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The Cumberland Islander Aug 14, 1920

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Array Tni^ CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
tf
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No, 33.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 11120.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
ALL ABOARD FOR
ROYSTON PICNIC
All Arrangements Completed for the Picnic of the Employees of
the Canadian Collieries to lie Held at Royston Today—Grounds
Laid Out and Buildings and Necessary Fixtures All in Shape
—Two Grandstands, Quarter-Mile Track, Children's Swings,
Refreshment Booths for Children and Grown-Ups.
The General Picnic Committee made a I rip of inspection of the
grounds at Royston Thursday evening, when about'iil'ly members
made the journey in autos lent by committee members. They
found the grounds in first-class shape and all arrangements satisfactorily completed. In fact everything is now ready for the great
event of the season, which from present indications promises to
be an*-*unuualified success.
Two large grandstands have been erected, which will give the
onlookers a good view of the various events taking place. Between the two stands are tracks for boys' and girls' races, areas
laid out for tug-of-war, wrestling and first aid contests, while
around these areas and the two grandstands is a quarter-mile
track. The bandstand, whereon the Cumberland 'City Band will
regale visitors with music during the day, is a conspicuous fixture.
One corner of the field is devoted to quoits and a bosche game,
whatever that is; another has swings for the children, where the
small fry can swing to their hearts' content.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the G. W. V. A. has a refreshment
booth booth, as also has the G.W.V.A. The children's refreshment
booth wiH undoubtedly be well patronized. Hot and cold water
will be available all day.
The Picnic Committee were wry well satisfied with the arrangements and tendered the Grounds Committee a hearty vote of
thanks for the exceedingly good work they have accomplished.
The management of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd.,
has. gone to considerable trouble and. expense in getting thc
grounds and buildings in shape and supplying the huge amount of
good things necessary to make the picnic a success. The hearty
spirit of co-operation existing between the company and its employees is strong evidence of the good feeling and harmonious
relations prevailing between the great coal company and its workers. If this same spirit of get-together was more prevalent there
would be better working conditions and less labor troubles in the
world.
A Long Programme With Valuable Prizes.
As there are over fifty events on the programme there will be
plenty doing all the day and interest should be well stistainod until
the train leaves Royston at 8.30 in the evening.
During the lunch hour it is expected that Mr. Henry S. Fleming,
President of the Company, will give a short address.
A special train will* leave Cumberland at 8 o'clock Saturday
morning, and the first events, races for boys and girls, are scheduled to start at 10 sharp, and from then on the fun should be fast
and furious, the programme including events for all sorts and
conditions of people, such as girls' shoe scramble, boys' pillow
fights, cracker-eating contest, a race for married women, old men's
race, the married women's nail-driving competition, Japanese and
Chinese races, Chinese and Japanese tugs-of-war. We hope our
Society Editor will be able to lake a verbatim report of the
language used in these Oriental events.
BASEBALL AND FOOTBALL EVENTS ON SUNDAY.
Some of the big events in connection with the picnic will take
place on the day following at Cumberland, when baseball contests
forjuniors and seniors wil be held, and also a five-a-side football
competition. Some very valuable prizes are offered for these
events and it is expected that teams from the Mainland and Island
will compete. Invitations were sent out sometime ago for these
events.
FIRE DESTROYS TWO
HOMES IN ALBERNI
ALBERNI.—Two houses, situated
on the bluff buck of the OUroy-MuKajr
. lumber mill, were destroyed by (Ire on
Thursday of last week, and the volunteer lire brigade had a hard time saving other property in Ihe neighborhood. The conflagration was caused
by sparks from the open burner of tlie
lumber mill wliieh landed on the roof
of one of the houses. '
The lire had scarcely made any heail-
way before it was discovered by employees of the mill, who Immediately
telephoned an alarm, Some delay was
experienced iu gelling lllc general
alarm sounded alter II had been received at Central, and then further delay resulted (rom dilllcully iu getting
ihe lire auto Into satisfactory running
order. It wus nearly half an hour before tbe brigade hud tlie hose read>
to play on the lire and by that time il
bad got beyond eontrol, Tbo Humes
leaped and roared mid burning embers
were blown all over the neighborhood.
Fiery sparks were constantly [ailing
on the residence of J. Held across thc
way'aud it wns saved by a volunteer
who climbed to the roof and kept a
garden hose at work.
Before the lire had burned itself otil
there was another alarm, the roof of
a small unoccupied building on tlie
north Bide of Argyle Street having
been set nlirc by stray sparks. In tho
meantime the Alberni volunteer (Ire
brigade bad come to the assistance of
Port Alberni brigade and wns dispatched to take care of the new dan
ger. Tills (ire waa extinguished after
a small amount of damage bad been
done to the roof.
As Hie weal her was hot and everything seemed to be so dry as to be
easily Inflammable, while a strong
breeite «as blowing in the direction of
the most thickly populated portion of
the townsite. there was much anxiety
on the part of properly owners while
the blaze on the bluff lasted. For
over two hours it was felt that a new
blaze might start anywhere, lo be followed by a general conflagration.
However, shortly after live o'clock all
anxiety was relieved, there being then
nothing more threatening In evidence
than the smouldering ruins of two
homes.
Crew Quit Ship
Through Dispute
Not Liquor Secured at the Coaling Town as Stated in the
Press Reports.
Residents of Union Hay have just
cause to be Indignant at tho press reports emanating from port Townsohd
early  thin  week.    The cause  of  tho
men (.ultting tho ship was on account
ot a grievance against the ship's officers und not because of liquor ob-
tallied  at  tho  coaling  station,    The
press dispatch was an follows:
Union Hay .Miillgned.
PORT TOWNSEND,   Aug.   8.—
(Special.)—Bound     for     Sydney
with  lumber  loaded  at  Mukilteo,
the big wooden steamer Snoqual-
mie arrived last night from Union
Boy, where she  took on  bunker
coal.    While at the coaling port
her engine crew quit with the exception of the engineers, the men
leaving their clothing and  other
effects  abourd   the   vessel.    Not
wishing to bo detained in the British Columbia port.   Capt.   Eugel-
brecht Balled for this place,  the
engineers   working* overtime   to
keep the ship going.   The men had
no complaint to make against the
steamer or her officers, and their
desertion  Is attributed to liquor,
which was plentiful lu the coaling
station.   The master went to Seattle today and expects to have men
here to take the places of the deserters in time for   her   to   sail
Monday afternoon.
The Facts of the Case.
The facts of the case are as follows:
Four of the engine crew had a grievance against the oflicers of thc ship
and the balance of the crew refused
,to go aboard until the grlvenace* was
settled.
The ship loft Union Bay at 1 a.m.
August 7; at 2 a.m. the mon who had
left the ship called on the emigration
officer at Union Bay and had an interview with him. He states that these
men were sober when they called
upon him.
At 5.30 a.m. the men called up Mr.
Clinton, the American consul. Their
spokesman stated that he represented
the men who had refused to Gall on
the S.S. Suodjialnite. The men were
taken care of and were returned to the
United States by the American Consul.
The Consul states that all the men
were sober when he saw them.
It is well known that the true cause
of the trouble was that the men were
upplted by two rival labor agencies
and one of the men induced some of
the men from the rival agency to quit
the'ship.
We feel that In justice to the people
of Union Bay. that these facts in connection with this matter should be
known.
City Band Picnic
The annual picnic of the Cumberland City Dand will be held at Royston
ou Saturday, August 21st. A hearty
invitation is extended to all to attend
this function.
CHINAMAN'S "LUCKY" FIND
While cutting the fern on the vacant
lots fronting on Dunsmuir Avenue one
day this week, a Chinaman disturbed
a hen setting iu a clump of bracken
right close to the sidewalk. Biddy was
indignant at being so unceremoniously
disturbed) but* tbe Celestial was delighted as he secured a big nest ot
eggs, though they must have been tn
various stages of incubation from the
effects of the hot weather of late.
Motor Accident
Near Courtenay
A. Hei'gstrnm Seriously Injured
—Driver of Car at Liberty
on $5,000 Bail.
A motor em* driven by Perl, Higgins
met with n serious accident near Courtenay on Saturday afternoon inst,
when as a result of the accident A.
Hcrgulrnin bail his Iok badly broken In
two placets, Ilia hack injured and several ribs broken. Ulggfns und another
occupant, Hum Kabayakawa, escaped
uninjured.
Tho .accident happened Just a few
yards from a turn in the road, and as
it is snld the car made three complete
turns It must have been travelling at a
terrific speed. It waB badly wrecked,
landing on "Its own wheels up against
a telegraph post.
Higgins appeared before Magistrate
Hames on Monday afternoon charged
with driving a motor vehicle on a
highway at a speed greater than reasonable and proper,' (hereby endangering life. The hearing of the case was
remanded until Monday morning next
Higgins was released on $5,000 ball.
GASOLINE SHORTAGE
Ou Sunday Inst all the garages In
town were out of gasoline, nnd car
owners wanting It had to go out of
town for It or leave their "Lizzies"
In the garage. Courtenay wns cleared
out of gas early iu thc day, a number
of cars beating It down there early in
the morn Ing to secure the necessary
fuel.
One man whose tank needed replenishing went to Stanford's Oarage, but
the proprietor had gone down to bathe
In the cool water at Itoyslon. No one
being there to serve him the seeker
after gas decided to help himself us
the pump was not locked. He filled his
tank und started on", delighted at his
success. He got about two blocks
when bis engine stalled. On examination he discovered the "gas" he had
helped himself to proved to be water!
WEDDING
STOCKATJD   ll.iinilNON.
A quiet wedding took place on Wednesday last, when Lizzie, daughter of
Mr, Win. Ilarmisou of this city, was
united in marriage to Mr. John. S.
Stockand, son of Mr, and .Mrs. Wm.
Stockand./
The ceremony wns performed hy the
liev. Geo. Kinney, al tlie residence of
die bride's father. Miss Jean Miller
was bridesmaid, aud Mr. Wm. Stock
and, Jr., atlondeifthe groom.
The bride looked charming in a blue
silk dress, and carried a bouquet ol
lilies, carnations nnd roses.
After the nuptial knot had been lied
a wedding supper was held, at which
the immediate friends and relatives of
the contracting parlies were present
Correspondence
in; contributions to e. iv. v. a.
lHIUHX'i KIMl.
Editor Islander. '
sir,- Having heard from various
sources thnt I refused to contribute to
the Huilding Fund of the O. W. V. A.
Memorial Hall, would you allow me to
suy that I have never been approached
by onyono in* connection with thc
above. I understand a gcuenil canvass of tbe merchants and others of
the city has been made, and I fail to
see why I should have been ostracized
in this manner. I have at all times
desired to assist, and whenever called
upon for help would do the best I
could for them. I might mention thai
thc last occasion I was approached by
any representative of the O. W. V. A
was when Mr. Walton called and had
tickets for sale for a concert and
dunce, to which I gladly contributed.
Yours for a square deal,
WM. GORDON.
Cumberland, B. C, Aug. 12, 1(120.   ■
OTHERWISE EVERYTHING
CMSMS TO BE ALRIGHT!
A Cumborland business man, who
has asked us to withhold hla name,
sends the following communication:
For the following reasons, I am
unable to send you the cheque asked
for:
I have been held up. held do«vn,
sand-bagged, walked on, sat on, flattened out and squeezed, first by the
Government for War Tax, the Excess
Profits Tax, Victory Bonds, Thrift
Stamps, Capital Stock Tax, Merchant's Licence und Auto Tax, und by
every society and organization that
the Inventive mind of man can invent
to extract what 1 may or may not
possess.
From the Society of John the Baptist, the G. W. V. A.. G. A. C. United
Veterans' League, the Woman's Auxiliaries, Navy League, the lied Cross,
the Black Cross, the Purple Cross, and
the Double Cross, the Children's Home,
the Dorcas Society, the Y.M.C.A., the
Y.W.C.A., Salvation Army, tlie Boy
Scouts, Jewish Relief, Belgiun Relief,
Tarring the Avenue, and the Fraternal
Order of Weary Willies.
The Government has so governed
my business that I don't know who
owns II. I am Inspected, suspected,
examined and re-examined, informed,
required and commanded, so I don't
know who I am, or why 1 am here.
All I know Is that 1 am supposed lo be
an Inexhaustible supply or money for
every known need, desire or hope ot
tlie humun race; and because 1 wlll
not sell all I have and go out aud
beg, borrow or steal money to gin
away, I have been cussed, discussed,
boycotted, talked to, talked about,
lied to, lied about, held up. hung up
robbed and nearly ruined; and fir
only reason I am clinging to life is to
see what lu hell is coming next.
