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The Cumberland Islander Jun 23, 1923

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLAND
'/■»» With which li eeaioIMated the Cumberland Sews.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR.—No. 26.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY. JUNE 23rd, 1923
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
ANNIE TILBURY O'BRIEN
LAID TO HER REST
The Funeral ol Annie Tilbury
O'Brien took place oh Sunday afternoon (rom Grace MethodlBt Church
to the Cumberland Cemetery. The
deceased was the eleven year old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles
O'Brien of this city. Only the memory o( the lovely child is left, yet how
sweet, how uplifting its influence.
For, after all, death is but the slipping
off of the outer body. The taking
away of this child has left a sad
Home, but the memories thereof can
fancy her awaiting them ln the place
prepared for her, a little apart (rom
the Innumerable company in bright
array; In the light. Not o( the sun,
neither o( the moon. We see her beyond the fields of fadeless asphodel,
under the waving palms, beside the
still waters bordered with silver lilies. These may be merely figures,
but they bear n precious meaning to
yearning hearts, made (or the deep
household loves. Hearts that will not
bo comforted because the angel of
the House is missing.
The Rev. J. R. Butler delivered an
impressive funeral sermon and the
pall hearers, Olive Richardson, Lily
Banks, Ella Burns, Nora Glen, Elizabeth Cunliffe, and Olive Jones were
school friends of the deceased. Floral
tributes are as  follows:
Pillow:—Mother and Dad, Bros,
and sisters.
Lyre:—Mrs.   Whitehouse   and   Bill
Wreaths:—Uncle George, Aunt Sadie and Kathleen, Mrs. John Mc-
Comb and family, Nanaimo, Grace Methodist Church Sunday School, Grace
Methodist Ladles' Aid, Four Square
Club, Girls of W. H. 0. Club Grace
Methodist Church, Board of Management C. L. and A. A., Harmony Re-
bekah Lodge, Mr. and Mrs. Holland.
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Davis, Mr. and Mrs.
W. G. Ewans, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Mumford, Mr. and Mrs. J. Walton, Miss
Irene Bateman, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Brown, Edna and Irene Davis, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Williams, Mr. and Mrs.
Jim Boyd, Josie Berghiner.
Crosses:—Mr; and Mrs. T. Cunliffe
and (amlly, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gordon, Teachers and pupils, Cumberland
School, Leland and Claudia, Hazel
Mounce, Mr. and Mrs. Glen.
Sprays:—Uncle Paddy, Aunt Mary,
Kathleen and Helen, Mr. and Mrs. I.
Foster and (amily, Ruth, Muriel and
Franklin, Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Fraser
(Qalicum) Mr. nnd Mrs. A. Lockhart
nnd (amlly, Mrs. E. W. Bickle, Mr. and
Mrs. F. Wllcock, Miss King and Miss
Shepherd. Miss Haywood, Mjr. and
Mrs. McCullock and Jimmy, Cousin
All' and Agnes, Margaret Robinson,
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Hughes and (amlly, Mr. nnd Mrs. L. H. Finch, Tommy Huby.
ANNOUNCEMENT
The G. A. Fletcher Music Co., Limited o( Nanaimo are now being re.
presented in Cumberland, Courtenay
and districts by Mr. J. Westover, who
has been appointed their sole representative (or Pianos and Phonographs.
The G. A. Fletcher Music Co., Limited are exclusive Agents (or the
Gerhard Heintzman, which is undoubtedly Canada's greatest piano,
Stelnway pianos, known the world
over as ono of the highest grade pianos and used by the greatest musicians throughout the universe, Nord-
helmer, Bell, Craig and other leading makes.
The New Edison Diamond Disc Pho
nograph, which has been long en-
Joyed by many satisfied owners
throughout the district, Fletchers' being the sole representatives (or this
district.
The Victor Victrola nnd other
standard makes of Phonographs are
also to be had.
Therefore it is now possible (or the
people of Cumberland and Courtenay
districts to enjoy the best possible, nt
a price within the rench of all.
ELKS HAVING BIG TIME
HANDSOME DONATION OF $500.00
Chairman Partridge and the Fire
wardens of this city Interviewed Mr.
Thomas Graham, Gen. Superintendent
of the Canadian Collieries, (Dunsmuir) Ltd. a few days ago, soliciting
a donation towards the proposed expenditure of J2.sno.oo in remodelling
the Fire Hall, we are informed that
the result of the interview is that
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited will give financial assistance
to the extent of $500.00.
The Elks are having a grand open
air dance at Royston next Wednesday
June 27th.
If you attend, you will certainly be
satisfied with the floor, which Is 60x
120, edge ground and plained lumber.
The orchestra Is being composed of
the best talents on Vancouver Island,
and will be 8 or 10 pieces.
Refreshments will be Buffet style,
under competent management. The
proceeds are for the Kiddie's fund, so
give your wholehearted support and
bring ns many friends ns you can.
Parking space for 200 cars near
courts. Don't forget to come and
support the Kiddles next Wednesday,
June 27th.
CHANGES SCHEDULE
R. Kaplansky. Optometrist will hold
office hours on Tuesday, July 3rd Instead of Monday and Tuesday, owing
to Monday being Dominion Day.
After that date he will hold office
hours every first and Third Monday
and Tuesday of each month.
MISS HARDISTY MEETS
WITH NASTY ACCIDENT
COMPLETE TENNIS COURT
Messrs. Idiens nnd Ash, by the end
of this week will have completed one
of thc finest Tennis Courts ln thc
Province, situated In a beautiful spot
on the walor front nt Royston. The
dimensions arc CO by 120. The floor
is made of llxll No. 1 Edge grain
double dressed nnd without a nail
visible on the entire space. Stage
dancing pavilion with nn orchestra
stand In thc centre. Lavatory, cloak
rooms nre some of the features of the
Royston Tennis Court.
An ideal spot tor open air concerts. The court will be illuminated
with a mass o( electric lights, so that
dancing or tennis may be indulged
lu cither day or night. This beautiful Tennis Court will be opened by
the Elks' Dance on Wednesday, June
27th.
On Sunday afternoon last, a car belonging to Mr. Herbert Bridges and
driven by Miss M. Mlchell. who we understand was taking lessons in driving, ran into some loose gravel and
before Mr. Bridges could offer any
assistance at the wheel the car struck
a stump and turned over.
Miss Hardlsty, ol Victoria, who
was in the rear seat with Mr. Kennedy, on seeing an accident was unavoidable Jumped out of the car, and
was caught under the running board.
The car was raised a little, enabling
Mr. Kennedy to release the imprisoned girl. Mr. J. N. McLeod of Courtenay came along and conveyed the Injured girl to St. Josephs' Hospital,
where she now lies in a critical condition.
The section of the highway adjacent to Oyster River Bridge, where
the accident happened, Is no place (or
anyone to learn to drive a car. It is
hard enough road (or an experienced
driver and persons who contemplate
learning to drive would be well advised to give this section of the highway a wide birth.
WHIST DRIVE AND
DANCE SATURDAY
Prize Winners At The
Cumberland Schools
Competition held at Courtenay,
June 15th and at Cumberland
June 22nd.
The Ladles Auxiliary of the G.W.
V.A. will hold a Whlst Drive and
Dance in tho G.W.V.A, Hall on Saturday, June 23rd. Whlst commences
at 8 p.m. and dancing at 10 p.m.
Refreshments will be served. Admission 50 cents.
GOLF CLUB MEETS
ROYSTON FESTIVAL
SUCCESSFUL AFFAIR
The Community Club of Royston
held a very successful Strawberry
Festival on the beautiful grounds of
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wllcock on Wednesday. The receipts are to go to-
words the purchase of a piano for
tho use of the Club and School Children.
The Courtenay Golf Club held a
meeting In the City Hall on Thursday
evening last, when Incorporation was
undertaken by a committee comprising Messrs. Tribe, Brown and Pldcock. Half the purchase price of
the grounds has already been subscribed and tho club ls ln a good,
sound financial condition. Monthly
competitions have been arranged, the
firBt to he held July 1st. *
BLt NT & EWART LTD. specialize
In satisfactory repair work. Phone
01, Courtenay.
Prizes—Writing.  Section A.
Class I.
1, Mah Wool, 90. Cumberland
2. Joe Town, 88, Cumberland
2. Chou Hoe, 88, Cumberland
3. Margaret Good, 86, Union Bay
3. Florence Atchison, 85, Union Bay
Class Ha.
1. Harvey Hurd, 7G, Cumberland
2. John Bannerman, 75, Cumberland
2. David Marshall, 75, Cumberland
2. Bryson Parnham, 75, Cumberland
2. Klyoka Abe, 75, Cumberland
2. Hutsuko Higashl, 75, Union Bay
3. Agnes  MacKinnon, 70, Cumberland
3. Ktkuye Nlshlkawa, 70,   Cumberland
3. Cyril Edwards, 70, Royston
Class lib.
1. Quong Chong, 75, Cumberland
2. Jamie Joe, 70, Cumberland
(Cumberland only)
2. Jennie Lawrence,   70,   Cumberland.
(Cumberland only)
3. Chou Kee, 60, Cumberland.
Class III.
1. Nina Shields, 70, Cumberland
2. Jack Coe, 69, Cumberland
3. William Piket, 60, Courtenay
3. Annie Caudmore, 60, Courtenay
Class IV.
1. Nina Loyd, 80, Courtenay
2. Mary Bell, 78, Courtenay
3. Alice Hurford, 75, Courtenay
3. Chiyeko'Kajlyama, 75,   Cumberland
3. Mlnom  Tahara,  75, Cumberland
Class V.
1. Tatsumi Iwasa, 76, Cumberland
2. Alko Yosklkum, 75, Cumberland
3. Addle Plercy, 74, Courtenay
Class VI.
1. Jessie Grant, 77, Cumberland
2. Mary Gozzano, 75, Cumberland
"3. Dora Good, 73, Union Bay
Class VII.
1. Marjorie Fletcher, 80, Courtenay
2. Caroline Gozzano. 75, Cumberland
2. Agnes Williams, 75, Courtenay
2. Kathleen  Hnggnrty,   76,    Union j
Bay
3. Toshlko Iwasa, 70, Cumberland
3. Mabel Jones, 70, Cumberland
3. Thelma Walker. 70, Courtenay
3. Dorothy Sutherland, 70, Courte-
nay
3. Annie Mackay, 70, Union Bay
3. Janet Marshall, 70, Union Bay      j
Section  B.  .Manual Arts
Prizes
Class I.—Receiving Class:
1. Madge  Bryan,  Cumberland
2. Johnny   Hah,  Cumberland
3. Margaret Williams, Cumberland
Class I.
1. Chou Hoe. Cumberland
2. Alice Pidcock, Courtenay
3. Stanley Douglas, Courtenay
Class II a.
1. Mitsuko Yoshida, Cumberland
2. Bryson, Parnham, Cumberland
3. David Marshall, Cumberland
Class lib.
1. Chou Kee, Cumberland
2. Walter Tarling, Courtenay
3. Arthur Good, Union Bay
Class III.
