a woolen mill being established at
Courtenay.
In reply to a question as to why they preferred Union Bay, Mr. Fleming
said it waa a good shipping place, and there wns a large supply of limestone
and ore close by; also, which was very important, ill the Comox district
there was a large farming district which could supply large quantities of
produce. The mills should result in their being a large population, at
Courtenay, Cumberland and Union Bay.
APOLOGIZE FOR DAMAGE
We, the undersigned, do hereby ten-
dor a most bumble apology to those
parties whose gardens we entered into
and whoso fruit and vegetables we
destroyed.
Wo realize that our actions in the
matter were not such as to reflect
credit on us as decent and law-abiding citizens iiiui'.we do hereby guar
antee that In future we will endeavor
at all times to respect tlie rights of
property and to so govern our conduct
that in the end wo shall become good
and loyal citizens.
Signed by Reginald F. Bale, Howard
K. Carey, James Wllcock and Francis
Potter. '
Witness: C. J. Bunbury, Chief of
Police.
Cumberland, U. 0, July 1C, 1920.
SUMMER
GOODS
WINDOW SCREENS at 50c each.
SCREEN DOORS at $3.00 and $3.75
HAMMOCKS, BABY HAMMOCKS, CAMP COTS and
MATTRESSES
LUNCH BASKETS
CAMP BLANKETS and COMFORTERS
ft full line of House
Furnishings in Stock
A. McKinnon
THE  FURNITURE STORE
Cumberland, B.C.
II
WE ARE
SOLE
AGENTS
WE ARE
SOLE
AGENTS
Mrs. Haines' Orange Marmalade
GOLD  BAR FRUITS
FREESTONE PEACHES, PEARS
APRICOTS, CHERRIES
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
ROYSTON ARRIVALS
Among those who are now residing
at Royston Benches are:
Mr. and Mrs. It. Grieves. '
Mr. and Mrs. Mumford.
Mr. und Mrs. F. Dalby and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Stanford.
Mr. and Mrs. McKinnon and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Sutherland and family.
Mr. J. C. Brown and family.
Miss McDonald. -
Mr. and Mrs. Marsh of the Roynl
Bank, Courtenay.
Mrs. H. Henderson, Nanaimo,
Mrs. Muir, the guest of Mrs. He'i-
derson.
Mr. and Mrs. McCarthy.
Mrs. Grant, Victoria.
Mr. and" Mrs. Chas. Graham.
Miss Bessie Stewart.
Miss M. Evans.
Mrs. Colin Campbell and family.
Miss Gallivan.
Miss Hlldebrand.
Jiiss Edith Bickle.
Miss Janet Graham.
Miss Ronald.
Miss Laura Robertson.
Dr. and Mrs. Christie,
AT HARTLEY POINT.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cooke and
family.
Mr. and Mrs. Tarbell alld family.
Dr. and Mrs. MacNaughton and
family.
*Uev. Jas. Hood and family.
Dr. and AlrB. Hicks and family.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cumeron.
Rev. nnd Mrs. Leversedge and family.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Bryan.
Mr. nnd Mrs. S. Pickard.
Mr. and Mrs. John Spicer.
The People Of Royston Are Saying
That nt the election held Thursday evening Mayor Dowdall was
unanimously chosen to do the honors
for another yenr.      '
That Messrs. Macdonald and Roy
took cold feel, and would not faco the
newly appointed Council of Ladles.
Tlrat the lady presiding ut tlie Council meeting Thursday night bandied
il in a masterly way.
That the appointment of Miss Macdonald as Treasurer for tbe year will
be much appreciated, as she knows
bow to look after the First Nationnl
Bank.
Thnt the impromptu concert held
after the meeting was a decided success.
That Mrs. Muir, who entertained the
audience, Is a star of thc first magnitude, and for song and story wilj be
hard to surpass.
That tlie bravery of the royal profession was upheld on tiie iiiltliilion of
Miss lliignn the other night.
That if the residents of some of the
nearby communities Intend remaining
on the mup they will have to show a
little more ot the Community Spirit.
(Produce the key of their cellar, so to
speak.)
That tlie Shamrock uphold the traditions of Old Ireland, and romped home
Thursday ulght in the first race.
That "Hall, Hail, the Gang Was All
There" on Thursday night and the
entertainment of the Gang by some of
the ladles was appreciated by all, and
wlll no doubt be followed by many
more pleasant evenings.
That lots seems to be in great demand at Royston at present.
That the presence of the girls on the
beach has had a good effect on the
hoys, and there have been no moro
midnight wanderings over to Comox
Hats on" to the girls!
That the two girls who wore wandering on the shore during the thun
derstorm on Sunday morning should
remember this is Leap Year,and there
fore should not be alone any longer
than they can help.
That wedding bells must be In tho
air over at a nearby settlement, Judging by the rush of ministers to do the
needful.   Hurry up, girls!
That tlie news of the success of the
two pupils for the Matriculation wus
heralded in by no mean way on announcement.
Thnt the successful candidates had
quite an embarrassing moment when
they met, and congratulated one an
other, judging hy the largo embrace
Which was witnessed.
That there are spiders and spiders,
but the recitation of "Bruce and the
Spider" was well rendered the other
evening.
That the residents of Cumberland
and the surrounding district may look
forward to the first concert to be
staged at Royston, when Mrs. Mulr
will be In full control, judging by the
standard set up the other night.
That she has promised to give tlie
full story of Jimmy Green some even
ing, and no doubt a crowd will be li
attendance.
KNEADS BREAD WITH GLOVES ON
It Is reported that one of the fastidious married women of this town
kneads bread with her gloves on. The
Incident may be somewhat peculiar,
but there are others.
The editor of this paper needs bread
with his shoes on—he   needs   bread
with his shirt on and he needs bread
with his pants on, aud unless some of
the delinquent subscribers of this "Old
Kag of Freedom" pony up before
long, Ire wlll   need   bread without a
d n thing on, and North Dakota Is
no Garden of Eden in the Winter time.
-From a North Dakota paper.
Picnic Necessities
Paper Plates
Paper Serviettes
Paper Tablecloths
LIME JUICE GRAPE JUICE
LOGANBERRY JUICE
LEMONADE  POWDER FRUIT SALTS
BATHING  CAPS
Frost's   Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Cumberland
Luxury Tax Removed
from Electric hteating
Appliances
You will be interested to know that the efforts of
manufacturers of Electric Heating Appliances and of
others interested, have been successful in securing the
removal of the 10 per cent. Luxury Tax on nickle-
plated Electric Heating Appliances.
We quote herewith a recent letter from R. W. Bread-
ner, Commissioner of Taxation, to a manufacturer of
appliances:
"In reply to your letter of the 15th inst., I may state
that the luxury tax applies to articles plated with gold
or silver adapted for household or ofiice use. Nickle-
plated electric heating appliances are exempt."
Some of the more important arguments used were:
1st—In almost all communities of the Dominion of
Canada it is actually more economical to iron, toast,
cook, etc., with electric appliances than by any other
method.
The proposed legislation, therefore, would be taxing
an economy rather than a luxury.
2nd—Appliances made from steel and iron require
a covering of something to protect them from the
action of rust.
Nickle is the best and most economical for this
purpose.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wUh to point out that It is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
ill
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii F
July 17, 1920.
-Tfifi   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
400 CARLOADS OF
ONIONS AND A BIG
BEAR IN FILM STORY
George Walsh Stars in Humorous Photoplay at the Ilo-llo
Theatre Tonight
What would you do, If after a ulghi
at the cabarets you discovered a bis
bear in your bathroom and it dawned
upou you that you had bought tin
animal tor a "pet." This may happei
i^-j. to you—this Is the ages of surprises—
bo you are advised to Bee "Jack Spur-
lock—Prodigal" at the llo-Ilo Ibit
( evening, where George Walsh the Wm
,' Fox star, as young Spurlock, solver
tbe problem of disposing ot the 400
pound Alaska bruin. Mr. Bruin maker
it Interesting for tbe Harvard Faculty
aud his young owner before he is gotten rid of.
"Jack Spurlock — Prodigal" was
written, by Oeorge Horace Lorimer
editor of Saturday POBt, published in
the Saturday Evening Post In serial
form and later in book form. The
story made a hit and the book attained
the distinction of being the "best
seller" on the market.
"Jack Spurlock—Prodigal" is the
story of a young Harvard student's experience beginning after he had been
dropped from Harvard because of his
escapade with the bear. He was a
self-reliant- chap and when his millionaire father placed him In charge
of the business lie sought to make a
good stroke by buying a few hundred
carloads of onions, not knowing that
his daddy had already bought 500 cars.
It works out alright, but before the
* film story is unfolded young Spurlock
has many funny and thrilllpg expert
ences.
of the most skilled horsewomen in the
country. ^^^^^^^A
Miss Ferguson has a splendid role
ui "Heart of the Wilds," the scenes ot
iVhleh are laid along the Canadian
■■order, There are troopers,. Indians
and cowboys aplenty lu the action.
ihumas .Meighan Is Miss Ferguson's
.cading man and the support is ex
oelleut throughout.
"Dardanella" Is one of the most
popular songs ever written in America.
Royalties on the piece are reported to
have reached $250,000. And Johnnie
Black who composed it got $100.
"Madelon" is the most popular song
that has been written in France In a
generation.   It has made hundreds of
thousands of francs for the publishers.
The French pollu who wrote it got
nothing—not a centime!—in royalties.
"Madelon" was written before the
war.    It was one   of   the   thousand
songs  that were heard occasionally.
Nobody paid any attention to it.   Then
the armies were   mobilized   and   the
French poilus took It up.   They demanded it to march to.   They saug It.
It was played by the bands over and
over and over.    It   spread   all   over
France.   Literally all France sang it,
whistled it, played It, marched to it.
Since the war tho French Chamber
of Deputies has made  it an official
national song.    A French newspaper
has raised a fund for the poilu writer
who was glad to give his composition
to the publisher just to see It printed.
When Johnny Black took "Dardanella" to the publishers they told him It
was   unusual.     Johnny    felt   proud.
When   the   publisher  offered   him   a
cheque for $100, he accepted.   Then he
became   aware   that   everybody  was
singing it and playing it—that it was
a hit!   Now he is suing for a share of
the royalties.
Much has beeu written about tin
.lumber of people who undergo prlva-
.ion to win screen fame. Yet, bow
jiany would actually risk llielr live,
.or a chance to linger iu the cellulolu
jpotligbt?
This   question   came   up   receutl)
,t. A. VNuish, motion picture producer,
inserted an advertisement iu a New
fork daily calling tor a man to ride
I jver Niagara Falls ln a houseboat to.
j a scene in a picture to be presented
jy the Mayflower Photoplay Corporation.    Walsh was determined to Invest the scene with all possible realism, hence the call for a man to actually go over the Falls.   The reward
offered was $1,000.