FOOTBALL IN B.C. NOW
ON A SOUND BASIS
Hritish Columbia Football Association and "British Columbia Provincial Football Association Amalgamate Under the Latter
Title at Large Gathering of Delegates Held in Vancouver—
Mr. Thomas Graham Elected Hon. President and Mr. Nat
Bevis Chosen Second Vice-President.
A meeting of all football clubs of lirilish .Columbia was called mi
Saturday last, August 7, at (ho Hotel Vancouver, I'm* thi.' purpose
cf trying to conn* t'i some settlement re tho dispute between the
two associations, li. C. F. A. and B. C. P. F. A. Tlu* latter being
the body affiliated wilh the Dominion Football Association, called
the meeting and some 48 delegate:;, representing about 60 clubs,
attended. President R, Forgie of tiie B, C. P. I1'. A. was in the
chair, and in a few remarks thanked the delegates for such tt large
attendance, which showed that all were interested in having this
dispute settled and all the clubs amalgamated into one association.
After some discussion it was unanimously decided that all clubs
should join with the British Columbia Provincial Football Association.   Thus ended the dispute.
Mr. Thomas Graham Elected Honorary President.
The. election of officers followed, when Mr. Thomas Graham of
Cumberland was elected Honorary President of the new association; Mr. John Hunt of Nanaimo, Honorary Vice-President; Mi*.
Jack Russell of Vancouver, President; Mr. Dave Leith of Vancouver, Vice-President; Mr. Nat F.evis of Cumberland, Second
Vice-President; Mr. G. E. Morton of Vancover is Secretary-
Treasurer. A Council of seven were elected along wilh the above
oflicers, five from the Mainland and two from the Island. The
executive is now busy drafting a constitution to govern the
association.
The province i3 likely to be divided into various districts, and it
is expected that the Upper Island will run its own association,
and an Upper Island league is likely to be going by the early part
of September.
Canadian Collieries' Picnic Committee Granted Permission.
The Canadian Collieries' Picnic Committee of Cumberland was
granted permission by the new association to run a five-a-side competition at Cumberland on Sunday, August 15th, provided that the
prizes for thc winners wero of value instead of money.
BIG GAME, ISLAND VERSUS MAINLAND, AUGUST 21.
The executive of the Inter-City Summer League are now
negotiating to stage a big game in Nanaimo on Saturday, August
21, between a team composed of Cumberland and Nanaimo players,
representing the Island, and a team composed of Rangers and
Celtics players, representing the Mainland. This should prove to
be one of the finest games of the season.
Allspice Is the pea-like fruit of a
shrill) grown iu the West Indies.
P. O. CLOSED 10.30 TO 4.30
As everyone will be out of town Sat-
urdny attending Ihe Canadian Collier
les Employees' Picnic at Royston. tin
local post ofiice will be closed between
the hours of 10.30 a.m. and 4.80 p.m.
ANOTHER SHOE AND
CLOTHING STORE TO
OPEN UP HERE
Mr. Frank Partridge of Ibis city haa
taken' ovor the store opposite the post
office and Is having It renovated and
fixed up. When completed it Is his Intention to open up a shoe and clothing
storo,
Car Overturns
At Royston
Four Loggers Get Good Shaking
Up When Cars Goes Over
the Bank at Roy's.
An accident which might have had
serious results occurred about 11.1.1
Thursday night ut the intersection of
the Cumberland-Koyaton Road with
the Highway. A parly of four loggers
were returning from Courtenay to
Union Bay, when, on approaching the
li III at Royston, one of the men told
the driver he had to I urn there -lie
apparently threw on the brakes aud
turned to come up the Cumberland
road, but the car thought otherwise
und rolled over and .down the incline,
badly damaging the nice new Maxwell
runabout, Ihough Ihe lour occupants,
wdio are snld lo hail all the way from
Sweden, escaped serious injury, one
of lliiin sustaining bruises to Ills
shoulder. Mr, Wilkinson, Hie local
football player, appealed on Ihe seen*
just after the occurrence and helped
extricate the men from tiie car, bring
lug tho injured man to Hie le. ipttal lo
he treated.
The grim J'dic of Ihe affair i*. thai
Hie driver hud only borrowed Ihe car
from one of Ihe engineers ol' He
Bloedel, Welch ami Stewarl camp 'I hi
in—wn:.    il   new   one,   having   been   In
use only n few da) B.
GOOD PROGRESS ON NEW
STATION FOR NANAIMO
Plans Call   for an  Up-to-Date
Railway Slaiion Wilh All
Conveniences.
■ -
NANAIMO —Contractor Geo. F. Wil
ou is busily employed at present In
the erection of the new atutlon which
Ihe D. & N. Kail ay nre constructing
ut Nanaimo. The new huilding will
stand ahuo.-l on Hie site nl the prci-eni
structure, hut will lie somewhat to the
west of bUine, in order to allow he
loom lor anothei Irack which will I"
laid where the present platform now
ilniid:. Hy ihe shifting and laying o.
a new track II will mean thai much ol
the curve to the south ot the station
Church Notices
HOLY TKIISHT CHURCH
Rev. W. l^evcrsedKO.
ill gus I 15, XI. Sunday Alter Trinity.
CUMBERLAND.
Evening service at 7 p.m.   Preacher,
tho Rector,
On Sunday evening, August 22nd,
the preacher at tho evening .service
at Holy Trinity Church will he tho Rev.
Loring Clark, D.Q,, uf St. Taul'ii
Episcopal Church, Chattanooga, Tenn.
ROHAN CATHOLIC CHCJtCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
9 a.m., mass at Cumberland.
i.k.w.   imiioiHsi ( mum
Rev. Geo. Kinney
Morning Service, 11 » m
Sunday Sen oft!, 10 a ni
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
NIKSHVTKHIi.N  SERVICES
James Hood, l astor.
Morning Sorvfce, 11 a in.
The preacher  al the   Presbj terlau
Church Bervice   on Sunday,   il  n.m.,
ill be Dl   (tail.. M.D., !>.!>. who Is
aid lo he an eloQuenl proachor from
'ennobi • e    Dr. Clark Is ;i membor of
tin'  Prolu 'ant   episcopal   Church   uf
America.
will he done away with.
Tii:' Blallon. when completed, will
lie ii structure one hundred anil eleven
feet long, f.wentj ft -i ol the centre of*
iVllich   Will   I"'  nf  two  BtO) les.     To   lllc
south oi ihe two-storey portion tho
waiting room will be provided. This
will include a ladles' waiting room. l!i
feel G Inches by 10 feet. Hie general
waltlhg ilium will be 35x18 feet Tho
lower floor of the two-itorry portion
will le used as ticket offlce, agent's
ofllce, etc., while the upper storey will
he divided into general othces. Tn iho
north of (he ticket offlce a baggage ami
expreas ofllce will he arranged. Tho
whole will he 34x29 feet. Tho express
office, which will lie used for express
parcels, will be 10x14 feet, while tlie
main baggage room will be 34x20 feet
Directly In Ironi ol the station a
Ixtt im-foot platform will he con-
Btruclod the full length of ih.- huihL
ing, nnd n platform will also extend
three hundred feel bouUi of tho
.station. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 14, 1920.
We arc making a  special  Bhowing  this  week of
Crockery, including some
Special Tea Sets
Now is your opportunity  to  stock   up  on wanted
pieces.   Our showing includes:
TEA  SETS
CUPS AND SAUCERS
TEA PLATES
DINNER PLATES
JUGS
PLATTERS
TEAPOTS
ETC., ETC.
T. E. BATE
P. O. Box 270 CUMBERLAND Phone 31
Great West Tea
WE ARE SOLE AGENTS IN CUMBERLAND FOR
Red, Green and Blue Labels
65c.     75c.    90c.
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
Make Your
Drinks at Home
LIME JUICE
COOLING FOR THE BLOOD
GRAPE JUICE
REFRESHING FOR THE STOMACH
(See William Jennings Bryan)
LOGANBERRY JUICE
SWEET FOR TIIE KIDDIES
Frost's Drug Store
The Rexall Store
Cumberland, B.C.
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION  BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT  DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
Hotel Waitress (to Professor of
Languages : "lilil you say 'iiuililln','
sir?" Professor: "No, my dear lady, 1
didn't—and I never shall!"
MRS.
F. C. STEARMAN
DIES AT NANAIMO
.Mrs. Pred. C. Stuarraan, wife of Mr.
Fred. Stearman, druggist of Nanaimo.
died In the hospital there on Saturday
evening, following an operation which
had been performed earlier in the day.
and from which she never fully recovered. Tho end came with tragic
suddenness, for till the late Mrs. Stear-
niun's friends and relatives had been
hoping and expecting that she would
lie home again within a couple of
weeks, Ihe seriousness of the operation not having manifested itself until
alter it had actually been commenced.
Business Conditions
Reviewed
The Royal Bank of Canada, in its
monthly report just issued, reports on
business and trade conditions in part
as follows:
Reports on business conditions have
tor some time reflected more than a
little uncertainty as to the future.
Even as tar as the present state ot
trade is concerned, they have been of
a conflicting nature. The subject has
therefore been thought of such special interest that a survey is given below, based on reports received monthly
by this bank from points all over
Canada.
British Columbia,
Businosa is dull, particularly in the
lumber trade. Tlie demand for cedar
logs and shingles fell off to such an
exiont that some logging camps and
practically all the shingle mills had
lo close down. Lumbermen are confident that this Is only a temporary
depression am! that, owing io the
world scarcity of lumber, demand will
heroine more active aud prices tend
tn return to previous levels. The mining output is normal on the coast, but
lias fallen off in tbe interior. Nanaimo
reports a daily increasing production
of coal and a probability of higher
prices. Mining in the Slocau District
was retarded considerably by a strike,
operating again and, while practically
all the properties are operating again
they are affected by a labor shortage
and are not showing the activity of
last season, ln the province as a
whole, the demand for labor has
slackened and few labor troubles are
■reported.
Crop reports indicate good hay and
fruit crops. The latter is estimated at
from 60 to 70 per cent, of last year's
crop.
The Prairie Provinces.
The usual summer period of uncertainty is being experienced. Business
conditions all over Canada, and particularly in the West, depend upon the
coming wheat harvest. Much needed
rain came in the third week in July,
making the wheat prospects excellent
There can be no absolute certainty as
to the size of the crop, however, until
almost harvest time. The resultant
state of hope and doubt is reflected in
general trade. Wholesale prices remain firm, although orders are below
normal. Buying for immediate delivery is brisk, but little is being sold
for future delivery. Some retailers,
anxious as to tlie future, bavfl. .jwiji-
celled fall delivery orders and are attempting to sell off their present surplus stock. They are not willing;
however, to sell at a loss aud little
real price cutting is being done.
Wholesalers generally are optimistic
and expect a big business season after the wheat lias been harvested and
sold
Coal mines in the Lethbridge District, Alberta, are working all the
men they can obtain and it is estimated tbat to date the 1020 output is
about -15 per cent, more than that of
1919. No coal ia being stocked, and
there is a demand for more than ia
being produced. Regina, Saskatchewan, reports that coal stocks in the
city nre very low at present, being
only about 35 per cent, of previous
years.
There have been few strikes. Labor
supply and demand seem roughly to
have balanced. Conditions may lie unset i led by the harvest time need for
workers.
Ontario.
Wholesale trade is good and prices
are showing a tendency to rise. Retail
trade is normal, although some dealers, lo obtain funds, have put on cut-
rale sales. Scarcity of available funds
has also caused the renewal of more
trade paper,than formerly. .Manufacturers are, on the average, working
it normal capacity, although at some
points plants have had to close down
frequently owing to the shortage of
coal and power.
Tbe labor situation throughout the
province is satisfactory aud some
largo strikes, Including that of the
Hydro Bloctric employees at Chlppa-
wu, havo been adjusted. At Port
Arthur, Hie employees of the local
shipyard Struck for a 20 per cent, increase, but in less than two weeks
they returned to work on the old
schedule.
The coal mines of Nova Scotia are
not producing more than enough to
cover their outstanding orders, and no
new orders can be taken for some
time.
NOTICE
Will the person who took possession
of a Flat Bottom Boat, and lis holding same at anchor in White's Bay,
Comox Lake, kindly return same to
the undersigned and avoid further
trouble.
