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The Cumberland Islander Aug 6, 1921

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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDERS
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland Sens.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 32
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
$6,000 for Better Housing:
Colliery Company Give Lots
Seven Applications for Loans—
Efforts Made to Give G. W.
V. A. Members Preference
The Better Housing Scheme occupied considerable time at the Council
meeting on Monday night. A communication was received from Mr. J.
W. Clark, Superintendent ot B. C. Soldier Settlement, Victoria, stating that
Cumberland had been allotted $6000
under the scheme. The Dominion
Government allotted the funds to the
province on the basis of population,
the Provincial Government adopting
the same course.
Mr. Clark also said it would be very
unlikely that the city could get any
more money under the present loan.
Seven applications from returned
men were read, one being for $1600,
the others having no sum stated. Those
applying were; Messrs. Thos. Armstrong, W. T. Brown, W. M. Brown,
O. W. Roberts, John Sutherland, Robt.
Thomson and John McWhirter.
Canadian Collieries Will Give Lots.
Mayor MacDonald, in bringing the
matter before the Couucil, said the
question should be dealt with very
carefully. The city had been allotted
$6000, and there apparently was little
hope of getting any more. Seven applications for loans had been received.
The Mayor said the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. had offered to
give a lot to each returned man who
would build a house to the value of
$1200, or rather selling the lots for
one dollar each. Acting under this
offer, and in the hope of getting loans,
four men had already taken lots and
were busy clearing them ready for
building.
Under the scheme the money Is advanced to the Council by the Provincial Government, His Worship said,
the city being responsible for repayment and interest. Until the houses
are fully paid for the Council has control of them, and they cannot be sold
or transferred except with the consent of the Council.
Payments Over Twenty Years.
Re-payment of the money advenced
is extended over 20 years, or 240 equal
payments, together with 5% per cent.
Interest and taxes, so the conditions
are extremely easy,as on a $1200 house
the monthly payment would be $5, with
about an equal amount for interest.
The Council is allowed % of one per
cent, of the Interest towards its expenses In the matter.
Mr. W. A. Owen submitted plans of
two houses, each of which would cost
about $1200.
Speaks for 0. VT. v. A. Members.
Aid. Brown, speaking as a returned
man, Bald they had an organization in
town known as the G. W. V. A. They
had worked strenuously for eighteen
months, together with the Mayor and
Council, for the good of the returned
men. The G. W. V. A. had appointed
a committee to work ln conjunction
with the Council In this matter, and
had recommended names for loans
under the scheme. The alderman
claimed tliat the G. W. V. A. was an
asset to the city and he could not see
how the Council could overlook the
wishes of this organization in this
connection. There seemed to be no
hope of getting any more money under
this scheme at the present time. The
four men recommended had already
been hard at work clearing lots ready
for building, and he felt sure these
men would carry the thing through.
The four lots could be connected to
one septic tank, said the alderman,
and thus save about $200. If the city
could advance money to others it
would help to build up the city. He
thought the Council should recognize
the G. W. V. A. as an organization.
Loans of $1500 to each of the four
men favored would absorb the $6000.
Aid. Pickard asked if some of the
men could put up part of the money,
and so give alLn share? Perhaps all
of them would not need $1500 each, so
others could have a portion.
Aid. Francescini said he would like
all the seven men get help, If possible. The men clearing the lots were
working hard, and no doubt would
carry things through if given assistance.
If It had not been for the persistent
work of the G. W. V. A. as an organization, said Aid. Brown, there would
have been no such fund as the present. The organization had worked
very hard for the scheme. Therefore
he urged that the Council could not
ignore the G. W. V. A., especially those
members who had been a long time ln
the district.
Aid. Bannerman could not see why
the G. Vi. V. A. members should get
preferred treatment. The statement
had been made In the Council recently
that they had only about 15 members,
and he believed there were 200 returned men in the district.
Aid. Pickard suggested that a -committee meet the men and see how much
money they would need individually.
Some of the men might not need the
$1500, and so the $6000 could be spread
over more applicants. He moved a
resolution that the Mayor and two
aldermen he appointed to look into
the matter and report to the Council.
Aid. Francescini seconded the motion,
which was carried. The Mayor appointed Aid. Pickard and Aid. Brown.
Some of the applicants were present
and in the course of an informal talk
said they could do with less than the
$1500. They approved of tho idea ot
getting together and talking the matter over.
The committee wlll also Inquire into prices of lumber and other build-
ONLY A BLOOMING PARSON
VICTORIA.—Tlie Uev. Thos. Menzies, the Independent Liberal member
in the Legislature for Coinox, is telling one on himself.
On the southbound train from Nanaimo the parson-member sut behind
two citizens of Alberni. They were
talking to a tht*"4-man and did not
recognize Mr. Menzies ot all.
"I don't know what the matter ls
with Alherni." said one man. "Here
we live in a liv% thjrsty and ambitious
city and have Major Dick Burde as our
member, and we haven't yet got even
one government liquor store, while
Comox has two liquor stores, one iu
Cumberland and the other in Courtenay, and has only a Presbyterian
minister for its member."
Japanese Committed for Trial
On Robbery With Violence
Moose 'Lodge
Opens Aug. 27
Charter List Now Full—Degree
Coining Up From Ladysmith
To Put on Opening Work.
Eminent    Vancouver    Lawyers
Brought Here By Both Sides
—Accused Sent to Trial
A lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose
wlll be instituted in Cumberland on
the night of Saturday, August 27, when
a degree team will come up from
Ladysmith to put on the work, and it
is expected tliat t]|ere will also be
representatives present from Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo lodges.
The ceremouy will be held in the
Fraternity Hall, commencing at 7.30.
The charter list ol fifty members is
now complete and, as will be seen by
referring to the advertisement In another column, contains the names of
some of our most prominent citizens,
headed by our worthy mayor.
Those who are interested in this
order are requested to uiake early application for membership, as they can
still get in on the charter rate of $10.
Besides the fraternal advantages to
be derived from belonging to an order
having big lodges in all important
cities, with a total membership of over
one million, tlle local body will pay
sick ami funeral benefits, as well as
giving all the privileges of Mooseheart, which is so beautifully named,
for surely It exemplifies the real heart
of mankind. There the children of
deceased members, who are left unprovided for, aro taken care of, given
a high scliool education aud taught a
trade, so that they may become self-
supporting and worthy citizens.
Mr. Thompson, the organizer, is Indisposed, and has gone to his home in
Victoria for a few days. During his
absence Mr. Fred Dallos. of the Waverley Hotel, will transact any business and give all information concerning tlie new lodge.
Three Baseball
Gaines Sunday
Stellar Attraction Will Be Game
At Courtenay at 6 o'clock—
Alberni Teams Coming
No less than three baseball games
are scheduled for Sunday, two in Cumberland and one at Courtenay. The
Courtenay game, while the last to be
played, will take precedence In public
interest, as tlle Cumberland Seniors
will go' down to play a league game
with the hayseeds, the game having
been transferred from the following
Wednesday schedule.
It is expected that Easter, the new
star pitcher for Cumberland, will be
on the mound for this game, and after
his fine performance of last Sunday
fans are anxious to again see him in
action.
This game will be very important
to Cumberland, as another win will
mean them securing the league championship, as they have already won
four consecutive games.
Port Alberni Team Plays Here ut One
o'clock.
The Port Alberni Seniors are due
here Sunday for a game with tlie Cumberland boys at 1 o'clock, at the local
Recreation Grounds.
Intermediate (tame nl II.U0
The Cumberland Intermediates will
play the Alberni Intermediates at 3.30
on the local grounds. This time the
local boys Intend to get revenge for
their defeat on the occasion of their
recent trip to the canal city.
LEAGUE STANDING
Cumberland     4     4     0 1.000
Courtenay     3     12 .333
Union Bay    Jt     0     4. .000
l'Olt.UATIO.\ OF AUXILIARY COURT
A Female Court, ill connection with
the Ancient Order of Foresters, will he
formed here In the near future. All
interested parties are requested to
communicate with F. G. Eaton, secretary A. O. P., General Delivery,
Cumberland.
ing materials, so aa to have everything to go ahead as soon as details
are settled.
The Council decided to request Mr.
W. A. Owen to supervise the construction of the houses.
The City Clerk was authorized to
complete all necessary papers for the
Provincial Government to get thc
$6000 appropriation.
A case that created more than usual
interest was held in Cumberland on
Tuesday lust, when M. Shiaga, the
Japanese who was connected with the
shooting affray in Chinatown two
weeks ago, wus charged with robbery
with violence.
The case was of particular interest
in tliat the prosecution engaged Mr.
Alex. Henderson, K.C., of. Vancouver,
lo handle the cuse for them, while the
defence was In the bauds of Mr. J. A.
Hussell, of Vancouver, also a shining
luminary in legal circles.
The original charge against the
Japanese of shooting witli intent to
kill was withdrawn at a previous hearing, when he was charged with aud
pleaded guilty to carrying firearms,
for which offence he was lined $100
or three months in jail.
The present case, which was instituted hy local Chinese, was In connection with tho alleged robbery ou the
night iu question of some $350 from
one of the gaming tables in Shanghai
House.
A large number of Japanese and
Chinese were in the court during the
proceedings, which lasted from 10.30
a.m. to 6 in the evening.
The evidence of the witnesses and
arguments of counsel were voluminous and were taken down by Miss D.
Wilson, stenographer.
The evidence of the Chinese witnesses was given through an interpreter, Foon Sieu acting in this capacity.
K. Nakai appeared as Japanese interpreter, but bis services were not required, as the defence did not call
witnesses, reserving these for a higher
court.
Mr. Henderson and Mr. Russell occupied tlie court's attention for fully
un hour arguing as to the status of
the case and whether it was within the
jurisdiction of the magistrate to try
the case, Mr. Russell contending, and
quotiug exhaustively from the Criminal Code of Canada to prove his contention, that the magistrate could not
hear the case, as the facts of the case
had already been used in a conviction
against accused. A man shall not be
placed In jeopardy twice on the same
evidence, said Mr. Hussell.
Mr. Henderson said all the objections raised by his learned friend
should be raised in a higher court.
Accused had been convicted of a very
minor offence, said counsel, namely of
carrying a weapon. It was a straining of judicial machinery to say that
a man charged witli a very minor of-
lence cannot be charged with a major
offence.
The arguments of opposing counsel
were as lo whether the magistrate had
jurisdiction to "try" the case or to take
evidence as a preliminary hearing.
Mr. Baird decided In* would, treat
ihe case as a preliminary heaping,
following which court officials were
duly sworn and tlie taking of evidence
began.
Chinese Sworn hy Paper (lull*.
The Chinese witnesses were sworn
by what is known as tlie paper oalli,
which is done by tlie Chinaman writing his name on a strip of paper and
ilien burning it. lie declares that this
oatli is binding on his conscience.
Sai Yee was the lirst witness. He
said he was gambling at Shanghai
Uifllding about 12.30 a.m. on the morning of July 21. He recognized accused as tlie man who was standing
at the table at which witness was
playing. Another Japanese was sianil-
mg on the other side of him. Auother
Japanese also stood in the rear. Wong
Sliue was also at tlie table and tlle
banker and dealer. Witness had about
$150 of his own money and $200 he
had won, all of which was un the table
in front of him, in bills. Thc Japanese
aid something and witli his left hand
Slabbed at the money, at the same
time producing a gnu witli his right
band. The Japanese standing on his
left also grubbed at the money. Witness let go of the money as the accused pointed a gnu at him. the Japanese taking all the money and ran out
of the building, tlie Chinese following
them, through an alley and up on the
the railway track. During the getaway four shots were fired by the
Japanese, though witness did not see
(Continued on Page Eight)
Much Important Business
Dealt With By City Council
Union of II. C. Municipalities Meets in Alberni End of Month—
Special .Meeting Monday to Meet School Board Re Finances
—Thistles Being Cut on Streets and Public Places—Waterworks Company Ready to Meet Council.
Won Four Straight
Games in League
Cumberland Seniors Look Like
Annexing League Honors
Right Off the Bat.
Witli their success at Union Bay on
Wednesday, the Cumberland Seniors
now have four consecutive wins to
their credit, and look like annexing
honors without losing a game.
There was a good attendance at tbe
Union Bay grounds when the Cumberland and Union Bay boys lined up for
their second game together iu the
new league. A large number of local
fans went down in the expectation of
seeing Easter in the box again, but
they were disappointed in that respect
as the battery comprised Boyd and
Williamson, who made a good combination.
Union Bay has improved considerably since the previous game and gave
the visitors something to think about,
holding them down to six runs, while
they annexed two.
.   LAST SUNDAY'S GAME
The Courtenay swatters came up on
Sunday afternoon for a scheduled
game against the invincible Cumberland team. A large crowd was in attendance wheu the game commenced
and tlie onlookers were treated to a
very fast and exciting game all the
way through, the home boys again
winning, this time with a score of 7
runs to 3.
E. D. Easter, the star pitcher who
lately joined the Cumberland team,
pitched a splendid game, holding the
milkmen down to only live hits, which
were well scattered.
Bannerman, the swift   left   fielder,
was the star performer, he securing
no less than three of the seven runs,
and these on four hits.
Box Score.
Cumberland—   A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E.
Plump, 1 b  5    2    1    0  10    2
Hunden, s.s  5    10    12    1
Bannerman, l.f  5    3    4    0    0    0
Harrison, cf  5    112    0    0
James, 2 b  5    0    0    0    2    2
Marocchi, 3 b  4    0    114    1
Kerr, c  4    0    0    0    2    1
Conti, r.f  4    0    0    2    0    0
Easter, p  4    0    10    2    0
41 7 11    6 22    7
Courtenay—
II. Dixon, l.f  5 2 1110
McFarlane, 1 b  5 0 2    0 6    3
R. Dixon, 2 b  4 0 0     2 4    3
Pringle, s.s  4 0 0    2 4    1
Robinson, 3 b  4 0 10 2    0
Downey, c  4 0 0    3 2    2
McLean,  r.f.    4 0 12 0    0
A. Robinson, cf. ..4 0 0    2 0    0
L.. Larson, p  4 10    0 11
38    3    5   12  20  10
Score by innings:
Cumberland     2 0 10 0 0 3 1 0—7
Courtenay     10 0 0 10 0 0 1—3
Summary.—Three-base hits, James
md McFarlane; stolen bases. Plump;
struck out by Easter, 12; by Larsen,
6; bases on balls by Banter, 2; by
Larsen, 2; hits off Easter, 5; off Larsen, II; left on bases, Cumberland, 10;
Courtenay, 8.