The producer expected no more than
four or Ave applicants. Imagine his
surprise when 130 death-defying
demons appeared. Almost every nationality, color aud creed had its representative, eager to flirt with the god
of chance iii order to win film fame.
The applicants came from a varied
assortment of comparatively safe and
sane occupations. A large number
ivere mechanics; many were seamen
and salesmen; three were bank clerks;
two were insurance brokers, while
one was a deputy sheriff. The ma
jority were ex-service men, willing to
cake any chance.
Included In the number of applicants was Allan Law, brother of the
late Rodman Law, and himself a
famous daredevil who rode over the
Falls iu a barrel several years ogo.
Another was Frank Dupree, newspaper correspondent who made the
lirst long distance aeroplane flight In
1913—from Dover, Eng., to Cologne,
Germany.
citing Incidents of "The 13th Chair."
Politician Murdered In Seattle.
For example: Back in the early
nineties the City of Seattle was ln a
turmoil for days over the murder of a
prominent politician. It was the custom of the man, whenever engaged in
promoting particularly Important legislation to go to the library of his
home, shut himself In thc room, lock
the door, and permit no one to enter
until he had worked on the details of
the bill In wblch he was Interested.
Despite all these things, the man
was killed In his room, sometime between the hours of nine o'clock at
night aud midnight, and his murderer
has not been discovered to this day.
That was one of these cases In the
note book of Uf. Velller, and the murder taking place in the locked room
from which no one might enter or
leave, always appealed to him as being an ideal one for the plot ot a
mystery Btory.
ROMANCE AND FUN
ARE EVER PRESENT
IN "LESS THAN KIN"
Delightful Situations Feature of
Wallace Reid's Nefest
Photoplay.
MANY THRILLING
FEATS SHOWN IN
BIG NEW PICTURE
Elsie Ferguson, Aircraft Star,
Rides Wild Pony in "Heart
of the Wilds"
The romance and fun of the average
Central American revolution are admirably brought out in "Less Thau
Kin," the new Paramount photoplay,
starring Wallace Reid aud featuring
dainty Ann Little, wblch will be
shown at the ilo-llo Theatre on Wednesday next.
In this excellent picture Mr. Reid
plays two roles—that of a ne'er-do-
well, who Ib disowned by his family,
and the other that of a man who has
accidentally killed a man in tefence
of a woman, and who escapes from
jail and finds refuge in Central America, where he drills a motley army of
revolutionists. The resemblance be
tween these two men ls so startling
that on the death of the ne'er-do-well,
the refugee decids to assume his name
and station and return to New York,
where his imposture brings about
many highly diverting situations. In
the end, however, he is pardoned and
linds happiness and love in a charming girl.
Riding n wild and unruly mustang
which she controls with ease, Elsie
Ferguson, the beautiful Artcraft star
provides several thrilling scenes In
her latest photoplay, "Heart of the
Wilds," which will he the main attraction at the Ilo-Llo Theatre on Monday
night next. This is one of several unusual incidents which contribute to
make this picture one of the finest of
Its kind ever produced.
When Miss Ferguson, accompanied
by Director Marshall Nellan and her
supporting players went to Wyoming
to produce the great outdoors scenes
of the photoplay, it was necessary for
Miss Ferguson to make a daring horseback trip ln a rough country, along
the edge of high cliffs and down narrow precipitous footh paths. When
the people who .provided horses for
the producing outfit offered Miss Ferguson a rather tame pony, she good-
naturcdly declined to consider tho impossible mount.
"Give a spirited animal," she said
laughingly. "One that will necessitate
generalship to handle."
So it came about that when the
athletic actress mounted an unruly
animal and with a few deft applications of her qulrf brought the pony to
complete subjection, expert cowpunch-
ers marveled greatly thereat until
they learned that Miss Ferguson Is one
"THE THIRTEENTH
CHAIR" BASED ON
ACTUAL HAPPENINGS
Author of Great Story Collected
Data While He Was Working as Police Reporter
When the "13th Chair" was pro
duced In New York there were those
who, admitting tlie tenseness of the
story and the thrilling nature of its
climax, charged tbat It was too improbable. As a matter of fact, the
main features of the story worked out
In the play happened in real life, aud
all came under the personal notice of
Bayard Velller, the author.
In his younger days, and for a
period covering several years, Mr.
Velller was a working newspaper
man, both on New York papers and
on some of the largest and most Im-
portant papers ln tho West. A greater
part of bis newspaper work was in
covering polico court stories, and the
young newspaper man won not a little praise on a number of occasions
for his skill ln uncovering clues, that
eventually led to the solving of several murder mysteries.
Ills Note Book Helps.
Incidentally he kept   a little   note
book into which went memoranda on
jail the Interesting cases  and out  of
j which came several of tho most ev-
Jiew method of Murder.
One of the most ingenious methods
ever employed by a man to do murder
was that of a San Francisco man, who
arranged a device much after the
fashion of a sling shot to drive a
knife lhto the back of his victim at
the moment that the marked man
stood in a position to make the attack
certain to prove fatal. Mr. Velller
covered the trail of that murderer aud
the Idea of a person being able to
drive a knife Into the back of another
without once coming near the victim
of the attack, struck him as presenting
a phase of mystery that would baffle
the efforts of the shrewdest detectives
to unravel.
The murder ln which the mystic
third degree was employed was one
that stirred the city of Denver as it
has seldom been stirred by a similar
crime. The victim was a well known
society woman. Suspicion pointed with
almost convincing certainty toward a
woman almost as well known in society circles.
Confesses During Seance.
All the efforts of the police to obtain a confession or sufficient proof
to warrant an actual charge of murder were unavailing until it was
learned that the woman under suspicion was a great believer ln the
power of a certain medium ln that
city. The police did not hesitate to
make use of this Information and at a
I fake seance at wblch Mr. Velller was
one of those present, a series ot events
occurred wblch the suspect was able
[to account for only In the belief that
there were manifestations of supernatural power, and which brought
from the shrieking criminal a cry of
confession.
All three murder cases have contributed their share to the mystery ln
'The 13th Chair." Naturally, Mr.
Velller, in constructing his fictitious
mystery, has employed .only portions j
of the actual mysteries which he encountered in real life, but, remarkable
story as he has written, to those who
brand it as being too impossible to
have actually occurred, he need only
refer them to the police records of
three cities to let them read for themselves stories that put an even greater
tax on the credulity, and one of which
never has had an explanation of
solution.
This greatest of all mystery dramas
will be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre
on Thursday evening next.
As a stage production, "The Thlr
teenth Chair" was rated among the
most successful ever produced. Now
tlie great play has been made into a
motion picture.
Betty Cameron, who leaped to fame
overnight because of her performance
in "The Miracle Man," has the leading
feminine role in Tucker's second independent production for Mayflower,
'Ladles Must Live."
*   *   •
WAITERS VS. LABOK,
While filming "The Deep Purple,"
Director R. A. Walsh needed two bills
| of large denomination. A thorough
canvass of the stars and studio at
taches present failed to reveal tbe re
quired "wherewithal." A group of
waiters, hired for the picture, suggested a live possibility. Walking
over to a corner where the purveyors
of gastronomic necessities were engaged ln animated conversation, Walsh
Inquired for the bills. With irritating
Indifference, all four Knights of the
Steaming Dlsb dug into their pockets
and extracted from rolls of ponderpus
proportions the required greenbacks.
Thereupon the director was heard to
mutter something about "All things
come to those who wait."
Bluffon—I had a misunderstanding
with my uncle last night.
Callem—What was the trouble-
lose the ticket?
ILO-ILO THEATRE
4 SHOWS WEEKLY
II ATI PC     AS   THE   THEATRE   HAS   BEEN   ENGAGED   FOR   OTHER   UPtfT    UfCCIf
IIU I IUC"PURP0SES   THERE   WILL   BB   NO   SHOW   ON   TUESDAY   IICA I     If EX IV
During the months of July and August there
will be 4 Shows weekly Mondays, Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays
Saturday, July 17th
GEORGE WALSH
— IN —
"JACK SPURLOCK—PRODIGAL"
HAVE YOU A BAD DISPOSITION? WANT IT CURED? TRY A
DOSE OF PROFESSOR GEORGE WALSH'S "CURE ALL." TO BE
SOLD IN THEATREFULS UNDER THE NAME OF "JACK SPURLOCK
—PRODIGAL," AT THE ILO-ILO THEATRE TONIGHT!
Also Fifth Episode of
Jack Dempsey
-IN
"DAREDEVIL  JACK"
Monday, July 19th
ELSIE  FERGUSON
— IN —
"Heart of the Wilds"
Wednesday, July 21st
"LESS THAN KIN"
A Paramount Picture
Starring
WALLACE    REID
HE CHANGED HIS MIND ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER MANS LIFE
WHEN THE OTHER MAN'S WIFE AND CHILDREN  APPEARED!
Thursday, July 22nd
GREATEST OF ALL MYSTERY DRAMAS
"The Thirteenth Chair"
The Wonderplay of Mystery and Suspense
Starring
YVONNE DELVA AND J
CREIGHTON   HALE
ALSO
Pearl White
— IN —
THE BLACK SECRET' Four
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1920.
July 17. 1920.
VOTERS' LIST OPEN TO END OF JULY
The Provincial Government has extended the
time for receiving registrations in the new Provincial'Voters' List until the end of the month.
In this the administration has acted wisely, as
otherwise many thousands of persons entitled to
vote would not have had their names on the new
last. This week good progress has been made in
enrollments, and Mr. John Baird, District Registrar, says he has now five thousand names for
the new list. With two more weeks' good work
must of the available citizens should be on the
list and a representative vote thus be possible
when the elections arrive.
In the meantime, if you have failed to do your
duty up to the present, do not delay any longer
but get on the list at once. The only cost is a
few moments' time. Do you value your citizenship that much?
THE NEWSPAPER OUTLOOK
Peterborough is the latest city in Ontario to
join the number of single newspaper towns. Since
the beginning of the great war, Brantford, St.
Thomas, Sarnia, Niagara Falls, Brockville, Fort
William, Port Arthur and St. Catharines have all
entered that category, and the tale is not yet completed. Nothing can be more certain than the
increased cost of production, due to the rapid rise
in price of newsprint, in labor scales and in the
cost of almost every other article and service a
newspaper requires, will compel the abandonment
of competition in the smaller fields. Nor thi3
only, for with the substantial increase in second-
class postal rates provided in the federal budget
and the further advance in newsprint heralded by
the manufacturers, disaster looms ahead for those
newspapers that do not face the situation squarely
and by higher subscription or advertising rates, or
both, provide the greater revenue necessary to
meet the growing expenditure.