R. RIDEOUT
Sale of City Lots
SEALED TENDERS are Invited for
the purchase of:
Lot 2, Block 15, May 522A
Lot 8, Block E, Miii> B22A
Lot 7, Block I, .Uny 522
In the corporate limits of tlie City of
Cumberland, as authorized in the Cily
of Cumberland Land Sale Bylaws Nj.
1, 1919, and No. 2, 1920, to each of
wliieh of the aforesaid lots the City of
Cumberland   holds   an    Indefeasible
Title.
Tenders  must be sealed   and   tor-
warded to the City Clerk.
T. MORDY.
July 9th, 1920. City Clerk.
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
Try one of Henderson's
Special Banana
Splits
We make our own Ice Cream
and claim it to be the best ou the
Island. We get the cream fresh
from the farm every day.
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water ffi™* Pure
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING  CO.,   LTD
NANAIMO. B.C.
ADRIFT FOR THREE DAYS
IN GULF OF GEORGIA
Resident of Ketchikan Reaches
Nanaimo After Drifting
Down the Channel.
WILL CHALLENGE FOR
THE AMERICA'S CUP
SYDNEY, N. S.—The Royal "Capo
Breton Yacht squadron announces
'hat it wlll challenge for the America's
cup as soon as satisfactory arrangements can be completed to finance the
project.
Lamp wicks which wlll last a year
arc made of asbestos boiled in wax.
Jim Innian, a resident of Ketchikan.
Alaska, arrived In Nanaimo Tuesday
evening from Chemainus, at which
place he landed from the launch Alice
after having drifted down the Gulf
from Ihe Balllliac Islands to Cowlchan
Cap. a distance of some forty-live
miles.
A party of Seattle men were en
route from Ketchikan to Seattle in
the lnrge gasoline hont Hague, which
was towing a small launch, tho Alice,
which had broken down. When rounding the Dummies the Hague grounded,
and after repeated efforts to float the
Hague had failed the men attempted
to swim to the Alice but were unable
to do so owing to the strong current.
Inman then put oft' In a small' skiff
and htwl no sooner got aboard the
Alice than It broke adrift, carrying In-
mon down the Gulf. He threw overboard the anchor attached to 100
fathoms of chain, tlie anchor holding
for a few minutes oft* Five Fingers,
the boat again.continuing Its drifting
course down the Gulf. Tuesday morning, having been without food or
water since Sunday morning, Inman
decided to abandon the launch and
put off in the skiff and rowed to Cowichan Gap, afterwardB crossing over
to Chemainus and going to Nanaimo
by train.
It hns since been reported that Ionian's companions were looked after
hy the keeper of ilio Balllliac Light,
aud according to the latest information the Hague Is still aground ou the
lialllnncs.
FATAL ACCIDENT
NEAR ALBERNI
Resident of Alherni Killed When
Auto Stalled and Backed Over
Steep Embankment.
E. E. McKay, a returned soldier of
Alberni, who conducted a barber shop
in thnt town, wns killed In an automobile accident about 9 o'clock Sunday night at a point five miles from
Alberni on the way to Nanaimo. McKay was riding In a car driven by
Douglas McKenzie of Alherni. When
climbiug a steep grade the engine
stalled, the car backing over the embankment and turned over pinning
the unfortunate man underneath and
breaking his neck.
AUSTRALIA'S FLl-JET
GROWING RAPIDLY
MELBOURNE, Victoria.—Australia's
merchant fleet ls growing rapidly, the
federal-owned vessels totaling 38.
Twenty steel cargo vessels are being
built, or have been built, for the federal government, In Australia, and 5
steel steamers of 12,000 tons each are
being built in England for the government. A rough estimate of the profits
made by the 15 cargo vessels purchased by the Prime Minister in 1915,
at a cost of £2,000,000 shows £8,600,-
000 in less than three years. If to this
amount is added tho revenue earned
hy the former German steamships
worked hy the Commonwealth, a gross
profit of .C 0,300,000 Is shown. These
figures ure used with excellent effect
by members of the federal ministry
whenever any unkind critic refers to
certain wooden vessels purchased .from
the United States.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
August 0—Equator and Scow, Seattle; Snoqualmie, Australia; Esdud and
Scow, Prince Rupert; Shamrock,
coastwise,
August 7—Coaster, Dominion, Chemainus, coastwise; Clayburn and
Scow, Vancouver.
August 8—Earl, coastwise; Canadian Exporter, Australia.
August 9—Fearful and Scow, i'rlnce
Rupert; Wythevillo, Boston", Mass.
August 10—Mount Etna, Portland,
Ore.; Stadacona, coastwise.
August 11 — Westham, Phoenix,
coastwise; Steel Trader, Everett;
Storm King, Alccdo, coastwise.
It is easier to dodge responsibility
than it is to dodge the result. August 14, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER*
Thr
icf
mc?
,< f VNSfi_ r*y.-'i'H'A *\
D EHIND every industry in Canada—
—from the patient truck-gardener bowed over his
lettuces—
—to the young manufacturer struggling to prove the
worth of Canadian skill and Canadian material in
some new enterprise—
—stand the railways—the intelligence, the power and
the hopes of the railways of Canada.
Not, like the Exploiter, watching to take harsh advantage of hard-times or the follies of a boom-
Not seeking by a moment's shrewdness to "clean up a
million and get out!"
at
Not interested in the price of real estate in just one
town, or thc prosperity of just ONE province—    '
But, instead, employing their widely-gathered
intelligence in the interests of all Canada for all time
to come!
For the railways of Canada cannot be lifted up and
carried away to serve any other- master than Canada!
Their services cannot find any buyer but Canada!
They injure themselves if by asking too high returns
Today they damage the prosperity of the citizens
of To-morrow.
The request for increased freight rates is made with
these facts in view.
Canada will still have the cheapest, the fastest and
the most reliable railways in the world!
This is the third of a series of advertisements published under the authority of
The Railway Association of Canada
formerly   the   CANADIAN    RAILWAY    WAR    BOARD
Al
MANLESS MEN-OF-WAR
The other day, on thc James River,
at tlie plant of the Newporl News
Shipbuilding Company, was launched
tho dreadnought Maryland, There
were press photographers and Ihore
were hundreds of burly workers
whose labor had gone lo put her together. She has 38,000 tonnage, Is
fl0« feet long and will have as her
lirst battery eight 16-lnoh guns ami,
of course, a full quoin of smaller
calibres. As modern warships go, she
has no bad lines and ought to make n
useful member of tho American Heel;
we nre told that she has been "designed to lie the most powerful warship afloat," and. for the sake ot the
American navy, we trust that this will
prove to he the case.
The professional observer, however,
is hound to paint out the fact thai
when completed and fitted, her usefulness will be much increased by having
aboard a full crew properly trained,
and such a thing seems hard to find
at present. The problem is somewhat
different for the merchant marine, ln
which building goes on steadily and
tliero seems to be. little anxiety about
crews. Por instance, at Hog Island
during the year ending Marcli 31,
there will have been delivered some
580,876 dead-weight tons of ships. Tic*
first ship that Hog Island turned out
the Qulsconck nnd wus christened by
Mrs. WOQdl'OW Wilson. The ship lias
a record of 00,000 steaming miles, and
after doing 37,500 miles was dry
docked and found to be In good con
dition.    Hog Island  ill  llllll  had at
LARGEST STEER IN THE
WORLD IS IN ONTARIO
TORONTO.—The Toronto Globe publishes the following despatch from
Clinton, Ont.:
Ex-Reeve Charles (Stewart's farm In
Ashileld Township, Huron County, Is
Ihe nieccu of hundreds of visitors.
drawn hy.curloslly to drive 25, 50 or
even 100 miles to see whal Is snld to
he the largest steer lu tho world.
"Sir Dougfas Haig" le the name
given tn this magnificent Shorthorn,
wlih'li measures nine feet six Inches
around tlie chest and has a girth of
t"ii (eel six Inches. Ills present estimated weight Is 3,500 pounds.
II Is claimed that this steer surpasses In weight the one shown In the
Chicago world's fair.
VOCATIONAL TRAINING
IN SASKATCHEWAN
•Address Wauled ut Once.
Where Is the woman now who call
drive a man to drink?—Life.
Judge—Did the prisoner offer any
resistance?
Pollcemnn—Only a dqjlar, yer honor, an' I wouldn't take it.
average dally working force of 30,000
aud consumed a staggering amount of
material; all this Is fine enough, but
the merchant marine is always dependent on the navy, and the navy on
Its ships, nnd though these be a mile
long and have guns that shoot twice
around the Horn, they are of no particular use without crews. Steamships arc not propelled by wind. -
Christian Boleuce Monitor.
Poultry Accounts
(Experimental Farms Note.)
Three dollars profit over cost of feed
each year for every hen on the farm
Is a very good return, and according
to monthly accounts received from
farmers, by the Poultry Division of the
experimental Farm. Ottawa, there are
a good many farmers' poultry flocks
which are actually giving this profll
every year, and some even better.
Poultry keeping on the farm Is not
merely a side line now. but ia u sane
jusine.'.s |iropo:,iliou,\nlid the hil-and
miss methods that forme; ly obtained
In poultry work should no longer be
tolerated, A national indui try well
iu tlie way to one hundred million
dollars a year demands business
methods, und In order to help Ihe industry nnd to make It possible for the
average poultrynmn to keep track ol
his poultry operations, the Poultry
Division has put out a very simple
toi ill of poultry accounting, copies ol
which will he sent to any person making application and who will return to
the Poultry Division ouch month u
duplicate copy.
A Few Figures.
For several years these poultry accounts have been supplied to persons
asking for them and a compilation of
the reports shows some very interesting dutu. For Instance, of all the
farms reporting their poultry operations, 84.5 per cent, of them show u
profit, aud of this number the average
receipts over expenditure for each lien
per year Is $2M. As might be expected a number of reports show a distinct loss each year aud that is where
one of the benefits of the account form
comes In. fiilher the farmer himself
or the Poultry Division at Ottawa can
pick out the weak point or points and
have thoiu rectified.
Some other interesting figures ure
obtained from these reports. Among
these are the figures that show that
the average number of hens on the
farms reporting is 62.9; tlie average
expenditure per hen tbat is, for feed,
appliances, etc., is 12.111, aud the average profit over expenditure is $2.04.
One farmer claims that ho can attend
to one hundred hens while he lu attending to'one cow, and his average
return from 100 hens is $250.
-  (lood Prospects.
The future looks bright for the poultry industry, and the man who can
keep poultry whether on the farm or
ih the back yard may look for remunerative returns if he uses business
methods lu his operations. Prices are
good aud though feed and labor may
be high, one can take for grunted
that the higher the price for feed the
higher the price of the product, and
the labor question ou a well organized
poultry plant is not serious, for some
one member of the family, even a boy
or a girl, can often look after the
poultry. The value of poultry products
Is being appreciated each year. Last
winter, when beef on a Canadian market was selling at from 10 to 12 cents
a pound live weight, guaranteed new-
laid eggs were selling at 10 ceuts for
two ounces or 80 cents a pound. It Is
about time that the Canadian hen was
considered ss a valuable asset.
If you want to make more money
out of your poultry, write to the Poultry Division of the Experimental Farm,
Ottawa, for free account forms. They
will ask you to return each month a
copy, but they will help you make
your poulary pay.
FOREST BLAZE LIKE
MASS OF FIREWORKS
III0O1NA.—Arrangements have been
completed to "put vocational educational training In Saskatchewan in the
public and high schools on a systematic basis under tlie new federal
scheme furnishing an appropriation of
approximately $50,000 annually to the
Province. Regulations framed by Ihe
SaBktttohewan .Minister of Education
provide for three-year courses iu com-
inerilnl training, home economics, In
diistrlnl work nnd agriculture In the
high schools. Separate courses are
provided for students attending the
duy schools and for evening classes.
In the day schools the regulations provide for at least 30 to 40 per cent, of
the students' school time being occupied with the vocational training
courses during the first two years and
at least 60 per cent, in tho Inst year.
The act passed at tbe last session
of the Saskatchewan Assembly provides for administration by local
boards consisting of three employers
of labor, three employees and four
representative citizens. Employers
are appointed by the city or town
council, employees by local labor organizations, and the remaining members by the local school board. To
carry on tills work Saskatchewan will
derive an annual grant of approximately $54,000, partly based on population. Regina is the first city to take
advantage of the new act, a board hav-
I ing recently been appointed to admln-
j biter vocational training In the high
I school.