Umpire—Altken, of Bevati.   ^
Mrs. Pankhurst
Lectures Monday
Sleeting   in   Anglican   Hail   on
Monday Evening—Other
Visiting Speakers.
On Monday evening In the Anglican
Hall, Mrs. Kmineline Pankhurst will
speak ou Social Hygiene. This famous
lady Is on a lecture tour of the Island,
speaking on behalf of the Provincial
Council for Combating Venereal
Diseases.
Other speakers will include Rev.'.H.
T. Haverhill and Uev. H. T. Arehbold.
B.A. The meeting, which commences
at S o'clock, will lie open to all over
the age of IT years.
It is the, hope of those interested in
this work to form a branch ot the
couucil in Cumberland at this meeting, to work in conjunction witli the
Provincial and Dominion councils.
NO EVENING SERVICE AT
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
During the Sabbatjis of tliis month
there will be no evening service ai St.
George's Presbyterian Church. There
will be the usual morning Bervlce at
11 o'clock, to wliieh all Intending woj**-
shippers will be welcomed.
The regular church notices were
printed in another page of this Issue
before this Intimation was handed in,
so adherents will please take notice.
Hev. 11 1 Assists ut Induction.
Hev. James Hood, pastor of the
Presbyterian Church, lefl town Friday
morning to assist at the induction ol
Rev. Davhi Lister, ol Victoria, win-
has been called to St. Andrew's Cbuch,
Nanaimo.
Hev. Held of Ladysmith, will receive
and induct the minister; Kev. David
Walker of Victoria will preach, the
sermon; Hev, Dr. Clay of Victoria will
address the people, while Hev. James
Hood, Moderator of the Presbyterian
Assembly, will address the minister.
Mr. Hood will return Saturday night
so as to be here for the morntug sei
vice on Sunday.
TENNIS TOURNAMENT
BEGINS ON WEDNESDAY
Comox Club Has Issued Challenge for Friendly (James—
First Series Played Here.
The Comox Tennis club has challenged the Cumberland Tennis Club
to a friendly tournament, and the
challenge lias been accepted. Tbe
first games will be played on Wed nen
day next, August la, commencing at -
p.m., at the Cumberland court.
Pour ladies and four gentlemen
will be selected to represent each club
and ladies' singles, men's singles am!
mixed doubles will be played.
On August i Ti li the Cumberland
players will play return games al Ibe
Comox Court.
Mrs. Spicer. Mrs. Clinton, Mrs. Scott.
Miss Browne, A. it. Stacey, J. Bplcer,
J.'Walton and Dr. Christie have boon
asked to carry Cumberland's banner
on the Itfth.
"HEADED FOR YOKOHAMA"
In an endeavor to mitigate the uuls-
uice of cows wandering on the streets
lie   Chief   of    Police   on   Wednesday
urested three and. after a great deal
if  difficulty,  got  them  safely  to  the
ily pound.   This place did not appeal
,(i one of the newly,arrivals and she
iu mediately broke through ibe fen
rushed across the street and into the
grounds of a well-known citizen
in ber frenzy ibe cow rushed into the
poultry yard, taking no notice whatever of the wire feme, a large portion
of which hung to her burns. Rushing
out of the place, despite all efforts to
tassoo her. s4ie made a clean get-away,
and when last seen was headed, so
ihe chief says, with tail erect and a
nig chunk of the wire mesh on her
horns, in the direction of Yokohama,
travelling "bell for leather" as the
saying  goes.
Ladysmith Loses
The First Game
Toronto Scottish Staged a Shut-
Out C!o of 3 to 0—Toronto
Defence Their Undoing
TORONTO, Aug. a.-Ladysmith lost
the lirst of the two-game series for
the Dominion soccer championship
and Connaught cup to Toronto Scottish tonight by ;i lo 0. Tbe visitors
showed an intimate knowledge of the
game and when attacking, outplayed
Ihe Scottish with clever head and
footwork and short passes, until they
reached the Toronto defence, upon
Which their attacks went to pieces like
waves upon the rocks. Both teams
possessed a world of speed aud gave
one of the prettiest exhibitions of
soccer which has been seen here for
some time.
Although three goals were scored
against bim, Sheppard, the Ladysmith
goalkeeper, showed real class and was
uot responsible for his team's loss.
He made lit good saves during the
game, seven iu tbe first naif and six
in tiie last. Smith; the local goal
keeper, was obliged to make only two
'saves in the lirst period aud three in
the last. Those bo did make, however, wero all of the spectacular type.
Scottish lost the toss and were
forced to play against the sun, but in
spile of this, all goals were scored in
Ihe lirst half. Macdonald, Voting and
Fidler were the scorers. Although
Sheppard made good attempts, he
failed lo prevent the ball from entering the goal.
In thc second half, tbe westerners
did not attempt so much combination
and made better headway, but the
local hacks were in their best form.
Orr, the visiting captain, was laid out
but resumed after attention, while
Oeorge Campbell, of Toronto, was
twice hurl.
Seaplane Passes
Over Gulf Points
On Look-Out for Fires Started
By Campers and Week-End
Parties—Weekly Cruises
Residents and visitors on Comox
Bay and vicinity on Sunday afternoon
were treated to a splendid view of a
seaplane Hying overhead.
The Provincial Government has instituted an aerial week-end lire pretention patrol, and this was the first
Vlsll ol the season. A seaplane from
Vancouver makes a scouting lour ol
ib" whole coast as far north as Thurston Pay every Sunday until the fire
season Is pttBt. Tbe patrol covers an
area on tbe Mainland and Llund ol
between 300 and 400 miles long.
Week ends, when campers and motorists gol out, is the danger time, tire
protection officials find. The aerial
patrol will keep in touch with everything along (be coast and see that no
camp lues gel away, when a lire is
polled tlie seaplane will direct for-
flfctry protection fire-fighters to it and
perhaps take the Rre-fighters there.
So far this season there have been
103 lores! (ires in British Columbia,
according lo reports to P. Z. Caver-
hill. Chief Forester. Of these-*, llfl
were on Ihe Island and iu the Vancouver district.
COLLIERY EMPLOYEES
MEET SUNDAY MORNING
       •*
A mass meeting of the employees of
he Canadian Collieries i Dunsmuir)
I nl i ■* called for Sunday morning al
10.30. in the Athletic Hall. Business
"i importance is to be discussed.
QUOITING  CLUB
An effort is being made to form a
Quoltlng Club In the district, and all
thoso Interested in the game are re-
q,ue i' d ■'< attend a meeting to be held
fn the First Aid and Mine tlOSCUQ Hall
on Wednesday evening next at 6,30
o'clock.
The CHy Council had a busy night
al ihe regular meeting on Monday,
most of the business arising out of a
pile of communications. Mayor MacDonald was in (he chair and all the
aldermen were present with the exception of Aid. C. J, Parnham, who is
confined to his bed.
■i.-mhI ltouds Convention*
A communication was received from
Die Good Roads League of British
Columbia notifying the Council that
the league will meet at Port Alberni
at lu a.m. on Tuesday. August 30, prior
to the meeting of the Union of B. C.
Municipalities, and that the Couucil
is entitled to two delegates,
Union of II. C. .MunlcipalllY*.
A letter was received from Mr. A.
W. Cray, secretary of the Union of B.
C. Municipalities, Informing the Council that the annual convention will bo
held in the City Hall, Port Alberni, on
Wednesday, August 81, commencing
at I p.m. The communication asked
that the Council he fully represented
as the main question will be the dis-,
cuBsion of the taxation problem and
the arrangements decided upon for
presentation of the Union's views before the Provincial Government Executive.
In connection with the above a letter was read from Mr. R. F. Ulandy,
City Clerk of Port Alherni, extending
to the City Council aud its ollicials a
hearty invitation to attend the convention, which is to be held on August
W\ and September 1 and 2.
Aid. Brown moved that His Worship
and one alderman be appointed lo attend the convention. This motion carried unanimously.
Aid. Thomson moved and Aid. Pickard seconded a motion that Aid.
Brown attend the convention. Thia
motion carried.
School Hoard Wants Money tu Improve
New Grounds.
The following communication was
received from Air. A. MacKinnou, secretary ot the School Board:
"On behalf of tbe Cuinborlaud Board
of School Trustees, I wish to thank
you for the donation of one thousand
dollars an intimated by the Mayor and
City Clerk. The Board has let a contract for the painting aud repairing
ol the outside of the old school building, which will put this building in
fairly good shape and will add to its
appearance and lite.
"1 also beg to report that, following
ihe request of His Worship and the
writer, when in Victoria last February, the Doparement hus let a contract for the installation of a complete sanitary system In the old huild-
"ug. This will fill a long needed
necessity.
"The new addition to school grounds
s situated outside the city Pmits, and
the Board will assist lu any way it
can in having these incorporated
within the city limits. This property
is held in thc name of tho city, but
should be in the name of the School
Board, as it is being purchased with
icbool funds, and also to comply with
the School Act.
"The clearing of the new grounds Is
now about complete and they require
i good deal of levelling and tilling in.
A new fence should also be placed
iround them. The Board find that
they have no funds for this work, and
if the Couucil has any further funds
for school purposes we would bo
pleased to know the amount at as
early a date as your convenience will
permit."
Aid. Bannerman thought it best to
let the matter of granting the School
Hoard lay over until tbe Finance Committee gives its report. He thought
ome of the money derived from the
recent collection of the $ii poll-tax
diould be reserved for use later, in
he hope of lowering the taxes next
year.
Aid. Pickard reminded the Council
that the fine weather was now with
us and work should he done now if
possible.
In reply to a question it was stated
that there is about $3500 remaining
of the poll-tax, which is to be used
for school and hospital purposes only.
Special Meeting on .Monday.
The feeling of the Council was that
Ihe School Board should meet the
Council and discuss the question fully.
For this purpose it was decided to
bold a special meeting on Monday
next at 7 o'clock.
Waterworks Company Ready to Meet
Couucil*
The Cumberland and Union Waterworks Co. notified thc Council that
they were prepared to meet thc Council that evening at 8 o'clock, in connection with the negotiations over
hydrant   charges.
Mayor MacDonald explained that
owing to pressure ot business that
evening he bad Informed Mr, Clinton
that the Council coum\ nol receive
them that evening. A special meeting will be called later for this purpose.
A number of replios were received
from municipalities in answer to tho
request of the City Clerk for informa-
lion    relative    lo    hydrant    »barges.
(Continued on Page Five) Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
August 6, 1921.
We have a big assortment of
Paints,  Varnishes,  Stains
Kalsomines, etc.
FULL LINE OF BRUSHES TO SUIT ALL REQUIREMENTS
THE BATE HARDWARE CO.
PHONE 31
P. 0. BOX 279
You Spend One Third of
Your Time in Bed!
Why not Sleep Comfortably ?
SPECIAL OFFERING IN BRASS BEDS at $35.00,
§42.50, §43.50, §45.00, §51.50 and $56.50.
STEEL BEDS, in White and Verni   Martin finishes.
Prices ranging from $11.00 to §25.00 each.
*-**** THIS IS THE BEST SELECTION
OF BEDS WE HAVE EVER SHOWN
SPRINGS—Woven Wire and Spiral Springs, at $7.00,
§8.50, §12.50and $15.00.
MATTRESSES—Cotton and Felt Mattresses at prices
ranging from §12.75 to §25.00 each.
BLANKETS, COMFORTERS,   PILLOWS,   SHEETS
PILLOW CASES, ETC.
EVERYTHING  FOR THE  BED
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOBACCO GROWING
IN THE DOMINION
Bulletin Tells of Cultivation and
Preparation for Market.
It was well on in tbe fourth century
that Sir Walter Raleigh introduced
tobacco to England and since that
time it has grown into world-wide
popularity. There are now, H. A.
Freeman, Dominion tobacco specialist,
tells us in a bulletin just issued at
Ottawa on "White Burley Tobacco in
Canada," more than fifty species ot
the genus Nicotiana. On the North
American continent the tobacco ot
commercial Importance belongs'to the
special Nicotiana tabacum. White
Burley, discovered ln Ohio In 1866,
was Introduced into Canada some
years later and ls now grown principally in Essex and Kent counties, but
has extended at Intervals as far as
Prince Edward county. Its growth in
quantity varies greatly.
In 1911 and 1913 thirteen million
pounds of White Burley were grown in
Canada; in 1914, 1915 and 1916, three
or four million pounds only; in 1919,
fifteen million pounds, and ln 1920,
twenty million pounds. The duty on
Importations is responsible for the
great increase in the last few years
of home-produced tobacco.
There are three varieties of White
Burley grown in this country, namely
Broadleaf White Burley, that does
not grow well on heavy land; Stanley
White Burley that is recommended
for dark, heavier soils, and Johnston's
Resistant Burley, which is best to sow
on "diseased" land, that ls land not
free from root-rot. White Burley is
used for both chewing and smoking.
The annual crop in North America,
Including Canada, is three hundred
and fifty to four hundred million
pounds, Kentucky being the principal
seat of Its growth. It finds a market
in Europe as well as in Canada and
the United States, but while in the
last-mentioned country the acreage
devoted to White Burley is from three
to four hundred thousand acres, in
Canada only about twenty thousand
acres are covered.
Mr. Freeman In his bulletin tells all
about its cultivation and preparation
for the market.
ONE BORN EVERY MINUTE
Wisconsin Farmers Offer "Rainmaker $3000 an Inch for Rain.
C. W. Pomerening, president of th*
Wisconsin Society of Equity, has
telegraphed F. H. Ratcliffe, of Leth-
brldge, Alta., to "make it rain in Wisconsin and we will pay $3000 an inch
for the use of your rain-maker," according to a dispatch to the New York
Times.
OBSERVATIONS
There are two kinds of men; those
who do what their wives tell them,
and those who never marry.
He: "So your father nnd mother
both object to me. Can't they be won
over?"