1. Angus Hamilton, Puntledge
2. Kitty Prior, Cumberland
3. Colton Hngnrty, Courtenay
Class IV.
1. Tusku Oyama, Cumberland
2. Mary Bell, Courtenay
3. Ruth Pldcock. Courlenay
Clnss V.
1. Tatsumi  Iwasa. Cumberland
2. Eileen Grieve, Courtenay
3. Wilfred Colling, Cumberland
Class VI.
1. Burnadlne Shannon, Courtenay
2. Stewart MacQulllan, Courtenay
3. Dora Good, Union Bay
Class VII.
1. Annie Bowden, Union Bay
2. Kathleen Good, Union Bay
3. Dorothy Sutherland, Courtenay
Section f. Geography
Prizes-
Class Ha.
1. Jack Marpole, 95, Cumberland
2. Mah Wool, 92, Cumberland
3. Ronald  Saunders, 88, Courtenny
Class  lib.—(Cumberland only).
1. Charlie Gomm, 90, Cumberland
2. Harold Hughes, 85, Cumberland
3. Lome Murdock, 83, Cumberland
Class HI.
1. Muriel Harrison, 95, Cumberland
1. Billie Mackay, 95, Courtenay
1. Margaret Brown, 96, Courtenay
G. W. V. A. NOTES
2. Sidney Hunt, 92, Cumberland
3. Quong Chong, 90, Cumberland
3. Joe Whyley, 90, Cumberland
3. Jack MacLean, 90, Courtenay
3. Charlie Nisbet, 90, Courtenay
3. Jim Webb. 90, Courtenay    '
3. David Idiens, 90, Royston
3. Angus Hamilton, 90, Puntledge
Class IV.
1. Reta Devoy, 96, Cumberland
2. Donald Haas, 94, Courtenny
3. Margaret McDonald. 92, Cumberland
Class V.
Stanley Williams, 95, Courtenay
2. Alko Yoshikum, 92, Cumberland
3. Mah Shun, 90, Cumberland
3. Eileen Grieves, 90, Courtenay
Class VI.
1. Oral McNeil, 95, Courtenay
2. Low Yuen, 90, Cumberland
3. Kathleen Moore, 88, Courtenay
3. Dora Good, 88, Union Bay
Class VII.
1. Olga Owen, 95, Cumberland
2. Toshlko Iwasa, 92, Cumberland
3. Mabel Jones, 91, Cumberland.
Section  I),  Composition
Prizes-
Class 11 a.
1. Chrissie Robertson, 90, Cumberland
2: Agnes  MacKinnon,  85,  Cumberland
3. William MacNaughton, 80, Cumberland
Class II b.—(Cumberland only)
1. Robert Marshall, 74, Cumberland
2. Jonnie Lawrence, 69, Cumberland
3. Hiroshl  Okuda, 68, Cumberland
3. Alice Taylor, 68, Cumberland
3. Doris Drew, 68, Cumberland
3. Joe Whyley, 68, Cumberland
Albert Drew, 68, Cumberland.
Class III.
1. Howard Sutton, 90, Courtenay
2. Willie Stewart, 85, Courtenay
3. Nellie Walker, 80, Cumberland
Class IV.
1. John Tribe, 85, Courtenay
2. Evelyn McKenzie, 83, Courtenay
3. Harold Cornwell, 81, Puntledge
Clais V.
1. Hazel Warren, 92, Courtenay
2. Norman Frelone, 90, Cumberland
3. Norma Parnham, 88, Cumberland
Class VI.
1. Oral McNeil, 90, Courtenay
2. May Hughes, 87, Cumberland
3. Greta Kay, 85, Union Bay-
Class VII.
1. Marjorie Grant, 86, Cumberland
2. Ella Burns, 84, Cumberland
3. Marjorie Rigler, 82, Courtenay
Section K.—History
Prizes-
Class IV.
1. Mlchuslki Aslilknwn. 95. Courtenay
2. Kitty Prior, 90, Cumberland
3. Thomas Hughes, 87, Courtenay
Clnss V.
1. Thelma Munroe, 95, Courtenny
2. Eileen Grieve, 92, Courtenay
2. James Rushton, 92, Courtenay
3. Hazel Warren, 90, Courtenay
3. Alko Yoshikum, 90, Cumberland
3. Clifford  Laver, 90, Royston
Clnss VI.
1. Emma  Picketti, 95, Cumberland
2. Robert Ash, 93, Royston
3. Alastalr MacKinnon, 92,  Cumberland
Class VII.
1. T. McPherson, 97, Courtenny
2. Geo. Edwards, 95, Courtenay
2. Richard Idlens, 95, Royston
3. Toshlko Iwasa, 93, Cumberland
Poems: —Cumberland:
Margaret Robinson, 1st poem
Elizabeth Cunliffe 2nd poem
Vera Picketti, 3rd poem
Courtenay—Clnss  IV.
Jack Homes, 1st poem.
Sowing- (ourlenaj
1st William McKay, section II., Item
G.
ClnsslV.—3rd   Mabel   Dock,   Item   E.
,       2nd Mlrron Thomas, Item E.
Class VI.—Cumberland Sewing — II.
1st Jessie Grant, item G.
1st Jessie Grant, item C.
Class V.—1st Mary Sweeney, item D.
3rd, Mary Sweeney item D.
1st Josephine Welsh, item F.
Class V.—2nd Sarah Oyama, Item F.
1st Lily Leversedge, Item G.
Class VI.—3rd Audrey Westover. Item
C.
1st Ruth Oyama, Item D.
1st, Marguerite Struthers, Item E.
Class  IV.—3rd,  Margaret  McDonald,
Item C.
Class V.—1st Edna Conrod, Item C.
Class IV.—1st Kathleen O'Brien, Item
D. 2nd Caukol Iwasa, item D. 2nd
Sadako Iwasa, item D.
Class VII.—1st Toshlko Iwasa, item
D.—2nd Evelyn Carey, Item D.
Union  Bay—Section  H.
Thc local branch of
the G. W. V. A. of Canada meet every Tuesday in the G. W. V. A.
Hall, at 7.30 p.m.
Members of any ex-
service men's organl-.
zation, or of the American  Legion  arc  wel-
The Club rooms Idurlng the Summer Months and until further notice) will be open from 7 p.m. to II
p m. daily—Sunday  excepted.
* *     ♦
A1J. members arc requested to intend thc next regular meeting on
Tuesday next June 2(!lli—several
items nf importance iu connection
with the association will come up
for discussion, also the Auditors—
half yearly, and special audit will be
given.
We are in receipt of a request from
the Auxiliary's executive, to urge as
many of the members as possible
lo attend their Whlst Drive and
dance on Saturday, 23rd.
* *     *
Mr. F. W. Crawford, Provincial Organizer of the G. A. U, V. paid a fraternal visit to the Branch on .Monday.
Com. Crawford renewed tlio acquaintance of several members who was
with him In France.
* *     *
Members arc again reminded to
send in their names for special rates
etc. (or the B. C. Reunion ot Ex-
Servlce Men, June 30th to July 7th inclusive.
* *     *
Sixth national Convention, (I. W.
V. A. of Canada will also be held in
Vancouver Juno 3rd to July 7th, inclusive.
* •    #
Information Is sought ns    to    the
present whereabouts ot Com. .1.
Crawford ex-private C. E. F. No.
210185.
CONGRATULATIONS
FROM FIRE MARSHAL
In acknowledging the receipt of the
reports of the Fire Equipment of the
Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd.
nnd picture of the local Volunteer
Fire department, Mr. J. A. Thomas.
Fire Marshall, Court House, Vancouver, 1). C. In his communications addressed to Charles ,1. Parnham, assistant Fire Marshall. Cumberland,
B. ('. says ns follows:
Dear Sir:-
Re Report on Fire Equipment Of
the Canadian Collieries, Ltd.
I am In receipt of your very complete report on the above matter. You
are to he congratulated that you have
a Company that takes such a deep Interest in the work of fire protection
for their property.
I am very pleased lo gel this report, anil lo know ilial such splendid
equipment is kept on hand.
Thanking you. I remain
Yours  very  truly,
J.   A.   THOMAS.
Fire Marshal.
Dear Sir: —
Re Pictures nf Fire Department
II has been called to my attention
tliat I have never acknowledged Ihe
receipt of the photographs of your Department, which reached this office
during my absence.
I wish you would express to the
boys my thanks for the remembrance,
and tell them thai the pictures nre
occupying a prominent place on the
walls ut tiie office, and that I greatly appreciate the interest they are
taking in their work, and the equipment.
I am sure tliat you have one of the
best volunteer Fire Departments thai
there is in the Province. The work
thai they have done In the pasl speaks
ror Itself.
Willi very best wishes (or your
future success, I remain
Yours  very truly,
.1.   A.  THOMAS,
Fire Marshal.
SUCCESSFUL GARDEN
PARTY AT COURTENAY
Try   BUNT  &   KWART  LT1>.  for
your   ear   repairs:   Satisfaction   guaranteed.  I'lione Gl, Courtenny.
PLEASANT HOUSE PARTY
•PJic ladles' aid society of St.
George's Presbyterian Church, Courtenny held a very successful garden
parly, and sale of work on Wednesday last nt the home of Sirs. Nlsbel.
The grounds were beautifully decorated with flags, bunting, pennants,
and booths had been erected under
tbe Maple Trees.
The ladies ill charge or the various
stnllB were: serving, .Mrs. 11. Smith,
Mrs. O. Davis; candy, Mrs. W. Drown;
home-conklng. Miss H. Loggie and
Mrs. F. Kerton; bran dip. Mrs. Fielder.
Supper was served al six o'clock
and an orchestra composed ol' Messrs.
Cnrwlther, Mordy. Smith, Thorpe,
Cliff, Sutherland, Rlsle. and Slunrt
Smith rendered selections during tho
evening.
The community sing in (lie evening was under the leadership or J.
II, Maclntyre with Horace Everett
as accompanist, solos being rendered by Mrs. Piket, Mrs. Maclntyre.
Mrs. Herbert Smith und Professor
Turner.
W. Stubbs acted as auctioneer for
surplus refreshments. Votes of thanks
to Mrs. Ncsbitt for use ot I lie
grounds and to Mr. Joseph McPhee
for use of Piano and lhe singing of
Auld Land Tync and God bsvc the
King, brought to an end a most successful day.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and
Mrs. Robert. Thompson entertained a
number of their friends nt their home
on Derwent Avenue. A very enjoyable evening wns spent in singing
and dam-lug.
Dainty rel'i'esliiiicnts were served
ai midnight.
Among those present, were Mr. and
Mrs. It. Thompson, .Mr. and Mrs. 1'.
.Shearer. Mr. mid Mrs. fi. Johnsun,
Mrs. J. Hunden, Mrs. R. Ray, Mr. nnd
Mrs. A. Thompson, Mrs. (1. Shearer,
Misses Dru and Dellna Wilson. Han-
nab Lockart, Hazel Mounce, Irene
Bateman, Jessie Stevenson, Messrs.
Hill Hutchinson, Rob. Bennie, Dave
Richards, "Toots" Plump, Harold
Hanks, .Mat. Stewart and II. Johnson,
The Cumberland Baseball Team
travel lo Powell River on Sunday,
leaving Comox wharf at 1 o'clock, returning Immediately after the game.