Night Scenes Very Spectacular
During Recent Bush Fire
s   in Upper Country.
PENTICTON.—Last week's forest
blaze lu Ihe llreen Lake and Vassonux
Lake districts was pel lisps the most
spectacular bush lire which has ever
been seen here. The naming pines
and fire lit up the countryside for
miles und Ihe scene, particularly al
night, was an Inspiring one. From the
bald-face hill behind Hie cliff ranch
north almost to.Dog Luke Ihe clumps
of trees kept blazing day afler duy nnd
at night lit up the waters of Vessoaux
lake with a thousand sentinel fires.
The red reflection could he seen as
far north as Naramata and In dny time
huge clouds of smoke kept drifting
northward.
The fire is said tb have-been caused
by lightning more than two weeks ago
and although the fire wardens thought
they bad It extinguished it started up
again at the beginning of Inst week.
Ill
Luxury Tax Removed
from  Electric Heating:
Appliances
You will be interested tn know that the efforts ot
manufacturers of Electric Heating* Appliances and of
others interested, have been successful in securing the
removal of thc 10 per cent. Luxury Tax on nickle-
plated Electric Heating Appliances.
Wo nuote herewith a recent letter from R. W. Bread-
ner, Commissioner of Taxation, to a manufacturer of
appliances: .
"In reply to your letter of the lfith inst., I may state
that (he luxury tax applies to articles plated with gold
or silver adapted tor household or orlice use. Nickle
plated electric heating appliances are exempt."
Some of the more important arguments used were:
1st—In almost all communities of the Dominion ol
Canada it is actually more economical to iron, toast,
cook, etc., with electric appliances than by any other
method.
The proposed legislation, therefore, would be taxing
an economy rather than a luxury.
2nd—Appliances made from steel and iron require
a covering of something to protect them from the
action of rust.
Nickle is the best and most economical for this
purpose.
CUMBERLAND.AND UNION WATER.WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on. the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it ls a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they wlll he prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of tho law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P.O. 314
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be consid-
s>
ered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of allluancc long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
I
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
A proud young father telegraphed
the news of his happiness to his
brother In these worth-,: "A handsome
boy has come to my house and claims
to be your nephew. We are doing our
best to give him a proper welcome."
Tlie brother, However, failed lo see
the point and wired back: "I have no
nephew. The young man Is an impostor." *
INVICTUS
Out of the night that covers me,
Black ns thc pil rrotn pole to pule,
I thank whatever gods mny be
For my unconquerable soul.
In Ihe fell clutch of circumstance
1 have not winced nor cried aloud
L'uder the bludgeonlngs of chance
' My head Is bloody hut unbowed.
Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms out Hie horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of Ihe years
Kinds, nnd will find me, unafraid.
It matters not how strnll tlie gate,
How charged  wilh punishment  Ui.e
scroll.
I mn the master nf my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.
- Wm. Ernest Henley, Kour
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 14, 1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN 1 Editor.
Saturday, August 14, 1920.
A WORLD-WAR ON DISEASE
Out of the war with Germany has arisen a world-war
against germs, observes Brun Lasker, in an article in The
Survey, picturing the League of Nations at work. When
constructive effort became the paramount duty of the
Allies, an International Health Office, with which was Incorporated the Office international d'Hyglene Publlque,
and of which tlie lied Cross Societies have become an integral part, was established as a bureau of the League
Among the practical methods of work contemplated for the
near future, In addition to the general duly of advising
the League of Nations iu matters affecting health, there
are mainly live, states the writer:
"To bring administrative health authorities in different
countries Into closer relationship wilh each other;
"To organize means of more rnpid Interchange of Infor
million on matters where Immediate preoautlons ugutnst
disease may be required le. g., epldemios), and to simplify
methods ior acting rapidly on such Information where It
affects more than one country;
"To provide n ready organization for securing or revising necessary international agreements for administrative
action in matters of health, and more particularly for examining those subjects which it is proposed lo bring before
the executive nnd general committees, with u view to the
conclusion of international conventions;
"To he advisory to tlie International  Labor   Olllce
health questions;
"To confer with and, when requested, to advise the
League of Red Cross Societies and other authorized voluu
tary organizations."
Thus the office will become an international clearing
house of information pertaining to matters of health, and
be ever ready lo act when any part of the world Is threat
ened with disease or disaster. It has a gigantic task even
now, the writer points out, for—
"Of Immediate importance, in view of Hie appalling situ
ation in regard* to the epidemic diseases in eastern Europe
aud Asia, is international organization to combat plague,
cholera, yellow fever, typhus, smallpox, influenza. At pi'BB
ent every efficient national public-heallh office seeks to
obtain us best it. can Information on the prevalence of the:
diseases in other countries, so as to make its plans accordingly. The International Health Office, by issuing weekly
statements to them, wlll supplement the Information
secured directly or make isolated action iu tiie matter unnecessary."
HUDSON BAY RAILWAY
Before fall it is expected thai the 90-odd miles of track
still needed to complete tbe Hudson Bay Railway will be
in place, and a new route opened for carrying grain from
the prairie provinces of Canada to Europe. The value of
the new route, in Hie opinion of some critics, can be proved
only by several years of operation, for it depends upon
keeping the Hudson Straits open during three mouths of
tiie yenr to provide regular passage for the grain ships
from Hie terminal at Port Nelson to the Atlantic. In the
early days of the Hudson's Bay Company small trading
vessels made regular trips to the bay ports, and it seems
reasonable to suppose that navigation will be practicable
except in winter, when the ice conditions are unusually
severe. Hitherto Hie grain has gone by rail from Sas-
katoon, In* the Saskatchewan grain region, 1489 miles to
Montreal and thence 3359 miles by sea to Liverpool. The
new route shortens the distance; from Saskatoon to Port
Nelson will be 697 miles, and from Port Nelson to Liver
pool 29G6 miles. On 30,000,000 bushels of grain sent
annually to Europe over the new route it is estimated that
15 cents a bushel will be saved in freight charges, which
would amount in all to $4,500,000.
INJECTION OR SPRAYING
New Zealand fruitgrowers huve recently been Interested
in experiments for eliminating fruit tree pests by Injection.
This method has been tried with some success tn the
southern dominion for the cure of silver blight, and it is
possible that in some cases the cap or even the soil may
be made to carry the medium which will arrest or cure
the disease.   A writer dealing with the subject asks:
Is it possible to eliminate the spray pump from Hie
orchard equipment? Probably the greatest drawbacks to
fruitgrowing, both in the BUburban garden nnd on the wider
commercial scale, is the ceaseless toll which insect pests
impo;e upon the trees. Wooly aphis und codlin moth on
tlle apple, blnck aphis, fruit fly. and lip moth on the
peaches, nnd scales—brown, olive, red. Indian wnx nnd
others—on Uie citrus, to mention but n few of the growers'
numberless enemies, are an over-present reminder Hint only
by eternal vigilance can Hie fruii he retained in n suitable
condition for human use. Km* nil ihen* pests Ihe spray
pump und the fumigating tent are offorod as means of
eradication; bul how ninny men have lime und patience lo
use them effectively? Whni appears to ho a totally new
method ol coping with those peBts, however, bus been
devised, and although il Is by no menus travelled beyond
the exjiei'liueiiuil singe, from Hit; evidence already available
It holds out tt strung probability Hint it simpler, more effective mid lass expensive treatment is In sight. One of tlie
chief drawbacks lo spraying 1ms boon the almost Insur-
mountablo difficulty ot covering with tho inseeilde every
portion of the Infested tree; fur too often In the growing
tips and the curl of the leaves there remains n sulllelenl
number of ihe parasites to recommence their work.
Especially in the small orchard, where ihe high-pressure
pump is out of the question, is tlie difficulty realised, Fumigation, except for citrus trees, lias been found impracticable, owing to the cost of tents nnd cyanide.
In contrast to these, tho now treatment alius at comln-
ing with natural forces to carry out the remedial work,
und uses the say circulation to convey the Insectlde. By
boring a hole, sny, half un inch In diameter and three or
four Inches deep, into Hie trunk of Ihe infested tree and
inserting a suitable quantity of a specil'c, in -18 hours there
ure evidences that the sap, even to the furthest terminal
tip, has been affected. In a few weeks tbe parasites nre
killed without apparently checking the health or bearing
capacity of the tree.
LOVE OF ANIMALS IS KEY TO CHARACTER
in an "Introduction," written for "Thoughts on Humane
Education," P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of
Education, says: "The really great are ever gentle and kind
and the greatest are the kindest and most gentle. Cruelty
aud indifference to the feelings of one's fellows or of tiny
sentient beings are marks of coarseness of nature or want
of proper instruction and training. .Fineness of fibre, inherited or acquired, in man or woman, as in woods and
textiles and cordage, is a sure element of strength..
Thoughtfulness of the feelings and interests and welfare of others comes chiefly from careful instruction and
training in childhood and youth. Learning to think and
care for the welfare of wild and domestic animals makes
one more thoughtful and careful of the feelings aud welfare of men, women and children.
How much richer and fuller Is the life of the man or
woman who has learned to sympathize with all nature and
to treat till creatures kindly aud mercifully. For indeed the
quality of mercy is not strained. It blesses liim thut gives
even more than him that receives. Our best living is nut
lu abstract and logical thinking, but In true und kindly
living und in uclions prompted hy good will. Hu who hits
learned to regard the birds as little brothers of the uir and
to look upon domestic anlnials and tho beasts of the tield
as his less fortunate kindred who need his help linds a
pleasure iu their color and voice aud minions, and a Joy
in the contemplation of their habits unknown to those who
are without this feeling of kinship, lie feels, us others
cannot, the throb of life of the world and rejoices in Hie
recognition of ills kinship with the universe.
"The teaching which lends to these results is a part of
the iualinuhlc rights of all children und must be included
In thc education ol home anil school if we would replace
tlie old cruellies hy thoughtful kindness aud muke the new
world a world of freedom and progress and brotherly love."
WHAT SOME MEN THINK OF THE LIFE
INSURANCE AGENT
Yesterday you made your tenth call on me. You have
been i | .ing on me for over two months, and iu all Hint
time yea have not impressed me or convinced me why.l
should take out a policy lu your company. You have asked
uie if I have any policy with other companies. You have
told me how uiuch "reserve" your company has, how
promptly you pay your death claims; tlie amount of bust
ness you have closed duiitig Hie past year. You have told
me that Mr. So-aud-So and others huve policies with your
company—
But iii ull those ten calls you have not figured out which
policy would he best lor me lo take out." You haven't
brought out Hie practical side of assurance. You have
given rite ilio impression that lo take out a policy with
your company 1 would he helping you to earn your bread
and bulU'i*. You have made mc feel that 1 would be doing
you a favor—you iiave come to sell me something instead
of offering me an opportunity to buy. Your Idea lias been
to sell, sell, sell- so that you could go to the next man and
say, "Here, 1 gut this man signed up this morning " and
show him signs of exultation. You huve one of the great
est professions in tbe world und you treat it lightly—nl
you seem to be able to do Is to say, "My company Is the
best—all the others aren't half so strong. I am the great
I am."
When some man comes around and shows mc that he
lias a policy tbat will 111 my case aud show mc why 1 should
have it from my own sclffish standpoint, I will buy—and
not before.
AN IMPORTANT BODY
Judging by the arrangements being made by govern
meats, municipal councils, boards o! trade and other iiodiea
for the entertainment und enlightenment of the delegates
to Hie Imperial Press Conference, now in session in Ottawa,
Canndu generally appreciates the incalculable importance
of this visit, which, in many ways, iu unique in her unuals
Never before has this Dominion had an opportunity of displaying its attractions aud advantages to so important a
company of visitors, for the delegates comprise the leading
publishers, journalists and publicists of the Empire—from
the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa,
Egypt, India, Malta, Straits Settlement, as well as from
Canada and Newfoundland. The great daily newspapers
of every important city under the British flag are represented, while the big trade and technical publications have
sent either their editors or aide members of their staffs to
record their impressions of Canada of today, and Hie opportunities she offers for investment. The Dominion should
benefit to an Inestimable • extent from the visit of so Influential tt body, especially those parts of tho Dominion
whose citizens have sufficient foresight and public spirit to
make the most of so rare an occasion.
A bullet-proof glass for cashiers' cages has been tested
by New York police for a bankers' protective association.