She; "I'm afraid not. It's the only
thing they have agreed on in years."
The pressman says all girls are Interested In forestry. They pine to
look spruce.
A fellow walked into our offlce the
other day and loked us over.
"How many people work here?" he
asked of the foreman.
"Only one. He came today. The
others have been with us some time,"
replied the foreman.
Small Bank Accounts
Many people put off opening a Savings Bank Account
until they feel they have a large enough sum to make
it worth while. This is why they never learn the habit
of thrift.
Open an account with us by depositing $1, and add
$1 weekly or monthly until you can increase the
amount of your periodical deposit.
WE WELCOME SMALL ACCOUNTS
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
GRAINGER, Manager.
Our Garage,
A boiler and a kettle-lid,
Some plates that Maggie broke and hid,
A chopping-block, a knuckle-bone,
A phonograph that doesn't phone,
Some lingerie that lingered long,
A mattress with the mat all gone,
A bustle out of grandma's trunk,
A rat-trap and some other junk,
A demijohn  of faint bouquet
(Sweet hundred-proof of yesterday),
Tomato cans of Auld Lang Syne,
A hundred feet of washing line,
A pair of pants (demobilized),
One garden hose  (derubberlzed),
The box in which the rabbit died,
The bike that mother used to ride;
Of many things a sundry crop-
All but tlie car—that's in the shop.
Ev'rybody helps make room In the
game for the loser.
The classic sign, "Don't shoot the
professor, he's doing the best he can,'
which hung over the piano In n wesi-
ern dance hall, ls rivalled by a placard
In a local restaurant; "Don't make
fun of our coffee—you may be old anil
weak yourself some day."
People who complain the home,
paper has no news get all het up If
It Isn't delivered on time,
The saddest words,
From kith or kin,
Come from friend wife,
"Where have you been?"
First She: "Let's cross the street."
Second She:  "But the street is a
puddle."
First She: "That's all right—mine's
silk."
However, the question Is not how
the apples get Into the dumpling, bin
how the peaches get Into the tight
skirts.
VALUE  OP FORESTS
Canada Is one of the greatest forest
countries of the world. .Much of our
Canadian soil is unsuited to farming
but is capable of growing magnificent
timber. Our forests provide work
which maintains half a million people.
Thoy give work, too, for our sailors
and railway men and furnish business
l„r our merchants and bankers. All
citizens can assist 111 taking care of
our forests and particularly ill protecting them ajjaiust fire.
BURNT.FORESTS DONT PAY
Burnt forests provide no freight
traliic. neither do they pay wages to
the workmen, profit to the merchant
or revenue to the government. Fire is
the great enemy, taking eight times
as much toll as the axe. It ia to the
interest of every citizen to reduce this
loss.
Nothing so ennobles a man as to
have some woman believe In his nobility.
The man who says styles are shocking Is always willing to be a shock-
absorber.
Some motorists think the "Stop,
Look, Listen" signs are Intended for
the trains.
When opportunity knocks at some
doors it can't be heard because of the
knockers Inside.
If all fish stories were true the
ocean would drop about ten feet.
      Kitsilano Times.
ISLAND SUPPLY STORE
BEVAN
We cater for a general family trade and are open to compete with any
mail order house, consistent with quality.
We carry a $15,000  Stock of  Groceries
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, also Hardware
MATERIALS MADE UP
From our DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT we make up articles to your
measure, in HOUSE DRESSES, GARDEN DRESSES, APRONS AND
CHILDREN'S WEAR.
All we ask is the opportunity to serve you
Shipments of New Goods will be arriving monthly, as the business offering is showing a substantial increase.
A SHIPMENT  OF  PATON'S  "ALLOA"  YARNS  AND  "BEEHIVE"
FINGERING IS ON THE WAY
GEORGE   BEATTIE
FORESTRY CONVENTION
TAKES PLACE NEXT
MONTH ON COAST
Will Sit in Vancouver and Victoria—To Discuss Matters
Vital to Province.
Arrangements have been completed
tor the holding of a Provincial Forestry Convention at Vancouver, September 19 and 20, and Victoria September 21, under the auspices of the
Canadian Forestry Association. The
British Columbia directors of the association are Hon. Hewitt Bostock,
Hon. A. C. Fluinertelt, P. Z. Caverhlll,
Provincial Forester, Chas. D. McNab,
II. R. MacMillan aiid R. D. Prettie. It
is expected that a considerable delegation will be present from Eastern Can-
ida and from Alberta.
A distinguished group of speakers,
each an authority in his special
sphere, will take part. Every effort
las been made to have the programme
horoughly prnctical and helpful and
to make the topics and their treatment
>f positive service to the business In-
erests of British Columbia. The Canadian Forestry Association Is a national institution, twenty-one years
)ld, with no identification with any
government or commercial interest.
Die membership is composed chiefly
if Canadian citizens having a patriotic
interest In forest conservation. Mr.
0, E. E. L'ssher of Montreal has been
president since 1919 alld will attend
this convention.
POULTRY KEEPERS
SHOULD HAVE PAMPHLET
It Tells How To Make Poultry
Pay, How They Should Be
Treated During Year.
It you wish to know how best to
!teep poultry and secure the most satisfactory results, consult a pamphlet
treating on the subject prepared by
■he Department of Agriculture at Ottawa. The pamphlet can be had free
on application to the Publications
Branch. It tells of how poultry can
'je made to pay, how the birds should
lie housed and fed. how they should
he treated ill winter and summer, how-
to commence keeping ln a small way,
the equipment that ls desirable, how
to choose a breed, how to hatch and
rear, and how to gather, keep or market the eggs. In short, all the essentials to success in poultry keeping for
home consumtpoin or selling are
clearly and explicitly explained. In
the term poultry are included geese,
turkeys, ducks, guinea fowls and
pigeons, the raising and care of which
are fully discussed. Numerous illustrations of types of birds, and of
methods of housing and feeding contribute to make the pamphlet an Invaluable compendium on poultry-
keeping and marketing.
NOTICE
May 25, 1921.
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our ofiice by interested parties.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 C*0M Ltd. p. Q. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered,with the valves on the mains of thia company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
m
m
1
Why does a brunette's face resemble SL
u wet day? Because it's uot lair.       Ilflffi ■q
August 6, 1921.
V
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
(
lb
Three
Loyal Order of Moose
The application for Dispensation for Lodge Charter, Loyal Order of Moose,
has been filled up and signed by fifty good men and true of Cumberland.
Bevan, Union Bay,. Courtenay, and district. A Lodge of L. 0. 0. M. will
accordingly be instituted here on Saturday, August 27, 1921. A Degree Team
Is expected to come from LadySmith to put on the work, and they may be
accompanied by members from Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo Lodges of
the L. 0. 0. M.
Intending Members Can Still Join at Charter Rates.
Intending member's please note that your applications will still be accepted
at the charter rate. The charter fee is ten dollars and the monthly Lodge
dues are $1.25. Make your application to W. F. H. Thompson, the organizer,
evenings, or to any of the following men who have already joined the order:
Mayor D. R. MacDonald, Edward W. Bickle, J. D. Somerville, Geo. Barton,
Sidney Hunt, R. H. Robertson, John Thomson, Robert Thomson. Samuel
Stanaway. James Larrigan. Win. Henderson, Jos. P. Dallos, P. P. Harrison,
C. J. Bunbury, Wm. Gordon, Paolo Monte, J. R. Logan, J. E. Spicer, J. A.
English, Vi. R. Newman, Frank Carter, Joseph Salmon, T. H. Baker, Norman
Battersby, John McAllister and Jas. W. Tremlett, all of Cumberland.
Richard James, Wm. Herd, Donald John Fraser, Wm. Thomas McLean.
Erastus Thomas, Robert McAllister, 11, M„ Charles Walker, William Weir,
William Westfield, Colin Campbell Altken, James Irvine, Alexander Robertson, Peter Mitchell, Martin Herman, Frederick Slmlster, all of lievan; W. F.
Gosnell, Courtenay; H. G. Knappett, Union Bay; any of whom are eligible
and will be willing to give you'Information, and also to take your application
and give you receipt foe the charter fee.
Order Has Over One Million Members
Remember, this order has one million' members, handed together for the
purpose of protecting the children and widows of deceased Moose; and tht
local Lodge will also give sick and funeral benelits. It is essentially a
worklngman's order and a large international social order, having Lodges In
all big centres, where a member is made welcome by introducing himself with
his Moose card, which is a very valuable benefit when taken into consideration
that your Moose card may be the means of you llndlng work or any information In any of the big cities, where one Is bound to find thousands of Moose
brothers. This benefit is worth all you pay in dues. Besides this, you have
the benefits of Mooseheart, which takes tare of any number of children under
14 years and brings them up to IS years of age, giving them the best of
attention as well as a High Scliool education and a trade, when they are
ready for the battle of life. Mrs. Kirk, whose husband became demented,
was taken to Mooseheart with seven children. A man from Nome, Alaska,
died after having paid three dollars in dues; his three little girls were taken
to Mooseheart without any expense to the mother. In many cases the mother
Is taken, too. Be assured there is no insurance like it, and the cost of $1.25
is so small that it does not interfere with other insurance.
There is No Other Insurance to Equal It
Do not make any mistake, join the Moose and you will never regret it,
but will thank your stars that you did join it. Vour security is that we are
planting in Cumberland, the farthest West big city in Canada, a Lodge of
the Loyal Order of Moose, and you are backed by One Million Members.
"Happy" Langford, that ls what everybody called him. He worked in the
mines at Terre Haute, Indiana. Life looked good to him, for he was young
and strong, and was liked by all his fellows. He had three boys, ages 6, 4
and 3 years, and a handsome wife with a High Scliool education. Langford
joined the Moose on January 13, 1915, and on August 11, 1916, there was an
accident In the mines—a man was killed. "Happy" Langford, who had kissed
his little brood good-bye that morning as he went smiling to his work, was
brought home dead. All lie left was a building lot worth $500, an insurance
policy for $200, and the receipt for the two dollars he had contributed to his
Moose Lodge.
It Will Cost $15,000 to Care for and Educate This Family.
Today his widow and three little boys are at Moiweh'cart, and there is a
little girl, six months old, who was bom after her lather died. They will
remain at Mooseheart until they graduate. It will cost ovcr $15,000 to educate
and prepare for life's work these three little brothers and sister. IS THERE
ANY INSURANCE EQUAL TO IT?
"You applied for membership In the L. O. O. M. some time ago, Mr. Jones.
You paid your money—why don't you come In and be Initialed?" "I want to."
Mr. Jones replied ovcr the wire, for it wns a telephone call from the Moose
organizer. "I want to, but I can't; my wife is dead and I have tlyee little
children here to take care of. They have me only at night; I'm on the
railroad all day." "That's a sad case," said the organizer, moved to tender
sympathy. It was an April evening in Tacoma, Wash., iu 1913. "Mighty sad,
but worse still supposing you should fall off that train tomorrow; who would
care for your little babes In all the long years to come?" Mr. JoneB saw the
point; he left the children In care of a neighbor for a few hours that night,
while the foresighted father went downtown.
A month later.Brother Jones was in his grave. His three children are »t
Mooseheart, where they are being educated and prepared for lives of usefulness, protected by the strong arms of over a million .Moose.
Sign on Now at the Charter Rate and be Initiated at the First
Meeting of the Cumberland Lodge on August 27th.
WINNERS IN GRAND
RAFFLE DRAWING
illlll
(•nods and lash Prizes for Liidjsmith
In addition to the unclaimed prizes,
the following were apportioned to
Ladysmith:
Jewel Box (Weiler Bros., Victoria).
Superior Grill (Cumberland & Union
Water Works Co. Ltd.).
Electric Iron (Canadian General
£= Electric, Vancouver).
1      Make that Car look like a new one      M l^^uTv^Xi Vallance *
— —=     Fishing Rod   (McLennan,  McFeely
& Co. Ltd., Vancouver).
Twlnplex Strop (Canadian Explosives, Victoria).
Plate Glass Mirror (Bogardus,
Wlckens, Ltd.. Vancouver).
Miners' Caps  (Hardsoeg Mfg. Co).
$5 (Cammell, Laird St Co., Vancouver).
$5 (Pacific Waste Co., Vancouver).
$10 (Link-Belt North-Wcst. Seattle).
$10 (Giant Powder Co., Vancouver).
New Cars for Old
1 Phone 135 Courtenay
M AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE g
The following are the results of the
grand raffle conducted in connection
with the picnic of the employees of
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., recently. The name of the firm
donating the prize is In parenthesis:
Superior Grill (Cumberland Electric
Light Co.), No. 2115, Wong Yueng.
$5 bill (United Typewriter Co., Victoria), No. 1728, unclaimed.
Set of Carvers (W. S. Fraser Co.,
Victoria), No. 830, John Potter.
$5 bill (Staneland Co., Victoria),
No. 281, Wing See.
Electric Toaster (Northern Electric,
Vancouver), No. 153, unclaimed.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co.. Iowa), No. 1249, S. Harafugl.
$5 bill (Staneland Co., Victoria), No.
127. Kong See.
Leather Music Case (Storey &
Campbell, Vancouver), No. 901, Tom
Tapella.
$5 bill (Moore-Whlttlngton Co.,
Victoria), No. 998, Wung Sui.
Adjustable Wrench (Gordon & Bel-
yea, Vancouver), No. 2360, unclaimed.
$5 bill (Moore-Whlttlngton Co., Victoria), No. S14, Robt. McNeil.
Pair Gymnasium Boots (Dominion
Rubber System, Victoria), No. 2001.
Order for $10 goods (E. Q. Prior &
Co., Victoria), No. 161 unclaimed.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co., Iowa), No. 2023, Kuug Sul.
$5 bill (Douglas Mackay. Victoria),
No. 787, Lun Yan.
Glass Shelf and 'Supports (Crane
Ltd., Vancouver), No. 2489, J. Freloni.
$5 bill (Douglas Mackay Co., Victoria), No. 1468, Chas. J. Parnham.
Plate Glass Mirror (Bogardus
Wlckens, Ltd., Vancouver), No. 226.
F. Bott.
Fishing Rod (McLennan, McFeely
& Co., Ltd., Vancouver), No. 230, unclaimed.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co., Iowa), No. 1838, unclaimed.