* THE GATHERING STORM
(Victoria Times)
Advices from many parts of India have reached
London to the effect that impressive observance
of the "hartal," or cessation of business, as a protest against the British government's policy towards the Indian Empire, has been conspicuously
manifested. Of particular significance, moreover,
has been the demonstration of unanimous action
by Hindus, Moslems, Parsees, Sunnis and Shias,
a factor which in itself adds weight to the suggestion that a form of "direct action" has supplanted
racial and religious cleavage which hitherto has
separated the Hindu from the Moslem in all matters wherein a common interest was not involved.
All these demonstrations may or may not be a
symptom of the state of mind in which the world
finds itself at the present time. Nevertheless,
there is the likelihood that the radical emissary
has succeeded temporarily in detaching the native
mind from its loyalty to British rule by alluring
promises with their obvious Moscow label. The
recent protest in the form of an almost complete
cessation of business is a sign of the times and an
incident that the government of india cannot
afford to ignore. Reform has been slow in making
itself felt. India's case demands the attention of
the statesman, not the improving politician.
EUGENIE
A woman of many years, many triumphs and
many sorrows, the last empress of the French
seems to have been spared until now that she
might see Sedan avenged, and the conquerors of
her husband and his country conquered in turn.
The lady who escaped from her palace and her
capital by the assistance of her American dentist
to spend the rest of her days in sad but honorable
exile, lived to see the grandson of Emperor William a dishonored exile in Holland. To witness
this it was necessary that she should be a widow
and an exile near three times as long as she was
a wife and empress. In her days the most beautiful and gayest of royal ladies, the leader of
European society, Eugenie came to be a mere relic
of a vanished era, an object of the world's sympathy. Yet she remained the respected and honored friend of three British sovereigns and the
British people. Recalling the Crimean war alliance, she welcomed the British entente with
republican France and the recovery of Alsace with
British help from the traditional enemy. Her
own friendship was with Britain, whose soil contains the body of her husband, and of the son who
received his baptism of fire at the hands of the
Germans, and died in Britain's wars. It will this
week receive her own, and that not unfittingly,
for she was of British as well as Spanish ancestry.
—Province.
THE NEXT ELECTION
(Vancouver Province)
Several impetuous speakers and writers in
Canada demand a sudden and hasty general election. On behalf of the mass of the people who do
not themselves give evidence of-* a desire to hurry
to the polls they insisted that Sir Robert Borden
should some weeks ago have appealed to the electors to know whether they wished his ministry
to continue in existence. They repreoach him for
giving up office without first holding such an election, and seem to doubt the mandate of the new
ministry to be created.
Let us assume that the people have a right to
decide who shall administer their affairs. It is
reasonable that they should have some basis for
their decision. When Sir Robert Borden saw that
he could not remain premier was it worth while
for him to call the people to the polls to say
whether they wished him to remain? When the
people are asked to approve or condemn the new
ministry and its programme, it is not a bad idea
to allow the new ministry to be formed and announce its programme, thus giving the people
something to decide.
Mr. Meighen is forming a ministry. Are the
interests of the country likely to suffer if the
electors should have time before the next election
to hear the man himself in a tour through the
country? It is not long since Mr. Mackenzie King
was called to lead the Liberal Opposition. He is
a stranger to many Canadian centres. Few of
them have heard or seen him as the party leader.
Mr. King announced that he intended to make a
tour from coast to* coast before the last session.
He was not able to do it, Jbut the people will be
glad to make his acquaintance during this recess
before they are called upon to say whether he is
the man they desire for premier. Mr. Crerar is
the leader of a third party, which may in the next
Parliament be the largest of the three, as it is
now in Ontario. It seems to be fitting that since
he did not get about much while he was a coalition
minister he should have opportunity to explain' his
policy and the programme of his party.
With these and the Labor party each competing
for the suffrages of the electors, with numerous
questions never before presented, with an electorate doubled by the admission of women to the
suffrage, a general election even after full discussion and consideration and development ofpublic
policies will be somewhat complicated and confused in its decision. But it might be worse if
the people should be called to the polls without
any preparation.
<§>
#
SPECIAL SHOWING 1
THIS WEEK AT   !
NEW ARRIVALS IN
GINGHAM VOILES, in neat checks
and plaids; special value, per yard 75c
PLAIN CHAMBRAYS—Extra special.
38 inches wide, in pink, sky and old
rose; at, per yard 75c
INFANTS' SLIPS, DRESSES, SKIRTS.
MISSES' and CHILDREN'S DRESSES.
in white voiles, muslins and colored
chambrays and ginghams.
LADIES' WASH SKIRTS and MIDDIES
GROCERY DEPMTMENT
Analyze the career of any man who has achieved his
own success, and you will find, when you have run him Into
corner, that he has a pronounced quality of courage.
Cowards never succeed. Any man who wins through to
the high places has overcome critical periods, and the
reason he is where he is, is because he had courage when
the fellows around him hadn't. Fortune may turn on the
courage of a moment.—Rhodes Colossus.
FOREST FIRES AND PROTECTION
Reports from Eastern Canada emphasize again
the absolute necessity for this country to consider
and institute a more effective system of forest fire
prevention and control.   It is not enough to place
reliance upon an uncertain public appreciation of
the danger which invariably follows the thoughtless act, any more than it is to be supposed that a
single fire hose will subdue the flames of a square
mile of timber ablaze.   The penalty for careless-
ness on the part of the camper and the itinerant
wanderer should be sufficiently severe to compel
more than an ordinary regard for the nation's
property.
Fortunately British  Columbia's  forest patrol
" service is as efficient as it is possible to make it
with the appliances at its disposal.   Nevertheless
the lesson of Eastern Canada's present condition
should be recognized by the Dominion government
in its national and not in its provincial sense. This
country's standing timber is a priceless heritage
upon which the Dominion exchequer depends in
' varied ways for continued contribution.   On that
account there should be no delay in providing this
province—by reason of its topographical peculiarities—with sufficient means, including possibly
an aircraft service, to assist in the task of fire
detection.   Wireless telephony already has been
inaugurated as a provincial enterprise, but its usefulness might be very considerably enhanced by a
system or aerial patrol.
A young man In Wyoming drove two miles alone before
he discovered that his sweetheart had fnllen out of tbo
buggy. Love-making In that state must lack some of the
ardor that characterizes It around here.
Those who live tlie most nre not the ones
fastest. ,
wlin live the
Don't believe all you bear-
yourself.
■especially whon It Is about
Don't get put out when folks tell lies about you—what
If they had told the truth! '
It Is no wonder a man loses his power of speech when
talking to a girl who is "too sweet for words'."
The man who makes the most noise talking makes the
least noise thinking.
It makes a mall feel like a sucker to see the kisses he has
coaxed for wasted upon a little black and white pup.
The man who thinks the country Is being run just as
good as he could run it himself can he safely classed as a
conservative.
The man who never gives up will some day have money
out at interest.
The automobile industry is doing much for labor. It
gives direct employment to about two million people, besides doing considerable In the way of lessening the number of people wanting Jobs.
Purity Flour, per sack  83.85
5-Rose Flour, per sack    $3.90
Royal Standard Flour, per sack $3.95
Pure Lard, 5-lb. tins  $1.85
Pure Lard, 3-lb, tins     $1.15
Magic Baking Powder, 2'/••■-lb. tins  90c
No. 1 Jap Rice 2 lbs. 35c
Tapioca 2 lbs. 25c
Sago 2 lbs. 25c
Cream of Wheat 2 pkts. 65c
Grape-Nuts  .'.  3 pkts. 45c
Macaroni, per packet   10c
Pacific Milk, large tins 7 for 95c
Pacific Milk, small tins per dozen 90c
Granulated Sugar, any quantity, lb. 22 '/jc
Yellow Sugar, per lb  19c
Cherry Jam, 4-lb. tins  $1.25
Raspberry Jam, King Beach, 4-lb. tin $1.40
Tea, loose,  3 lbs. $1.65
Gold Medal Catsup, per bottle 25c
Worcestershire Sauce, small, 2 bottles 25c
Smoked Meats
Sliced, 5c per lb. extra.
Ayrshire Roll, Sides (not Shoulder), per
pound   55c
Rolled and Boned Ham, 4 to 6 lb. pieces,
per lb 47 '/■* c
Cooked Hams, Swift's Premium, lb 75c
Sides Bacon, per lb 57'/jc
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buyChevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book. _ &
The experience of veteran moorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.'
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay §
July 17, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDfiR
Five
PUBLIC MEETING
WILL BE HELD IN THE
ILO-ILO THEATRE
TUESDAY NEXT
COMMENCING AT 8.30 P.M.
The chief speaker will be
Hon. W. J. Bowser
Leader of the Opposition
LADIES   SPECIALLY   INVITED
AGRICULTURAL
INSTRUCTION BY
GOVERNMENT
WAKE UP CANADA! PREVENT TYPHUS
FROM REACHING YOUR HOMES
This Is the advice given Mr. S. H.
Anschell. Campaign Director of the
Canadian Jewish Relief Committee,
who has been In the city to organize a
campaign for funds to alleviate tlie
sufferings of millions lu Central and
Eastern Europe, and in so doing prevent the dreaded typhus from reaching the Canadian shore.
He says: "What if this plague and
famine were here In tlie great territory on the Pacific seaboard, which
roughly parallels the extent ot these
ravaged countries, and that sixty-live
million of our people were condemned
to idleness by lack of raw material,
and whose fields bad been devastated
by Invasion and rapine, were racked
by starvation and pestilence, and if we
had lifted up our voices and Invoked
tlie attention of our brothers tn happier Europe to our own deep miseries,
and our cries bad fallen on deaf ears
—would we not In our despair exclaim
against their heartlessness?
"And even it this calamity had befallen us because of the wrong-doing
of our rulers, even if we were beset
by partizan wrangles and torn by
conflicting policies, would we not feel
that the very magnitude of our disasters outweighed our faults and constituted a claim on the Christian
humanity they had in common with
ourselves?
"Returning to the continent a few
months ago, with all these horrors
ringing in my ears, I found myself
once more in a laud whose granaries
were overflowing, where health' and
plenty abound, and where life and activity aud eager enterprise were in the
full flood. And though I well know
of a hundred disturbing problems, 1
heard ot no hunger cries. No Canadian children were dying in their
mothers' arms for  lack  of  milk  or
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
CaSCade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer,
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors. •
bread.