Cumberland are relying on lhe same
team as last week and expect lo re-
I glstcr another win.
PICNIC COMMITTEE
MEETS SUNDAY
With'The
Churches
<TMIIEII1.\M>,   SUNDAY   JINK   21.
IKII.Y TRINITY, ANGLICAN
li<".\ w. Leversedge
Holy Communion, 8.80 a.m.
Sunday School 2.80 p.m,
Eversong, 7 pin.
A meeting of the Canadian Collie
lies (D) Ltd. employees' Picnic Committee will be held In the Lecture
Hall of thc Literary and Athletic Association on Sunday morning, June
24th, nt 10.311. A full attendance is
desired.
Class   fl—1st   Grace Searle.  item  C.
3rd Donna Mellae, item E.
Clnss  111-2nd.  Marjorie  Bird,  Item
C.
Class VII —ami Winnie Bowtlon, Itom
c.
Class V.- 2nd Ellen Magnetic. Item I).
Clnss VII—2nd  Kathleen  (Joint,  item
F.
Class II—1st Jean Abrams. Item (1.
Clnss VI—3rd Clara Cave, Item F.
Headquarters:
2nd Ruby Dirfin. 1st. Gludys Irwin,
item F.
Royston:—H.—Clnss   L—2nd  Joyce
Smith, section B.
ST. (lEOnOH'S I'HENIiYTEKIAN
ROV. .lames llii.nl
Services 11 a.in. ami 7 i> in,
Bible Class 1.30. Sunday School 2.30
Evening  Service  7  p.m.
Anthem:  "The Lord  is my Light."
Mr.  Goodall  sings  the  solo  part  iu
this beautiful song ot praise, Everybody welcome,
GRACE   111
:thodi8T
( III Hill
Itev.   .1.
h. Butlor,
Pastor
Services   11
a.m.  and
7  p.m.
Suli-
bath School, 2
.:in p.m. Subject 11
nni.
"line  Ccmdltli
in.  Three
Results.'
Short   slon
sermon   1
'or  boys
and
Kills.
Sllbjeil      7
p.m;  "A
rrosting
Uie
Ill-ill."
Bright  nnd
helpful
services.
You
are cordially
invited to
worship
with
'us. TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
News of Courtenay and Surrounding  District
BY  OUR  SPECIAL  CORRESPONDENT
Prevent^
Forest Fires
The fires that start eaeh summer might have come
from YOUR cigarette-stub.
The Forest charred and burned might •have been thc
result of YOUR camp-fire.
The wooded hillsides might have been blackened by
YOUR lighted matches.
The burned farms might be the wages paid by YOUR
thoughtlessness.
Idle logging camps might be the result of YOUR momentary carelessness.
If forest fires annually destroy our natural wealth, if
money is to be spent in fighting fires instead of
building up the Province, then the loss is YOURS
and that of the generations to come. Be careful.
IT   PAYS
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
ELECTRIFY
FOR THE WARM WEATHER
— Wc Have in Stock —
RANGES, FANS, WASHERS, TOASTERS, TABLE
STOVES, IRONS, PERCOLATORS. ETC.
Complete Lines of SHADES and FIXTURES
— Radio Sets and Parts —
Wc arc Electrical Contractors
When  in  need of  Electrical  Work,  Phone  164,
Courtenay.
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Phone Hi I
Courtenay
I
3E
■sa
i    There's a Difference!
A garage understands cars! But it takes a Tire
Shop to understand Tires, also!
There is as much difference between the various
makes of tires as between daylight and dark—so get
your Tires from a Tire Shop—and get satisfaction.
BOOL AND WILSON
TIRES—ALL SIZES TIRE REPAIRS
Courtenay
PHONE 178
MISS ELLA HAWKINS
WEDS WM. McKENZIE
The wedding took place on Tuesday
night of two of Comox Valleys popular young native born residents. The
Rev. Canon Leakey officiated at the
marriage of Miss Ella Hawkins ,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hawkins, Comox and Mr. John A. McKenzie, son of Mr. nnd Mrs. John
McKenzie and grandson of Mrs. Florence Cliffe. Comox. The bride was
assisted as bridemald by her sister
Ida and Mr. Willlum McKenzie, brother of the bridegroom acted as best
man. The popularity of the contracting couple was attested by thc large
number of friends who assembled nt
thc Anglican church, Comox' and afterwards attended a wedding reception at the home of the bridegroom's
parents. Two hundred attended. Mr.
and Mrs, McKenzie were the recipients
of many handsome presents. They
left on Wednesday morning on their
way to Seattle, Portland and Victoria
to spend a honeymoon.
Try  BLUNT &  EWART LTI>. for
your  car   repairs;   Satisfaction   guaranteed.  Phone 111, Courtenay.
FOIt
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Price's to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office Mill Bridge Street, Victoria, B.O.
Twice as many
said "Willard"
Last summer 12237 car
owners selected at random
were asked, "What battery
will you buy next?" Practically twice as many said
"Willard" as said any
other battery.
8860 were asked what
battery they bought last
(for replacement) — and
again it was twice as many
for Willard.
Performance is the only
possible reason.
SPARKS CO.
Auto Electricians
COURTENAY
NANAIMO DUNCAN
Willard
of Canada
Speaking
of Service
—Do you know that we not only make Delicious Chocolates
and all sort of Delicious Candy.
—But likewise we serve Light
Lunches and Ice Cream.
—BUT. This is a Confectionery
Store. That is a Joy lo all,
who know it.
Busy Bee
Confectionery
UHHTENAY, II. ('.
Next to Malpas & Wilson
MAJOR STEPHENSON
LAID TO HIS REST
The funeral of the late Major Stephenson was held on Wednesday afternoon from Sutton's funeral parlors to the Sandwlck Presbyterian cemetery, thc Rev. W. T. Beattie officiating. At thc church "What a Friend
We Have in Jesus" and "Nearer My
tiod to Thee" were the hymns sung.
The late Mr. Stephenson was particularly well known In Courlenay,
where he had made his home for the
past ten years. He wns a cabinet
maker and carpenter, and nlso spent
a great denl of time prospecting in
various parts of the district. lie Is
known to have made some linds of
mineral but as he never even hinted
as to what part of the district he had
visited so that the secret of his findings have gone with him. Ho Is
mourned by a brother Frank, a resident of Grantham this district; a
brother Elijah F., editor of "The
Speaker" at New Llsgard, Ontario.
A sister also resides at New Market,
Ontario, the home town tn which the
late Mr. Stephenson was born seventy-two years ago. The pallbearer's
at the funeral were Messrs. Thomas
Booth. J. H. Maclntyre, P. L. Anderton. Wm. Rockwell, A. H. Herd and
J. N. McLeod.
An inquest was held on Tuesday
night to enquire Into the death of
Mr. Stephenson nnd a verdict of accidental death was returned.
INTERRED AT PARKSVILLE
There passed away on Wednesday
afternoon at the home of his daughter
Mrs. John Milligan, one of the real
pioneers of Vancouver Island. Edwin
Herbert Wood, was born in Ontario
In ISM and had resided in British Columbia for thc past fifty years. He
was a farmer at Parksville. He
leaves to mourn his passing a widow,
lour daughters, Mrs. Cleland of Invermere, B. C.; Mrs. Frey of Calgary;
Mrs. Waddlngton of Nanaimo; Mrs.
John Milligan of Sandwick; one son
Edgar Is at home as Parksville. The
body was shipped to Parksville yesterday (Friday) the funeral being
held there on arrival of thc southbound train.
PREPARE YOUR CHILDREN
NOW FOR THE
Summer Vacation
WE STOCK
CHILDREN'S BLOUSES — CHILDREN'S SHOES
 CHILDREN'S HATS and CAPS,
CHILDREN'S TIES
AND OTHER GALA-DAY WEARING APPAREL
We can also outfit adults and our Prices Are Right
Open Saturday Night till 10 o'clock
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Courtenay, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKRHIFiELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
 .	
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
i My endeavor ia to please my
i customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
I and best and freshest quality of
'■ goods.
REPAIRS
MOTOR AND TRANSMISSION COMPLETELY
OVERHAULED
For
$25.00
Our equipment enables us to quote that price, so
get it done before you go to the
ELKS' DANCE AT ROYSTON
next Wednesday, June 27th
You will then enjoy the drive as well as the
dance.
(All Work Guaranteed)
Corfield Motors
LIMITED
COURTENAY, B. C.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B. C.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your' cars in for an estimate.
Prices reasonable, Work guaranteed.
Workshop nt the Condensnry.
C. G. WILSON
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders ut Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
WOMEN AND CHILDRENS
WEAR
llninlj Crcntlous nl Must Kciisiinnlilc
Prices
Buy Here and Save Money
ARMSTRONG'S   ('umberUmd, R. ('.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and     JOS.   DAMONTE
Bakers general delivery
PHONE 11      CUMBERLAND
| Conl, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts ol District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
I'nion Bay Road
TELEPHONE   rq   TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome HoteL SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
REE      I iiO
THREE
"P"P"C"C 10 Quicker,
Easier Shaves
Millions of Men Save
Shaving Time, Now
We ask you to try
Quicker shaves now save time for millions
of men. Kasier shaves save skin irritation for
millions of faces.
These men did what we ask you to do:
they tried, at our expense, the shaving cream
which has 5 distinct ways to give better,
quicker shaves:
PALMOLIVE SHAVING CREAM
multiplies itself 250 times in rich lather.
Without rubbing-in, this lather softens any
beard in one minute.
what they tried
It doesn't dry—lasts 10 minutes on the face.
Lather-bubbles, strong-walled, hold hairs
erect for easier cutting.
Produces a lotion-like after-effect—soothing to skin.
Try it. Our expense. It cost 18 months'
time—130 experiments—to perfect this
cream for you. Test for yourself our
claims.  Mail coupon.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
Montreal, Que.        Toronto. Ont.        Winnipeg, Man.
10   SHAVES   FREE
Fill in your name and mail to
The Palmolive Company uf Canada, Limited
Dept. 1)404 Toronto, Ont.
PALMOLIVE
SHAVING CREAM
Modern Golf
• ^cWf(JJmnkcJhompsot\
NOTED CANADIAN GOLFERS
ISLAND HAS COAL
FOR 300 YEARS
BEGINNERS' FAULTS
I would like to worn beginners at
thecommencement ot ibis article,
against the Impression ihat there Is
any short road to success In golf. In
the last analysis success in the game
rests solely and absolutely with the
Individual. No one can develop another's game. The best an instructor
can do la to lay down broad principles, auch as maintaining balance at
nil times with the least expenditure
of energy. Mosl of the Instructor's
time should be spent In giving the
pupil clear ideas about the game, and
then allowing each player to develop
his own way of executing the shots.
Tiie Wrong Way
Unfortunately this method is the
exception and not the rule; too often
the player's time is taken up trying
to get the club to travel in a certain
line and no other. This is nn artificial way of learning the game and.