$5 bill (Pacific Coast Pipe Co., Van-
ouvcr), No. 825, W. Somerville.
Twlnplex Razor Strop ( Canadian
Explosives, Victoria), No. 1904, T.
Eccleston, Jr.
$5 bill (Pacific Coast Pipe Co., Vancouver), No. 647, K. Masa.
Safety Razor (Wood, Vallance &
Leggat Ltd., Vancouver), No. 774, Lun
Sing.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co., Iowa), No. 1507, unclaimed.
Order for $5 (Compresed Gas Co.,
Vancouver), No. 1872, John Gibson.
Congoleum Rug (Barret Co., Vancouver), No. 679, Andrew Walker.
$5 bill (Great Western Smelting and
Refining Co., Vancouver), No. 280,
Mah Yen.
Set of Molders' Tools (E. J. Woodl-
son Co., Seattle), No. 1457, Chas. J.
Parnham.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co., Iowa), No. 973, Chin Poy.
$5 bill (Great Western Smelting and
Refining Co., Vancouver), No. 91,
Lung Po.
Compass with sights (Electric Blue
Print Co., Victoria), No. 1869, Alf. G.
Jones.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co., Iowa), No. 488, Sing Kee Jan.
$5 bill (Alcock, Downing & Wright,
Vancouver), No. 11, Chas. Mackintosh.
Fishing Rod (McLennan, McFeely &
Co., Ltd., Vancouver), No. 2446, Lum
Chung.
$5 bill (Alcock, Downing & Wright.
Vancouver), No. 1837, T. Eccleston, Jr.
Reinforced Visor Cap (Hardsoeg
Mfg. Co., Iowa), No. 235, unclaimed.
50 feet Garden Hose (Gutta Percha
& Rubber Co., Victoria), No. 779, John
Quinn.
Set of Step Mats (Dunlop Tire &
Rubber Co., Victoria), No. 2065, Yee
Sing.
Donated by Maccy Abbell Co., Victoria, No. 518, Sing Kee Jan.
The unclaimed prizes will bo sent
to Ladysmith to be used for a similar
purpose in connection with the Canadian Employees' picnic there on Saturday, August 6
| K. P. Auto Painting Co. m
M    ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY    jj
I ALL WORK GUARANTEED H
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
White Laundry
Leave orders at
LIDDELL'S BARBER SHOP
Dunsmuir Avenue
or Phone 47-F
when   your   requirements   will
receive immediate attention.
THE COURTENAY LAUNDRY
C.R. Mulholland
late  of Cameron's  Garage,  Cumber
land, has bought
Central Garage
Haliburton Street,   NANAIMO
and   wlll   be   pleased   to   have   the
patronage ot his old friends and acquaintances when in Nanaimo.
Repairs Guaranteed.
GAS, OILS AND SUPPLIES
Prices Reasonable.     •
The Rexall Store
For Rexall Quality
Eat Bread in the
Morning
Two or three slices of Bread
—plain or toasted—at breakfast
time is equal to, double tho
amount of other food bccau.se it
is more nourishing.
Bread is your Best Food—Eal
more of it.
Start the day right* with several substantial slices of Bread—
the food that satisfies.
You will like the flavor of
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
—the Bread that .Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Avenue     ■     (' norland
POPULAR SUMMER HOPS
TO EASTERN CANADA
Summer tourist fares, now in effect
on Canadian National Rail way 8, oiler
the holiday traveller on exceptional
opportunity of seeing Canada's natural scenic beauty spots, vast prairie
territory ami large progressive cities.
The journey to the East may be
made over the all-rail route on a
through train of solid steel equipment,
electrically lighted, antl modern in
every respect. Tliis train traverses
the fertile Fraser Valley, along the
banks of tlie Fraser River, and continues along the banks oi the- Thompson and North Thompson Itivers to
the foothills of the Rocky Mountains.
The Rocky Mountains arc crossed
at lowest altitude, nt thc same lime
affording the passenger unobstructed
views of the highest mountain peaks
(including lit. Robson, (he highest
peak in Canada,.over 13,000 ft. elevation), deep valleys, canyons and rushing rivers. The prairie district ls
then traversed for some two* thousand
miles, continuing through the gai-den
district of Ontario and Quebec, until
the terminus in the great metropolis
of Montreul Is reached, whoro convenient connection is made with trains
for the lower provinces and Eastern
states. .   .
As a variation the passenger may
enjoy the pleasures ut n short, ocean
voyage by using the palatial steamers
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
between Vancouver and Prince Rupert, and view the wonders of the
scenic sen route through sheltered
waters. At Prince Rupert direct connection is niado witli trains for the
East.
Another variation is the beautiful
water trip front Port Arthur, Ontario.
to Sarula, ou the Northern Navigation
Co. steamers—a two-day trip on un
Inland sea.
Diverse routes will be accorded
passengers al their option on either
going or return journey.
Complete information can he obtained from E, W. Bickle, agent.
WHY SIBERIA IS A LAND
WORTH FIGHTING  FOB
Frailer Hunt, writing in a current
magazine, has many things to tell en
the real Siberia of which probabl]
most people have no knowledge,
"Take a bleak forest," says .Mr.
Hunt, "with a starving pack of grey
wolves and three feel of Btiow anil a
dashing troika with a man and his
bride aud his lust cartridge, and nii.\
with long lines of bnll-and-chaln en
iles being driven Into tin1 liungrj
mouths of cruel mines, and what's the
result? A composite picture of the
Average Person's idea ol .Siberia.
"Take a country roughly 4,000 mllei
long and u thousand or two deep, with
millions upon millions ol smiling
acres, the most valuable gold mines iu
the world and more utiles nt navigable
rivers than even America has. and
mix with virgin forests yd untracked.
and coal aud nre and platinum anil
precious mines, and what's the result'.'
A composite picture of the Siberia of
reality.
" 'The last great frontier ol* the
white man.' someone hits called this
.laud of undreamod-of miles and un-
calculated wealth. And it is a land
for white men, a half-world thai will
help to conquer the rest of Uie world.
If there ever was a country worth
fighting for It Is this Siberia thai we
are talking about. That's what Die
little men of Japan think. And that's
what a determined handful "I white
men, fighting a lung light, battling I'm
almost a lost cause in Ihelr frozon
hills of eastern Siberia, think."
WE STOCK ONLY
PARKE, DAVIS' EXTRACTS AND TINCTURES
MALLINKROFT'S PURE CHEMICALS
WAMPOI.E'S PHARMACEUTICALS
OUR MSl'ENSIN't; DEPARTMENT RECEIVES OUR BEST
ATTENTION
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The   meetings   of   thc   Great   War
Veterans  Association nre held  every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock In the Mel ial
Hall.
With an
Autographic Kodak
the date anS title may be written on each film at the
time the picture is made.
This is accomplished by an autographic arrangement, a^
feature tliat is exclusively Eastman.
For pictures on the motor trip, snapshots of the children,
iu fact for iilinost any type of picture, the title, in the
years to come, adds lmieli—the date even more.
Photography expensive? Look at the price tags in
our Kodak window—or better still look ovcr the line.
Expensive? Vou never got such lasting pleasure
at so small cost,
Kodaks -fg.oo up—Brownies $2.00 rip
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
How Do You
Telephone?
When you call on a busy man at his ofliee, send in
your card, and then, when he had indicated that he
could seo you, keep him waiting while you finished
reading a magazine in his outer oilice?
It is just as important when you telephone that you
lie ready to talk when your party answers. It shows
consideration of (he other person"s time.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Acreage for Sale
(>!j acres of Land for sale,
21/4 acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. I1ICKLE
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
a minister wiih a son bo of humor
determined to stop tin* talking in his
congregation. The services wero becoming ii disgrace, one Sunday lit
arranged « sign with the choir. Ai e
given moment they Btopped singing.
A voice was heard in ono of the forward pews saying, "I always fry mine
In lard."
"As we know thnt she always fries
them in lard, wo will proreed with
Ihe service," &aid the minister, Four
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
August 6, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY. AUGUST 0, 1921.
SENSATIONALISM VERSUS TRUTH
On Thursday morning of last week ihe Vancouver Sun.
which ol late has taken to sensationalism in its news,
produced Ihe following weird story of the opium episode
at Union nay recently:
BOP ON -.TOG IS ffDiGED AM) GIVES IT HOPE
Gumshoeing along the deck of the big Blue Funnel
freighter Talthyblus as she lay in Union Bay, Creeping close behind the lor'd hatch, and then making a
Budden pounce on Hop On Wing, a particularly
emaciated Chinaman, J. C. Barton, special officer of
His Majesty's Canadian Customs, closed off one of
tbe principal avenues of dope running ou Uie Pacific
Coasi.
Dop Ou Wing was well named, as for mouths lie
has moved dupe on the wing, w ithout a doubt, and
this time iiad several thousand dollars worth of tlie
dint's iu his possession when Officer Barton landed
all fours on the celestial, and captured tbe offender,
as well as the drugs. It bas long been known tliat
drugs were leaving tbe Blue Funnel boats when they
are coaling ou Vancouver Island, but this is the first
big catch, The offender was a Chinaman employed
on tbe dock and was as sly as the doorkeeper in a
Macao gambling bouse.
The yam in the Sun Is nothing but a pack of lies, evidently tbe production of someone having a violent brainstorm. Tbe case referred to was heard before Magistrate
Baird in Cumberland on Wednesday of last week, and the
facts, as sworn to by tbe three members of the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police in evidence, and now part of the
records of the court, were published in tbe Islander of
last week. The evidence submitted by the constables in
question was substantially as follows:
Members of the R. C. M. P., Provincial Police and Customs Oflicers were on watch on the night in question—on
shore—and searching Chinese coal-trimmers as tbey came
ashore. The officers were at different stations, and during
the proceedings Constable Hicks noticed a Chinaman coming along tlie top of tbe wharf from the boat. The constable at once went to meet him and as the Chinaman
reached the botthom of the stairs leading to the ground
he came face to face witli tiie constable, who was in uniform. The Chinaman threw tbe bag at ihe constable's feet
and ran away, successfully evading search, it being late
at night. Later on Sergeant Bryan saw a Chinaman running towards the boat and arrested him; be appeared before
the magistrate in due course but Constable Hicks could
not swear that be was the man who threw tbe sack at his
feet and the case was dismissed, without 'calling any evidence for the defence.
Compare these statements with the lurid stulf quoted
above and you will not wonder that thc Sun is going down
In public estimation.
JAPAN PLANNING FUTURE IN SIBERIA
The great war taught Japan no moral lesson, but it did
teach her that a nation which failed to control the essentials of war materials—coal alld iron—would lose a
modern war. Military Japan must have these. To gain
national wealth she would grab the priceless gold mines
and the fishing rights and the economic advantages that
Ihe control of the railroads of eastern Siberia would give
her. With this wealth and these raw materials in twenty
years she would not hesitate to force any Issue with the
western world.
Japan is a master at creating situations. By leaving a
small battalion of Japanese troops in the frozen city of
Nikolaievsk she invited the fighting tbat last year resulted
in practically the annihilation of her nationals there. She
called it "the Nikolaievsk massacre" and with it as a match
she attempted through pure governmental propaganda to
light the fire of false patriotism in her people at home—
most of whom have always been opposed to the wllole
Siberian adventure—and gain popular consent to a brutal
Siberian military campaign.
When Japan moves sbe advances in three columns—
her array, ber official propaganda agents, and her commercial interests. While her official propaganda feeds the
world on tales of Red terror in Siberia, her armies kill the
game that ber commercial interests later gobble up.
Assisting in tbe complete breakdown and demoralization
of eastern Siberia by playing one side against the other,
Japan has secured great timber, mining and fishery concessions, while ber nationals have purchased for a song
valuable mining properties from impoverished and frightened Siberians.
Japan demands and will continue to demand that all
these concessions granted by various Cossack chiefs, and
these properties bought even after they had been confiscated, shall be recognized and protected by any future
Siberian government. How much farther and deeper her
demands will go, no one knows.—Frazier Hunt in the
International.
CLEANSE POLITICS IN B. C.
So long as the present demoralizing system of party
machine politics is allowed to fatten its hog-trough heelers
through public moneys stolen under legal subterfuge,
whether based upon contracts from which the party campaign funds get "rake-offs' or "commissions" on land, etc.,
allegedly bought for public purposes, such as government
railways, terminals, military camps, gravel pits, etc., so
long will our burdensome taxes be increased, and wasteful
Inefficiency of government deteriorate public service.
The fact that so niueh waste and extravagance in those
directions have been made manifest to your readers during recent years, bas palled upon tbe public, many of whom
while anxious to get rid of tbat incubus, have become so
far discouraged by the failure of political "commissions"
to rectify those subtle abuses, that tbey have begun to
weaken and cry, "What's tbe use?"
To all such. I make this earnest appeal, in the hope that
they will both practically and financially back up the
efforts now being made to free all right-minded parties
from unscrupulous deceivers, who have too long dominated
political life, to tbe enrichment of themselves, and to the
grave impoverishment of taxpayers; also to the serious
embarrassment of the great majority of worthier men and
women who can thus become the means by which our
political life can lie cleansed, and the taxation of home life
sensibly lie reduced.—-M. B. Cotsworth.
A WELL LINED WALLET
Money asks no questions, It demands no references, it
never inquires Into one's moral character, does not care
whether one is a preacher-man or a porch-climber, never
hesitates to help, neither has it the habit of looking the
other way. When one wants anything it straightway goes
and gets it, whether it is a prayer-book or a tin of tobacco.
When one Is hungry it gets one food, when thirsty It gets
that which satisfies: when one is cold it furnishes clothing, when shelterless it furnishes a home or a lodging
place: when weary it provides a resting place; when travel
and change of scenes Is desired it provides a comfortable
seat in a luxurious train and good sleeping quarters;
when amusement is craved for, money will bring any kind
of pleasure desired; when one goes hence to be no more
seen it brings out the brethren to ride or walk behind
th occupant of the hearse, and places flowers where the
party honored cannot see them; then it sets up a headstone covered with doubtful compliments calculated to
make the folks at home feel good.
So—put money in thy wallet.
