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The Cumberland Islander Jun 10, 1927

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Array -"ov/;
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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
l/
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR—No. 23.
CUMBERLAND. BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY,* JUNE 10, 1927.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Red Widow Show
Proved To Be A
Masterly Effort
For the second year in succession
the Courtenay Lodge or Elks have
scored as play producers, their
presentation ln the Ilo-llo theatre last
Thursday night of "The Red Widow" !
making a decided hit witli the crowded house. The cast Included some 60
odd Courtenay people, who danced
and sang their way in colorful costumes through two hours nnd a half
ot .splendid entertainment. "The Red
"Widow" Is the successor to "Tho
Beauty Shop," which was last year
presented In Cumberland by the Elks
Lodge and under the direction of Mr.
Lewis.
The scenes of the play wcre laid in
London and St. Petersburg before the
Great War, the period naturally giving a wonderful scope for brilliant
costumes and dramatic situations, to
«ay nothing of thc excellent scenic
representation of the Annual White
Fete ln the grounds of the Czar's
Winter Palace. Through a maze of
intricate situations there Is injected
into this life one Col. Cicero Hannibal
Butts, manufacturer of C.H.B. corsets
and colonel In the New York State
National Guards. The part was taken
by Mr. G. William Stubbs and might
have been specially written for him.
When "Buttsy" appeared on the scene,
mirth came with him, and his Interpretations of the many amusing lines
and clever local allusions kept the
audience ln a state of delirious
laughter.
The Red Widow, the part of a
Russian Nihilist who later reforms
for the love of a captain of the Czar's
Imperial Bodyguard, was ably taken
by Mra. B. Harvey, who shared the
feminine lead with Miss Edna Rossiter as wife of the hen-pecked "Buttsy
the corset maker."
Each member of tho large cist
played their part admirably, the
choruses going with a rousing swing
and the dances calling for repeated
encores. Miss Gwen Noel and Mr. V.
Dalby made a good Impression In their
Russian dance.
The cast, in order of appearance.
was as follows:
Oswald Butts, son of Col. Butts—
—P. C. McLoughlln, Jr.
Mrs. Violet Butts, wife of Col. Butts
—Edna Rossiter
Yvette, a dancer—.
—Mrs. P. C. McLoughlln. Jr.
iCapt. Basil Romanoff, of tlie Imperial
Bodyguard   — —   Bamelt Harvey
Baron Maximilian Searcoviteh. a detective  Fre'k. W. Tull
Anna Varvara, "The Red Widow," a
Nihilist Mrs. B. Harvey
Col. Cicero Hannibal Butts, Manufacturer of the C. H. B. corsets and
Colonel tn thc New York State National Guards, U.S.A.—
—0. William Stubbs
Lieut. Fields Elmer Orr
Clerk of Hotel E. H. Tull
(Continued on Page Two)
DATE CHANGED FOR
HOME ECONOMICS TEA
The afternoon tea lo be given by
the home economics classes will be
held in the United Church hall next
Wednesday, June 15th, instead of on
June 21st as previously advertised.
The tea is being held for the purpose
of raising funds to assist in purchasing a reference library, and it is to
be hoped that the citizens of Cumberland will lend their support in no
small measure.
Local Oddfellow Is
Grand Treasurer
The Grand Conclave of Oddfellows'
representatives of almost every lodge
in the jurisdiction of B. C„ assembled
Wednesday alld Thursday of this
week in Black Diamond No. li Lodge
room, Nanaimo, Cumberland was well
represented, T. Conn, Noble Grand,
and several other members making
the trip to the hub city.
Cumberland was especially honored
in that Mr. John C. Brown was elected to the office of Grand Treasurer.
Particulars of the sessions arc not
yet available, but a full report wlll
be carried in our next week's issue.
ISLANDER RECEIVES
BOOK ON SUGGESTIONS
FOR HISTORICAL FLOATS
Fire Protection
Question Solved
At Courtenay
COURTENAY, June 8.--Referring
to the report of the chairman of the
Fire Committee at Monday's council
meeting, Aid. Pearse said that il was
most satisfactory that the city lire
protection question had been solved.