'Sixty-five million people In Central
Europe are facing starvation. Thousands upon .thousands have already
died of starvation, or typhus, and of
other diseases, which follow in the
red wake of war. The worst disease
epidemic in the history of the world
threatens all of Europe. Even more
threatening is the complete economic
chaos which sems inevitable unless
aid from outside sources is torthcom
Ing.
"Budapest is one vast city of misery and suffering. The number of
deaths ls double that or* births. Of
160,000 children in the schools, 100,000
are dependent on public charity.
There are 150,000 workers idle.
"In Roumania. the dreaded tuberculosis is spreading ln an alarming and
unprecedented manner. All energies
are tlevoted to keeping the typhus
epidemic at bay, and a military cordon
along the Oueister River prevents the
entrance of 20,000 Russian refugees
on the other side, whose infection ls
feared.
In Siberia, typhus has broken out
again and there are but 200 physicians
to minister to the needs of that entire
country. In Montenegro, where food
Is running short, there are but five
physicians for an estimated population
of 460,000.
"Typhus adn smallpox have Invaded the four countries composing
Czecho-Slovakla, and there Is a great
lack of medicines, soap aud physicians. The shelves of their pharmacies
and their hospitals are bare.
"These are but a few of tbe top
notes of the tragedy. There ls nothing here about Russia, whose population is rationed, or of Germany, whose
problems are acute, or of Armenia,
where the distress and destruction are
beyond description. Hunger and
disease and despair are the lot of
these fellow humans of ours. Powerless to help themselves they are slowly
perishing before our eyes.
"It Is hoped that the people of this
community will appreciate the importance of this campaign, aud con
tribute to this cause as liberally as
they cun, for this is one of tbe objects
that we must figure, that outside aid
alone can prevent complete economic
chaos."
A. man may never be too old to
learn, but the youth is conceded to be
more teachable than the person of
mature age. By providing suitable
instruction and training for the young
men aud women of tbe furm, more
lasting benefit will be conferred than
by seeking to make good thc deficiencies of the older generation. The
1918-1!) report ot the Agricultural Instruction Act Commissioner reviews
the work carried on during the year
py the provlnclal departments of agri-
Culture and education with the funds
placed at the disposal of the provinces
for agricultural Instruction by the
federal government. This bulletin Is
obtainable from the Publications
Branch, Department of Agrlculhture.
Ottawa. The report Indicates that
about one-half of the total annual
grant of $1,100,000 is applied to the
Instruction of adolescents.
For the advancement lu the direction of agricultural teaching iu the
rural schools the grant ls largely accountable. Along with it have been
developed, nature study, school and
home gardening, canning, boys' and
girls' clubB in poultry,' pig and call
rearing, canning, bread-making and
similar activities, culminating in the
annual school fair. Practical projects of this kind may easily be made
the medium for training the Intelligence, because they are seized upon
with eagerness by most boys and
girls.
In certain high schools agricultural
and household science courses are being developed, and in more than one
province, special vocational schools of
agriculture have been established and
receive assistance from the grant. In
developing such as these lies the hope
for the improvement of modern agriculture through* the rank and file of
the rural population, to whom the centralized college of agriculture is not
availagle. The present-day need is
that It should be made easy for country boys and girls to secure an educational training of such a character as
will fit them for country life and rural
pursuits. Colleges of agriculture and
veterinary colleges have not, however,
been overlooked; they also are given
liberal assistance. Following . the
close of the war the attendance at
these Institutions shows a marked and
gratifying increase, and their influence
In promoting the advancement of Canada's leading basic Industry, agriculture, will continue to make Itself felt.
MARKETINGS OF LIVE
STOCK FOR HALF YEAR
Marketings of Canadian farm stock
at the six main stockyards of the Dominion for the half year ending June
30, as compiled by the Industrial and
Development Council of Canadian
Packers, Toronto, show the number of
head handled at all these yards lu the
period to have exceeded 864,000. The
total was made up as follows:
Cattle   283,765
Calves    135,387
Sheep    91,957
Hogs     354,784
VALUABLE CHAIRS
The taste of the curio collector
changes from time to time, and at the
moment there seems to be a craze for
historic chairs. This particular craze
was. says thc Dally Graphic, probably
prompted by the sensational offer
made by an American collector for
tbe chair used by the signatories to
the Peace Treaty at Versailles. But
there are some chairs lu England
which no money could purchase. There
is, for instance, at Addington Manor,
a chair which Lord Radnor recently
refused to Bell for £10,000. It is a
chair of state, originally presented hy
the City of Togsburg to the Emperor
Rudolph II, Is composed ot steel
throughout, and Is most elalioratn In
design.   It took thirty years to make
UNION  BREWING  CO.,   LTD
NANAIMO, B.C.
LYALLS AWARDED
LARGE AMOUNT FOR
BREACH OF CONTRACT
VANCOUVER.—Judgment has been
signed here for $1,343,015.57, ln favor
of the Lyall Shipbuilding Company
against Raymond Van Hemelryck,
agent of the Belgian Government.
Tlie sum for six five-masted schooners,
purchase of which was cancelled bo-
fore delivery. It Is the largest sum
for which judgment has ever been
given in British Columbia.
SINCE 11870
ILOH
30E?S?ICOUGHS
WHERE THEY AltltlYKIl AT.
A group of workmen were talking
politics, when one of the disputants
turned to a friend who had remained
silent during the argument.
"I ain't a-goln' to say," said Bill,
doggedly. "Me and Hennery Green
thrashed it out once before."
"What did you arrive at?"        .
"Well," said Bill, "l"Iennery, 'e ar
rived at the 'ospltal an' 1 arrived nt
the police station."
Don't Experiment!
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THE PHOTOGRAPHER
Cumberland and Courtenay
- tor -
Developing, Printing and
Enlarging.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Hay, Grain and
Mill Feed
Also Baby Chick Feed and All
Kinds of Poultry Supplies.
(CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor.
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, RC.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Ofiice: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
by selecting the shells that
hunters from coast to coast
have proved dependable
under all conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
are a double assurance of
success for the man who
prefers ballistite powder.
We also cany a full line of
Canuck and Sovereign Shotgun Shells and Dominion
Metallic Gartrldfteo — each
backed by the big "D" traiJ*>;
mark
FOSSIL EGG TELLS
STORY OF AGES
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsinulr Ave. Cumberland, B. C.
Canada Food Board License  No. 10-4986
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE KA1L1VAY STATION.
first Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES. Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. ('.
License No. lO-lli'ie
PALMISTRY AND'
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
633 Hastings St., W., Corner of
Granville.    Vancouver, b.c.
OYSTERS
VENDOME CAFE
The House of Quality.
Our motto:   To  please.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops
Also Oysters, Oyster Loaves and
French Fried Potatoes to take
home.
Doxes for Ladies.
Open llay and Mght.
Our Motto:    TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays-
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries,'.DryIGoods, Boots and
■ Shoes, Crockeryware and
2S; General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING CHONG, On   Nirland
HONG CHONG & CO., BevLd
GENERAL BUSINESS
CONDITIONS REVIEWED
A prospector examining the stones
in the Olla River In Arizona came
upon a water worn pebble four or live
Inches tn diameter. He cracked nit a
fragment with his pick and discovered
a fossil egg inside. The specimen
came into the hands of a gentleman
in California, who brought tt to tlie
attention of scientific experts.
The chief point of interest from a
scientific standpoint is the fact that
the contents of the egg had been converted into a bituminous substance resembling asphalt, thus supporting the
hypothesis that bitumen ts derived
from animal remains.
The egg is quite large—as large as
that of a duck or gouse—and resembling most closely the egg of a cormorant. It ls so perfectly preserved
as to show that it must have been
completely embedded shortly after it
was laid in the substance that afterward was consolidated into limestone.
Thus we have a representation of nn
event that happened thousands and
thousands of years ago.
A bird of tlie size of a cormorant or
>gnose laid this precious egg, which
by, some mischance tumbled Into the
water, or at all events Into tlie .toft
ooze of which limestone IS formed.
with sufficient force to become completely embedded in the ooze and thus
protected. For countless years this
ooze continued to lie formed ou top,
and at last the whole became consolidated into limestone. Then the limestone was lifted from Its watery bed by
volcanic or other action and became a
portion of a mountain range. Then
trosion began. Through the agencies
of frost aud ruin, sunshine and cold,
fragments of limestone were broken
off, until at last the egg was reached
and the fragments containing it fell
into one of tlie gullies that feed tlie
Gila. There in flood time it was rolled
over and over, amid a multitude of
other stones, small and large until al!
its angles were rubbed off and it became a water worn pebble in a mountain range, moving downward when
the floods came in sufficient volume to
stir it from its resting place, and then
a prospector, searching for gold or
other mineral, found it and cracked It
with ills geologic pick, exposing one
end of the egg.
'Twas a wonderful history. But still
more wonderful is the thought of the
thousands and thousands of years that
Under the heading of General Business Conditions the monthly circular
of the Canadian Bank of Commerce
nays:
Cereal Prices Will Iteuiatn Firm.
The world's wheat requirements for
the coming year will barely be mot by
the availablo surplus of exporting
countries. In' the United States the
yield is estimated to be less than that
of last year, aud it would thus appear
that prices for cereals will remain
firm. Industrial recovery in Europe,
now rapidly taking place, will maintain tbe demand for all kinds of foodstuffs, which are the mainstay of Canadian exports.
sterling Exchange Sleadll) KlsJng.
It is also encouraging to note thut
sterling exchange, iu which currency
the greater part of our exports is paid
for, is steadily rising, Domestic trade
has slackened, consumers apparently
having realized (bat the advance lu
prices can only be checked effectively
by a lessening of consumption, and
high-priced articles uot ranking as
essentials are now more diltlcult to
dispose of.
Progress in Lhe construction of new
Industrial plants has been retarded by
the difficulty of procuring capital and
labor on reasonable terms! These tendencies have induced more careful
purchasing, the reduction of stocks
md the cancellation ot orders to q
limited extent. Imports, particularly
from the United Slates, continue to be
large, with the result thai tlie premium on New York funds remains high.
During May securities amounting to
$26,000,000 were reported as being
sold in the United states, but this had
no appreciable effect on tho rate of
exchange. Tlie balance of Canada's
foreign trade for April. 1920, was unfavorable to the extent of $46,000,000,
as against a favorable balance of
$10,1 ,000 a year ago.
"What do you think of my daughter's execution on tbe piano?' '
"Good name for It, that; she cer-
l(tlnly does murder the time,"
must have elapsed between tho day
when the egg fell into the water and
became embedded and the day when it
next met the light, as n fossil, in tlu
bands of man. si*
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
July 17, 1920.