Only the incompetent need be poor. Must some of us
plead guilty to the charge of Incompetency? As sure as
taxes, when the time comes that the bottom drops out of
things, and we begin to go around from good-fellow to
good-fellow trying to cash in a little of the goodfellowship
we've bought so dearly, we will obtain nothing more than
a large gone feeling In the Innards, and will then realize
that for the man without "fifteen dollars in his insidi
pocket," this is a cold and cruel world.—Okanagan Com
moner.
WHAT IS A CLASSIC?
\ true classic Is an author who lias done something to
enrich the human mind; who has really added to its
wealth; who has caused it to take another step forward;
who has discovered some incontestable moral truth, or
caught sight in the human heart, where everything seemed
known and explored, or some unrecognized but eternal
human passion; who has expressed his thought, his observation, his discovery, in some form, no matter what, which
is at once large and free, delicate and judicious, healthy
and charming; who has addressed everybody in a style of
his own, which is yet the style of everybody—a style at
once new and antique, and which may pass current for all
time.—Ste. Beuve.
GLARING HEADLIGHTS STILL A MENACE
Attempts to mitigate tbe menace of glaring headlights on
automobiles have so far not proved a marked success. All
automobiles are now supposed to lie equipped with non-
glare headlights of approved design. While certain types
of lenses are undoubtedly better than others, it is doubtful if there is sucli a thing as a lens .which will throw a
strong light on Ibe road for any distance and at the same
time not cause a blinding glare when it strikes tbe line of
vision of a motorist coming iu the opposite direction. A
powerful headlight is a great advantage when travelling
on country roads at night. Danger from tbe use of searchlights would lie largely eliminated if motorists would
religiously practice tbe courtesy of dimming their lights
when meeting another car. Motorists have tbe remedy in
their own bands, nnd it is much more effective than erratic
attempts to standardize certain kinds of headlights.
Tlie only effect of the enforced use of so-called non-glare
headlights is to render the light less efficient when picking
one's way ovcr a bad road without iu the slightest degree
protecting the motorist coming in the opposite direction.
Motorists are now inclined to rely on tbe fact that they
have non-glare headlights and neglect the precaution of
dimming. The other fellow has "non-gla're" headlights,
hut tbey glare just the same.—Free Press.
British Columbia only requires to have a few Optimists
working at their trade. The province nnd its resources
are as wonderful as ever.  Let's have a "Cheer-Up Week." 11§
British Columbians are proud ot their province, and believe in its future. They believe In it for their children
and their children's children; but only by building up
British Columbia Industries can they guarantee its future.
The dog days are responsible for many fairy tales told
by newspaper writers, but the "Bill Miner" dope now
occupying pnges of a Vancouver dally are hitting the limit.
Up here we knew "Bill" Miner—Kamloops Sentinel.
Necessity knows no law, and it is useless to appeal from
her decree.
I affirm that religion is necessary for tlle moral life of
man. And I affirm that religion Is necessary for the
spiritual life ot man. If man is to develop to his full
stature wbether morally or spiritually, it can only be with
the assistance and the guidance of religion. And so
religion must always remain with us. It cannot reasonably lie regarded as a more temporary phase of human
culture, through which men and nations pass and then
have done with it for ever. Nay. it must last while humanity lasts. It, must continue to bo the support and Inspiration of mankind throughout the ages. It is demanded hy
our very nature. For the one thing needful for the life of
man Is—God.—Rev. F. Jl. Dudden, D.D.
The majority of men are unknown to fame and fortune
-and are likely to remain so.
TALKING TREES
I think the trees only wake up at night. In the daytime
they drowse under the heat of the sun and are just trees;
but at night they whisper together; they sway softly to the
light wind that drives before the dawn. Over the tops of
the houses, with nothing to break their gaze, they can look
Into the depth of the night sky. Some trees are rounded
and placid, and prefer just to bend and murmur to the!
comrades like gracious ladies; but there are others that
lift themselves high, with aspiration in every line of the!
bearing, into the sky, to rise into the lighted darkness of
the night.
When I was a very little girl I used to lie on my back in
the fields of a great prairie farm and look into the sky for
a long, long time. There was nothing to break my vision,
and all I could see was the night sky. Gradually the feeling would envelope me that that was all there was in the
universe, and that 1 was sinking Into Into It further and
further, that I was being drowned In an immensity of
something strange and beautiful and unknown that was
too big for me to hold; and in a sudden little gaspy fear
I would struggle to the surface alld turn quickly to feel the
grass under my hand, and to look at some familiar and
terrestrial object.
The trees are face to face always with this vastness.
They must know all about It by now. Perhaps that is why
they are so strong and calm and majestic. Perhaps that
ls what they speak of, reven'ently and softly, as they rustb
 , in the light winds that escape to them every naw and
One seldom hears life alluded to as a lottery except by I then from the heaven Into which they lift their souls,
men who have drawn blanks. I ^_ —Virginia Tenor lu the Province.
NEW GOODS SHOWN THIS WEEK
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF LADIES' HOUSE DRESSES AND BUNGALOW APRONS, in Fancy Prints, Striped Chambrays and Zephyr
Ginghams.
A COMPLETE RANGE OF COTTON CREPE IN SELF-COLORS AND
NOVELTY STRIPES.
JUST ARRIVED. A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF NOVELTY LACE COLLARS AND FANCY LACE VESTEES.
NEWEST SUMMER MODELS IN C C A LA GRACE CORSETS
SPECIAL MODELS IN ELASTIC GIRDLES AND LADIES' ATHLETIC
CORSETS
Special Reductions this Week
ON
LADIES' AND MISSES' BATHING SUITS
LADIES' AND MISSES' BATHING CAPS AND SHOES
LADIES' WHITE CANVAS SHOES, PUMPS AND OXFORDS
LADIES' WHITE VOILE WAISTS
LADIES' WASH SKIRTS AND SUMMER UNDERWEAR
CHILDREN'S COTTON JERSEY PLAY SUITS, in Rose, Copen,
Brown and Navy
■li Illlll
II
The Studebaker
Light-Six       1
1   The World's Greatest  Light-Weight  Automobile   1
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil con- «
sumption.
Weeks   Motors
m
n
H       i
LIMITED
H     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.     B ■i
August 6, 1921.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
The Battery
Question Is
Have you a Willard
Threaded Rubber Battery
in your car?
Then your battery Judgment is backed by the best
brains in the automobile
business.
Car builders who are particular about battery quality specify the Willard
Threaded Rubber Battery.
Car buyers who are particular about battery performance look for the red
Thread-Rubber Trade-
Mark.
Ask about Willard
Threaded Rubber Insulation whether you are in
the market for a new battery or not. We give
authorized Willard Service.
New batteries — repairs —
recharging.
SPARKS CO.
COURTENAY
NANAIMO  nnd  DUNCAN
Willard
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While II Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITAIIY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS, "ft-
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write tor prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2620 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Soeclaltr.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
rt
r'ive
MUCH IMPORTANT
BUSINESS DEALT WITH
BY CITY COUNCIL
(Continued trom Page One)
These were ordered laid on the table.
B. C. Fire Underwriters Will Sunej*
City.
The B. C. Fire Underwriters wrote
the Council that representatives will
shortly visit Cumberland tu make a
new survey for lire insurance purposes, and asked tbe loan of a plan
to assist tliem in this work. The best
available is being forwarded.
ijilliiiiii fur Belter Housing.
When definite information first came
through that the government would
make loans under the Better Housing
Scheme for returned men, City Clerk
Mordy. not having received a satisfactory reply to his communications
in tlie matter, held a lengthy longdistance conversation witli Mr. J. Vi.
Clark, B. C. Superintendent of the
Soldier Settlement, in an endeavor to
get the best results for the men of Ibis
city. Tbat Mr. Motdy's efforts were
fruitful is borne out by the following
reply from Mr. Clark:
"Pursuant to our telephone conversation of today's date relative to the
Better Housing Scheme:
"I have withdrawn a dictated reply
to your letter of the ilth inst.. which
was passed to this Department on the
13th inst., and beg now to advise you
as follows:
The Better Housing Funds were
allotted by tbe Dominion. Government
to the various provinces on a population basis, and, similarly, by the Provincial Government to the various
municipalities.
"The City of Cumberland was allotted $3600 under the lirst loan. However, as $6000 of tlie second loan is
now available, i have had tbe forms
prepared for this amount aud enclose
same herewith in duplicate for the
necessary signatures.
"On our receipt of both copies of
the signed document, vouchers will
be prepared for the full amount and
cheque will be forwarded you iu due
course, together with one copy of the
agreement for your liles.
"The Provincial-Municipal form is
self-explanatory, but it may simplify
matters to advise you that we do uot
require plans of the houses to be submitted for approval; we look to the
municipal authorities to carry out the
terms of the agreement and do not
interfere unnecessarily with their administration."
in answer to another communication
of the City Clerk, Mr. Clark wrote:
"The department can offer no encouragement that any further funds
will be available for the City of Cumberland. The only possible chance
being that some other municipality
may yet turn down their opportunity,
which is, as you know, extremely unlikely."
The Council's action in tills matter
is reported ln another column.
Mr. Edwards Doesn't Want Tnrvln.
Iu reply to a request for his share
of money for tarvia for oiling tlie
two blocks on Dunsmuir Avenue between Third anil Fifth Streels. Mr.
Edwards wrote: "Yours of July Dili to
hand asking my approval of spending
$60 in tarvia for Dunsmuir Avenue In
your city. 1 have given the matter my
thorough consideration and beg to
state Hint I ilo not give my consent to
any expenditure at such a time, when
property owners are so heavily taxed
as we are at present, so please leave
the portioli in front of my place undone."
Bills und Accounts.
The  following  bills  and  accounts
were read and referred to the Finance
Commute:
A. Nunns, shingles  $ 15.00
W. W. Willard. supplies     D.10
Wellington Colliery Hy., freight   5.00
W. Gordon     2.20
Isolation Hospital, labor, etc  90,00
Evans, Coleman & Evans, vitrified pipe   69.02
10 sacks cement   10.69
Workmen's Compensation Board 27.67
Canadian Collieries  377.S5
Committee Reports.
The Board of Works reported that
a new 12-inch pipe had beeu laid on
the drain leading from Dunsmuir
Avenue.
Also that the clearing of Derwent
Avenue between Fourth and Fifth
Streets was progressing satisfactorily.
Provision would have to be made for
taking oil the water in the locality in
the rainy season, otherwise some of
the lots would be flooded.
The Mayor suggested that tbe Council inspect tlle street when cleared
and decide what action to he taken.
Mayor -MacDonald reported that ln
conversation with Capt. Richardson,
district engineer, the latter sold he
had received no instructions concerning tbe grading of Dunsmuir Avenue.
Xo information lias yet been received
from the Minister of Works re classification of roads.
Noxious Weeds living Cut.
Following the suggestion that thc
thistles growing on some streets and
public places he cut before the seeds
are scattered, the Council decided to
have a man cut them down, and also
to ask the management of the Canadian
Collieries to take similar action on
their property.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Dnj and Night.
"As soon as I found there was a
possibility of dishonest profit being
made iu thc position, I got out of it,"
said a business man.
"Yes, go on and finish tlie sentence,''
returned the reporter.
"I have.  I say I got out of it."
. "Yes, yes;   but my business  Is  to
discover what you got out of it."
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
Wood for Sale
$1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
Hay - Fever
SUMMED COLDS, ASTHMA,
spoil many a holiday.
RAZ - MAH
Positively stops these troubles ■
Sneezing, weezing, coughing,
weeping eyes aren't necessary—
unless you like being that way.
J1.00 at your druggist's, or write
Xempletons, Toronto, for a free trial
Sold by H. E. FROST
OPEN GAME SEASON
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. flATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Offlce:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phoue 116 Cumberland, B. C.
New   Regulations   Fix   Periods
Game, Fur-Bearing Animals
And Birds on Island.
Open seasons for big game, game
birds and fur-bearing animals have
been decided upon by tbo Provincial
Qamo Conservation Hoard, the new
regulations of which are now promulgated. The season for Vancouver Island fur various kinds ol* game are
fixed as follows.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - • B. C.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone ««
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologua
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
und Corned Beef I It l» delicious.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
Wty.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberlai.il, B. C
Thos. H. Carey
FJRE AND LIFE  LNSITIUMK
Cumberland, B, C
licit r.
1, 1021, in Juno
Delusive.
::■>, in
Noverabei
both (liiios
Deer,
September 17 to December 16, both
tiatos inclusive, excepting North and
South Saanich und the Highlands dls-
trlct, bucks only.
Ducks.
(except    wood
Ducks (except wood aud eider
ducks), Wilson nnd Jack Snipe,
Black Breasted und Qoldeu Plover,
Greater und Lesser Vellow-Le^s—
October 25, 1921, to January 30, 1922.
(•rouse anil Kraut.
November 12, 1921. to February 27.
in 22.
Grouse anil IMiiriiitain.
In the Islands electoral district, ox-
opt North Saanich, blue grouse from
September 17 to October 1; in balance of Vancouver Island, with the
exception ot South Saanich and High-
lands districts, Cowichan Municipality and Denman and Hornby Islands.
September 17 to November 13.
Quail. #
In electoral districts of Cowichan,
tisquimalt, Saanich (except Oak Bay
Municipality), Newcastle south of the
Nanaimo River, and the Islands riding, October 15 to December 31, bulb
dates iuclusive.
Pheasants.
Pheasants (except Golden and Silver Pheasants)—On Vancouver Island, except the electoral districts of
Alberni and Nanaimo, and except in
tlie Municipality of Oak Bay, cock
birds only, October 10 to November
30. In those portions of the islands
district, being Sidney Island, Moresby
Island, Pender Island and Mayne Island, October 15 to November 30. ln
Salt Spring Island and those parts of
(lie Comox district known as Denman
Island and Hornby Island, October 15
to December 31.
European Purlrito.
North Saanich, Soutli Saanich and
Highlands district. November 19 to
30, both dates inclusive.
Ban Limits.
The new regulations prescribe that
no person shall be allowed to kill,
take or have in bis possession during
the open season more than three deer,
all of which shall be of the male sex,
or more than two grizzly bear or three
bear nf other species. North of the
the main line of the C. P. U. the bag
limit of mountain sheep is two. In
the electoral districts of Columbia,
Fernie, C'ranbrook. Cariboo aud Lll-
loett one mountain sheep is the bag
limit.