I am convinced, is all wrong. In the
first place, it reduces all players to a
certain type of swing, and lhe uinaz-
lug thing about ull the stars is that
$
Cascade
OR
U. B. C. Beer
PURE FULL-STRENGTH BEERS
They Wear Well
On the Market as long as the Oldest inhabitants remember and still the most
POPULAR    BEERS
Sold in British Columbia
Old Friends Are Best
—   Leave Your Order at any Government Store   —
WE   DO   THE   REST
-* -M
If you have a problem
of power or transportation bring it to us. There
is a Ford or an adaptation of a Ford for every
purpose.
,   Corfield Motors
Limited
COURTENAY, B. C.
3523
FORD   MOTOR   COMPANY   OF   CANADA,   LIMITED,   FORD,   ONTARIO
mMwswMEiwsssieWSsiWSsi^sssssisiSfi raaaaa/aajaMaiaaBiaEiasEJaEiafflffla^
151 »
EASTBOUND
SUMMER  EXCURSIONS
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
,$72.00
WINNIPEG
MINNEAPOLIS'
ST. PAUL
DIILUTII
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 14.3. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
CHICAGO   HWJtM) LONDON   %\K."t
DIOTROIT *108.62 TORONTO  $ll!l.7,".
NIAGAIU FALLS. $120,0!}
MONTREAL   HHS8.75 QUEBEC   $III.Stl
ST. JOHN »IOOJW HALIFAX *l(l«.!l.1
BOSTON. *I«UW
NEW YORK, *H?.J.I
$13.00 additional for ocean trip between Vancouver-Prince Rupert on sale dally to Sept. ir.Hi. Pinal roinrn limit, October
31st.    Choice of routes—stop-overs and  side  trips
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PARK
$40.25 Return from Victoria
E. W. BICKLE, Agent c. F. ICARI.R li.P.A.
Cumberland, B. C. Victoria   II   r.
Canadian Nanonal RaTluilijs
their swings, so far as detail goes,
are all different although there are
certain general principles, such as
maintaining balance, having the
weight on lhe left foot at impact, and
general flexibility of the body which I
aro common to all.
It is all very well to say. as one of- J
ten hears said, that in order to piny
Hie game well one must start III
childhood. But I would emphatically
draw tn the readers' attention the fact
that there are numerous players who
have boon under the care of Instructors since childhood who are anything but golfers. Tho reason for
their mediocrity is that instead of being allowed to feel their way and play
lhe game as nature intended .lliey are
compelled to build their games according to some preconceived conception of it, which, in most cases,
has turned out subsequently to be
wrong.
One of the leading professionals In
Britain is credited with the remark,
that if he lmd a son he would simply
give him a club and send him off to
learn the game by himself with no
advice except, perhaps to show him
a good grip.
Where Mentality Tells
Golf is largely mental. Given two
players of et|ual physical conception
of the swing will be thc best player.
All instruction, whether written or
verbal, will be in vnin unless it gives
the student a clear conception of the
essentials which, Heaven bo praised,
ore not many.
One of the most glaring faults of
the bcgiiinncr ls the attempt to use
the body tab much. Somehow or
oilier the novice gets the idea that it
is weight that is the important thing
in golf. And in order to get weight
behind the blow he forces the body Into ungainly and ineffectual positions. This is all wrong, for we
know it is the velocity of the swing
which is the important factor. So long
as the beginner attempts lo throw
the weight from one foot to the other
little progress is possible for the
simple reason that balance is difficult, If not Impossible, to maintain.
A distinct sway is introduced by this
method so that thc body either gets
into the stroke ahead of the hands
or lags behind them. In either case
liming Is destroyed, resulting in ,i
lopped or foiindcrede ball. Ninety-
nine players out of every hundred
use lhe body too much. The chief
duty of thc body, is to twist so thai
the hands may get into a hitting position. The smallest movement on
lhe part of thc body, compatible with
thlfl, the better.
Too Much Swaying
Beginners as a rule have an Idea
that it is necessary tn Indulge in wild
lagolng from one toe to the other.
Nothing could be farlher from the
truth. One has only lo watch Mil-
, clioll to realize how 'far the ball can
be driven without swaying the body
or Inking tho feel off the ground a
great deal. Notwithstanding the lauded style of Vardon and Duncan, Mitchell possesses perhaps the simples!
method from a tnecliinical and anatomical standpoint, and one which
possesses few difficulties 111 copying.
Beginners, as a rule, make the
game harder by taking an Inordinately wide stance One cannot always Hunt tlle feelings, and the fooling of the beginner by straddling his
feel, Is n false one. li is contrary to
experience. I think, of all the star
players, Mitchell keeps his feet closer togelhor than any of 'he rest.
»jaMMjaBBaI
For Results Advertise in The Islander
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland. B. C.
A Comfortable stance
Tha boglnnor should lake an ordinary Blanco, which is comfortable
Tliis will enablo him to keep tlio body relaxed anil permit it to pivot
without greai strain.
Another faull common to tho beginner ami similar lo excessive body
movement, is seen In lhe use of the
iron clubs. A spectator gets tho Im-
pressaton that the player is trying to
lift the ball up wilh the arms with
a stori of scooping movement, which,
of course, results in topping it. Contrary as it may seem, tho reverse pro
coduro is the correct way. Instead of
flic player trying lo lift tho ball up,
he should actually try lo drive il into the ground. When this method is
followed a strnlghter bull With o certain amount of back spill follows.
Boglliners as a class lark i-elnxii-
lioii. which will lie taken up In the
closing article entitled "Ease vs. Effort "
There's' no need to fear a Goalless
age on Vancouver Island for generations  nnil  generations  to  como.
This was made clear lasl week
when preliminary results of the boring tests carried on by the Canadian
Collieries for conl In the Sable River
district, six miles from Union Bay,
were made known.
These borings indicate that there
are enough coal bodies in tliat district
yet untouched to permit of a production of ,1000 tons a day for 300 years.
Boring tests to find coal seams and
get an Idea of the real extent of tho
resources ot the company have been
going on for the last couple of years.
Three thousand tons a day means
about 1,000,000 ions a yenr, it was
explained today. That would cxceoil
the present production of the Canadian Collieries from their two mining
areas at Newcastle hack of Ladysmlth and at Cumberland farther up
the Island. The total production
from those two districts last year was
G7S,13ri tons, out ot a total of 1,754,-
650 for the- year for all Vancouver
Island mines combined.
Western Fuel Corporation operating the extremely rich coal mines at
Nanaimo also has coal blocked out
for generations to come. The production of this company was 691.401
tons last year.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACT AMENDMENTS
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to $5 nn acre; second-class
to J2.50 nn acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which ls non-timber
land.'
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parlies of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary improvements on
respective claims.
Pro-emplors must occupy claims
for five years and mako improvements
to valuo of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivation of at leant fi
acres before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation
not loss than ,1 years, and has made
proportionate improvements, he may,
because of Ill-health, or other cause!
bo grunted intermediate certificate of
improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent
ot $360 per annum and records same
; each year. Failure to make improvements or record same will operate ns
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
in loss than 5 years, and improvements of liu.uo per acre, Including
5 acres cleared and cultivated, nnd
residence of n( least 2 years are required,
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant.
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land in conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation
provided statutory improvements
made and residence maintained on
Grown granted land.
I'nsiirveyed areas, not exceeding
2(1 acres, may be leased as bomesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding (140 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial sites on
timber laud not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate ot ouo-half of
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purchase pi-Ice. is made.
I'ro-Kmplors'  Free  (.'rants   Act.
'I'1"' scope of mis Act is enlarged to
Include all persons joining and serving Willi His Majesty's Forces Tlle
tunc within which the heirs or devisees ol a deceased pre-emptor may apply lor title under Hie Act Is extended from for one year from the death
01 such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege is also inudo're-
trocatlve,
No fees relating   to   pre-emptions
aro dua or payable by soldiers on pre-
ciiiptiuiis   recorded   afler   June   2C
018,    luxes ore roraltled for   five
years.
Provision for return of moneys ac-
''''""; ","' ""'I been paid since August i. 1814. on account of pay mon Is
|hj;'/"' '"* i soldiers' pre-omp.
interest on agreements to purchase
(own or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or, lependenla, acquired
direct or indirect, remitted from en-
llstmont lo March ;u   logo
.S.ib.I'Mrcliasors of Iron,,  |„11(|s
Provision   made  for    Issuance    of
town grants to sub-purchasei-s   o
'77' ^ds; acquiring rlghi,from
Purchasers who failed  i„   complete
Klln?\»1™!vlng forfeiture, on tit
men, o conditions of purcC/h.
nal  parcel,  purchase  price due ami
<""*< "emadebyAiay°i,YaP2o P
Grazing
d
provides   fo.
irovldos      ,.       I_v_orto<*    i'l'liislry
Brazing dhirlou    anil
sued base,     •'!«"""« Permits Is-
"wen, ..... •  "rm" C^m   S""'k-
'» '•'•"". ocni.lt.-. tor settlers   ""'"Ul-
'"■ "wallers, „„ l0 , /     • «"P«i FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
OUR TALE OF WOE
Editing a newspaper Is a pleasant
business—If you can stand lt.
If the paper contains many advertisements a subscriber complains
that they tako up too much space. If
there ls lack of advertisements tho
paper is unpopular, and the people
don't want lt.
If the editor attends church regularly, they say he goes for effect. If
we Btay away from church, they Bay
we are monstrously  heathenish.
If wo accept an invitation to a wedding, they say wo were only Invited
to "write It up." If wc go to a show
they Bay we go on free tickets. If wo
are Been upon the strcots too often
they say we are neglecting our business. If we avoid going on tho
street they say we don't hustle around
after tho news.
If wc publish a man who has
brought disgrace upon his family,
the friends of tho family never forgive us. If we, out of goodness of
heart, decline to any anything on the
subject, the man's enemies are disappointed, and we are branded as
white-livered cowards.
WORTH WAITING FOR
If any boy ever comes across a girl
who, with a face full of roses says,
as you come to the door: "I can't go
for thirty minutes, because the dishes are not washed," you wait for
that girl. You Bit right down on the
door step and wait for her, 'cause
some other fellow may come along
and carry her off, and right there
you have lost an angel. Walt for
that girl and then stick to her like a
burr to a mule's tall.
And it you should happen to be
that girl who went to the door after
your hands out of the dish water,
just ask the boy while he Is waiting,
"If he would please cut you some
wood so father wouldn't have to do
it when he comes home tired from
work," or "would he mind sprinkling
the lawn?" If he jerks off his coat in
a hurry and fills the wood box ln ten
minutes ,or puts on the hose and
sprinkles the lawn, then say to that
young man, "I will be at home next
Wednesday evening, If you would like
to walk to prayer meeting with me,"
and If he looks delighted, and says:
"I should be glad to go," instead of
"I nm sorry, but I have an engagement to play pool that evening"—
then do you with your pretty ways
entice and encourage him to come often to your home.
HAVING A GOOD TIME
Did you ever see people work harder to have a good time than do the
present generation, who clutter thc
earth, during what will some day be
termed the gasoline age? To those
of ub who stop to think, It Beems that
cxiatence today is rather depressing.