A 38-callbre automatic fired at a distance of three feet,
failed to penetrate the glass.
Prohibition bus at least reduced tho number of men who
think they can sing.
Some people have the idea that only the other fellows     0hlo may be the mother of Presidents, but there is sure
can possibly be bigoted and intolerant. to be a lot of trouble In the family this summer.
Although Canada is no longer at war with Qormany, n
prominent resident of British Columbia iu the person ol
Alvo von Alvenslehon has been officially declared to be an
enemy of ihe Dominion. A proclamation lo this effect appears in the Canada Gazette, li describes Alvo as a Ger-
mnn national, us one who is still regarded us un enem*.
within the meaning of the sub-section of Hie peace treaty,
under which the Allied governments look Hie right lo so
declare certain individual Qormans, Huron von Afven-
sleben oul a Bomewhal prominent figure on the Pncllc
Coasl In pre-war days uml wus believed in be Hie personal
representative in Canada of the Kaiser.
CONTEMPORARY QUIPS
It's harder lo convince the Germans thoy were licked
han il wus to lick 'em.
ss-s-s-s-ss^-s-ssssss^s-vre-s-wreg*;
NEW   GOODS
First Shipment of Early Fall Goods now to hand
DKESS GOODS IN ALL-WOOL SERGES, in cream, old rose, navy blue, dark green,
saxe and brown, in 54-inch width, at $4.50 per yard.
WOOL AND COTTON TARTAN PLAIDS, small and largo checks, in black and white,
from $2.25 to $4.50 per yard.
TRICOTINES,  GABARDINES,  PANAMAS AND COATINGS, in all popular shades.
MARCELLA BEDSPREADS from $6.00 to $14.75.
COTTON EIDERDOWN in 30-inch width, in pink, sky, sand and cardinal, at 90c per
yard.
TOWELS—TOWELLINGS—TABLE DAMASKS
FLANNELETTES—CANTON   FLANNELS, bleached and unbleached.
TEDDY BEAR CRIB BLANKETS, in pink and sky, at $2.25 each.
TELEPHONE
CUMBERLAND
&&9&mGGmmwmwmG®&m®sm&&&i*mQQ&w
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
A new revolt Is reported to be on In China,   This mnke
ii u He between China und Mexico.
A Philadelphia preacher says tbat all profiteers go to
hell.   Perhaps that accounts fur the high price of coal.
Cotton is a wonderful plant,   it provides cotton cloih,
olive oil, silk stockings und all-wool clothing,
Still, those oarpuffs don't prevent tlie average girl from
hearing the honk of nn automobile out lu front of her
house of un evening.
The census shows there nre 20,000,000 women in tho
United States above the age of 21, lint there are comparatively few above the age of 23.
How enn you expect to buy u cigur for 5 cents Willi
vegetables as high us they are?
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book.
The experience of veteran moorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cats afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay
a
\swmeek%umtmaum*mm.^t—■—■«——__ <U
August 14, 1920.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Five
JUST ISSUED
Wrigley's B.C. Directory
for 1920
YEAR BOOK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Official data covering agriculture, lands, timber, mining, fishing and public works.
GAZETTER AND ALPHABETICAL  DIRECTORY
Describing 2149 cities, towns, villages and settlements within the Province, giving location, distances
and directions from larger points, how reached, with a synopsis of local resources, populations, etc., fol-
lovved by an alphabetical directory of all business and professional men, employees, farmers, stock
raisers, fruit growers, etc.
CLASSIFIED BUSINESS SECTION
i
The business interests of the Province, including manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers, listing .all
products from the raw material to the finished article, are classified under 569 headings, alphabetically
arranged according to towns.
TRADE NAMES, BRANDS AND TRADE MARKS
A list of popular trade names, brands and trade mark goods, either manufactured or represented in
British Columbia, alphabetically arranged.
PATRONIZE  li. C.  INDUSTRIES
Almost anything which anyone desires can be purchased in British Columbia. Every dollar spent in B.
C. assists the Province. You can assist B. C. by trading with B. C. merchants. If you are unable to purchase what you desire in your*local town or community, then consult Wrigley's Classified Business
Directory, a copy of which can be secured at all first-class drug stores, confectionery stores, hotels, automobile garages, in fact, most of the live business concerns have a copy of Wrigley's 1920 British Columbia
Directory.
Subscription $10.00 prepaid to any address
Wrigley's Directories Limited
198 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 2876
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. Wc are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet, Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize   in   REPUBLIC  TRUCKS  and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
HANTED-BOAB1) FOB SUMMER
For a vacation we would go
To some place where  the  rates  are
low.
Where files In the morning do not bite,
Nor skeetcrs sing around at night.
Where we could rest our weary dome
Upon a bed like that at home.
Where we could get fresh garden stuff,
Whero chickens are not old and tough.
And for a lake we also wish
Where we'd be sure of catching lish.
A cool, delightful, charming spot
Where It is never sizzling hot.
Where we could hear not, night or
morn,
The tooting of an auto horn.
Where dogs would not buy at the moon
Or phonographs emit a tune.
Where we could drink from bubbling
springs
And not absorb tadpoles aiid things.
Where ev'ry road   was   arched   witli
t rees,
Where one could always lind u breeze.
Where one could on a picnic go,
Where poison ivy does not grow.
To lind such place as we've in view
We've looked the culnlogues ull thru.
AIuh, wo must say with regret,
We haven't found the place as yet.
—Tom W. Jackson.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
The best thing about a woman Is a
man's arm.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Ialcenso No. 8-25489
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Hay, Grain and
Mill Feed
Also Baby Chick Feed and All
Kinds of Poultry Supplies.
Don't Experiment!
SEND YOUR FILMS TO
BARTON
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
Cumberland and Courtenay
- fer -
Developing, Printing and
Enlarging.
DUNSMUIR ESTATE
INVENTORY FILED
Assets Valued at $3,597,583 and
Liabilities Amounted to
$265,066.
In accordance with the Succession
Duty Act of British Columbia a complete Inventory of the cstato of the
late James Dunsmuir has been died
by the family solicitor in the Supreme
Court at Victoria. The document sets
out all the assets within and without
Urltlsli Columbia differentiating between real estate, moneys secured by
mortgage, securities for money, Including life insurance and cash, book
debts, promissory notes ami bank and
other stocks. The lotal value of the
estate Is given as $3,597,588.08 gross
with debts and liabilities estimated ai
(365,068,08,
No mention is made lu the inventory of tlie Canadian .Northern debenture stock referred to iu the late Mr.
Dunsmuir's ulll, which was doubltless
disposed of by him during ids lifetime. Reference is made to some ol*
the stock, however, in an affidavit
executed by Mrs. Dunsmuir as having been transferred to the children
In February last, the total sum mentioned being £764,719.12.4%.
Detailed Assets.
Included In the detailed inventory
of assets are individual items selling
out their separate values such us
household aud furniture, 136,000;
farming implements and so forth,
$1,650; thirteen horses, $1,360; horned
cattle, $2,010; sheep, swine and lambs,
$428; hook debts and promissory
notes, $0,898.97; moneys secured by
mortgage, $904,962.08; bank slock aud
other stocks—without the province—
$1,365,633.23; securities for money.
$682,089.93; cash on hand, $771.97;
cash in bank within the province.
$100,8118.82; cash In bank without tlie
province. $71,980.13; other personal
property, motor cars und so' forth,
$7,000, und real estate, $307,000.
liabilities.
Debts and liabilities are similarly
Itemized, the chief among them being
Income tax payable to the Dominion
government for 1919, $131,228.33,
added to which is the amount estimated as payable to June 6 of the present
yew, namely, $60,000; income tux payable to thc Provlnclal government is
sot down for the year 1919 at $19,181.05
and up to June 6 last, approximately
$9,000. other liabilities Include Hat-
ley Park and other taxes, various
household and personal uccounts.
CLOCK TO RUN FOR
TEN THOUSAND YEARS
Expected to Run for 1000 Years
Without Attention—Correct
Astronomical Dial.
rnoj'En WAGES.
"Musicians are sadly underpaid! '
carped the wild-haired man. "1 play
trombone In a jazz orchestra, and what
do you suppose ray salary Ib? Havo
you any Idea what an expert jazz
trombonist should be?" "Oh, yes," replied J. Fuller Oloom. "The wages of
sin is death."
"1 liked that last story of yours,"
he said to the funny merchant. "Always have liked It. I recollect when
I first heard that yarn I laughed so
much I nearly kicked my cradle to
pieces."
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. OATZ, Proprietor
SINCE 11870     ^UtWii'i
ILOH
30S?8F§COUGHS
William Blauforrt. an Inventor, who
was born In London, Bug., in 183K, hut
who went to Aurora. 111., when 41
yearn old, has ju,«t died (here, Invented
a wonderful antrouomfeal clock.
The calendar of tliia clock in arranged for 10,000 yearn, even tho
double leap yearn being provided for.
Tho antronoinical dial in wound once
every a-xty-eight yearn. During the
llrat 1,000 yearn the clock in expected
to operate without attention. The
calendar reginteru the number aud
name of each day, each month and
each year. Cabinet aud uiecbanimn
were made by Mr. Blanford lu bit;
little workshop near lib home. Tin-
upper dial marks the time wilh absolute accuracy and in governed by an
eight-day movement Above the time
dial in (lie moon frame, allowing Ihe
phases of the moon, changing automatically each (juaiier. Tho astronomical dial, below thc time dial, allows
the earth's revolutions and movement
around the nun; the time II eulern the
couatollalfons or signs of the eodiao;
parallolinm of the earth's axis, and
tbe seasons. The main dial In foui
feet In diameter. Twi iity-tour smatlei
dtaln surrounding It BbOW tlie time in
the chief cities uf ihe world,
VWIV, IM. BANE MatT ins soil,
Sven had been guiding logs down
tbe chute to the buzz saw for several
bourn when the bona came along,
"This bane two much work for on<
man," »Sven told him.
"All right," said ihe bos-.; "1*11 send
John down to help you."
An hour pa.sned and the bosn cauu-
past ag&fll, Sven made tbe name com
plaint.
"This bane too much worlt for om
man."
"Iiut 1 sent John down to help you.
Where in he?"
"John, ho ain't bane here for some
time. lie vent down 'tween two log>
I tank he quit liim yob."
"Fifteen dollars u week for teachin'
ichool? It's a darn nbaine! Thoy
uiglita give per eighteen or twenty
lotlars. Why, I'm gettln' forty dollars
down to th' fnct'ry."   Lite.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEBRIFiELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir 'Ave.       Cumberland, B. C.
Canada Food Board License No. 10-4986
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Aliilerinl
mid
IViirkmiiiiKlilp *-..
Guaranteed .afN.—A**i •■""'
J®^\
lllililier Heels   lived IVIille I* Hull
Phillips' Military Heels anil Soles.
S.DAVIS   -   Dunsmuir A*, cnue
(.001)  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Slealts and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Opon Day and Mi:III.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specially
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland.
Lleollso No: 0-U72
mm
Begin Your
Trip Right
by selecting the abells that
hunters fromcoastto coast
have proved dependable
under ull conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
are a double assurance of
success for the man who
prefers ballistite powder.
Wrnlio carry a full line of
Canuck and Soverelftn Shot,
gun Shell* and Dominion
Metallic (...rirldat-H — each
backed by tliebia ,TD" tnu'e-
mark
C. H. TAKUELL
'Ciimherlnnd,  B.C.
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and   Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery,   '
Charges Moderate.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slali Wood (double load) . $5.00
Paolo Monie
Shoemaker
Shoe llepalrhiK n Snerliilt).
f'l'.MHKItl.ANI*.   IM!. Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 14, 1920.
Good Health Depends
on Sound Sleep
We can make you comfortable
OSTERMOOR MATTRESSES, S36.00 each.
GOOD SERVICEABLE COTTON FELT MATTRESSES at $20.00, $22.00 and $24.00 each.
WOVEN WIRE, LINK FABRIC and COIL SPRINGS,
from S8.C0 to $16.50 each.
STEEL BEDS, in white and Verni Martin finishes;
good designs; a choice assortment at prices ranging
up to $50.00.
PILLOWS to suit your choice.   .
BLANKETS, in white, grey ana red.
FLANNELETTE SHEETS, COTTON SHEETS and
PILLOW COVERS.
BED SPREADS.
T\. McKinnon
Complete House Furnishers
Cumberland, B.C.