For tbe purpose of defining open
seasons tor game birds and the trapping nf fur-bearing animals, the province has been divided into three districts, to be known as the Northern.
Eastern and Western Districts, as
follows:
NORTHERN.—Includes the electoral district of Atlin aud all that portion lying north of the main line nf
the G. T. P. and east uf the summit nt
the Cascade Kange.
EASTERN.—All that portion of the
Province lying east nl the suuimii ol
the Cascade Rauge ami south of the
main line of the G. T. P.
WESTERN.—That portion of the
province west of the Casemle Range
and south ot the electoral district of
Atlin.
Bay limits have been fixed as follows for the day and for tbe open
season:
Western District— Day Season
Pheasants (cocks only).,   a        36
Quail     2o       160
European Partridge      G 25
Eastern District (South Okanagan
and Simllkameen electoral districts);
Pheasants        1 12
Quail   lu        5o
Throughout Whole of Province
Ducks   2'i       150
Geese     lu 50
Brant     in        60
Grouse,  six  of  any  species   and   nol
more than twelve of all species per
day, and fifty for tbe season.
On tbe principle tbat a good tenuis
player should uot be spoiled splitting
wood, there are men who lind time to
play the game while their wives do
the splitting (tf the wood.
John: "Are you dining anywhere on
Thursday?"
Sandy (anticipating a cheap dinner):
Thursday! Let mc see. Monday, Tuesday, Wed—no, I'm not dining anywhere on Thursday."
John: "Won't you be hungry ou
Friday, old^boy!"
A group of tourists were looking
nto the inferno of Vesuvius in full
-ruption. "Aillt this just like bell!"
ejaculated a Yank. "Ah, zese Americans," exclaimed a Frenchman, "where
have zey not been?"
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accomnindutlou.     Heater"
tliniuKbnut by Electricity.
WILLIAM jonks, Proprietor,
Cumberland, li. C.
^~
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON  SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even  better than in pre-war days, and  brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made Irom  mall and  hops only.
Guaranteed Strength, 12 Per Cent.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY  PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in li. ('.   Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. I'hone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd
w
23
EVENTUALLY: 1
THEN WHY NOT NOW?
Eventually you will, like music lovers everywhere,
want to get
A Heintzman & Co. Piano
Why not get (lie best now?   It is the cheapest and
best policy in the long run.
Besides,  the price  is  lit tic  more, and  we  can
' arrange terms to suit any customer,   Write us.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS. Manager—Box 283, Vicloria
Cumberland
VICTORIA
Nanaimo
Canadian National Railwaus
ON
SCENIC
SEAS
"ONVOK ^. NJ
THROUGH
SHELTERED
WATERS
nwwriw***. |
Victoria to Prince Rupert
PALATIAL STEAMERS
SS, PRINCE  RUPEKT  CDflM   Wlf-ToPIA   ss*  PM»CB  GEORGE
Sundays, U turn.      rilUM    VlulUnlft     ffednesdn-fs, 11 iuu.
(Standard Time)
CONNECTING WITH Til HNS K01I
PRAIRIE POINTS AND EASTERN CANADA
SIMMER TOURIST PARES
COMBINE  RAM,,  LAKE   ANI»  OCEAN   FEATURES
E. W. BICKLE, Agent
CUMBERLAND, B. C. Six
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
August 6, 1S21.
r^J
Music and Ptwtoplays
t^r  I
"THE CITY OF SILENT MEN"
A Romance That Starts in a Big
City's Underworld arid Ends
On Heights of Infinite Love
Tbe famous Bridge ot Sighs in tbe
Tombs ot New York, the interior of
Slug Sing, world famous prison—
these are admirably shown in Thos.
Melghan'a new Paramount picture,
"The City of Silent Men," which
shows at the Ilo-llo on Saturday.
Jim Montgomery, a small town mechanic, leaves [or the big city to get
work. Alter appl>*lng at several
establishments In vain, he becomes
discouraged and when two crooks,
seeing he Is a greenhorn, asks him If
wants a night Job, he accepts, thinking they mean honest work, and thai
night be meets them al the door ot n
bank. They tell him to wall and taking his kit of mechanic's tqols, the
crooks enter the bank, kill Ibe night
watchman with a monkey wrench,
rob the bank, replace the wrench in
the tool kit, clrt']> it ut the boy's feel
as they run out. ami make Ihelr getaway.
Policemen find tlie bewildered boy
examining the bloody wrench, and he
Is arrested, tiled and sent to Sing Sing
prison. During his stay there, the
boy's mother fails rapidly and be.
knowing she Is dying, seeks an opportunity to escape, did Hill, another
inmate, believes Jim innocent and
plans for live years lo complete a
means for bis escape, but the plot is
discovered.
Jim finally manages to conceal himself in a box and is shipped out of the
prison. Detectives searching for him
trail him to his mother's house, and
at daybreak Jim arrives in a thicket
across the road alld lies down to
await nightfall. He awakes just at
sundown nnd sees a funeral proces
sion leaving the house. Knowing his
mother is dead, be goes to tbe bouse,
gets a change of clothes and starts
west, barely eluding the detective.
Arriving in California. Jim obtains
work in a knitting mill, works up to
the position of superintendent. A love
affair develops between Jim and the
owner's pretty daughter, Molly Bryant, hut Jim, realizing his disgrace,
withholds liis affections.   One day at
a picnic Jim sees a convict lurking in
the woods and helps him to escape,
and when Molly asks him why ho did
it. he confesses his past to her, but
tells ber he is innocent Sbe believes
him and they arrange for a wedding.
Meantime old Bill has been paroled
and now devotes his life to finding
tiie real criminal, in order to clear
Jim's name. Jim, by exercises, has
so altered his physical proportions
that he no longer fits the criminal
lescription, but he knows that the detectives can still identify him by his
linger prints. The detective, following a clue, calls at the mills on Jim's
wedding day, while he Is making a
speech to his employees, who have
tendered him a reception. Jim meets
the detective, but pretends not to
know him. While they are talking,
Jim hears that one of the girls has
caught in the needles of the machine,
lie rescues the girl and the incident
inspires him with an idea—a terrible
but sure means of destroying tiie only
remaining identification of Jim, the
convict. He places his hands In the
machine aud the needle penetrates
his linger and thumb tips.
Realizing that at last he has been
beaten, the detective tells Jim he has
won. Meantime, old Bill has found
the real murderer in a dying condition, and gets from him a confession.
This; clears Jim's name and all ends
happily.
LOVE AND SUPERSTITION
MINGLE IN COMING FILM
"The House of the Tolling Bell'
Deals with Superstition and
Passion of the South
"MOVIES" IN GREENLAND
An expedition lias left Copenhagen
for Greenland to film aa Arctic drama
there. The actors will go north to
Thuel and thence by sledge over the
Ice to Hudson Bay. Kuud Rasmussen,
famous Arctic explorer, ls In charge.
The Universal Film Company of Los
Angeles are going to Bull River, near
Cranbrook, this month, to film a picture, the scenario of which Is written
round "The Conflict," by David
Graham Phillips. There will be about
one hundred and twenty-five members
in the party and the staging and Aiming of the picture around Bull River,
Cranbrook and Rampart, wlll take
about two months. The cost of production is estimated at about {30,000.
Spark Plug: "I got fired today."
Battery:   "That's nothing;  I'm discharged, also."
"The House of the Tolling Bell" Is
the title of the photoplay which comes
to the Ilo-llo Theatre on Thursday of
next week. May McAvoy, the petite
aud charming star, is the featured
player of this newest Blackton-Pathe
production, ably supported by Bruce
Gordon.
Tlie theme of "The House of the
Tolling Bell" deals with the chivalry,
the passion and the superstition of the
South.
The plot hinges upon the division
of an extensive estate among the
heirs, upon tlie death of its old master.
One stipulation of the wlll demands
that the heir who enters the manor
house must live in it for one year. To
the natives of the community this
abode, known as "The House of the
Tolling Bell," bears an evil reputation.
Woe to the stranger who subjects himself to the "bad luck" which comes to
everyone who lives in this House of
the Tolling Bell.
A neice of the old master and the
son of the disowned daughter, unknown to each other, take up residence there. After thrilling experiences, not altogether due to evil
spirits but to wicked men as well,
they discover each other's presence.
Young, unmarried and honorable they
should not be living alone in the un
frequented house. But each other
wants the estate and something must
be done. The solution is such
amazing climax to so thrilling a story
that to tell it would spoil the enjoyment of the picture.
The patrons of the Ilo-llo Theatre
are assured of an unusual pleasure
next Thursday, for "The House of the
Tolling Bell" ls a breath-taking romance with a punch, a laugh and a
thrill.
CONVICTED OF SHOWING
IMMORAL PICTURES
MONTREAL.—Wilfrid J. Chartrand
has been found guilty of exhibiting
Immoral motion pictures mid ordered
to pay costs and give a personal bond
ot $1000 for his good behavior for the
next year, in default of which he will
serve six months lu jail.
Willie: "Pa, do all orange blossoms
produce oranges?"
Mr. Phamley: "Not all of them, my
son; some orange blossoms produce
olive branches."
What is a
Recommendation Worth?
That depends very much upon who gives
it.    For instance, we recommend Ames
Holden "Auto-Shoes" as the cheapest
miieage you can buy.
And we know a lot about tires. We have
to in our business.
Hence our recommendation should carry
some weight, apart from the fact that
we are benefiting to some extent by your
custom.
We know tliat if you buy once, you will
buy again—because you will find that
our recommendation saves you  money
on mileage.
We will give you a guarantee with Ames Holden
"Auto-Shoes" loo—a guarantee that protectsyou
against any defect in tnaterTal or workmanship
which may arise at any time in the life of the
tire. And we will gel you an adjustment on that
basis should necessity arise, without quibble or
red-tape.   Drop in .md lit us show you Ames
Holden "Auto-Shoes" to-day if you can.
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"   ►
«' id aiid Fabric Tires in all Standard Sizes
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland Phone 77
DESPERADO OPERATES
ON THE WEST COAST
,-tt
."•it.*'.*,S
•"t-AV-
•|*~"*2£»*.'   ,*>r:S»f **. %
THE EDUCATION OF YOUR CHILDREN
Have you the money with which to do it?
Start to save while they are young—let them
commence life knowing you are at the back
of them.
Savings Accounts are a specialty with
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
A desperate fugitive ls at large
somewhere on the west coast of Van
couver Island, or may have escaped to
United States territory, leaving behind him a trail of crime and mystery.
The outlaw, whose identity Is unknown, entered Ucluelet harbor In
canoe on Sunday night and boarded
a Ashing launch. Without explanation
or making any demands he knocked
down and tied up a Japanese fisherman who was the only person aboard.
The Jap, thinking his assailant was
a robber, readily offered to give up
all his money to save himself, but the
stranger announced that he did not
want money. All he wanted was to
get out of the country quickly and he
needed a launch.
With the Jap securely bound, and
the canoe in tow, the usurper took
the launch out of the harbor and
headed southward. When a short
distance out the engine stopped for
wont of gasoline. Then he took to his
canoe again and disappeared, leaving
the launch to toss and drift with the
helpless Jap still aboard.
The fishing craft was found early
Monday morning and taken back to
Ucluelet where the fisherman told the
story of the adventure.
Provincial Constable Anderson, of
Clayoquot, was informed and he Im
mediately started out to track the des
perado.
Another fishing launch, that had
been bored and sunk close to Village
Island, Barclay Sound, was found by
some Indians on Sunday morning, the
trolling mast being a little above
water.
It is suspected that there Is some
connection between the sinking of thit
launch and the latter exploit In
Ucluelet harbor.
The cause of the stranger's desperate anxiety to get away suggests
mystery of a serious nature.—Alberni
.News.
mnw..s7sm.x?v  • ,.,\ .
ALBERNI HOSPITAL IN
FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES
A public meeting has been called
for this week at Alberni to discuss
the question ot keeping tlie Wesl
Coast Hospital open. The institution
is sadly in need of financial assistance
and will have to be closed unless mort-
support ls coming, says the Alberni
News.
FEARS CHINESE MAY
CONTROL FOOD SUPPLY
'Before long the white population
of B. C. will be dependent on Orientals
for Its food supply," declared Alex. D.
Patterson, M.L.A., In a speech delivered at Cloverdale recently. He urged
the Surrey farmers to Join the new
Potato Growers' Association and Blgn
the pledge refusing to lease land to
Orientals.
The Fraser Valley will soou be as
had as Ashcroft and LUlooet," he said.
Ashcroft Is now practically owned
by Chinese."
ill
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, August 6th
Jesse L. Lasky presents
ThomasMeighan
IN-
THE   CITY  OF
SILENT  MEN
Blighting the joy of his wedding day—the shadow of prison walls!  -And
the arms of love had to yield to the law.   For a crime of which another
man was guilty!   What was the past that the bride did not know ?   What
was the future that these two souls fought through together?
A "jailbird" romance that starts in a big city's underworld and ends on
the heightrh of an infinite love.   Thomas Meighan's most appealing role
since George Loane Tucker's "The Miracle Man."
Adapted from "The Quarry.'
Cast includes Lois Wilson.
A Paramount Special Picture
Thursday, August 11th
May McAvoy and
Bruce   Gordon   in
THE HOUSE OF THE
TOLLING BELL
A PLAY OF SUPERSTITION, ROMANCE AND THRILLS
Do you think that ghosts walk? Do you believe that seven years of bad
luck comes to the person breaking a mirror? Are you afraid to walk
under a ladder? Would you live in a haunted house? Are you superstitious?
Whether you are or not, you will be interested in seeing "The House of
the Tolling Bell," a romance of love and mystery in Louisiana.
It's a drama of the old Southland, where tradition clings like ivy, and
adventure still lives in the hearts of the gallant gentle folk. In that quaint
town, the ringing of the tolling bell struck creep terror in the hearts of
the villagers. Imagine a boy looking for a ghost in this house and finding
a girl!
You must see this superb Blackton Feature
ROSES IN WINTER
How to Preserve Summer Fragrance for Your Christmas
Table—Very Simple.