People do try so hard to amuse themselves but lt must bo acknowledged
that their success ls meagre. Where
can the fault bo?
From morning till night, where-
over we go, the people we meet arc
hurried, worried, preoccupied.
Some hove wasted their energy in
thc etcrnol and futile effort to keep
up appearances, others are disheartened by tho meanness nnd jealousy
they have encoutered among ihelr so-
called friends. Business competition
troubles the sloop of not a few. The
working classes suffer the consequences of a ceaseless Industrial
struggle.
Pleasure should be a relaxation,
but do you notice anybody relaxing
today as ho guides his flivver along
tho crowdod highway? We havo
shortened the working day that wo
may have more time to play, and then
wc work hnrdcr at our play than we
did during tho hours we spent In office or shop.
And what of the old-fashioned plc-
a real joy. You went leisurely about
your preparations and presented yourself at tho home of your host In clean
linen, and hungry. The dinner wns
excellent and there was restful talk
about books and plays and then there
was music In the living room afterward.
How Ib it today? You snap down
your desk and hustle Into your car.
There ls barely time to shave and
dross, ond you arrlvo nt tho home of
your friend Just in time lo be ushered Into the dining room. Thc meal Is
served hurriedly, that the tables may
be cleared and thc cardo shuffled before yon havo finished the dessert.
Then it Is cut and deal and hurry
throughout tho rest of tho evening.
When you toll tho hostess you havo
had a lovoly time you know that you
are lying.   You havo boon rushed to
death all evening by some fat old
dame with earrings, who has been
saying Incessantly, "Your play."
And what o tthe old-fashioned picnic where you lay on your back under the trees and made willow whistles tor the youngsters? The picnic today, even In the small town, follows a
strenuous afternoon of golf. You
stand up and eat potato chips and
chicken salad In your knickers. The
guests all talk about why they missed
a put or sliced a drive. When the
shadows gather, you load up the old
gasoline bus and roll homo ln tho
glare of passing headlights all on
odge from the good time you had at
the picnic.
What has become of tho simple life
of our grandolres? Where are the
folk dances and games on the lawn?
Those thlngB have been crowded out
of the village life by the automobile
ond the saxophone.
"What fools we mortals be."
FOREST INCOME
OF 500 MILLIONS
MENACED BY FIRE
By Dr. Clifton D. Howe, Acting
President, Canadian Forestry
Association.
Iu tho last analysis, adequate Are
protection resolveB itself down to the
question of whether or not the people
of this country wish to save their
wood-using industries. Lot us look
into the service of theso* to tho country. The value of the manufactured
pulp and paper products Is $250,000,-
000 per annum. The various companies have invested in the business
some $375,000,000. They employ 33,000
men in the mills and in the forest
and they pay them each year $40,000,-
000 in wages. Isn't that business
worth saving.
The value of lumber, lath and
shingles produced in one year is
$150,000,000. Lumber means boards|
and deals, dimension Btock—not the
finished product, as In the case of
paper. I can't find just how much is
ndded to this value by the various
minor wood-using industries. With
reservr-tlona, I will say that the minor industries, which depend entirely
upon wood, produce products to the
value of $60,000,000 annually. They
havo an invested capital of over
$50,000,000. They employ 13,000
people and pay annually ln wages
around $14,000,000. Is It not worth
some effort to keep these Industries
going?
Are these worth whflol
To theso should be added the industries that depend in essential part
hut not entirely upon forest products.
These, such ns the horse-drawn and
motor-drawn vehicles, produce each
year products valued at $86,553,314.
The capital Invested totals over $65,-
000,000. The employees number over
9000 to whom arc paid wages amounting to nearly $12,000,000.
Going back to the lumber industry
proper, wc find thnt Ub Invested capital reaches $250,000,000. It omployB
55,000 men, and gives them $600,000,-
000 In wages annually. That business
is worth saving too, is it not?
There are more than 100,000 people
in Canada at work converting the
foreBt product into wealth ln some
form or other. They arc chiefly heads
of families or the bread winners of
families, thus they represent probably a half million people dependent
upon the forest for a livelihood. Are
they worth while in their work? Are
they worth while to tho country?
Must Invest iu Protection
Let me emphasize that our great
pulp and paper companies, the great
lumber concerns will not exist many
years longer unless there Is more effective fire protection. In order to
got more effective protection, the
public must invest more money in lt.
When we consider tho area (totally
under license or pulpwood concession, the amount expended on lt as a
whole, average less than one cent per
acre per year. In othor words wo
spond loss than n cent an acre as an
Insurance rate on forest lands whose
supplies at tho present day yields us
products to the value ot $500,000,000
annually.
June 6th.—In Committee on Estimates on a vote to place lignite coal
on free list with United States Neill
(Comox-Alberni) asked the Finance
Minister to explain why 2 of the 3
varieties of coal mined ln Canada,
namely anthracite and lignite, should
be on the tree list and the third, bituminous coal, should have a duty of
53 cents a ton. Ho pointed oat that
there is ln the United States tariff
now a clause by which on Canada
placing coal on the free list coming
from the States, then automatically
coal going from Canada Into the
States also goes on their tree-list
which would mean a stimulant to the
coal production of Vancouver Island
mines.
The Minister of Finance had some
difficulty in evading the question the
real reason being that Nova Scotia
(the Province from which he and 15
other Liberal stalwarts come from)
Ib a large producers of bituminous
coal and the duty ot 53 cents a ton on
American bituminous coal coming Into Canada helps them to meet American competition.
Aa the Leader ot the Conservatives
pointed out, the Minister of Finance
is strong on Reciprocity with the
United States but balks when it Ib
proposed to be applied to coal.
June 6th.—House debated oleomargarine from 3 p.m. until 3 a.m. next
morning, Anally passing an amendment to the effect that as its Introduction was originally only as a temporary was measure and on the distinct pledge that it would cease as
sooon as the abnormal scarcity due
to the war was over, the question
should now be placed back in the
same position as it was before the
war (when its Bale was prohibited)
but without prejudice to the merits
of the case if it should later be deemed
wise to allow Its sale.
The Hon. S. Telmle very strong on
allowing Oleo.
The principal argument urged In
Its favor was the "Right of the poor
Man" to have a cheap spread for his
children's bread.
It was shewn that it is not a cheap
but a dear spread in regard to its
food value and that children absolutely require the tats of butter; it was
shown that most of the imported
Oleo comes from the Swift Packing
Co. of Chicago and that It Is hardly
likely that the intensive Lobby maintained by the Oleo Interests at Ottawa since the beginning of the Session, was there In the real Interests
of Canadaian working men. It was
further shown that its principal use
and greatest value was when lt
could be Bold and fed to people in
place of butter,
Tbe vote which was one ot the
keenest this Session resulted In 54
for Oleo and 125 against lt with 6
paired ou each side.
Corsets for Evening Wear
We have some beautifully designed
m
Corsets
which are to t>e recommended for
evening wear. They fit the figure
like a glove, and bring out to the
fullest extent all the grace and charm
that a gown possesses.
We invite you to come and see them and to try
them on in our Corset Showrooms before purchasing.
REVISION OF VOTERS LIST
Comox  Electoral District
NOTICE is hereby given that I
shall, on Monday, the 18th day ot
June, 1923, hold a Court of Revision,
for the purpose of hearing and determining any and all objections
against the retention ot any name or
names on the Register ot Voters for
the Comox Electoral District. Such
Court will be open at the Court
House, Cumberland, at 10 o'clock tn
the forenoon.
Dated at Cumberland, I). C. May
7th, 1923.
JOHN   BAIRD,
Registrar  of  Voters.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
FORESHORE LEASE
Nanaimo Land District
District    of Newcastle,    Vancouver
Island, B. C.
OBSERVATIONS OF A
FEDERAL MEMBER
.May 28th.—On vote ln Estimates
for Investigation of Wrecks, A. W.
Neill, (Comox-Alberni) drew attention to the wreck of the Alaskan last
winter, and criticised the investigation hold on It. claiming that the
scone of the wreck hnd not been
visited, nor Important witnesses been
called. He urged that the regulations
be altered so that boats of less than
150 tons bo subject to hull inspection, this boat which was 36 years
old and carried 11 men, not having
to bo Inspected by Govt. Inspectors
as to her hull. Goverment promised
favourable consideration ot tho question ond also of further life Bavlng
appliances.
Do You Want
to Marry
Conflldental details. No trifling.
Highest references. Honorable. Helpful. Only bureau in B. C. Use assumed uame at Ilrst, if desired, to save
cmbbarroBsment. Write The Ruth
Foster Syndicate, Box 340 Vancouver, B. C.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leaving Cumberland at 8 a.m.
TAKE notice that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited ot
Victoria, B. C, occupation Mine
Owners, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted 374
feet North (Ast) from the South
West corner of Lot 1, Newcastle District, Vancouver Island, B. C. at the
approximate high water mark and
point of beginning, thence North
(Ast.) to low water mark, an approximate distance of 752 feet more or
less, thence meandering along the
said low water mark, northeasterly,
northerly, northwesterly and southwesterly to tho Intersection ot a line
produced North (Ast.) trom tbe West
boundary of said Lot 1, thence North
(Ast.) to approximate high water
mark, a distance ot 168 feet more or
less, thence northeasterly, easterly,
southeasterly and southwesterly
along said approximate high water
mark to point of beginning, and containing in all 42 acres more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED.
Date, May Uth, 1923.
Albert  Crompton  Lymn,  Agent.
Jy. 21.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
((
>>
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People Trade
Strawberries
Fresh picked Vancouver Island Strawberries arriving Every Day.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR PRESERVING
BERRIES
NOW
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   vVillard
Block.   •   'Phone 116.
Daily They Come To Me
Tattered and Torn
Back They Go Looking
Like New The Next Mom.
■ From The
Family Shoe Repairer
S. DAVIS, "ft—
PILES
No one but Ihe sufferer known the terrible agony
or the ltchlni niture of Plies and how IioiwIvm
tt »«■ ran to try for relief In olntmenta, Injections
■nil dilators.
Genius produce*
"PAX"
Internal Pile Remedy
Pax li the prescription of ■ well known physician
anil hat proTfil successful lu hundred! ot raw*.
Pai Ii Internal distinct from any other treatment Applications from the outside are futile.
No ointments, injection* or dilator* are necessary. Pax li complete and 1* a feietahlo remedy,
contains no drugs or alcohol.
If you bare not hitherto found relief do not
despair, place your faith In Pai.
Except in unusually stubborn casva one boi la
usually Bufflclunt.
Get "PAX" from your Druggist or If he cinnot
supply you srnd One Dollar and "PAX" will be
atnt you Iu a plain package.
CBOWV CXSKIOAft
moDuori or cakada
1016 DomUlon ■nlldiaf
TAiroouvim, a.o. SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FIVE
•See ii on ih
tf
BOYS AND GIRLS!
TELL Dad or Mother that you want those "sneakers" with the
Boy Scout or the Girl Guide emblem on the sole, this year.