THIS trade-mark is branded
in red on one side of the
Still Better Willard—the only
storage battery with Threaded
Rubber Insulation.
136 passenger car and truck
manufacturers have selected this
battery, knowing from experience that Threaded Rubber Insulation is far superior to wood
or any other form of storage
battery insulation.
136 Manufacturers Using Threaded Rubber Insulation
Acason
Colonial
Henney  .
Nelson At
Seidell
Acme
Comet
Highway
LeMoon
Service
All American
Commerce
Holmes
Noble
Shelby
Allis-Chalmers
Commodore
Holt
Northway
Signal
American
Cunningham
HupmobUe
Ogren
Singer
LaFrance
Daniels
Indiana
Old Hickory
Southern
Apex
Dart
International
•Olds
Standard 8
*Apperson
Dependable
(I. H. C.)
Oneida
Standard
Armleder
Atterbury
•Aubum
Austin
Diamond T
Dixie Flyer
Dodge
Dorris
•Kissel
Koehler
Lancia
Oshkosh
•Paige
Parker
Peerless
Studebaker
Stutz
Sunbeam
Bacon
Fargo
•Liberty
Peugeot
Tarkington
Bell
Fergus
Luverne
Phianna
Tiffin
Belmont
Ferris
Madison
Marmon
Menominee
Mercer
Pierce-Arrow
Titan
Bessemer
FWD
Premier
Tow Motor
Bets
Biddle
Franklin
Fulton
Preston
Ranier
Transport
Traylor
Brockway
Garford
Mercury
•Reo
Ultimate
Buffalo
GMC
Meteor (Phila.)
Republic
•Buiclc
Giant
MHC
ReVere
Velle
Glide
•Mitchell
Riddle
Vulcan
Capitol
Great Western
Murray
Robinson
Ward LaFrance
•Case
Hahn
McFarlan
R & V Knight
White
•Chevrolet
HCS
•MrTrfnighlln
Rowe
Wilson
Clydesdale
Hurlburt
Napoleon
Sandow
Winther
Cole
Hawkeye
Nash
Sayers
Wlnton
Collier
Haynes
Nelson
Seagrave
Wolverine
•For Export
Spares Co., Distributors, Nanaimo, B.C.
U STORAGE *■
BATTERY I
ard
THESE  BATTERIES ARE
AT  ALL   CUMBERLAND
FOR SALE
GARAGES
Facilitating
SERVICE
The person who likes promptness in telephone
service will appreciate your effort if when you answer
thc telephone you give the name of the flrm. If you
are answering in a department, give the name of the
department. The person will not have to ask who is
speaking, if that is done. Besides facilitating service,
it is a courtesy that is at once appreciated.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Limited.
CROP IN MANITOBA
TO BE A BUMPER
Profusion of Wild Flowers This
Year, Say Farmers, is a
Sure Portent.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
The 1920 crop In Manitoba Is going
to be a "bumper." The farmers of
long experience say It is, and they
know. They base their deductions on
various signs and portents and point
especially to great profusion of wild
flowers which are ln bloom this year.
Not for years have these been so large
and luxuriant and plentiful as they are
at the present time.
There was a perfect riot of wild
roses In June anil now the prairie is
lirllliuiii with tiger lilies, ladies' slippers and sunflowers. Even such comparatively rare ilowers as pinkwootl
orchids, blue flags and Solomon seal,
have appeared In great abundance. It
ls common to lind tiger lilies with two,
three nml four and even live Ilowers
on one stem. More than two or three
is very unusual. j
S.S. OLYMPIC RETURNS
TO SERVICE AFTER
LONG ABSENCE
Ship's 195 Furnaces Converted
to Oil-Burners After Exhaustive Tests.
The largest oil-burning steamer in
the world, the White Star Liner Olympic, wlll shortly return to the passenger service between New York, Cherbourg and Southamptlon, after an
absence of several months, during
which the vessel has been reconditioned throughout.
The selection of oil-fuel as a motive
power for this mammoth steamer was
made after exhaustive testa, and follows the latest marine practice as
adopted by the greatest navies and
thousands of mercantile vessels the
world over. Scores of large liners in
the United States and abroad are at
present ln the process of being "oiled,"
as the technical phrase has It.
The task of converting the Olympic's 196 furnaces from coal to oil-fuel
to provide steam In the twenty-nine
boilers has been a most interesting
and intricate one, four thousand workmen having been employed for several
months installing special machinery
for this purpose. The Olympic's oil-
carrying capacity Is estimated at 50,-
000 barrels, which will be. stored between the double bottoms of the ship
It ls estimated that the steamer will
consume approximately 25,000 barrels
ou each* voyage. The Installation of
oil-fuel will prevent the delays Incident to coal-loading, and will also result lu greater comfort to the passengers because of the absence of dust
and cinders.
The Olympic's outward appearance
has not been altered, but numerous
improvements have been made in the
steamer's already beautiful publlc
apartments and stateroom accomtuo
datlou.
While every trace of the splendid
war-time services rendered by this
big ship has been removed, the Olympic's unique war record will not soon
be forgotten. The towing of the big
battle cruiser Audacious, the ram.
ming and sinking of a German sub'
marine, aud the transportation of 200,-
00(1 persons across the ocean amid unknown submarine dangers, all without
ihe loss of a life. While performing
these exploits the Olympic steamed
184,000 miles and consumed 347,000
tons of coal with uot the slightest delay or accident to the machinery.
The Olympic's commander, Captain
Sir Bertram Fox Haynes, K. C. M. O.,
D. S. 0., was the first officer of the
British mercantile mariue to be
knighted by King George In recognition of his distinguished war services.
MARVELLOUS MOUNTAINS UNDER THE SEA
Continent of 25,000,000 Square
Miles Said to Lie in the
Atlantic Ocean.
OLDEST REMAINS OF MAN
A negro chauffeur of Washington
was haled Into court for running down
a man. "Yo Tlonnh," said the darky.
"I tried to warn de geiinulman, but de
horn didn't work." "Then," said the
Judge, "why didn't you slow up rather
than run him down?" A light seemed
tb dawn on the prisoner, who linall*.*
said, "Why, jedge, dat's one on mq
ain't it? I neber thought ob that."
TEMPLETON'S
RHEUMATIC CAPSULES
FOf)
RHEUHATISM.NEURITIS.SCIATICA
LUMBAGO. NEURALGIA.GOUT ETC
ASURE RELIEF FOR THE WORST HEADACHE
$ISS PER BOX
0NS l" l-ViatW KING St.W TOdOKTO
Apnrlna er.rywa.ra. tfDalrDniatllirnurtoWnaelbth.m,
wrltaT.miilBtrtti'aWrttrmllnii. li, Il..a lfi-J.Vlrt.irla. T B ('.'a
sialic J an jwl.ero fur (I.ul, or liuukkt aa&t. flea on.requMl
Sole agent*for Cumberland, Ii.  E
Frost.
Dr. Ameghino, director of the Buenos
Aires Museum, claims that he has just
discovered the oldest remains of man
yet known.
Previous exploration of the ravines
of Chapalmalal and Miramar had revealed important deposits of the Stono
Age, such as polished stone balls, fire-
stones, calcined bones, baked-clay vessels, weights for Ashing nets made of
stone or of the bones of huge mammals, flint knives, rasps, fossilized
bones of enormous animals of the tertiary age, like the zoxodon, together
with the quartzite arrow and spear
heads, curiously wrought, with which
primitive man hunted them; aud these
linds had encouraged the belief that
one day the bones of men who fashioned them would also be found. Thi.*,
it is reported, has now been accomplished. From a telegram sent by the
naturalist lu charge of the excavations
Dr. Ameghino learned recently that at
the base of the ravine wall on which
work was proceeding several bones
and other objects had been brought to
light, and on his arrival at the site he
was able to establish the accuracy ol*
his conjectures.
The new linds consist of a stone fireplace of tho tertiary age a'uil a fragment of human jaw with two molars
Study of the morphology and fosslllza-
llon of the remains proves, it is said,
thai they belong to a type of man far
older than thc oldest hitherto discovered.
At the captain's table on an Allan
tic liner a young woman idly inquired
how far the ship was form the nearest
land, says a writer in the New York
Sun. Several passengers would have
said off-hand, "About eight hundred
miles." But the captain turned the
question over to a quiet gentleman
who looked at his watch and at a
chart and amazed his hearers by
answering, "Just about Beventy yards.'
"The laud I speak of is just thirty
six fathoms beneath this ship," continued the expert oceanographer. "It
is the summit of the Laura Ethel
Mountain, which is 20,000 feet above
the lowest level of the Atlantic basin.
If It were some two hundred feet
higher, or the seas were two hundred
feet lower, you would call it an is
land."
In effect, the Atlantic ls a huge continent boasting a superficial area of
25,000,000 square miles. It is 9,000
miles long and 2,700 miles broad. The
depth of the water that covers It Is by
no means so considerable as people
used to Imagine. Oceanography as a
science may be said to date only from
about 1850, but—thanks chiefly to the
labors of the cable-laying and cable-
repairing ships—our knowledge of the
configuration of the bed of the ocean
grows greater every year.
The Laura Ethel Mountain, discovered in 1878, is the uppermost peak
of one of the most celebrated of the
submarine elevations in the Atlantic.
Mount Chaucer, at the eastward of It,
was revealed to oceano'graphers ln
1850. Salnthlll, which is westward of
both, has the honor to be the first
mountain discovered In the Atlantic
It became known ln 1832.
Prior to the laying of the first Atlantic cable, Lieutenant Maury, ot the
United States Navy, made it known
that a wide plateau exists beneath the
ocean, running from Ireland to Newfoundland. It seemed so admirably
suited to the purpose of cable laying
that he modestly called It Telegraphic
Plateau, but ln most charts It bears
the discoverer's name.
The location of "Davy Jones' Locker" might be said to have beeu established with the discovery of Sajutulll,
It has been estimated that at the base
of this eminence the relics of no fewer
than seven thousand wrecks He scattered. Or one might ascribe that gruesome distinction to the Farady Hills,
discovered In 1883, and lying between
Mount Chaucer and Laura Ethel
Mountain. These hills are noted
among oceahographers for the amount
of wreckage of which they are the
monument.
There are cavernous depths, of
course, ln the. Atlantic, as well as ma
jestlc heights. Four miles and a half
may be taken to be the greatest. The
average is probably about two miles.
Heights and depths alike are merely
hidden land, which may some day be
exposed by the mighty working of
nature.
Meantime comparatively few changes
occur. Beneath the ocean there are
no frosts, no lightnings, no glaciers,
no meteorological agents at work. If
it were not for the eddies and the destruction and accumulation of animal
life, these Atlantic hills and vales
might rest as immutable as the peaks
and craters of the moon, where there
is no atmosphere to cause decay.