To have fresh at Christmas time a
supply of rosebuds tliat grow in Ihe
nitnmcr garden, a correspondent of a
contemporary says is possible if the
directions  are  carefully  carried  out.
The process is begun by choosing
perfect buds, just opening, and gath-
jring them on a sunny day. Before
jutting, a piece ot railla must be tied
.ound the stem hy which to hold it,
is neither bud nor stnlk must be
mndled.
Have some sealing wax ready melted, cut the rosebud with about three
inches of stalk, and dip thc end of tlie
;talk in the sealing wax, which should
ie warm enough to form a blob on
he end.
Wrap each bud separately In tissue
taper, put them away In a tin box, and
vrap the box up in thick brown paper.
Put the parcel away in a box or drawer
inttl Christmas.
Then unpack your box of rosebuds,
jut off the end of each stalk above the
lealing wax, and place ln warm water.
In about three hours your rosebuds
.vlll be giving out their summer
fragrance.
Even one such bud, placed In ooe
if the graceful bud-vases that are
liked now for a single bloom, would
ie a treasure on a wintry day.
Motorist: "I haven't paid a cent for
repairs on that machine during all the
teu months that I'vo had It."
Prospective buyer: "So tlie man who
repaired It told me."
luff
Plant Home
Grown Fruit Trees
Shrubs, Roses
and place your order with the
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
who have a large lot of splendid fruit trees and other
nursery stock coming on for Fall delivery.
OUR ROSES are specially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to
plant. All our trees and plants are the finest in the
land, and are sure to please you.
PRICES REDUCED.   WRITE US TODAY.
ADDRESS—
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
SARDIS, B. C.
Department C. Mention this paper when writing. ■Mm*
■Ti
August 6, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
Fresh
Local Vegetables
Potatoes Broad Beans
Cabbage String Beans
Green Peas   Green Onions
Fresh from the Grower
 Daily
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
FORDS m DOWN
EMDE'S NEW PRICES
1921 models fully equipped with electric starter,
electric head and tail lights, dimmers, demountable
rims on all four wheels, traction tires rear, with many
other refinements, and delivered to you.at Courtenay:
Touring, with starter..***! 841.57
Touring, no starter  754.47
Runabout, with starter 774.96
Runabout, no starter... "6S7.SC
Sedan, with starter  1230.98
Coupe, with starter  112S.50
Chassis with starter  733.97
Chassis, no starter   $646.57
Truck, with starter  887.69
Truck, no starter   800.58
Light Delivery, starter S03.66
Light Delivery, no
starter   716.55
Tractor   S59.00
E. C EMDE
PHONE 46
FORD GARAGE
COURTENAY
=
FOR  SALE
Acreage   on  Royston-
Cumberland   Road
Price $30.00 JZ
Acre
APPLY—
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
am
illllllllllllllllllli
YOUR TEETH
FILLING  MATERIALS
By REA PROCTOR McGEE, Editor of
"Oral Hygiene."
Who invented filling for teeth and
what the first fillings were made of
will always remain a mystery.
We know that this work has been
done from ancient times, but ln recent years there has been such an
alarming increase ln carles (decay of
the teeth) that the prevention of decay and the repair of carious teeth
lias become an Important subject to
everyone.
There are three general classes of
lilling materials; plastics, silicates
and metals.
The plastics are the various forms
of dental cements and gutta-percha.
The silicates are a form of translucent cement tllat is an Imitation
porcelain. The colors of the teeth can
be matched accurately and this material will last well, preserving the
teeth and avoiding unsightly disfigurement that would be present it a
metal were used in the front of tbe
mouth in a large cavity.
The metals used as lining materials
are gold, and amalgam—which Is principally silver.
Tins aud platinums were used for
some years but they are now obsolete.
A metal ls used where there Is great
strain on tbe filling.
Amalgam, which is an alloy of silver made into a paste with mercury,
is the most widely used filling in the
world. It has done splendid service
and is used in those cavities where
appearance ls a secondary consideration.
Gold Is considered the most permanent of the lllliugs. There are two
ways of using gold; one ls by mallet-
ing pure gold foil into the cavity and
thus making the filling in the tooth
that it is to protect; the other way Is
to make the tilling outside the mouth
from a very accurate wax pattern of
the cavity. This is the most modern
method and Ib called an inlay.
IT'S PYORRHEA
Have you corns ou your toes?
It's pyorrhea.
Have you freckles on your nose?
It's pyorrhea.
When you hurry do you wheeze?
Are you shaky at the knees?
Are you getting hard to please?
Have you specks before your eyes?
It's pyorrhea.
Has your head increased ln size?
It's pyorrhea.
Are you restless when at home?
Are you bald upon the dome?
Did you ever write a poem?
It's pyorrhea.
Is your liver out ot whack?
It's pyorrhea.
.Have you pimples on your back?
It's pyorrhea.
Are you Itchy anywhere?
Have you dandruff in your hair?
Have you any cash to spare?
It's pyorrhea.
AUTO HINTS
HOW DO YOU TEST YOUB TIKES 1
Do not believe tho man who pretends that he can kick a tire and tell
you when there Is air enough. The
only proper test Is to use a pressure
gauge. This costs but little and is
worth its weight in gold ln saving
tires. The correct pressure is sometimes stamped on the tire, but the
rule is easy to learn: Twenty pounds
per inch of small diameter for the
rear wheels, and 18 pounds for the
front. Thus a 34x4 tire would require
80 pounds for the rear and 72 pounds
for the front wheels.
To avoid breaking spark plugs while
removing them get a wrench made for
the purpose. One which sets down
around the plug and bears on all sides
like a socket wrench is best. It will
soon pay for Itself In porcelaltAaved.
BE SUKE ABOUT VOUR STEERING
GEAR.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL DELIVERY
Conl, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to AH Parts ot District.
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE (TO TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome Hotel.
At a certain funeral ill Scotland
a fussy individual had irritated the
sexton with many needless questions
and suggestions until that harrassed
Individual exclaimed sarcastically:
"It's a' richt; but thank ye for tellln'
me aboot thae things. I'll hae pleasure in seeing that they're all duly
carried out when your ain time
comes."
Liquidation.
A colored blacksmith recently announced a change in his business as
follows:
"Notice.—De co-pardnorship herc-
to-forc resisting between me and Mose
Skinner is hereby resolved. Dem wat
owe de firm wlll settle wid mc. end
dem wat de firm owes wlll settle wld
Mose."
Go over your steering gear oeea
slonally to see if any part is coming
loose. If this mechanism fails there
is usually a serious accident. If all
parts are tight, put oil or grease
wherever necessary aud then see If
there Is any lost motion In the steering wheel. If there is an inch or so
It should be taken out. Details differ
with different designs, but they ull
have some means of adjustment. Have
this attended to at the service station.
REAL  BEER
BACK   AGAIN
Cascade Beer
Guaranteed full strength, not less than S per cent, proof spirit, is
On Sale at all Government
Vendors' Shops
This is the old-lime brew that for more than a quarter of a century has
been the most popular beer in British Columbia.
Insist on Cascade
Vancouver   Breweries  Limited
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Eleventh Sunday After Trinity.
Cumberland, 8 pm. Parishioners
will note the change of time for tlie
evening service during August.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Twelfth Sun-lay After Pentecost.
Mass at 11 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. G. B. Kinney, B.A, F.R.G.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
NEWS IN BRIEF
More than one and a quarter
million barrels of apples were exported from Canada last season, the bulk
of these going to thc United Kingdom.
The average cost of Imprisoning a
prisoner in the penitentiary is (2800.
To this must be added the loss or
damage resulting from the commission of the crime, together with the
value of the support given to dependants of the mon Imprisoned, as well
as the economic loss to the state of
the man's labor. Though a limited
amount of pay work was done at tlie
penitentiaries during tlie past year n
revenue of $143,334 was returned to
tlie government.
The average labor cost in o pair of
boots or slioes is no more than $1,
the maximum being $1.20 In a (10 pair,
said E. W. O'Dcll, an official of the
Boot and Shoe Workers' I'nlon, In
answer to a charge thai labor costs
were preventing a reduction lu Ihe
price of boots and shoes.
FOUR CONDITIONS NECESSARY
When struggling with a balky engine keep in mind tour conditions
necessary for an engine to start:
Carburetion, the correct mixture of
gasoline, and air to produce the explosion; ignition, a hot spark iu each
cylinder at the proper time to produce
the power stroke; compression, no
leakage of the compressed gas from
any part of the combusiton space;
lubrication, every part properly oiled
and free to move. Bearing these four
in mind and working to eleminate
them one by one the trouble will Anally be found and remedied.
GASOLINE SHOULD BE STRAINED
Gasoline should be strained while
it Is being poured into the tank, but a
wire gauze should be used, and not a
chamois skin. The government has
issued a bulletin against this practice,
as it is found that the friction of the
gasoline against the chamois causes
a spark which jumps from the funnel
lo the tank and so sots fire to the
vapor. Many mysterious fires which
occurred while filling tanks have now
been explained, and It Is no longer
considered safe lo strain gasoline
through a chamois skiu.
The State of Oregon lias passed 0
law making it illegal for anyone to
make any by-bids or other false or
fraudulent bids designed to stimulate
bona tide bidding at any auction sale
of pure-bred stock In the State of
Oregon. The penalty for any Infraction of this law Is a line of from $600
to $10011 or six months to u year's
imprlsoiimeut. Similar legislation la
said to be under consideration In California.
The Vancouver Fall fair will lie held
from August 13lh tu August 20th.
The big Provincial exhibition, described on the cover uf the prize list
as "a full week of education and entertainment," will be opened in New
Westminster on September 12.
Asleep over four months is the remarkable experience of Michael Fitzgerald, 13, ill with sleeping sickness.
Since March 29 he has been feil liquid
food with water at intervals.
His fellow-clerks gathered around
hliu when the news became publlc
property, and extended congratulations.
"But." said one man. "I understand-
thc girl you're engaged to is n twin.
How do you tell the difference between her and her sister?"
"Well, it's a very nice family." said
the lucky man, "and 1 don't bother
very much."
McLaughlin
Sane progress, botTi in engineering and body design,
won tho unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
Thus the Master Six is better known and more widely
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for the
Master-Six a fixed value that makes -its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK, W1LLEMAR &  WAIN
Phone 25 COURTENAY, B. C.     P. O. Box 153
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL.  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE and MARINE
LIKE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets  $156,673,215.00
Life Funds     58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
II. G. McKINNON,
Special Agent,
Cumberland.
EDWARD W. BICKLE,
District Agent,
Cumberland.
Why did tiie boy stand on tbe burning deck? Because it wns too hoi to
bit down?
"Now, my friends." said the parliamentary candidate, making another
effort I" amuse the enthusiasm of his
audience, "what do we need In order
to carry  this  constltutency   by   the
biggest majority in history?"
Tbe response was immediate and
enthusiastic.
"Another candidate!"
There   is   nothing   more
than a sure thing.
Uncertain
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C. Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
August 6, 1921.
Extra Specials for Saturday
BOYS' AND GIRLS' BATHING SUITS—
Regular price $1.50. QP\/»
Saturday price  t/tli/
HEX'S BATHING SUITS—All sizes 34 to
■12.    Regular price $1.95.
Saturday price 	
BOYS' KHAKI PANTS—Long legs; just
what the growing boys       d»*|   Qf*
$1.50
LADIES' VESTS — Interchangeable, can
be made into a V-neck or round neck as
desired.
Saturday price 	
65c
CAMISOLES—See   our  leading   line   in
White and Pink Camisoles,
trimmed with val lace	
95c
want.  Saturday price, pair
GIRLS' MIDDIES,  with  colored   collars,
95c
for ages S to 11 years.
Saturday price 	
95c
LADIES' WAISTS—Only ten in the lot;
sizes  10,  12 and 44.   White Voile and
Striped White and Black Voile.
Price 	
GIRLS' HATS—Only a few left. Regular
price $2.50 each. QP>/»
Saturday price  t/OC
LADIES' HATS—Your choice of any hat,
prices up to $9.50. Out (j*sy QP
they go Saturday at    tp^ut/i)
LADIES' EXTRA SPECIAL VOILE
WAISTS—Regular values <J»/» QP
$9.50 to $12.50, reduced to  *p\3.uO
OUR LEADING LINE IN LADIES' HOSE
—Black, White and Brown.        QPCp
Per pair ....N Ou-L
Or  three pairs $1.00
EXTRA SPECIAL IN TOWELS
We think we have the bst value on the
market in Bath Towels; English make;
striped Grey and White. Very      *TK/»
large size, each    *■* ***-'
Phone 134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
NOTICE
Simon Leiser & Co. Ltd. will be obliged if those still owing the flrm will pay same to
J. Sutherland at Sutherland's Dry Goods Store at their very earliest, so that the complete closing of their interests may be done as speedily as possible.
SIMON LEISER & CO., LTD.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
July 2S—Dola and Scow, Victoria;
Shamrock, coastwise.
July 29—Charmer, Vancouver; Kin-
derdijk, Tacoma; Quathiaski and scow,
Quathiaski Cove; Hilda and scow,
Faultless, coastwise.
July 30—Oivenchy, coastwise.
July 31—Deep Sea. Seattle; Active,
coastwise; Hulk 100, Vancouver.
August i—Esdud, coastwise; Joyful. Comox.
August -—Hope, coastwise.
August 3—Daring, coastwise; Jessie
Mac. coastwise.
ALBERNI OFFICIALS
ASK GOVERNMENT TO
WITHDRAW CHARTER
ALBERNI.—The Hoard uf Trade and
city ollicials of Alberni decided that it
would be in the best interests of the
public to ask the provincial government to withdraw the charter of the
city. A petition to this effect has been
circulated and signed by a large majority of taxpayers and voters. The
different city utilities will be taken
over by a local company and operated
as at present, it was slated.
With lower taxation il is expected
Unit many new settlers will locate
here. The financial position of the
town is sound, and strong resolutions
were passeil at tbe local Hoard of
Trade and City Council meeting protesting against tbe appointment by the
government of a receiver or commission In the eiiy.