DRAWS FUEL FROM AIR
TO DRIVE HIS MOTOR CAR
TIRES AT REDOOED PRICES
EUY WHILE THE STOCK LASTS
Size 31 x-1 	
Size 30x31-:. 	
 $33.00 artr.1 $35.00
 $20.00 and $22.75
Get your Timken Roller Bearings
installed here
Cumberland Motor Works
DISTRICT AGENTS FOR CHEVROLET CARS
FOR.
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. II. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Bouts and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARUffl SING CHONG, Ci-   Vrlaud
HONG CHONO & CO.. BevLd
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
683 Hastings St., W.i Corner ot
Oranvlllo,     VANCOUVER, U.C.
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beet,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIALS —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our  Pickled  Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
SAILING OF PILGRIM
FATHERS HONORED
SOUTHAMPTOrl, Eng.—The scones
attending the departure, 800 years ago.
of lliat little band of adventurers
known to history as the Pilgrim
Fathers, were reonacted in a pageant
inaugurating a four days' celebration
of tho tercentenary of the sailing of
the Mayflower. The pageant was pre-
coded by n luncheon tenderd by the
Lord Mayor. There were 400 guests
at the luncheon, including pronilnenl
persons In American and British ofll-
< ial life and the heads of various
Anglo-American societies.
Southampton, desirous of reminding
ihe world of her proud claim to fame
as the original port of embarkation of
the founders ol the American Commonwealth, cooperated with Plymouth
in commemorating the event. By
itaging the pageant, which is entitled
'.John Alden's Choice," at the ancient
quay-side near the West tlatc, through
which the Pilgrim Fathers left, because no roadway existed, and garbing
ihe performers in Puritanical dross,
an attempt was made to have the reproduction as historically faithful ns
possible. The gate has remained
through Ihe Intervening centuries as a
veritable monument to the Pilgrim
Fathers.
AUTO
PAINTING
General Woodwork, Auto Bodies,
Trucks *ind Wheels built ti order
Repairs Promptly Attended to,
Jas. C. Allan
Cor. Prldenux & FltzwIlUam Sts,
NANAIMO, B. C.
Discovery   Whereby   Gases   oi'
the Air Are Utilized for
Power Purposes.
Increasing costs o£ gasoline and repeated siories ot the shortage ot this
universally u^ed commodity make *
any invention .that promises to supplant gasoline of interest to everyone.
The following article in Webster City,
Iowa, will lie particularly interesting:
Without one drop ot gasoline or oil
of any kind and securing all power
from oxygen of the air, Arthur Brun-
dy recently drove an overland tiuck
about tlie city tiie entire day and thus
demonstrated beyond question the
practicability of his invention—using
the oxygen of the air for all power.
The oxygen Is drawn from the air by
certain chemicals, which Mr. Bruudy
lias compounded and not only will it
produce power but light and heat also
are obtained by the same process.
Tho chemicals are inexpensive, and
running the truck Uie entire day cost
just live cents. "The chemicals are
taken from tlie natural resources that
are all about us." declared Mr. Bruudy,
"but they are not inflammable, unless
there i:i air pressure; nor explosive.
and a child iuay drink them and it
will not hurt him."
The generator containing the chemicals 'was placed on the side of the
Overland truck and a small tube connects it with the large tubes of the
car engine. A small afr-hole in one
of tho-ao tubes allows the air to pass
in and a cap over this opening is regulated by the throttle of the machine.
TaG more the cap is raised and the
more air that is allowed to pass into
the cubes, the faster the engine runs.
There is not one drop of oil of any
I description used in this new process,
and die Overland which .Mr. Bruudy
i; ,ed, a model of about 10 years ago,
runs as smoothly and evenly aa the
most expensive model car on the mar-
rket today.
I .-if present the regular car engine
li- beiiiK uaed but the inventor now
lias under way on engine which will
occupy about one-lbird as much space
aud which is especially adapted to
the oxygen power process. It will
weigh hot over Si) pounds, will have
no spark plugs, no carburetor and ihe
numerous other contrivances necessary ou tbe gasoline motor. Tlie engine is a series of rotary cells through
which the air is forced by the chemicals and will occupy a space not more
than SxlS inches and will furnish one
horsepower for each pound of weight.
With the same chemicals to draw
tbe air qualities, a (lame with sulli-
cfent beat to cook over, or to warm a
house, is produced and Mr. Bruudy
also demonstrated this process. A. J.
Peterson, cashier of the Webster City
Savings Hank, and one of the promoters of tbe Brundy invention, plans to
use these chemicals in his furnace ibis
winter, and will order no coal if it is
found sufficient hent can be produced
to warm the house. The cost of heating with the chemicals will only be u
fraction of that for heating with coal.
in;; with coal.
Demonstrating the beating method,
Mr. Brundy tool* a small tank containing tlie chemicals, and over the
end of this held a lighted match. There
was no ignition. The inventor then
attached a gas burner to one end of
tlie tank and placed the other end to
bis lips, drawing the air in, and holding a lighted match over the gas i
turner, a clear blue blaze immediately
leaped up. The burner itself, tbe iron
frame, does not become hot from the
blaze, but only above the blaze, where
the oxygen is separated from the air
by the chemicals, there is heat.
The benelita which will lie derived
from ibis Invention, the saving which
will he realized by its practical ust
will be Invaluable lo the world, and
the tact that Mr. Brundy has a "real
thillg" is recognized now by those who
lirst scoffed at Ihe Idea.
"Of course it is not perfect," he de
dares. "There are numerous details
to he worked out and perfected but il
will nut be long before people will be
cooking witli air, heating their homes
with air, and running automobiles and
motors of every kind with air."
Miss Plane -Do you think, since I
have promised to he Will's wife, that
1 ought to confess to him that I was
kissed once*by another man—many
years ago?
Miss lunick— Ob, no, 1 don't believe
it is necessary for you to tell hi.ro anything about it—unless , of course, you
wish, to boast about it!
ANOMALIES SHOWN
IN GRATUITY AWARDS
Fallen Soldiers' Widows and Dependents Subjected to Unfair Treatment.
Considerable dissatisfaction in being
manifested among returned men, according to The B. C. Veterans'
Weekly, in conection witli the recent
.mler-in-couueil ot the Dominion government in dealing wilh tlie payment
ot war service gratuities to the widows
ami dependents ot fallen soldiers. In
each ease there is delimited from the
amount granted the whole of the 20 pel
cent, pension bonus that is being paid
at present. This deduction can be
Justified, It Is claimed, on one score
and only one, that of economy, and
even that Justification is nol one acceptable to Canadian citizens, who
have no desire to economize at the expense of the loved ones of tho men
who fell overseas, The gratuity lu not
Ihe full amount thai would have been
paid had the veteran returned, but Is
only the share that would have been
paid direct to his dependents, a not
too generous viewpoint iu th* lirst
place.
Here Is one specific case. The government granted a certain widow a
gratuity of $180 and deducted $6*1 bo-
ciiiue she had received the 20 per cent,
bonus for eight months. II is a good
thing that she was not receiving the
new 50 per cent, bonus, for under sucli
a method of gratuity payment she
would very nearly be in debt to the
government. '   *
Again, although tlie government
finally granted the fairness of the
claims put forward ou behalf of Can
adians who served in the Imperial
forces, and paid them the difference
between Canadian and British gram
Ities, the order-in-council arousing so
much unfavorable comment does not
include in its benefits the dependents
of those men of Canadian domicile
who fell in the imperial forces. Th
fiirther discrimination should not be
allowed to continue against claims
that cannot be denied with any pre-
lence of Justice.
DEPARTURE OF FATHER
BIGLIN FROM LADYSMITH
LADYSMITH.—The departure of
Hev. Father Blglfn for the East after
a residence of twenty mont*ts in Ladysmith as pastor of St. Mary's Roman
Catholic Church ia deeply regretted by
the parishioners ol" the church as well
as by the citizens generally. During
Father Blglin's residence in Ladysmith he has come In contact with
citizens of all denominations, and his
uniform kindness and unliable disposition won for him tlie admiration of
all classes. During his pastorship of
St. Mary's tlie church gained rapidly
in numbers and it was with sorrow
that his parishioners bade him goodbye. The reverend father has gone
back to his old home at New London.
Conn., but it Is uudorstood that before
very long he will again take up Ills
work in Hie West.
THREE AUTOMOBILES
IN A COLLISION
Three Cars in-Mix-up—All More
or Less Damaged But No
. One Badly Hurt.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
Klrst Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
LADYSMITH.—Sunday afternoon at
a point below the Diamond bridge
three cars came together and considerable damage was caused to two of
them, the third escaping with u broken
headlight. Tlie cars were an Overland, driven by William Morgan, a
Ford driven by It. D. Merrill, of Duncan, and a car owned and driven by a
Hindoo. It appears that the Morgan
car was coming along the Victoria
Road when, near Ivey's place, the
other ears approached. Morgan hiiw
the danger ahead ami to avoid what
might be a fatal accident he turned
out. but it was Impossible to avoid the
oncoming cars. The Overland collided with the Ford, but the Hindoo's car
cleared with only a broken headlight.
The Overland wns badly damaged, the
radiator being bent, one front mudguard doubled up, tlle frame bent and
the running board broken. To Mr.
Merritt's ear the damage consisted ol"
a bent front axle, mudguard doubled
up, radiator smashed and radius rods
also bent. The .cars were hatjly
shaken up and it was indeed fortunate that none of the occupants
were injured.
Timid Youth—What do I pay for a
marriage licence?
Facetious Clerk—Well, you get It on
the instalment plan.
Timid Youth—How's that?
Facetious Clerk—Two dollars down
and your entire salary every week for
the rest of your life.
PIANO
SPECIAL
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
Here is a Piano at a remarkably low price but of a
particularly high standard. The Regent hns a beautiful tone and is well finished throughout.
The Price
is only
$385
FREE FROM
TAX
With increased cost of production and taxes, we are not
sure how long we will be able to sell this instrument
at this price, so intending customers will do well to
decide while there are a few in stock.
CONVENIENT TERMS WILL BE  ARRANGED
In addition to the above we have a few Pianos at
Tax Free prices:
The GERHARD HEINTZMAN, which needs no introduction, as many hundreds have been sold in this
- district.
The MENDELSSOHN, in mahogany and fumed oak
finish, at a snap price.
The CECILIAN, full toned instrument, at $575.   Con-
venient terms arranged.
The HAINES BROS. Piano, at $57.5.
We have a full stock of all other lines and will be
pleased to demonstrate when you call.
CONVENIENT TERMS ARRANGED.
GEO. A. FLETCHER
MUSIC COMPANY
"EVERYTHING  IN MUSIC"
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
All Phonographs in Stock
Special  Summer
Terms for One
Week  onb
$60 cash
$15 per month
Give Telephone
Numbers Clearly
When calling Central, be sure to consult the directory
first, and when giving the number do so slowly, speaking the digits clearly. It shows consideration and
assists the operator in her effort to give service.
British Columbia Telephone Co. August 14, 1920.
f^mm'***************'■■—— ———^_  —
Music and Photoplays]
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLAlvnBB
\>
of
FANATICS CLIP GIRL'S
HAIR, BELIEVING THAT
BEAUTY IS A VENAL SIN
Colli Illiiiiileil Men and Women Torture
Young Lovers on the Theory That
Han-Inge is Not for Tills World
An Extended Tour.
Just before the St. Mihlel show the
Germans blew up an ammunition-dump
| near a company of Americans.   It was
 J reported that there was a large quan-
mise, it is not surprising that Geor- a*f ot gas-shells in the dump, and as
gina never wanted to see another 300n as the explosions began tbe
"good" man as long as she lived. Yanks  immediately made themselves
Bent on hunting wickedness she
turns her steps New Yorkward and
visits her brother-in-law, Jeffry, and
his wife. Despite advice to "be careful," Georgiana throws away her
mourning veils and ambles to Central
Park, where she is gratified to see a
passing horseman flirt with her.
Thinking  him  a  "rounder"  she
Robert   W.   Chambers,   tlie   famous
novelist, pictures a curious   sect,   In
"Even an Eve," a  film adaptation of 	
his story, "Tlie Shining Band."   The I cVuTages his'adLJ^'V", S''e   e"'
=,:-r"™ ■• '"•"-" ■£:=::■:
men and women, some of tliem sincere
In their beliefs, but  led   by a   fnlse
prophet, who heads Ihe bund simply
for the money he can get out of It.