They're made to stand the hardest kind of wear, and Just
think—you will be wearing real Boy Scout or Girl Guide tennis
shoes. SoW at «.«.^.,^_.„,       ,„,.  „    .   ,
Shoe Store"
GORDON'S
SPECIALS—
Children's brown leather Sandals, sizes 4's to 8V4 (£1   OK
per pair      tyV.LD
Children's White Canvas Yachting Oxfords (£1   At\
per pair     «pl«4U
Ladies' Black and White Canvas, one Strap slippers (fin nr
per pair    .- tpA* f O
Ladies' Black and White Canvas Slippers. Low Heal, with Buckle Strap <J»0 fJM
per pair  tp.ii. I D
Buy Your Shoes here and get Satisfaction.
GORDON'S
GROCERIES — DRY GOODS — BOOTS AND SHOES
Phone 133 Phone 133
Hello Friends. One reason why there
are »o many suicides nowadays Is because It takes so much courage    to I
live. i
My favorite pest
Is Eph O'Pratt,
He always says
"You're getting tat."
A face that cannot smile ls seldom
worth while.
A Cumberland absent minded business man, just before he went to the
store the other morning, threw his
wife out tbe back door and kissed the
garbage.
* *    *
Our wife says there are some
people who make fools of men, but
there are more who make men of
fools.
* *     *
;     The fellow who tries to lie out of a
mistake, says Chester has discovered ■
a form of perpetual motion.
It Ls easy to cow the man that
looks sheepish If you threaton to lam
him.
* •    *
Some men work, although they do
watch the clock, and others, again
just watch the clock, says Hazel.
We've heard of no casualties so far
resulting trom the ultimate consumer
getting hit by falling prices.
Another way to prevent gray hair,
"is to have the break linings examined more than once a year."
* «     ♦
Perhaps thc easiest way to amuse
criminals would be to let them listen
ln on the deliberations ot juries.
Pittsburgh mlnlstor has been censured for preaching broad sermons.
But no sermon Is as broad as it Is
long.
a       ♦       *
Some of those slow moving pictures
should bo made of movie stars marrying so we could see how they do It
so fast, suggests Hayworth,
...
"Hope" said Father Hoots, "Is like
0' dem patent medicine advertisement —Comfortln'  but  misleading'"
* *     *
Good times are those not used as a
topic of conversation.
* ♦     *
—J The richest man In the world
is the one who is satisfied with what
he has.
* *     .
The Artiste
"A fine stenog you arc! Call yourself a typist and don't know how to
put a ribbon on a typewriter."
"Does Paderewskl know how to
tune a piano?"
* *     *
He was so bashful that he would't
look at tho pictures of the girls in
the bathing suit advertisements.
* *     *
"Johnny, get away from that machinist's  bench;   you'll  get   bad  habits from their naughty vises."
...
Time is slipping, said thc Sand
clock as the Granules steadily tell.
* *     *
A bee has the advantage over a man.
"They take away all a bee makes in
a year, but they don't mako him (lie
an Income tax return before they
take It."
* *     *
The difference between a saint and
a sinner is that one happened at a
certain important place to turn to the
right, while the other didn't.
* *     ♦
A kiss on the cheek is like riding
on tha fender of an automobile says
Hurray.
The automobile ls a necessity and
luxury combined, according to Ken-
nerley. And a nuisance when you are
looking for a place to park.
* ♦     *
Free  Medical  Advice:   "Don't  buy
I thermometers   In   the   summer—they
are lower In winter.
* •     *
No. Archipelago, mints are not the
only Life Savers.
...
An experienced driver, according to
Jones Is one who can tell In an emergency whether that sound Is his
brakes squeaking or his wife squel-
Ing
* *    *
Another good memory test Is trying lo remember whether and why
famous women have husbands.
* *     •
You never heard of a circus having a show for women only, as they
do for men. It would be no use to
carry such an outfit.
* *     *
An Ohio man grafted skin of a
thicken on his dogs back and now
the dog can go chase himself, thinks
Cameron.
* *     *
We mortals have to swat and shoo
The flies from dawn till dark,
'Cause Noah didn't swat the two
That roosted in the ark.
* *     *
When we have what Is wanted to
make us comfortable, all the rest Is
vanity, excess and envy. The only
poor man is the man who has lost
his health. You may not have all the
money that you feel you would like
to use, but how would you like to
trade your good health for a wheel
chair and some chronic complaint?
Yesterday we were talking with a
man that was rich last week. Today
ho Is poverty poor, and worse—he Is
In debt. Tomorrow he will be broken
in health for he is terribly worried.
Speculation did it. Today we were
talking with a man who is proudly
happy of a debt ho has Incurred. He
borrowed money to build a home. The
man who speculated lost all. Tbe
man who went into debt to build a
home will whittle down hla debt and
win all.
CONTROLLING
THE MOSQUITO
The discomfort produced by the
mosquito during the early summer
months leads not only the scientists
but the man on the street to consider whether the pest cannot be controlled. Tho question often asked,
"Of what value Is the mosquito?" has
hot been satisfactorily answered.
Fortunately, methods of controlling
this insect have been discovered and
are being applied with greater or
less success. Portions of the tropics would, perhaps, never have been
made habitable for the hite man had
not successful mosquito control methods been discovered. The means
employed in the tropics have been
found applicable to other places.
It has long been understood that
the multiplication ot the mosquito depends on  pools or areas of    water,
more or less stagnant. In these the
mosquito deposits Its eggs, which
soon develop Into larvae and then
Into adult Insects. The larvae, it has
been discovered, are destroyed by
contact with an oily substance. Tho
remedy, therefore, Is found in applying oil to tho breeding places of
the insect, A very small amount has
beon found sufficient to spread itself
oyer a considerable area of water.
This extremely thin layer Is sufficient to destroy all of the larvae that
come ln contact with it.
The Entomological Branch of the
Federal Department of Agriculture
has for several years been working
on this problem In British Columbia.
Last year the district surrounding thc
town of Banff ln Alberta was dealt
with. An area of several miles In
extent was surveyed and breeding
places were treated. The area treated  included both  open  pounds  and
marshy spots clothed with dense willow growths. The work Was done
during May and June, when 2,800 gallons of oil were applied. Watering
cans and knapsack sprayers were
used in spreading the oil, which was
sprayed on all water where larvae'
were found. Coal oil alone was used,
as it was feared that, owing to cold
nights, heavier oil would not become
thorougly distributed. Although a
number of inaccessible places were
missed .the results of the oiling
were very marked. It is estimated
that Beventy-flve percent of control
was realized. In an article describ-
Ing this work, In the May-June number of The Agricultural Gazette of
Canada .the author states that the
town of Banff and vicinity was rendered comparatively free trom the
pest.
Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, June 22nd and 23rd
Thrills, Romance, Comedy, Heart-Interest and a bin punch.
"Quincy Adams Sawyer"
with
10—of the screens biggest stars—10
including Blanche Sweet, Lon Chaney, Elmo Lincoln and Barbara LaMarr.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS  AND DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159
Night—134-X Courtenay
1 Maybe Harding rebuked Daughterly for throwing his hat Into the ring
because It's still too cool to be going
bareheaded.
*     *     *
Murray says just about the time a
man begins to balance outgo against
Income somebody Induces him to try
his hand at golf, and then his tailor
has to worry again.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. O'Brien and
family desire to express their gratitude to Dr. E. 11. Hicks and the staff
of the Cumberland General Hospital
for kind consideration and attention
shown to their beloved one. Special
thanks are extended to nurse Webb,
who by her untiring efforts and practical sympathy did so much to relieve the sufferings of a beloved
daughter and sister.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs, Chas. O'Brien and fa- I
mily extend to all friends their heartfelt thanks for the many kind deeds,
also for the beautiful floral tributes
received on the loss of a loving
daughter and sister.
Possibly the most
thrilling water scenes
ever filmed are shown in
the final scenes of
"QUINCY ADAMS
SAWYER"
A real Ferry boat, its
only occupant a blind
girl, is seen to go over
the steep falls. Just as
the ferry is about to
make the descent, the
hero swims from shore
and rescues the imperiled girl. It is a truly
exciting scene, and
brings a smashing cli-
imwimrmimwmsikwmmt^^ max to the picture.
A Scene from "QUINCY ADAMS SAWYER"
Al St. John Comedy
"THE STUDIO RUBE"
MATINEE SATURDAY 2.30 P. M.
Coming next Friday and Saturday
"KINDRED OF THE DUST"
Tuesday and Wednesday
TOM MIX IN "ROMANCE LAND"
Horses flying feet, stage coaches careeing nn two wheels, the cracking of whips,
hair-breadth escapes and a hundred  other thrills.
Mix is at his best in this picture.
Watch for the big double feature show on Tuesday and Wednesday. SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
imiiiiniiiiiiinmiin
ii
11 DUNLOP
The World's Most
Envied Tire
Record Mileage-Faultless Anti-skid
iiiiiiiiiii ••••••••• t ». » < » »
It's a long trail
From the North Pole to the
South Pole, but Royal Baking Powder went with Admiral Peary—Amundsen has
it with him now. It went with
Scott to the South Pole.
Stanley had it in darkest
Africa. Royal is the only
baking powder you can buy
anywhere under the sun.
Baking VkwwH
Made from Cream of Tartar
derived from grapes
Contains No Alum—Leaves No Bitter Taste
MADE IN CANADA
AUCTION SALE
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
G. J. Hardy has received instructions from Mrs.
Colin Campbell to sell by Auction, without any reserve,
at her Residence the New Townsite, Cumberland, on
WEDNEDAY, JUNE 27th AT 2 O'CLOCK—Prompt
The whole of the very valuable Household Furniture, Bedroom Appointments and Effects including:—
Brussels Carpet 15'xl2' as new; Brussels Rug
9'x6'; Several small Rugs; Extension Dining Table;
Six Dining Chairs; Two Rockers; Comfortable Arm
Chair upholstered in Tapestry; Oak Secretary; Oak
Buffet with bevelled mirror back; Occasional Table;
Parlor Table; Music Stool; Empire Heater; Small Oak
Table; Quantity of Framed Pictures; Large quantity
of Novels and other Books; Singer Treadle Sewing Machine; Chiffonier with bevelled mirror and six Drawers; Sheraton Dressing Table with large bevelled
Mirror; Brass and Iron Bedstead with Springs and
Mattress; White Enamel Bedstead with Springs and
Mattress; White Enamel Dresser; White Enamel
Washstand; Camp Bed; Linoleum; Cook Range; Kitchen Table fitted with Bins and Drawers, etc.; Oak
Bookcase; All the usual Kitchen and Cooking Utensils; Bread Mixer; Wash Boilers and Tubs; Wringer;
Large quantity of China and Crockery; Quantity of
Fruit Jars; Electric Iron; Electric Toaster Stove; Two
Step Ladders; Quantity of Tools and a large quantity
of other Effects.
Terms CASH. — Further particulars may be had
from the Auctioneer.
G. J. HARDY
COURTENAY, B. C.
Phone 10.
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade Wilh us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 5fi—We Deliver.
«
OFFICE CAT
BY JUNIUS
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Howdy, folkn! One-piece bathing
suits will be prohibited at the bathing beaches this year. Bet this makes
the wild wavea wilder.