Port Alberni, although only three
miles from Alberni, is a separate city,
and will not be affected If this change
is made. A convention of tlie municipalities of 11. C. will be held jit the
"port" end of this month.
"ALF'S BUTTON"
JAPANESE COMMITTED
FOR TRIAL ON ROBBERY WITH VIOLENCE
(Continued from Page One)
The famous llritish film comedy,
"Alfs Hutton." was shown to a capacity house on Thursday night at the
Ilo-llo. Cable reports from London
said that all London was aching after
seeing the famous comedy. Patrons
who visited the Ilo-llo certainly got
their money's worth, as the picture is
a scream from start to finish. If you
have not seen this Incomparable com-
edy, go to the Ilo-llo tonight (Friday)
and see the last performance here. It
begins at S.15. Anyone who has a
sense of humor will hold their sides
laughing at this hilarious comedy.
■•"■ - '.vise ones will take a card ot
1, helor buttons and a few spare
afcty pins—you may need 'em with
all the laughter.
Teacher: "Can any of you tell mc
what a svnonym Is?"
Bright Boy: "Please, teacher. It's
tlie word you use when .vou can't spell
the other one."
accused fire any shots. While waiting
at the track Constable Bell appeared
and arrested accused.
The third Japanese in the gambling
aouse produced two revolvers when
the others grabbed the money, and
shouted, "Stop!   Stop!"
Witness was cross-examined by Mr.
Kussel at considerable length.
Constable Bell gave evidence that
on tlie night iu question he was ln the
vicinity of Chinatown when four shots
rang out; he ran there and found
a crowd of excited Chinamen. In consequence of what he heard he went to
the railway track and saw Chtnamen
standing there aud the accused in a
crouching position. Asked what he
was doing there tlle Japanese said he
threw money in the busy because the
Chinamen were gaining on him. The
constable asked him where he got It
and was told that he had robbed a
Chinese gambling house, as his partner had said grab the money because
the Chinese were cheating. Constable
Bell returned to the gambling house
wilh the accused, asking a-Chinaman
to look around where the Jap was
searching and see if he could find a
gun. Just us they got inside the
house Choo Hoy came In with a .32
calibre revolver.
He examined the Chinaman who
was shot, and found he had a wound
in his back. The wounded man said
the accused did not shoot him but
grabbed tlie money. He took the
wounded man to the hospital and the
accused to the lock-up. On searching
him several bills were found which
plainly showed they had been in a
scuffle.
Shue Hoy, Jung shue and Wong
Shue were also called as witnesses,
their evidence being substantially the
same as that of Sal Yee. They were
subjected to cross-examination by Mr.
Hussell.
At this stage of the case counsel
again had a debate as to the state ot
the case, Mr. Russell asking his worship if he would weigh the evidence
he was prepared to submit for the defence as against that given by the
Chinese, which the counsel alleged was
unrelaible.
Magistrate Baird said he would believe the evidence presented by the
prosecution, but would not weigh the
evidence, but would commit the accused for trial.
The question of ball for the accused
having to be dealt with by a judge,
Mr. Itussell pressed his worship to
suggest a sum, which after some discussion was named at $2000. However, this Is only a suggestion and It
Is tor the^ judge to name the amount.'
MONTENEGRIN PEOPLE
SEEKING JUSTICE
A petition which has received some
400 signatures of Cumberland folks ls
being circulated by Mr. .Michael G.
Bulatovich. This petition alleges rank
injustice against the Montenegrin
people and seeks redress. It reads as
follows:
"To the governments of all civilized
peoples.
"In spite of the formal and solemn
promises of the Allied and Associated
Governments, guaranteeing the independence and the sovereignty of
Montenegro; in spite ' of reiterated
affirmations Uiat the allies took up
arms to defend the dignity of peoples
and independence of the nations, we
are today assisting at the most barbarous persecution and systematic extermination of the Montenegrin people, whose country has been ravished
from "them by an annexation at once
hypocritical and brutal.
"The International Committee for
Montenegrin Independence, tlie International Offlce for the defense of the
Rights of Peoples, at Geneva, the Pro-
Montenegro committees in America, in
England, in Italy and in France, as
well as the undersigned, demand, in
the name of Humanity thirsting for
peace and justice, in the name of the
morality which is its base, In short, In
the name of thousands of .Montenegrins, of their wives and children who
are suffering and dying:
1. The evacuation of Montenegro bv
the Serbian troops and authorities;
"2. The consultation of the Montenegrin people hy means of a free
plebiscite with every guarantee of Impartiality;
"3. The despatch of an Impartial
commission of Inquiry to establish the
conduct of the Serbs In Montenegro
conduct which Is, according to the
confession of the Belgrade and Agram
Press, contrary.to the most elementary principles of morality and humanity."
Personal Mention
Mrs. W. McLellan and son George
left for Vancouver Tuesday on a two
weeks' visit to friends.
Mr. L. B. Toombs of Vancouver was
in town Wednesday and Thursday on
business.
Mr. W. J  Crooks of Vancouver ar-
•ivod on Wednesday.
Mr.  P. J. While of Victoria was
visitor during the week.
.Mr. John Sutherland, of Sutherland's
Dry Goods Store, went to Vancouver
Wednesday on a business trip.
Mr. Joseph C. Class, assistant manager of tbe Bank of California. National Association, accompanied by
Mrs. Glass and daughter Ruth, also
Mr. Mllo J. Loveless, lawyer, and Mrs.
M. J. Loveless, were an aun» party
from Seattle. Wash..* on a tour of Van-
coin er Island. The parly arrived in
Cumberland ou Tuesday, spent the afternoon on the shores ol* Comox Lake,
and then left for Campbell Lake.
.Mr. and Mrs. C. It. Drader left for
Victoria Monday morning. Mr. Drader
will proceed to San Francisco, Cal.,
where he will continue his studies at
the University. Mrs. Drader will return Saturday.
Miss J. Balagno, of the Royal Bank
of Canada, returned Saturday from
Victoria, where she had been spend-
ing two weeks vacation.
Mr. Charles Graham. District Superintendent Canadian Collieries (Duns
muir)  Ltd.,   relumed   from   Victoria
Tuesday.
Miss Jean Graham returned to Victoria Monday morning after spending
two weeks' vacation with Miss Janet
Graham at Little River.
Mr. A. B. Gatz left for Carbonado.
Wash., Monday.
Mr. Thos. Graham. General Superintendent Canadian Collieries iDuns-
nnilr) Ltd., left for Victoria Thursday
morning.
Miss Bess B. Stewart leaves for Van
eouver Saturday morning after spend
ing three weeks' vacation with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. Stewart.
Mrs. Murphy, Mrs. Kinser and Miss
Klnser arrived Friday from Seattle,
on a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Graham.
Miss Ruth Clinton left for Victoria
.Monday morning.
Mr A. B. Jones is expected to arriv*
Saturday evening from Portland. Ore.
on a visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs
Wm. Jones.
Mrs. Lowden and family, after
spending a vacation in Cumberland,
motored to Nanaimo this morning en
route for Vancouver. During their
stay in town they were the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Jones.
Mrs. Burrell of Victoria arrived on
Monday and returned Tuesday, accompanied by Miss Katherine Lymn,
Mrs.  J.  Fouracre  left for Victoria
Thursday morning on a vacation.
Mr. W. R. Rickson of Vancouver ar
rived Tuesday evening on a visit to
his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Rickson of Dunsmuir Avenue.
GEORGE O'BRIEN LEFT
FOR CALIFORNIA FRIDAY
TO CANVASS ISLAND
FOR PUBLICITY FUND
Victoria   and   Island   Development Association Executive Takes Action.
Two delegates of the Victoria and
Island Development Association will
tour Vancouver Island for the purpose
of convincing up-Island centres of the
importance of contributing to the general fund for publicity work of the
Island.
The Development Association will
undertake this canvass in the hope
that the rest of the Island will put
aside the unfairness which has existed for some years in that Victoria and
neighboring districts have supplied
the publicity fund for the whole Island.
Accepts    Responsible   Position
With Coal Company in Mon-
terey County.
Mr. George O'Brien. Safety Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited, both here and at Ladysmith,
left Friday morning for California, he
having accepted a very lucrative position with the Stone-Cannon Coal Co.,
Monterey County, in that state.
President John H. Leavell and Chief
Engineer Early W. Brooks, of the
company, come to British Columbia in
search of the best man available. They
were referred to Mr. Thomas Graham
as being one of the most able and successful mining men in the Dominion.
After hearing their requirements, Mr.
Graham, while loath to lose his services, unhesitatingly recommended Mr.
George O'Brien as the man they needed. The gentlemen offered Mr. O'Brien
such splendid financial remuneration
tliat he decided to sever his connection and go south.
His many friends will regret losing
blm but wish him every success in his
new station.
Mrs. O'Brien and family will follow
later.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
Wiio is the beginner in swimming
wiio went out of her depth at Royston
the other day? Safety First swimmers
should not go further out than where
their toes can touch bottom.
Who is the man who is in the habit
of "singing" until 2 a.m. and keeping
his neighbors awake?
Which little lady again lost her hat
overboard ou Sunday? Helen again.
If it is correct that the "Cumberland Warbler" is going to succeed
Caruso and appear in the Metropolitan
Theatre, New York, in the near future?
Who sat on a crate of young pigs
and got bitten by one of them Friday
morning? A very prominent city official could tell something. Two Cumberland gentlemen were at Royston
waiting for the train, and were discussing the new boulevard. On the
station was a crate containing ten
young porkers. One of the men sat
down on the crate and began to draw
plans thereon, to convince his friend
of the benefits of the scheme. Pre»-
ently he let out a yell and jumped three
feet In thc air.
KEEP   COOL
Summer Drinks
SHERBET AND LEMONADE POWDERS
RASPBERRY VINEGAR
GRAPE JUICE
LOGANBERRY' JUICE
LIMEADE AND LEMONADE CORDIAL
LIME JUICE AND HIRES ROOT BEER
SPECIALS
Potted Meats 2 tins for 2iic ami 3 tins for 25c
Lobster, i.'..-lb. tins, 30c   i ..-lb. tins 55c
Sardines   3 tins 25c
LIBBY'S PICKLES
Chow, Sweet Chow,   Relish,  Sour Mixed   and  Sweet
Mixed and Gherkins
3  for  $1.00
Libby's Salad Dressing, bottle  35c
Libby's Prepared Mustard, bottle   25c
Sodas, per package 35c 3 for SL00
Pilchards, flats 2 for 25c tails, each 25c
Pink Salmon, Hats 2 for 25c tails, each 25c
Squirrel Brand Peanut Butter, tin   25c
Corn Flakes   2 pkgs. 25c
Post Toasties, pkt. 15c  7 for SLOG-
FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUIT
Plums, Peaches, Cherries, Bananas, Lemons, Oranges,
Grape Fruit, New Apples. Cantaloupes.
VEGETABLES
Fresh Tomatoes and Cucumbers, Celery Head Lettuce,
Green Cabbage, Onions, Beets, Carrots and Turnips.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR
Casaba Melons,  Pears,
Preserving Cherries
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
B. C. LABOR NEWS IS
LATEST PUBLICATION
The British Columbia Labor Xe>ws
the new official organ ol the Vancouver Trades ami Lai.or Council, made
it.*; appearance this week. Mr. H. W.
Watts is editor and manager.
300 NEW BOOKS FOR
CUMBERLAND LIBRARY
Mr. J. \V. Tremlett, librarian, announces that he has received a new
set of some 300 books, which are now
on the shelves and going into circulation like hot cakes. Profiting by the
experience aud demand of the reading public as shown during the time
the library has been open, the librarian has been able to get a supply of
hooks such as subscribers like most.
NEW LIQUOR STORE
WILL OPEN SHORTLY
Mr. Bohhy Thomson took charge of
his new premises on Dunsmuir Ave.
on Monday nml carpenters nre now
busy getting the place into condition
for the new trade. It is expected that
the new store will he open early in
tlie week with a stock both of heer
and hard stuff,
The city engineer and his assistants
naked oui one block of Dunsmuir
ivctnie on Thursday afternoon, ready
for grading. However, the rain came
on ami delayed matters. Some of the
stakes are still standing, others being
knocked down by passing automobiles,
the language of the drivers adding to
tlie temperature considerably.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month, in
the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Ranger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F. Slaughter,
Treasurer.
NOTICE
Mass Meeting of Employees
A Mass Meeting of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Employees will
ie held on
Sunday, August, 7, at 10.30 a.m.
in the Athletic Hall.
Matters of importance will be discussed.
ROBT. WALKER.
CHAS. O'BRIEN.
Madame   Mordunt
OF VANCOUVER
will be pleased to meet ladies
desirous of having: their Sports
Suits, Dresses, Evening Frocks,
etc., made to order.
Present address:
Courtenay Hotel, Courtenay.
PERSONAL  MENTION
WE CLEAN* OR DVE SOILED OR
Faded Garments, Housefurnlshlngs,
etc. Let us send you our price list.
Waterproofs "reproofed." Permanent Dye Works Limited, 1611 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver, B. C.
LOST AT UNION BAY
BUNCH OF KEYS AT BALL GAME,
I'nlon Bay, on Wednesday evening.
Please notify Islander. 1-32
FOUND
CAP OF AUTOMOBILE GAS TANK
on Thursday. Owner can have same
on applying to islander and paying
for this advertisement. 1-31
FOR SALE
PURE-BRED BELGIAN HARES AND
Cross-bred Rabbits for sale. Apply
Jack Fouracre, Penrith Avenue. 3-34
FURNITURE FOR SALE-LTGiTrElT-
day high oven range, McClary hot-
blast heater, carpets, dining-room
suite (S pieces), brass bed, child's
crib, Morris chair, »icker chair,
princess dresses, sink, clarinet,
Boehn system, etc. C. McMillan, 53
Camp. 1-32
SIX-ROOMED HOUSE AND THREE
acres; also
CHEVROLET CAR, .MODEL ' 1920—
first-class order, been very little
used. Cheap for quick sale. Apply
H. Thompson, Royston Road.    3-34
1920 MITCHELL ROADSTER FOR'
sale—Equipped with cord tires and
one spare tire; $1960 cash, or $2000
on terms. Car Insured for $2700.
For particulars telephone 16, Courtenay.

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