Cold  and  unscrupulous,  lie not only
deceives  Ills  followers,  bul   the  man
whose trusted agent he Is, attempting
to  despoil  his  employer  of  valuable
lands which he knows he owns.
Believe In Torture.
The members of tlie band are grim,
determined men and women, who believe in direful punishments both on
this earth aud the hereafter for those
not iu the cllcuie, and help to administer some of tlie punishments themselves.   In their fanaticism there is no
deed at which they will stop at the
command  of their   leader,   even   attempting the slaying of innocent persons  who  have,  in   their  estimation,
infringed on their rights.
They do everything In their power
to force Eileen, the pretty daughter
of O'Hara, wealthy recluse, to adhere
to theh' followlngs. They are encouraged by the father because he has
become soured on^ the world through
tiie disloyalty of his wife years before.
He trusts no men except the members
of the band, and is a believer in them
because their teachings forbid the relationship of the sexes, their theory
being that marriage Is a sin.
Eileen, cooped up iu her mountain
cabin   far   from   civilization,   gets   a
Ulsle of il through seeing the members
of a   wealthy   club   at   their   social
gaities ill a clubhouse which has been
built near their mountain home.   She
is seen at one time talking to a handsome young clubman, after which she
ls kept in forcible confinement iu her
cabin for lime, and an attempt made
on  the  life of tho   man.   who   It   Is
thought   is trying to Induce her Into
following the ways of the world.
Think Ueiiutv a Mill.
Clud in drab garments and sombre
hats, the female members of tlie sect
believe thai  beauty Is a sin.    Eileen,
having  beautiful  golden   locks,   thoy!
throw  her to the floor and start to
cut her hair, when somo of Ihe men
from the city appear on tho scene and
interfere.
But love laughs at locksmiths, and
even iu their own band, among the
younger members, there often Is dis-
affectlon. Despite their uncouth garb.
two of the younger members fall iu I
lovo. Caught, they arc tied lo a wagon
and led from place lo place in this way
wherever the band chances to wander,
until it was time for punishment to be
wreaked upon them.
However, fortunately for the two
young beings longing for the path of
love, the members of the baud ,ln their
fanaticism, attack thc clubhouse In an
attempt to exterminate the Inmates.
There they are met by the guards and
alter a battle dispersed.
ed man.
scarce with great rapidity.
When the danger had passed all
started drifting back with the exception of one man who did not appear
till the next day.
"Well, where have you been?" demanded the top kick, eyeing him
coldly.
"Sergeant," replied tlie other earnestly, "I don't know where I have
been, but 1 give you my word I have
been all day gettln' back."—The American Legion Weekly.
Seven
The Clmiier of u Lifetime.
Bul Jeffry and his wife are called
anuy on account of his mother having
the measles, and Georglanu Is asked
to entertain a visitor that samo evening by I be name of Jack Garrison—
which, by the way, was the name of
the wicked man in the park.
Iu order to test his wickedness agal
Georgiana plans to tell Garrison that elev
she is Jelfry's wife. For, as she says,
'a man who will make love to his
best -friend's wife is half human, anyway." Bul she reckoned not with
Garrison's code of honor. Once told
that she was Jelfry's wife, lie donned
his iiat and quit tiie apartment with
dignity.
Jeffry and his wife were meaixwhile i
In quarantine for two weeks. So that I
Georgiana set her trap to "make tbe
tame man wild." After decorating
the apartment with the most sensuous
pictures available she again invites
Garrison to dine, and succeeds in her
I purpose. He embraces her violently
I until his conscience forges to the
front and he dramatically broke away
from the place, after telling Georgiana
that he Is "going to hell."
He finds the wildest-woman on Sixth
Avenue, takes her to his apartment
and gels out his private stock of
champagne. They are found there by
Jeffry and Georgiana later when Jell"
breaks quarantine lo see how Ills
home Is getting along.
Satisfied with Garrison's wildness
Georgiana helps out the wild-woman
from the apartmenl and a new element develops 111 tlle story.
A woman went to a photographer's
shop and asked—"Do you photograph
children, sir?"
"Yes. madam," was the reply; "that
la my specialty."   .
"What do you charge?"
"Three dollars a dozen, madam."
"Thank you very much," said tlle
women, "but I'm afraid I must call
again   later  on.    I   have   only   got
A fish never advertises.   Hence the
expression, "Poor fish!"
Here lies in peace
Sylvester Brew;
He learned to make
His own home brew.
McMIV, OF LONDON.
Two Highlanders stood looking at
the imposing facade of a building- in
Westminster. The cornerstone bore
the date in Roman letters, "MCMIV."
"Luke a' that, Angus," said one.
"Ah've never heard th' name of McMiv
before, but theare's a Scotsman who's
got Ills name on one of th' finest
buildings ln London. Ye can't keep
'cm down, can ye?—Tit-Bits.
"GATES OF BRASS" IS A
BIG KEENAN TRIUMPH
"Well, that's enough to try the patience of Job!" exclaimed the village
minister, as he threw aside the local
paper.
"Why, what's the matter, dear?"
asked his wife.
"Last Sunday 1 preached from the
text. 'Be ye. therefore, steadfast,'" answered tlie pastor, "but the printer
makes It read. 'Be ye there for breakfast.' "
llo you believe In an anti-marriage
league? Did you ever hear of one and
would you liko to join? Grace Darling belonged to one In "Even as Eve,"
at the llo-Ilo on Monday. See what
she did.
A   woman   is   a female
social   veneer  but thinly
nnturul   Instincts. "Even
proves It.
first—her
■ells hor
ns    Eve"
Does a woman Instantly catalogue a
man upon the lirst meeting iu one of
two classes, the mall she would marry
and the man she would not? An interesting answer to this question Is
found in "Even as Eve," shown at the
ilo-llo on .Monday.
Wanted! A Sinner Who Can
Add /est to the Life of a
Pretty Young Widow
Ciinstiinri* Tiilmiiduc  Hunts  for  Him
In Latest I'mrrsiin-LiMis Picture
nf the Ilo-llo on Tuesday.
"In Search of a Sinner," Constance
Talmadge's latest picture, will show
at the Ilo-llo on Tuesday evening next.
The main action of the play revolves around Oeorgiua Chadboure,
a widow of twenty, who has been
"bored to death" by three years of
living  with  a  "perfectly good  man."
Henry Cliadbournc, her late husband, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
was built more on the lines of a saint |   Some men make opportunities   for
than a mortal.   So thai, after his de- others to take advantage of.
The second of a notable series of
productions made by Frank Keenan,
lu which lie appears as Ihe star, will
be shown at (he local picture house on
Thursday evening next, when Included In the usual big bill for that day
wlll be another Harold Lloyd comedy
and another episode of "The Black
Secret." which is being so well received.
"Gales of Brass" is a marvelous love
story—Ihe great love of an unworthy
father for his daughter, who believes
him to be the soul of honor; the love
of an unworthy young man for the
girl, that no disaster may shake, and
above all the wonderful heart devotion
of the father of the girl, ft Is called
Gates of Brass" because of the thing
dial holds back in the nature of a man
-struggling, prison things that cry
nut for utterance and freedom; but It
might as well have been called "Gates
of Gold," for It was this yellow metal'
of a heightened value which finally
crushed Jim Blake and swept him into
ilcnt tragedy, the pathos of which ls
tear-compelling,
Jim Blake was a man who saw the
only good iu life In bis motherless
daughter. The rest of the world was
bis legitimate prey, and, from the
time he was a shell-worker In the
circus to the period of affluence as J.
Hatfield Iflake, promoter, he never
scrupled for an instant lo rob and
plunder where he could, mindless of
a disaster that might attend his victims. He was the cold, bloodless. In-
arnadon nf plunder. And (he rapacity wilh which he took wns only surpassed by the measure of his devotion
lo his daughter.
Hut he lost her through the very-
method by which he had hoped to
Mold her to him, and Ihe retribution
Which came to him by awaiting
through the Christmas night for the
sound of familiar footsteps and the
voice that would gladden his lonely
heart, Is ono of tho largest tragic
moments ever put upon tlie stage or
screen. It is big in its inevitable
working out, big iu its line interpretation, with a psychology which fairly'
fascinates the beholder. And tlie cntl-
ng with its touch of shadow and tears
is never less luminous witli light and
spiritual quality.
The teacher had grown eloquent in
picturing to his little pupils the beauties of heaven, and he finally asked:
"What kind of little boys go to
heaven?
A lively four-year-old boy, with
kicking boots, held up his hand.
"Well, you mny answer," said the
teacher.
"Dead ones!" tlle little fellow
shouted, at the extent of his lungs.
The lawyer was cross-examining a
witness to a robbery.
"When did this robbery take place?"
"I think—" began the witness.
"We don't care what you think. We
want lo know what you know."
"Then If you dop't want to know
what I think, I may as well leave the
stand. I can't talk without thinking.
I'm no lawyer."
First Constable—Did yer git that
feller's number?
Second Constable—No, he waa too
gol-derned fast fer me. That was a
perty perl-lookln' gal In the back seat,
wasn't It?
First Constable—She shure was!
CHINESE PHILOSOPHY
Industrial discontent In Australia is
puzzling arbitration judges, federal
politicians and basic wage commissions, and even in the northern territory there are disturbances. J1**.
Lindsay, tlie well-known explorer, had
Ihe whole question summed up for
blm most ably by an old Chinaman in
the territory. Repeating tlie conversation to a representative of the Melbourne Argus. Mr. Lindsay said. "A
Chinese who was a young man when
1 went to the Northern Territory In
1878, and Is now keeping a store there,
remarked to me, 'When you and me
young men, no wages, plenty fruit,
plenty fish, plenty vegetable, everybody happy. Now, * high wages, no
fruit, no fish, no vegetable, everybody
growl, nobody happy."
Onions are recommended as a cure
for indigestion, bul as yet no cure has
been discovered for onions.
"What do you mean by keeping me
standing on the corner like an Idiot?"
demanded the angry husband whose
wife had kept him waiting to go
shopping with her.
"Now, really, dear," she replied
sweetly, "I can't help the way you
stand."
"And if you are a good boy you
will go to heaven," finished up the
Presiding Elder.
"Aw, heck!" returned youn:1 Bear
 ..   ,vwi,'   ajcai-
cat Johnson, of RumpUB Ridge, "I
thought you was going to say you'd
give me a dime."
ILO=ILO THEATRE
Saturday, August 14th
William Fox presents
"FAN-FAN"
WITH AN ALL-STAR CAST
Eighth Episode of Jack Dempsey in
"DAREDEVIL JACK"
■****■***— '       ——J—^M^—^11   I —   . I ■      !■     ■■■      H        III"
Monday, August 16th
"EVEN AS EVE"
A Drama of Feminine Wiles
Adapted by Charles A. Logue from the story " The Shining Band "
By ROBERT W. CHAMBERS
A big cast of well known players including
Grace Darling, Ramsaye Wallace
Marc McDermott and many others
"Even as Eve" carries an appealing sex angle with thrilling tale of girl's
escape from band of fanatics. From the story by Robert W. Chambers.
The amazing adventures of a beautiful girl who is forced to join a group of
men and women who think love a sin and marriage is not for this world—
How she regains her rightful place in society—Role is cleverly and dramatically enacted by Grace Darling and a Strong Cast—A thrilling story of love,
romance and mystery—Beautiful scene/.y of Adirondack Mountains adds
to interest of picture.
Tuesday, August 17th
Constance Talmadge
In Charlotte Thompson's racy romance
"In Search of a Sinner"
Her hubby was too good to live so a heart that kept step with his mind
by stopping made her a widow at twenty—Zip!—Where's a real wild man
—Spotted! In a Park—Flirtation—Luncheon—Arrest—Escape—Plot—
Discovery that he's a purity leaguer—Then Constance Talmadge, "In
Search of a Sinner," decides making one nf a tame man is easier than finding one ready made and she tackles the job—Zowie!!  How she succeeded I
Thursday, August 19th
FRANK KEENAN
— IN
"GATES OF BRASS"
When "Jim Blake," "shell-game" expert, realized that "Ihe bigger the
game the easier," lie forsook the couny fair-grounds and trod the paths of
"high finance," but although his financial schemes .succeeded beyond his
wildest expectations—
He Lost His Greatest Treasure Thereby
Also Eighth Episode of
"THE BLACK SECRET" Page Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 14, 1920.
cAFTER SALE SPECIALS
There are quite-a
number of lines,
very desirable,
butwhichwedo
not intend
carrying
over to
another
season ^^^^^
CREPE DE CHINE WAISTS, in good
quality. Extra special prices, $3.95,
$4.95, $6.95, $7.95, $8.95.