• •     •
But they can carry this censor business too tar.   Some day they are
going to prohibit the water from getting rough.
• •    •
Ot course, the girls ahould wear
enough clothes to prevent their appendix from getting sunburned.
• *    * —
No Adeline, a Russian barber shop
Is not where you get a quick shave.
It has been suggested that we have
* *    *    •
a reckless driving week, but it'would
be hard to distinguish It from others.
• *    •
Comparisons
A bullet ls a deadly thing
Rushing onward, with a stag!
And should lt penetrate my hide,
Twould make an awful weight Inside,
Hut I don't think that It compares
With biscuits that my wife prepares.
• »    *
It Isn't what others may thluk about
you; tbat bring the worry wrinkles;
It's what you know of yourself.
• •     •
An optimist Is one who thinks matters might have been worse If wo
hadn't begun to elect senators by popular vote.
• •     •
After fifty, one thank Ood for every happy face, says Lelder.
• •    •
A great deal of alleged golden hair
is platted.
• •    •
"A gentleman" defines Morley In
a man who can made you hate him
and treat you so nlco you are ashamed
to cuss blm.
• *    •
J. Cameron attributes his escaping an aviation accident to his presence of mind.    He has consistently
refused to go up.
• *     *
No man Is a hero lo his office bny.
. . t    *
Home Is Just a woman's sympathy
surrounded by four walls.
.   '.    .
Some birds are not satisfied with
Just telling a He.  They want to prove
it as well.
• •    •
It ls all right to try t   boyuoer.e"
it Is all right to try to be   your
brother's keeper, but don't try to be
his conscience.
• •    •
Try E'm with Music
(Courtroom Scone)
The plaintiff: "He made me what I
am today."
The beautiful star witness:
"People call him Lovln' Sam, he's the
Sheik of Alabam."
The defendant: "I picked a lemon
in the garden of love."
The prosecuting attorney addresses the Jury: "He's a devil In his own
home town."
Councel for defense addresses Jury: "For he's a Jolly good fellow."
The Jury deliberates: "We won't
go home until morning."
The Judge passes sentence: "She
was happy till she met you and the
fault was all your own."
Behind the bars: "Alimony Blues."
• •     •
A lot of Cumberland girls can put
it on their faces so as to produce the
popular two-toned effect.
• «    •
Famous Words of Famous Men
"You might at least be sociable!"
"How much a quart?"
"Do you think you'll crash?"
"Now up at the house—"
"We've got to stop, ond let the on-
gtne cool."
"Now, do you have a match?"
|  "Every man should stand on his
town feet," says an oil magnate. Yes,
■especially ln our one-man cars.
' A Mosquito Triolet
He presented his Bill,
And I could not evade it,
In valley, on hill,
He presented his bill,
With stinging ill-will
So with blood, sir I paid It.
He presented his bill,
And I could not evade lt.
* •    •
The only trouble with Mr. Ford's
new method of burning coal twice
thinks Jcnks, Is that it will encourage a lot of Becond hand coal ilealers
to enter the market.
• •     •
Breaking the Pair
A well known Cumberland man
was riding down Dunsmuir Avenue
in his Ford with one foot hanging
out over the door. A small boy, noticing this, shouted after him: "Hey
mister! Did you lose your other roller skate?".
"I'VE DROPPED ON A GOOD
THING," SAID THE TREE AS IT
FELL ON THE PREACHER.
• *     *
Time Changeth
"A hundred years ago today a wilderness waa here;
A man with powder   in   his   gun
went forth to hunt a deer,
But now the times    have    changed
somewhat along a different plan;
A dear, with powder on her nose,
goes forth to hunt a MAN."
HOW DO THEY FIGURE SUNDAY
A DAY OF REST WHEN IT IS THE
ONLY DAY IN THE WEEK WHEN
A MAN STAYS HOME WITH HIS
WIFE.
• *     •
Bore:   Any  individual  who thinks
a proper sentence must begin with the
pronoun "I".
.     .     .
Little girl your bare knee shows
When the sunshine plays just so.
I can see your tinted flesh
Thru the thlnost gown of mesh;
Is It modest, do you s'poue,
Not to wear no underclothes?
• •     *
Ho used to roll his cigarettes,
She used to roH her sox;
Now they roll the baby's cart,
For blacks and blocks.
• •    «
»
A Casually Here
There was n young maiden named
Flo
show
Who a fellow took out to a
He thought she was fast,
Now his flag's at half-mast.
For sitting behind was—her beau.
SLATS' DIARY
By Ross Farquhar
Maw Creek Says
"Pa ain't never been what you'd
call a ladles' man, but ever since
we've been married I've noticed he'B
inclined to be a lot more charitable
towards poor, sinful women that be
Is toward poor, sinful men."
According  to the reformers,
rising generations Is sinking.
the
Friday—Pa got got mad at the clerk
down to the store today. He went
to by his self a new
Straw hat and after he
finely found 1 witch
looked larely decent
he handed It to the
clerk and sed I gess
this 1 will do. The clerk
sed Well theys no use
rapping It up you mite
as well ware it rite
away and leave fokes
go a bead and get there
laff over with rite now.
& laffed aa he sed It.
Saturday—They was
a man at are house today and Ant Emmy ast
him where did he live and he sed
South Bend and Ant Emmy sed Why
is South Bend a town I all ways thot
all the time It was a curve In the
pike somewheres.
Sunday—Jakes ma woodent send
him to Sunday skool today on acct.
the lesson was about Job She .sed
the Bible says Job cussed the day he
was horned and she diddent hardly
beleave ennybuddy cud of lernt to
tawk that quick iu life.
Monday—I guess wc will have a
nother wedding here In arc nelgbor-
hood soon In the future. They is a
fellow comes to see a girl acrost the
St. and every time he shows up she
gives him a good feed and pa says
she has got him 'A marryed all reddy.
Tuesday—The U. S. Statistix says
that they are a ottomobeel for evry
6 and a Yj people in the U. S. Pa says
he gess he Is the % person then because after looking over are 2nd
hand ford he dlsslded we only got %
a machine enny more.
Wensday—The preecher walked
past are house on bis way to prayer
meeting to chat and tawk a little wile.
Pa ast him what kind of a time they
was havelng at prayer meeting now
and he replyed and sed Well me and
the Janitor has a very nice time. Usually.
Thursday—Well me and pa played
a lot of checkers tonite. Ma Bed she
wood run over to Mrs. Glllems for a
minlt. bo we bad the hole evning to
are self.   And made good use of It.
CAVIN
LEADS THE WA Y!
Men! If you want -the best shoe that money can
buy, look over our line of "Astoria" Shoes. "Tailor-
made Shoes for Particular Men."
SPECIALS FOR SATURDAY BUYING
Leckies Youth School Shoes sizes 11 (fin fjr
to 131/a     «P«J. I D
Leckie's Chrome Double Soled Miner        (fir PA
Shoe for         tpU«t)U
Three lines of Mens' Dress Shoes, Black and Brown
recede and round toe. Solid leather and welted. To be
sold Saturday only, for (fir rt\
per pair       «pO.OU
Our bargains in Ladies' Shoes are too numerous to
mention in this ad. We have a very large stock, which
we "must reduce." Our prices are very, very low,
and it will pay you to look these shoes over before you
buy.
Tennis Shoes, For Saturday Only-
Boys, Black, sizes 1 to (Ji  «r
Wit per pair    tpJL« I D
Boys Brown Heavy Grey soles (fi-t  Qp»
sizes 1 to 5     tpJ.ot/9
Youths Black (fi-t   f»l\
Sizes 11 to 13i/o     tPl.DU
Youths Brown (fi-t   flr
Sizes 11 to 13'/.      «M.iO
Mens" Black d»-|   QT
per pair    tyL UD
Mens' Brown, heavy Grey (fin AA
soles     «P^.UU
Childs' Size (fi-t   Off
5 to 7'/>    *pL»tuD
We also have a number of lines of Ladies Tennis
which we will sell Saturday for cost.
Cavin's   Shoe   Store
CUMBERLAND — — B.C. 1
3 3JEJBIBIBJBIB131SlElSI8ia^^
Tax Notice
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF CUMBERLAND
NOTICE is hereby given that all assessed taxes
including School taxes assessed and levied are due and
payable at the office of the City Clark, Cumberland,
B.C.
For the benefit of the ratepayers wishing to pay
their taxes the office of the City Clerk, Dunsmuir
Avenue will be open Daily from 10 to 12 a.m. and 3
to C pjn. and on Saturday, June 30th, from 9 a.m. to
6 p.m.
Penalty for Non-Payment on or before June 30th,
1923:
Section 235 says: Upon the first day of July in
each year the collector shall add to the current year's
taxes unpaid on each parcel of land or improvements
upon his roll ten per centum of thc amount thereof,
and upon the first day of October in each year shall add
an additional amount of five per centum thereof, and
the said unpaid taxes, together with the amounts added, as aforesaid, shall from the respective dates aforesaid, be deemed to be the amount of the current year's
taxes upon such land or improvements.
A. J. FOURACRE,
City Clerk and Collector,
Cumberland, B. C.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR  TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND  OIL
A.J.EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
 PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES	
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Homc-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEN
K*
=s
u
ELKS'   DANCE
B.P.O.E. Lodge No. 60 at
Royston, Wednesday, June 27
NEW   TENNIS   COURT
Special 8-piece Orchestra
Elks' Grand March at 9.30
THIS   FLOOR   IS    THE    LARGEST   AND    BEST
open air dance floor on Vancouver Island.   Our Orchestra is com posed of the best talents the Island can produce.  We are catering
for 1000 people.   So if you want to be present at the largest dance ever held in the district
TICKETS:—GENTLEMEN      «pl.UU LADIES^    25C
Proceeds in aid of Kiddies Fund, Buffet Supper, Ice Cream, and Soft Drinks, will be served during the Dance.
Don't fail to be there next WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27th.
Parking space for 200 cars
RURAL CLASSIC IS i tnis season's photoplays is announced , popularity of the printed narrative by
NOW PHOTOPLAY ] as coming on Friday and Saturday to
                           I tho   llo-Ilo   Theatre.     It   is   "Quincy
"Quincy Adams Sawyer," Fam-  Adams sawyer," a Metro-si, picture
ous New England Story, to be ! baBed  on  the famous story of New
Shown at Ilo-llo Theatre.       j England lite which was a phenime-
  nnl "best seller" when It appeared a
One of Hie most widely heralded of | decade or so ago.    So great waa the
•sir   ix6
Kodak as you go
"Barefoot boy with check, of tan!"—
here he is—you'll meet him afterwards
in your Kodak album. With a Kodak
you bring the trip back.
Let us show you Kodaks from our
complete stock. They Ye priced as low
as $16.50, and they're, all autographic.
0
Lang's Drug Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lan's"
Send 11s Your Mail Orders.—Phone 23.
Charles Felton Pidgin that it was
dramatized, and in this form it won
more favor. The elaborate photoplay
version is even more interesting than
the book or the play.