GAS ON PEACE RIVER
EDMONTON.—Twenty million cubic
feet of gas every 24 hours from the
San Joaquin well on the Peace River
Is the news that H. L. Williams brings
down from the north. The flow was
struck while Mr. Williams was at the
well, and since his return telegraphic
advices have beeu to the effect that it
Is keeping up with undiminished force
and volume.
Royston Lumber Co.
.    MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) ...$5.00
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy. .
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIALS —
Cambridge'Pork Sausage
Homemade Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.   .
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland.
License No. 5-1172
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and   Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
s License No. 8-26489
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Material
and
Workmanship
Guaranteed
OVER HALF MILLION
MORE MEN THAN WOMEN
British Columbia Said to Have
An Excess of No Less Than
95,000 Males.
Despite war losses, there are still
550,000 more men than women ln
Canada,   according    to   an   estimate
lased on the last official census. Every
province in Canada shows a surplus of
nen, the ratio tor all Canada being
about 950 men to 880 women. In British Columbia the male surplus is now
95,000, as compared with 45,000 In
1001, but this Is a decrease on the
1911 figures (110,000) and 1915 (115,-
000).
I.1I.-0SS1BLE.
"Qabbleston tells a funny story of
how he shortchanged a taxlcab driver.'
"The Infernal liar!"
"Ah!   You know Gabbleston?"
"No, but I know taxlcab drivers."
"A decent husband should give his
wife all the money she wants," argued
Mrs. Gabb.    •'
"What are you talking about?" demanded Mr. Gabb. "There Isn't that
much money."
Rubber Heels
Fixed While U Walt
Phillips' Military Heels and Soles.
S. DAVIS  •  Dunsmuir Avenue
GOLD IN SEA-WATER
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
Every ton of sea-water contains
about one grain by weight of gold.
There are more than 4,000,000,000 tons
of water In a cubic mile, and the
oceans are estimated .to contain 300
cubic miles of water. Thus, according
to this reckoning, there are about
90,000,000,000 tons of gold in the sea,
or more than |n all the gold mines
that have ever been discovered.
PLAIN ENOUGH.
Counsel—Now, tell me, where did
ie kiss you?   .
Plaintiff—On the lips, sir.
Counsel—No, no; you don't underhand.   I mean, where were you?
rinintitf (blushing)—In his arms,
sir.
-Hi /
July 17, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SeVeB
i*
Nanaimo Still
Heads League
Celtics Lost Out to the Island
Team at Vancouver Last
Saturday by a 1-0 Score
Nanaimo's win over the Vancouver
Celtics by the only goal scored during
the match, places her welt ahead ol
her nearest rival, Cumberland, though
if Nanaimo should lose both her remaining matches and Cumberland
should happen to win all of hers, the
provincial champions would just nose
out the Nanaimo team for first place.
The match was far below the
standard of play which one has become accustomed to see at these fixtures. It was notable as being the
first game in which any player lias
had to be put off the Held for foul
play, this fate befalling one of the
Celtic full-backs, and the result was
really as great a penalty for Nanaimo
as It was for the Celtics, since with
one of the full-backs off the field, it
was hardly possible for the visitors
forward line to keep on-slde, and they
were pulled up time and again when
almost in scoring position for off-side.
From lirst to last the game was Nanaimo's, and the Celtic's custodian
was subjected to a continual bombardment, while since for some reason or
other none of our forwards had their
shooting eye with Them, there were
even more shots at goal which missed
by a wide margin than which actually
came to the goalie to deal with.
The one goal scored which gave the
match to Nanaimo, came from Dickenson who, in attempting a centre by
kicking the hall over his head, put in
a dropping ball close to the top of the
net, which the goal-keeper had little
chance of saving. Routledge, on the
other hand, had a very easy time of it,
only being tested on three occasions
throughout the game, all three of them
being comparatively easy Into the
bargain.
On the day's piny Nanaimo certainly
deserved to win, for they were continually pressing, the Celtics rarely being
able to pass the half-way line. As on
previous occasions, however, they fell
down whon It came lime to put the
llnlshlng touches to a movement, for
otherwise the score would have been
nearer ten to nil, than one to nil.
Record Scoring in Rangers
Versus Cumberland Match
(Contributed by Nut Bevis.)
Cumberland United and Vancouver Rangers met in an Inter-
City Summer League game at the "Y" grounds on Saturday last.
Both teams turned out with a few changes in the line-up. The
Rangers won the toss and James kicked off for Cumberland at
5.45 p.m., before 600 spectators. Referee Ingram of Vancouver
was in charge of the whistle.
The visitors immediately took the game in hand, and through
some fine combination by their forwards worked the ball to Clark's
goal, but a bye kick resulted. They were not to be denied, and
time and again they worked the ball to Clark's goal, but could not
find the net. The Cumberland boys than had their turn, Wyllie
and Bannerman worked the ball nicely down the right wing and
Bannerman tested Hughes with a hard shot, but Hughes disposed
of it in his usual style; however, the Cumberland team on the
whole had now settled down to business,and the Rangers were continually on the defensive. All the Cumberland forwards were in
great form. Harrison sent in one of his usual fast drives, but
Hughes saved but got mixed up and Harrison followed the ball
right through and scored. The ball was centred and Cumberland
forwards set aff again and in a few minutes James went through
on his own and scored from a fast drive.
Although the Rangers were now two goals down, they still put
lots of pep into the game. They were determined to reduce the
lead of thc Cumberland boys, and Ferguson, centre, passed to Newberry, outside right, who beat Clark with a good shot. This put
lots of life into the game, and from a corner kick taken by Harrison
the ball hit Campbell, the Rangers' back, and glided into the net
for the third goal. The Rangers appealed to Referee Ingram,
claiming it an illegitimate goal, but he allowed the point in accordance with the rules. A few minutes later James again broke
through the Rangers' defence and scored Cumberland's fourth
goal.   A few minutes later half-time was called.
In the second half both teams seemed to slacken down somewhat,
probably owing to the fast pace of the first period and the hot sun.
After two and a half minutes of this half James again scored for
Cumberland. The Rangers then had a turn or two at Clark's goal,
and Ferguson put one more through for them,* and fifteen miuutes
from time Gregg scored number three for the Rangers. There was
no more scoring during the game.
Thus ended a very fast and exciting game, and a splendid exhi-
hibition of football was put up by both teams. The final score was
5 goals to three, constituting the record goal scoring of any game
in the summer league.
INFALLIBLE TEST.
Johnny Jones was studying botany,
nnd he had an infallible w.ay to tell
the difference between mushrooms and
toadstools,
"When you git vi'lent spasms," said
Johnny, "with cramps, swelllu' of the
feet, and partial loss of vision endin'
In insanity and death—then It ain't
mushrooms."
«!Hllllllllillllllllll*IHIIIIIMlUllMIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIilllHIIIIII«lllllitl»««lllinUilllinMIIIMIIinnillllllllll«IUIlllltlMIIIllHII«IIMIJj|
Fred's and Joe's Place
CUMBERLAND
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL
THE ATHLETIC AND SPORTING ORGANIZATIONS IN THE
CUMBERLAND     DISTRICT.
WAVERLEY   HOTEL
The House of Qiinlilj.
I     Phone 69.
Cumberland, B.C.
Im iiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii mm minimi mmmiiiiinmiiii ill
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet, Dodge. Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize  in
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons,
REPUBLIC TRUCKS and
BASEBALL GAME WON
EASILY BY COURTENAY
The game played on the Y grounds
on Sunday last between the Courtenay
team and the local boys was somewhat
one-sided, the "milkmen" getting all
of th runs scored—eight of them.
Boyd's pitching for the Courtenn.*y
team was too much for Cumberland,
while the wet ground' following tlie
heavy rain seemed to just suit the
dairymen.
Boyd got two runs, Downey one,
Millard two and Robinson brothers
one apiece. Cumberland made one
good double play about the middle of
the game, but throughout all the game
only two of the local boya got to first
base, and only one safe hit was made
from Boyd's pitching.
The score by Innings was as follows:
Courtenay   04001002 1—8
Cumberland    '.. 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0—0
Cumberland—Conti, 21k; Robertson,
lb.; Beattie, cf.; D. Hvinden, l.t; E.
Hunden, l.f.; Stewart, r.f.; Banner-
man, 3b.; Westfield, c.'; J. Stant, p.
Courtenay—R. Dixon,, 2b.; H. Dixon,
lb.; Millard, cf.; Eas sen. s.s.; Qay,
l.f.; D. Robinson, r.f..; E. Robinson,
3b.; Downey, o.J Boyd, p.
Nanaimo's New
Licence Bylaw
(From Nanaimo Herald.)
The council has before It a new
licence bylaw. Just how this new
legislation should have come up at
this time would puzzle a university
factulty. The council started the year
with important practical questions to
deal with. These, for reasons it would
serve no purpose to discuss, have been
lost out of sight. It is true that the
Water Committee Is doing some work
on the pipe-line; but so far as we
can see it Is merely repair work, on a
much smaller scale than Engineer
King reported to be necessary, and
cannot even touch the main question
of an increased water supply. Lacking energetic and united action on
questions of practical urgency, th»
council has turned Its attention to the
Immortal welfare of tbe citizens, and
should this new Licence Bylaw go
through another cordon will be
stretched between the Bottomless Pit
of Near Beer and the feet of tbe unwary.
Also aud incidentally the council is
administering another severe jolt to
the deluded dispensers of what are
legally described as hop beverages. In
other words the council In this new
bylaw proposes to raise the licence
fee. It was pointed out, when the
issue of prohibition was on, .that the
city In the event of the bars being
closed would lose the revenue it de
rived from these licences. However,
that was counted as a mere bagatelle
In the uplift of an upward movement.
Now It seems that the uplift has subsided, and the council wants both prohibition and licence fees. The council
would go further than the government
and the people, aud would stop even
the drinking of near beer.
It first of all penalises the dispensers, and next, even in the hottest
month of the year, would close all
doors to the thirsty at 10 o'clock at
night. Why it should have gone even
to 10 o'clock Is a mystery, and why
should the .council confine Its attentions to the dispensaries of what is so
fraudulently described as beer. Why
not close everything up, the whole
town, and even the city council, at
curfeV? If necessity called any man
out after that hour, why he could be
sold a permit by the council. The
city would make money, and think of
the peaceful happiness of the town
closed up, no work, no nothing, dead
to the world from curfew. Of all mll-
lenrums, the ralllenium by legislation
Is the least possible of all. Meantime,
tbe lot of the average citizen ls to suffer from legislature from which the
necessity exists only in the vanity and
conceit of the cranks, well-meaning
and otherwise, responsible for it.