;' Our regular prices are all marked in
plain ligres, so you can readily see the
genuineness of the reductions.'
SILK WAISTS in pale blue and pink.
Special price $3.95.
HOYS' ZIMMERKNIT UNDERSHIRTS,
sizes 22, 24, 26, 28; 65c each.
So we put
the
pruning
knife in
again to
effect a quick
clearance
Take advantage of these
money savers
HEAVY APRON HOLLAND,  40  inches
wide; a snap at 65c per yard.
LADIES'SUMMER VESTS,  to  clear-at
50c each.
BOYS' AND GIRLS' RIBBED HOSE, up
to sizes 9'/B, clearing* at 50c pair.
LADIES' CORSETS, a big snap in small
sizes. Special at 95c, $1.95, $2.95 and
$3.95.   Very much reduced.
SPORT COATS VERY  MUCH  REDUCED—SEE THEM
See our Remnant Tables and lay in a stock
of many wanted lines
PHONE  134
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
We Want to Know Cumberland mariners
VVC    VYailL   LU   lYUUVV,     TAKEATUIpT0THECIT
Who was It that fell over the Trent
River bridge when tlie auto lights
came along?   Ask Bert.
Who was the young man thai was
put to bed Thursday night?
Why two drinks of "near beer"
makes some fellows think they can
sing?
Why th*( "chickens" and "ducks"
nut their heads under water when Ihe
iglaiitlers entered the saltchuck Wednesday evening?
Who is Ihe biggest little vamp in
Cumberland—not Koyston?
Why tlie local comedian doesn't star
ou the screen?
If Snake Juice is ^*ood to drink after umpteen near beers?
Why the water was so warm at
Vnion Bay?
INCIPIENT FIRE AT
CUMBERLAND HOTEL
Some little excitLMiiciit wan cnused
Tuesday afternoon when a pint of
ihe roof nf the Cumberland Hotel
caught lire, presumably caused by the
chimney being cleaned. The fire was
at once recognized aud an alarm
turned in. However, before the fire
apparatus arrived the incipient blaze
had been quenched by the application
of a bucket of water administered by
(he waitress.
The launch Nymph left Royston at
11.fill p.m. last Friday, for Vancouver.
Skipper Hallos was in charge, while
the crew and oflicers was composed of
—H. Smith, first mate; T. James, purser; A. Wylie, chief cook; T. Lewis,
chief engineer. The trip was long and
dry, the vessel calling at Nanaimo,
Sechelt and other places en route.
The craft eventually landed at the
City Wharf, Vancouver, when Skipper
Dallos deserted the ship with James,
Wylie and tlu* two A. B.'s. The first
mate, H. Smith, has taken charge of
the ship, which left Vancouver on
Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, but
up to the time of going to press ehe
lias not arrived at Royston. Dallos
and James decided to take a chanc-3
on the Princess Put for the return
journey.
GOOD FISHING AT ROYSTON
Excellent fishing is reported ut Royston, where several large spring salmon have been landed iu the last few
days.
The humpbacks are said to have
entered the Courtenay River, followed
by their natural enemies, the trout,
which follow them to devour the
spawn.
Don't skim the cream off the milk
of human kindness before peddling it
out. •
GORDON'S
For Preserving
PEACHES and APRICOTS
— AT —
$2.75 Per Box
And all the sugar yon require to preserve them.   Cull
or phone your order early to avoid disappointment.
NEXT WEEK IS PRESERVING WEEK
shoes For the kiddies
I've got what you want
THE  KORKER SHOE
THE BEST BY TEST—CALL AND SEE THEM
DRY GOODS
MEN'S SHIRTS, OVERALLS AND SOCKS
LADIES' SILK HOSE, in black and white.
BLANKETS!  BLANKETSM  BLANKETS!!!
ALL GOOD VALUES AND NO BAITS ADVERTISED
Personal Mention
Rev. Jas, Hood went to Victoria
Thursday to meet the Presbytery In
connection with his call to the Fraser
Valley. Mr, Hood will probably make
his decision at this meeting.
* *   *
Dr.  Clark,  M.D., D.D., an eloquent
preacher from Tennessee, will occupy
the pulpit at the Presbyterian Church
Sunday morning.
*'  *   *
Mr. R. Nicholson of Vancouver arrived in town Wednesday aud returned
on Saturday.
* * * *
Mr. Harold Piper of Vancouver arrived on Tuesday and will spend two
weeks' vacation with friends.
* *   *
Mr. and .Airs. William Henderson returned from Seattle on Tuesday after
spending two weeks' vacation.
* *   *
.Mr.  and  Mrs. John   Robertson   returned   home   on   Wednesday   after
spending two weeks' vacation in Vancouver and Seattle.
* *   *
.Miss J. Balagno of the Royal Hank
of Canada left for Vancouver on Monday morning.
* *   *
Miss Hazel White left for Vancouver
on .Monday.
* *   *
Mr. Hatfield lel't for Vancouver on
Monday on a short vacation.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. II. Carey and family
left tor Vancouver on Monday, where
they will spend a short vacation.
+   *    *
.Miss I.. Green returned to Victoria
on Friday after spending two weeks'
vacation at Comox Lake,
* *   *
.Miss   Edith   Bickle    returned    from
Victoria on  Wednesday,
* *    *
Mr. nnd Mrs. A. S. Killam of Victoria wore in town for a few days during the week.
* *    *
.Mr. I-:. W. IJickle left for Vancouver
on Wednesday.
* *   •
Mr. O. C. Raker arrived from Victoria on Friday last and returned on
Sunday.
* +    *
Mr. Sam Kineaid, who has been relieving Mr. Robertson at the Telegraph
Ofiice, goes to Union Ray to relieve the
operator there.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Moyer and family of Winnipeg were in town this
week, guests at tho Cumberland.
* *   *
Mr. P. Dunne,, formerly of Cumberland, has opened a tailor dliop iu tho
Briscoe Huilding, Courtenay.
What the People of
Royston are Saying
. That thc anniversary of the Mayor
of Cumberland's wedding was cele-j
brated at Gartley Point with a gather-1
ing of the clan.
That the >oung ladies who are
spending the evenings on the sands
with their young men should hand
them a little sand as a timely suggestion.
That the Soviet Government will be
inaugurated at Royston in the near
future if the usual honors are not accorded their Mayor -at Political meetings.
That the absence of Mayor Dowdall
on Mr. liowser's pIMtorin was a slight
to tiie community.
That the citizens of Royston will he
revenged for the omission.
Thut the arrangements made for his
home-coming from the political meeting was not iu keeping with the
dignitv of our community.
That lots are still booming in this
community and are being bought fast
That tlie arrangements and conveniences made in Roy's field for tlie
Sports are jalte, and great credit Is
due tlie management of the Canadian
Collieries for their forethought.
That there are so many wells being
dug at Royston just now that the object ls doubtful or suggestive, or both.
That great uneasiness is being felt
at the action of the Treasurer, as no
monies seem to have beeu deposited,
and no one dare touch the First
National Bank, where the funds are*
supposed to be.
That the ladies who disturbed a
nearby neighborhood at 11.SO a.m. are
to be brought before the Council and
j severely reprimanded for such an untimely visit.
That the salmon which left the
Fraser River arrived at Royston on
Wednesday and were caught with due
ceremony!
That a prominent fisherman at the
bay has changed his bait this season.
That there are- more ways than one
of killing a—Balmon!
That the big fellow got away just as
it was being * hauled aboard. It
weighed just 60*^ pounds—as shown
by the scales on its back.
That the "Duke of Sutherland" is a
real live, up-to-date fisherman! A
-ij-pounder is not to be snickered at,
except by the jealous.
That quite a number of Royston
folks have cut out the mush diet and
now live on choice Spring salmon...
That the Mayor, accompanied by
the Treasurer, will accompany the
Council to Roy's Field on Saturday
and give an official welcome to all
visitors.
That the young couples who paid
an official visit to the home of the
Treasurer and made nests fgr themselves in tbe sand better hurry up and
get permanent homes while the getting is good.
That the prodigal from Union Bay
came home on Saturday night and the
fatted calf was killed for the occasion.
That the supper put on by the girls
to their Headquarters friends was a
great success.
That Mr. and Mrs. Davis from town
have come to join the crowd for a
short holiday.
Thut Mr. and Mrs, Glen have returned to town after an enjoyable
time.
That Mr. and Mrs. Marsh have
friends for a visit.
That the good Doctor from Vancouver must not chloroform his hooks
when fishing.
That Tom's face was all smiles when
he saw tlie fish safely landed.
That the thrill that comes once, in a
lifetime was Find lay's when he landed
hilt first fish Thursday evening.
That George seems to have as hjjrd
luck witli tishing as with the girls.
Stay with It—better luck next time.
That Mr. J. C. Brown has gone into
Ihe bunking business.
That tho "ttiike or Sutherland" is
taking orders for 2!i and 50*lb, salmon,
to be filled Strictly in rotation—one
each evening.
A. I,. Williams
A. V. Webb
COURTENAY
PLUMBING
COMPANY
SANITARY PLUMBING
— uml —
GENERAL REPAIR
WORK
Corner Comox Road and
Lake Trail
COURTENAY, B. C.
Telephone 127
KEEP COOL
SUMMER DRINKS
SHERBET, per tin 40c
LEMONADE POWDER, tin 35c
STOWER'S LIME JUICE, bottle ,. SOc
ROSE'S LIME JUICE, bottle 60c
RASPBERRY VINEGAR, large bottles       75c
GRAPE-JUICE, pints 60e
PILCHARDS, a nice tasty fish; '/Vs, 2 for 25c; l's, 25c
ALBACORE, tlie fish that is light; suitable for salads;
Price   2 tins 35c
LIBBY'S AND CLARK'S POTTED MEATS, '/,,'s.... 10c
LIBBY'S AND CLARK'S POTTED MEATS, '/.'s... 15c
QUAKER PORK AND BEANS  10c
LIBBY'S PORK AND BEANS, large tins ., 20c
CLARK'S 'AND DA VIES'  SOUPS,  assorted  flavors;
at : 7 tins $1.00
A Sharp Advance in Cereals
KELLOGG'S CORN FLAKES, 15c pkg.; 7 for $1.00
KELLOGG'S KRUMBLES, pkg  20c
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR
' Preserving Apricots and Peaches
FULL STOCK OF
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Simon Leiser & Co.
Phone 38.
Limited
FOR SALE
FIVE-ROOMED HOUSE, WELL FIN-
ished inside and shingled out. Apply
J. J. Potter, Winderaere. 4-37
FIVE GOATS, TWO MILKING; ONE
4-hoIe cooking range; also chickens.
Apply Box 316, City.
SEVEN HOUSES FOR SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
FOR SALE—FOUR ACRES OF LAND
with three-room dwelling, barn.
garage ana other buildings; one and
a halt miles from Cumborland.
Price reasonable. Apply A. R. Wesley, Cumberland, B. C.
WANTED
FOR . SALE—3-ROOMED HOUSE.
Cash or terms. Apply to B. Pearse,
r.ltv.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from $550 to $1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 31.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, see T. F.. Bate.
Phone 31.
NOTICE
Canadian Collieries' Employees'
Annual Picnic Committee.
All firms and persons having claims
against the above Committee are requested to send same to Secretary not
later than 281b Inst., for settlement.
WANTED, CUMBERLAND DISTRICT,
a permanent representative (either
sex), for the "British. Columbia
Monthly," now entering tfiith year
as the Social, Educational, Literary
and Religious Magazine of the Canadian West, Independent of party,
sect or faction. Substantial commissions; renewal premiums. Address,
mentioning experience and references, Manager, B. C. II., 1100 Bute
Street, Vancouver, B. C.
FOUR. TO SIX-ROOM HOUSE IN
Cumberland—will buy, lease or rent
suitable place; immediate. Address,
B.H.G., c-o Islander.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Offlce: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO RUN A
BLIND PIG
IN ORDER TO DO A BIG BUSINESS!
Thc continuous stream of patrons at
Kelly's are after McKenzie's Famous
Ice Cream, Cold Drinks, Moir's High-
Grade Chocolates and all the other
good things served by him.
KELLY'S
OPPOSITE THE BIG STORE
CUMBERLAND

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