Everybody knows the story of
"Quincy Adams Sawyer." Everybody
knows and loves its quaint rustic
characters. The story of thc young
lawyer from floston, Quincy Adams
Sawyer; his coming to the small town
of Mason's Corner; his experiences
in running down a dishonorable
scoundrel; his great love affairs-
all this Is part of the attractive novel
which ls now a screen play. The delightful rural characters are fun-
provoking to the extreme, and the
fresh, clean, humor will appeal to
all lovers of better photoplays.
A lavish production has been given
this famous story. To enact the roles
lu the picture, the entire motion picture industry was searched for Its
best material. As a result, one of the
highest-priced assemblies of talent
is seen, and in the list are players
who have been starred In their own
right. Among the more important
are Blanche Sweet, Lon Chnney, Barbara I.a Marr, John Bowers, Elmo
Lincoln, Louise Fnzenda, June Elvidge
Hank .Mann, Zazu Pitts, and Many
others.
"Quincy Adams Sawyer" was adapted from the novel by Bernard McCon-
vllle. It was directed by Clarence B.
Badger. The production was made
by S-L (Arthur Sawyer-Herbert Lu-
bin) and Is released by Metro.
the story of a modern "Ivanhoe," Intermingled with touches of latter-day
inlcs, after the manner of King Arthur.    A tournament forms  part of
the screen narrative, and it contains
numerous   dramatic   scenes , which
mount swiftly to a climax of great
tensity.    But, winding in and out is
a love interest as engrossing aa any
) written about   the   days   of   brave
j knights and their fair ladles.
'  Nor did the Fox organization omit
j the element of comedy    when    they
j turned out the photoplay.   Tom Mix
has made so many good pictures that
j we are led to anticipate in this newest
! film    something  of  a  world-beater.
I Certainly it's title, "Romance Land,"
is replete with possibilities.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •     Cleaning    ■     Repair)
Telephone I.     •     F. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, R. V.
MIX HAS THRILLING
FLIGHT A HUNDRED
FEET IN MID-AIR
Swaying a hundred feet above a
river in a tool bucket less than six
feet In ita greatest measurement,
rocking with the awing of the cable
as lt tossed from side to aide, Tom
Mix forged ahead in midair, for more
than three hundred yards. When he
climbed to safety he had still another
dangerous task before him—that of
freeing a girl from the hands of kidnappers. This Is one of the many exciting scenes in "Romance Land," a
Fox production, which comes to (he
llo-Ilo theatre Tuesday and Wednesday.
From advance reports this film
seems to have surpassingly fine entertainment value,   It Is described as
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Op
tician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Tuesday and Wednesday
Cumberland Hotel Parlors
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9 p.m.
The Cost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary 'for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical installation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has to be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the BEST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
NURSING HOME
Courtenay now boasts of   a:
private institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the   most
homelike and pleasing surround-,
ings-
Call or   'phone   for  appoint-:
ments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 TEARS' EXPERIENCE
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered with Uie valves or the mains of Ibis Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of wafer to run to waste, wc
therefore wish to point out that It is a serious offence to tamper
with such volves, and should the ofl'endlug parties be apprehended, tliey will lie prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
I EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATl'RDAY, JUNE 23rd, 1923
Special  Shipment From
England
OF
Children's Silk and
Cashmere Dresses—
A specially good assortment of dresses for the tiny
tots in heavy quality washing silk also in Cream Cashmere, this is the first shipment we have had and the
style, value and quality is right.
Children's White Silk Dress, square yoke, embroidered front, blue silk sash. (fin *jr
Price           «?£• i O
Children's White Silk Dress, double yoke, lace   round
neck.   Embroidered nicely. (fin Af?
Price           $&.UD
Children's Silk Dress, three rows of beautiful silk
embroidery on skirt, short sleeves, embroidered yoke,
a verv pretty dress for baby. (fin  {?A
Price           tPU.OU
Children's Silk Dress, well made of a nice quality silk
a special (fi-t   AP
price        «PX««/0
Children's Cream Cashmere Dress, embroidered front,
and sleeves smocked front a very (fin  CA
dainty dress     «P^J*t)U
Both in White Silk and Cream Cashmere. We can
show you a very choice assortment of dresses for
baby up to 2 years.
Ladies Hosiery in brown Black and White. Special 3
Zs  $1.00
Ladies' Lisle hose in most of the wanted Kfi*»
shades, per pair   OUC
Ladies' Art Silk Hose in Brown, Black HV\n
and White. Price per pair  I t/C
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURN1SH1NOS
CHEVROLET
FOR ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION
The "Superior" CHEVROLET is NOT AN EXPERIMENT but the result of years of practical tests
under every condition. It has thc most powerful and
economical light car engine in the world, and the Chassis and working parts are built in proportion. The
"Superior" CHEVROLET is doing over 30 miles to the
gallon of gasoline, and standing up under the most
severe tests.
"COUNT TIIE CIIEVBOLETS"
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
Phone 61
AGENTS
COURTENAY. B. C.
Phone 61
Local Briefs
Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Davies ot Seattle
arrived in town on Friday and are
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. James M.
Savage of Beaufort House.
Mrs. A. Bird and family left on Saturday after spending a few days with
relotives in  this city.
Mr. Thomas Carey and Miss Lena
Carey left for Vancouver on Tuesday
morning and relumed on Friday.
Mr. A. E. Jeffrey left for Vancouver
on Tuesday.
Miss 0. Gill who has been ln this
city for the past few months left for
her home ln Alberni on Saturday.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., left for Nanaimo on
Thursday  morning.
ROYSTON  NEWS  PERSONALS  ....
Mr. Henderson of Vancouver is visiting his son Mr. A. S. Henderson of
Royston.
Miss D. Rodwell of Victoria Is visiting her sister Mrs. A. J. Edwards of
Royston.
Mr. J. Walton left for Victoria on
Monday last.
Mr. A. It. Stacey left for Vancouver
on Wednesday morning.
Mr. Chas. Graham left for Vancouver on Wednesday morning.
Mr. Reg. O'Brien left on Wednesday
lost for Seattle, after spending a few
days with his parents Mr. nnd Mrs.
Chas.  O'Brien.
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Nanaimo
on Tuesday evening.
Mr. Charles Duncan of the British
American Paint Co.. arrived In town
on Tuesday.
Tennis Rackets
Restrung
Golf Clubs
Repaired
Bring your repairs to
E. T. ELLISON
Bicycle Shop—Courtenay
Bicycles, New and 2nd Hand
always in stock.
FOR SALE
BREAD!
i ■
We could not get along with- j'
out it.
It's the old "Standby"—
Why? Because it is all substance and nourishment.
Because it satisfies when
other foods do not.
Ours has a real bread flavor
and a good substantial slice.
Call up your grocer. He has
it.
Bread is your Best Food—
Eat more of it.
Eat
FOR SALE—JERSEY COW FOR
sale—3 year old. Rich milker. Vo-
ry gentle. Make good Family Cow.
$60.00. Apply R. Waddell. Mlnto.
J. 30.
HALLWAY'S BREAD
"The Bread that Builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
HEAD YOUNG STOCK.—JERSEY
Pure llrcd and all are from High
producing dams. 15 to IS months
old. A good investment for (he
Dairyman. Apply 11. Waddell, Mlnto. J. 30
FOR SALE—CREAM PERSIAN KIT-
(ens, also a year old male full
grown. A beautiful cat. Apply Mrs.
Waddell, R. R.  1, Cumberland.
FOR SALE:—FOUR HOLE ALBION
Cook Stove, suitable for shack or
camp. Apply 108 Maryport Ave.
J 23.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor.  of  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite  Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
JULY  PICNIC
NEW SAMPLES JUST ARRIVED. ORDER YOUR
SUIT NOW, FOR THE HOLIDAY
TIP-TOP CLOTHING
in Light Summer
Tweeds and Darker
colorings. All Wool Ma
terials. — All One
teriterials. All One
Price
$27.00
Fit Guaranteed.
Hobberlin    Tailoring.
Priced from
$27.50
to
45.00
We are now showing Mens' and Boys'    Tweed
Caps r7r.O
from      I tIC
Mens' Straw and Panama Hats 7Pk/»
from      I OK,
Mens' Work Shirts in Khaki and Dark      (fi-t   rtP
Ginghams from     «pA«<J
Boys'Khaki and Dark Cottonade Bloomer (fi-t   EA
Pants.   Priced at      «P±»t)U
Mens' Fine and Dark Grey Work   OP«    fvA/»
Sox, per pair   LOK,* tll/C
See our Window for Pay-Day Specials.
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
FRANK PARTRIDGE
CUMBERLAND
LEAVE YOUR ORDER FOR PRESERVING
STRAWBERRIES
Vegetables Fruits
Cantelopes
Fresh Green Peas Bing Cherries
New Potatoes Table Berries
Green Onions Peaches
New Beets Plums
New Turnips Apricots
New Carrots Hot House Tomatoes
Cucumbers Grape Fruit
Rhubarb Oranges
Green Cabbage Lemons
Bananas
Apples
SPECIALS
Oranges, 4 doz. for   $1.00
Oranges, 3 doz. for   $1.00
Potted Meats, 3 tins for 25c
Potted Meats,  2tins for 25c
Del Monte Pork and Beans per tin 10c
JUST ARRIVED
Fall stock of Fruit Jars, Caps, Tops, Rings, Parrowax,
Etc.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY   .
PHONE 38
The many friends of Mrs. Norman
Searle of Union Bay will be pleased
to know that she Is getting along
favorably In the Cumberland General
Hospital.
No, Dr. Ignatz. an aspirin    tablet
Isn't something to write on.
Mr. John Bird was Injured while
at work in No. 4 mine on Tuesday
night aud was removed to the hospital where he is doing nicely.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Robertson, returned on Thursday from a visit to
thc Sound cities.
Specials This Week
25 inches Ginghams, in Check, Blue, Pink       OA/»
Brown and Mauve, per yard     u\3\,
32 inches Ginghams, special (fi -|   AA
3 yards for        »M»UU
New Valencines Laces f» -| A _
per yard       DL &   1UC
TOWELS—
A good large Bath Towel, regular KA*»
65c, This week   OUC
White Bath Towels, slightly KA/»
soiled, to clear, each   Uvl
Bathing Suits, all sizes—
Bathing Caps, each
25c, 35c * 50c
Couches, Bed Lounges and Camp Cots and Mattress.
Kitchen Chairs, Golden finish (fi-t   PA
Each           tpl.t)U
Children's High Chairs, Rocking Horses and Kiddie
Cars.
Dining Tables, Chairs and Rockers.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
THE INCREASING VALUE OF YOUR
TELEPHONE
YOUR TELEPHONE is of greater value
as each month goes by. With a steady
increase in the number of new telephones
you are constantly able to talk with a
larger number of people. This applies
to different- parts of the province.
It means to the business man that he is in close
touch with more people. As every telephone is a long
distance telephone, anyone on the Lower Mainland or
Vancouver Island may be reached at a moment's notice.   The conversation is direct the reply instant-
Don't overlook the cheaper night rates. Between
7 p.m. and 8 a.m., you get three times the day period
at the same price.
British Columbia Telephone Co.

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