MINE RESCUE TEAM
KILLED BY GAS
SEATTLE.—Three members of the
Pacific Const Coal Company's mine
rescue team at Black Diamond, Washington, are dead, and two others are
expected to die as result of breathing
poison gas fumes during a practice
drill in an abandoned shaft at Black
Diamond.
TO TALK ACROSS ATLANTIC
G.W.V.j\. and Politics
At a general meeting held by returned citizens at Courtenay on June
30th, a Central Committee was formed
for the purpose of taking any steps
that might from time to time be necessary in safeguarding their Interests.
At the same time it was decided that
the said committee should meet at
Courtenay on Friday, 9th Inst., to
consider the present political situation
and if possible formulate some definite
plan of action during thc forthcoming
provincial election, which, experts
claim, may be held this fall, though
the powers that be, at present are not
giving the public any intimation as to
their future plans. JuBt why the voting public should be kept ln the dark
is somewhat of a mystery. If the
present provincial government are
satisfied that their past record has
given satisfaction, and are therefore
not afraid to announce openly and
publily their intention to seek endorsement of their past actions and support In their endeavor to be retained
In offlce, then surely there is no need
for mystery or any attempt to evade
taking the public into their full confidence as to their plans for tbe near
future.
It has been written, "the public
likes to be fooled," which statement ls
far from being a tact. It has also been
written, "You can't fool all' of the
people all of the time," which is a
fact that most governing bodies have
discovered to their cost.
The matter of the coming elections
was most fully discussed at a representative meeting of the Cumberland
Q. W. V. A., at which the ladies of
their auxiliary were in attendance, and
after viewing the matter from all
angles the following appeared to be
the plain facts. That the present
provlnclal government had most
plainly shown that they were not in
sympathy with the needs of the returned men; that what steps they had
taken to help him to once more regain
the footing he had lost through his
years of service at the front, were
such as had been forced upon them.
The goverment have shown lack
of sympathy, interest or honesty in
their handling of the soldier problem.
On the other hand there is no absolute
guarantee that any other party would
remain true to their pre-election
pledges, and it is also very apparent
that an independent party would have
no chance of election, but would be
simply ground between the millstones
of the two powerful political parties.
Even should such an unlikely thing
happen as an Independent member being elected for this particular electoral district, he would have a seat in
the minority but no influence whatever
to advance the views of those who
elected him.
After much discussion It was unanimously decided that the hope of tbe
returned man for fair play lay, not in
the party but In the man, and.lt was
therefore also decided that In the
event of either of the two strong parties, one of whom ls certainly sure ot
election, nominating a man whose
record for honesty of purpose, sympathy and square dealing was known
to us without shadow of doubt, w;
pledged ourselves to give that man
our hearty support and to use our
best endeavors to have him elected,
and this, not because of any particular party he may belong to, but
simply because he would have our
trust and confidence as a member who
would at all times be true to his constituency, and honest and fearless in
the performance ot his duties. Should
such a man be nominated for this
district he will have the support of
every reasonable returned man who is
not asking any government to perform Impossibilities but is merely asking for honest and sane legislation.
C. J. BUNBURY.
COWICHAN LICENSEES
ARE HEAVILY FINED
Justices   Remember   Overseas
Services and Only Fine
Them $800
T. Marsden and A. Griffin, licensees
of the Tzouhalem bar, Duncan, were
each found guilty on two counts, flrBt
for unlawfully keeping liquor in the
bar, and secondly for unlawfully keeping liquor for sale there. Reeve Herd
and Mr. A. C. Altken, J.P., -Imposed
fines on each of $100 on, the first count
and $300 on the second count, with
costs. Fines totalled $800, and were
paid.   Pleas of not guilty were entered.
On the first charge City Constable
Dawkln testified that he and Provincial Contsable Kler raided the bar on
Saturday night, June 26. Four bottles
were found, three empty, one containing a drink of whiskey.
Mr. T. Marsden swore that he was
Ignorant of the charge and was ln
Vancouver at the time. Bottles were
picked up around the premises and
used for non-alcoholic drinks. Mr. A.
Griffin said that at 9.30 on the night
of the raid he went home to supper,
leaving a man, a comparative stranger
to him, in charge of the bar. He had
found three empty bottles that morning but had never before seen the
bottle with whiskey in It Answering
Mr. Davie, who prosecuted, he could
not swear that they had never had
liquor behind the bar for sickness or
something.
On the second charge the city constable said lie had information leading
him to believe that liquor was being
sold at the Tzouhalem bar. The raid
resulted.
Mr. Marsden put in a plea on his
good character and service at the
front, where he was regimental sergeant major. This, the bench stated,
they had taken into consideration in
imposing sentence.
CUMBERLAND BALL
TEAM TO PLAY AT
COURTENAY SUNDAY!
The Cumberland Baseball team Jour-i
ney to Courtenay Sunday to play a
return game with the "farmers." The
local team wlll be strengthened by the
Inclusion of Lapsansky, one of the
best ball players on the Island. They
wlll also have the service of Finch of
Victoria and Ross of Vancouver. The
local boys expect lo put It all ovor
the Courtenay team, taking revenge
for last Sunday's defeai.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
RECOMMENDS BAN
ON HEARST PAPERS
VANCOUVER. —A Bpeclal commit
tee, consisting of A. G. McCandless,
W. J. Baird and Cecil Killam, appointed by the Canadian' Club executive to Investigate the anti-British
character of the Hearst publications
arriving in this city and district, presented a report to the executive at a
taeeting on Monday aftemon.
The committee asloed that a recommendation he Rent -to the Dominion
government, urgir-ig drastic action
against all Hearstl publications coming into Canada./ The report was
adopted, and cop'.ea of the report were
ordered sent to Cfttawa and the central
association of Cf.jiadjan Clubs.
ST. JOHNS, NFD.—Preparations are
being made at the historical Signal
Hall for the establishment of communication between Newfoundland
and Great Britain by wireless telephone.
The feat of speaking across the Atlantic by wireless telephone alreadv
has been accomplished, connection
having been established between London, on the one side, and Glace Bay,
C.B., the Marconi headquarters, on
the other, but in the present Instance
it is planned to make the scheme much
more extensive. The real purpose of
the activities of the Marconi Company
is to give a demonstration to the Old
World members of the Imperial Press
Conference, who will shortly be on
their way to join the Dominion members for a two months' tour ot the
Dominion.
„    Three Htalluns.
The object is to have the steamship
Victorian, on which the newspaper
men are coming across, -In constant
communication with the land of either
aide from tho day she leaves Liverpool
until she arrives iu Halifax, and for
this purpose a station is being equipped on the Cornwall coast of England,
a second at Cabot Tower, Signal Hill,
St. Johns, and the third on the Victorian.     '
SILVER
Yeast—Did you buy that bonnet for
your wife?
Feast—I did.
Yeast—Well, believe me. It makes
her look fierce.
Feast—Well, take It from me, she
would have looked a good deal fiercer
If I hadn't.
All  news  Isn't  as  black  as it is
printed.
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aflluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT ALL THE  LEADING   HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C. Page Eight
■THE   CUMBERLAND   iSLANDEtt
July 17, 1920.
OUR RESPONSIBILITY
DOES NOT END WHEN YOU HAVE BOUGHT A
GOSSARD LACE FRONT CORSET
You must be satisfied. If it does not give you style to
make you happy; if it does not give you comfort beyond
price; if it does not give you a wearing service that alone
justifies its cost—return it. We take pride in your satisfaction.
We have just had delivered two new
lines in
Elastic Girdles
Light, graceful and comfortable. All
sizes in stock. Prices $2.95 and $4.95.
No woman can afford to be without one
of these dring the hot weather.
A NEW ARRIVAL OF
Window Scrims and
For Out Of Doors
Basket Chairs in a Great Variety.
We have a well assorted stock of
Basket Chairs, suitable for all purposes,
but especially suitable for a seat in a
shady nook during these hot days.
Marquisites
Some of the daintiest Musline, Marquisettes and Scrims for window decoration. It will help you if you have a
look over some of our new lines.
RUGS   RUGS   RUGS
A very good assortment awaits you if
you are in need of floor Rugs, and our
prices are reasonable.
IF THERE ARE GOODS IN OUR LINE WE DON'T CARRY, AND ARE ABLE
TO GET, WE ARE AT YOUR SERVICE.   TRY US."
PHONE  134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mr. Jim Fletcher,, of the Fletcher
Music House, was In town this week
on a business visit, later going on to
Campbell River on a fishing trip.
* •   •
Mrs. C. O'Brien, Miss J. O'Brien and
Master Fred O'Brien of Washington
arrived this week and are the guests
of Mr. aud Mrs. George O'Brien for a
lew days.
a   *   *
Thomas Weeks of the Weeks Motors
Limited, of Nanaimo, was here on a
business trip on Tuesday.
.   *   •
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thulin, Dr.
and Mrs. Carrothers, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Powell ot Campbell River
were a party that visited Cumberland
on Wednesday.
* .   .
Mrs. T. H. Mumford has returned
to town afther her visit to Victoria.
a    *    *
Mr. J. Walton left town last Saturday ou a visit to Victoria and is expected back today.
.   .   *
Mr. T. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, arrived tn town this week on
his usual inspection of the local mines.
.   .   .
Mr. Jarvls, of the local Bank ot Commerce, returned from his vacation
Wednesday, but has been transferred
to the Courtenay branch.
* *    a
Mrs. W. A. Owen and daughter Ogla
left town yesterday by motor ou a
vacation.
a    *    *
Mrs. D. Stewart left on Wednesday
for Vancouver.
a    *    *
Mrs. J. Bennle left on Wednesday
for Vancouver.
* .   *
Mrs. Robert Henderson and daughter have moved to Royston Beach for
the summer months.
.   *   .
Miss A. E. Hurst arrived from Vic
toria on Friday's train.
.   .   .
Mrs. H. Devlin of N'anaimo is visiting Mrs. T. Graham at Little River.
FORESHORE  LEASE
Nelson District, Vancouver Island.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, of
Victoria, B. C, Colliery Owners, Intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
high water mark three feet (3 ft.)
East from the South-East corner post
ot Lot 11, Nelson District, thence East
sixteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to the
approximate low water mark, thence
Southerly along the approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
the South-East corner of the North
Fractional halt of the South-Weat
quarter of Section 32, thence West to
aforesaid corner of said fractional
part ot Section 32, being the original
high water mark, thence Northerly
following original high water mark,
being the Easterly boundary of Section 32 and D. L. 28 in said Nelson
District to point of commencement,
containing in all ninety-six (90) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DUNS
MUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Graham, Agent
Dated June 22nd, 1920. 28-i
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  - •   B. C.
KEEP TO THE LEFT
UNTIL DECEMBER 15
Some little confusion is being
caused by the change of the rule of
the road in parts* of British Columbia
and not In others. Yesterday one
resident of Cumberland took It into
his head to adopt the "interior" rule
all on his own, and was somewhat indignant when he came head-on with
another automobile.
The change on Vancouver Island
does not go into effect until the 15th
of December next.
RAPID CONSTRUCTION
ON MEMORIAL HALL
The contractors on the G. W. V. A.
Memorial Hall are making good headway with the work of construction,
and before many days are past the
outside work will be almost completed.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
July 10—Daring. Coqultlam. Daring
and Scow, Vancouver.
July 12—Malasplna, coastwise; Oregon and Scow No. 30, Seattle; Olive
M, Alcedo, coastwise; Oregon and
Scow No. 33, Seattle; Chieftain, Gleeful. Cheerful, coastwise.
July 13—(j.P.R. Hulk 100, Qualicum.
Vancouver; Santa Anna, Nanaimo,
Faultless. Chemainus, coastwise;
Klldonan and Scow. Vancouver.
July 14—B. C. P., Progressive, coastwise; Daring and Scow, Vancouver.
Is Your Car Equipped With
The New
REGULATION
HEADLIGHTS ?
Have you read the new Provincial Motor Act regarding headlights? The Act requires that all cars be
equipped with a non-glare light.
WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF REGULATION LENS
IN STOCK
Cumberland Motor Works
J. H. CAMERON, Proprietor. Cumberland, B.C.
CAMPBELL RIVER FALLS
MUST BE PRESERVED
The provincial government is bolus
petitioned by the Courtenay-Comox
Board of Trade to set aside an area
around Campbell River Falls for a
park aud not to permit the scenic
beauty of tho FallB themselves to be
ruined by tlie diversion of their waters*
for commerce. The resolution waa
worded as follows:
Whereas, the Island Highway ls
yearly becoming more known aud appreciated by the public and ls a vain
able asset to Vancouver Island;
"And whereas "owing to logging
operations, forest fires and. other
causes, much of thc natural beauty of
the Island Highway has been lost, and
it is desirable to preserve as much a3
possible the scenic beauty now left;
And whereas of all the beautiful
scenery reached through the Island
Highway the most wonderful is the
Campbell River Falls. Unique from
the fact that here the Campbell River
makes a sheer drop of nearly 200 feet
and flows away through a beautiful
wooded canyon at right angles;
"And whereas one of the great
charms of the Falls ls the situation,
surrounded as they are by giant trees,
typical of Vancouver island's primaeval forest;
"And whereas any logging operations or other commercial enterprise
must necessarily irredeemably rob
this valuable asset of its natural features;
"Be It resolved, that the provincial
government be requested to set aside,
as a park, a suitable tract of land surrounding the Falls and reserve the
Fulls themselves from any form of
interference and so secure their pre.
servatlon for the use of teh public for
all time."
Church Notices
HOLY TK1MTY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Sixth Sunday After Trinity.
Celebration of Holy Communion, 11
a.m.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
9 a.m., mass at Cumberland.
11 a.m., mass at Comox.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7. p.m.
SUMMER DRINKS
LEMONADE POWDER GRAPE JUICE
LOGANBERRY JUICE SHERBET
ROSE'S AND STOWES' LIME JUICE
THORPE'S GINGER ALE AND GINGER BEER
Libby's Pickles-Suitable Sizes
For Picnics
Sour Mixed
Sweet Mixed
Gherkins
25c
Chow
Sweet Chow
Sweet Relish
MANZANILLO OLIVES, 4-oz. bottles 2 for 25c
CREST APRICOTS, l's, per tin 25c
CURTIS' PIMENTOES, per tin 25c
VAN CAMP'S, CLARKS and DAVIS, SOUPS, 2 for 35c
CALIFORNIA ASPARAGUS, l's, per tin 35c
BOULTER'S CORN   2 for 45c
LIBBY'S PORK AND BEANS, large tins 20c
QUAKER PORK AND BEANS, small tin 10c
Take advantage of the following
Specials while they last
1000 lbs. Small White Beans, per lb  10c
500 lbs. Bayo Speckled Beans, per lb  10c
50 sacks Graham Flour, 49-lb. sacks at  $3.50
80 sacks Graham Flour, 7-lb. sacks at  60c
30 sacks Whole Wheat Flour, 49-lb. sacks at.... $3.50
60 sacks Whole Wheat Flour, 7-lb. sacks at 60c
We Want to Know
1. Why crabbing at Royston Beach
is so good this season?
2. Why bonfires attract so many—
Bat*?
3. Why everyone is wondering who
cliaperones those wild ones? No one.
Well, we're astonished.
4. Which is Dame Gossip's port of
call? We are thankful that only
transients call at Union Bay.
5. What is the lirst impression of
anyone descending tbe hill to Comox
Lake?
6. Who enjoyed such a flue view
from the end of Royston Wharf Wednesday evening? Birthday celebrations, n'evorythlng.
7. Oue, two, three, four and Ave.
What happened to our sixth? Watch
our space next week.
8. Why tbe man handling the hose
turned the water on his fellow worker
Instead of the "tarvia" Are last night?
9. Who will wedding bells be ring-
lag for soon?   Here's luck!
10. How many girls can sleep on
a single camp bed?
11. What becomes of all the big
tUh that are caught hereabouts?
12. Why folks go to Royston when
a nice lawn, garden hose and bathing
s iltsare available?
Simon Leiser & Co.
Phone 38.
Limited
WAGE DISPUTE AT
PORT ALBERNI MILL
Strike Averted by  Agreement
to Retain the Old Scale-
Settled in Two Hours.
PORT ALBERNI. — What could
scarcely be called a strike occurred
at the Coal Creek Mill here on Thursday morning.
Tbe employees had been notified
that a general 10 per cent, cut In
wages was to go Into effect following
a reported 10 per cent, cut in wages
In other centres outside. The men decided not to go to work on these terms
and the local management immediately
got into communication with the
owners' representative, Mr. Oilroy, In
Vancouver, with the result that the
men returned to work on tbe original
scale ot pay. What threatened to result' in a strike was settled in two
hours.
The Gilroy mills are reported to
have contracts covering their output
for the next two years.
FUNERAL OBSEQUIES
OF ESTEEMED CITIZEN
Late Mr. Robert Watson, Ladysmith, Laid to His Rest—
Respected Old-Timer
LADYSMITH.—The funeral of the'
late Mr. Robert Watson took place
last Saturday afternoon under the
auspices of the local Masonic Order.
The deceased was the oldest Mason in
the city and, in addition, was a member of the local Order of Foresters,
the members of which lodge also attended as a body.
The popularity of the deceased gentleman and the esteem In which he
was held may be gauged by the large
number ot friends who were present
at the funeral. The religious services were conducted by Rev. J. O.
Reid, pastor of the First Presbyterian
Church, at the home of the deceased,
and the Masonic ceremony was held at
the graveside.
Advertise in The Islander—it pays.
LOST
NOTICE DI HOTEL.
"Gentlemen   without   baggage   wlll
bare their wives in the office."
NON-GLARE HEADLIGHTS
SILVER   HAT   PIN,'THISTLE   DE-
sign, on Courtenay Road, near the
slaughterhouse,  Thursday   evening.
Suitable  reward.    Notify Box  278.
1-29
The attention of motor drivers Is
c illed to the fact that under the provisions of the Motor Act the glare
hoadllghts are taboo, and no headlight
n ust project a light the apex of which
roaches higher than 3 1-2 feet at a
distance of 75 yards from the car.
WOOLLEN MILL MAY
START AT COURTENAY
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Geo. Kinney.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Ml'. W. H. Cochrane, who has had
considerable experience in the woollen
Industry in Scotland, ls making investigations looking towards establishing
a woollen mill at Courtenay, which
district has particularly impressed
him as an ideal place to commence
operations.
He met the members of the Cour-
tenny-Comox Board of Trade a few
days ago and laid the whole scheme
befcre them. Mr. Cochrane is very
enthusiastic about the matter. While
the factory would start with about 14
hands, he has every confidence that
it'would, extend very rapidly.
Jl ST A LITTLE  OBSCURE
A lawyer was asked by the court
lo apologize tor a seeming disrespect
to thc bench.   The lawyer said with
great dignity:
' "I do apologize, sir. Your Honor is
right and I am wrong, as your honor
generally le."
TEACHER WANTED
Experienced teacher wanted to
teach First Division, Minto Public
School. Duties to commence September 1st, 1920.
Applications will be received up to
July 31at. Salary, $1,140 per annum.
Town either way 3 miles from school.
Apply
DAVID MORGAN,
Secretary.
Sale of City Lots
SEALED* TENDERS are invited for
the purchase ot:
Lot 3, Block )S, May 6SSA
Lot 8, Block E, Map SSSA
Lot 7, Block 4, May 588
in the corporate limits ot the City of
Cumberland, as authorized in the City
ot Cumberland Land Sale Bylaws No.
1, 1919, and No. 2, 1920, to each of
which of the aforesaid lots the City ot
Cumberland   holds   an    Indefeasible
Title.
Tenders must be sealed   and   forwarded to the City Clerk.
T. MORDY,
July 9th, 1920. City Clerk,
tt
Don't believe all you bear, especially
when It's about yourself.
FOR SALE
GRAY-DORT SPECIAL CAR FOR
sale, model 1918; privately used, In
first-class order and fully equipped.
For price aud terms see Cameron,
Cumberland Motor .Works.       c2-28
FOR SALE—3-ROOMED HOUSE.
Cash or terms. Apply to B. Pearse,
nitv
AMERICAN UNDERSLUNG CAR, IN
first-class condition. Apply Barton,
Photographer, or Phone 86L.      cl
MOTORCYCLE — IN EXCELLENT
running order. Apply P. O. Box
105, Cumberland. 3-30
SEVEN HOUSES FOR SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
PEDIGREED AIREDALE TERRIER,
bitch; for further particulars apply
J. V. Jones, Islander Ofllce.
TWO ENGLISH BULL BITCHES,
one by Ch. Fallsworth White Knight.
Apply J. V. Jones, Islander Ofllce.
FOR SALE—FOUR ACRES OF LAND
with three-room dwelling, barn,
garage ana other buildings; one aud
a half miles from Cumberland.
Price reasonable. Apply A. R. Wesley, Cumberland, B. C.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from $550 to .(1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 31.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.

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