He thought the ratepayers should
recognize thc good work the firemen
are doing as a volunteer lire depart
ment. The chairman nf the Fire
Committee had reported that in the
event of an outside lire, tile city
would never bc left without the
proper protection of the. engine, hose
wagon and tull company of men. It
was the Intention to send a chemical
truck to Arcs occuring outside the
city limits with sufficient men In
operate it The department hnd purchased a Hudson super-six louring
■car which .would be stripped down
.and painted to conform with the other
.city Are equipment. There had been
no Urea in the city from May 16 to
.June 4, but on June 4th a private car
with Chief Thomson and three men
had gone to Merville, where Mr.
Mulr's house was reported in flames.
As a contribution to the department,
four of the local dealers hail each
given an auto tire and tube for the
Hudson car. These were Corfleld
Motors. Bool & Wilson, Pldcock ft
McKenzie Ltd., and Blunt & Passle.
Aid. Douglas, reporting fur the
Works Committee, gave particulars of
construction to date, ln co-operation
with the lire depnrlment. existing
drains had been flushed. The lot at
the rear of the city hall on Walter
street had been cleared and leveled
for the electrical sub-stallou. and a
(Continued on Page Five)
The Islander Is ln receipt of a very
well printed and designed booklet,
published by the executive committee
of the National Committee for the
celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of
Confederation, containing suggestions
for historical pageants, floats and tableaux (with illustrations lu color).
Any member of the local committee
In charge of the Diamond Jubilee
celebrations may see the book by calling at the office any time between the
hours ot S a.m. and 12 noon and 1 to
5 o'clock In the afternoon.
The book contains a wealth of Information, and a general sketch of
Canadian History with special reference to the Confederation period.
Tom Blair Works
Passage Back To
England: Stranded
The following story appeared ln the
"Bolton Buff." a paper published In
Bolton, Lanes., and has been turned
Into the Islander. Many of our readers wlll read the story with a great
deal of Interest as Tom Blair was for
a few months a resident here and a
member of the famous United team.
The story, appearing under the
heading, "A Goalkeeper's Warning-
Keep Away From America," la as fol-
owa:
"The advice of Tom Blair, formerly
goal-keeper for Kilmarnock and Manchester City, to all footballers ls, 'For
God's sake, keep away from America.'
"Blair reached Hull on Thursday
last, where he Is stranded after working lils passage across the Atlantic
as mess-room assistant iu a merchant
steamer.
"He Is another disillusioned and
disappointed British footballer who
was induced to go to America on an
offer of 50 dollars per week, with an
addltlounl ,10 dollars from employment
as an engineer. At the time, said
Blair, the prospect seemed to offer a
'bed of roses' and for the lirst fourteen months he was not disappointed,
"One day the club manager called
him into the office, and said that
owing to hnd limes he would have to
play for 20 dollars a week. The same
day he was told by the engineering
Iirm thnt his services would be dispensed with, and the following morning the club Informed him that lie
would no longer be required as u
young goalkeeper had been signed at
ten dollars weekly.
"With no court of nppeal such as
the F. A., he endured great hardship.
He encountered other emigrants, all
of whom were keenly disappointed,
and took the flrst available boat home.
"The American game, says Blair, is
very rough and hc Iibb seen players
kicked off the field."
School Report
Month of May
The staff of the Public and High
Schools wish to thank the following
people for taking contestants to the
aports at Nanaimo: Messrs. Banks,
M. Brown, Rev. Hewitt, Jackson, Dr.
MacNaughton, Lang, Lockner, D. R.
MacDonald, Mounce, Mumford, M,
Stewart, McLellan, G. O'Brien, Treen
and Richardson. Special thanks arc
due Mesdames G. J. Richardson and
T. Banks tor the Interest and energy
devoted to the canvassing done to
Becure the above cars on a day when
the mines were working.
Following ls the school report for
the month of May. It will be noted
that Miss Gallium's class has an
attendance of 97.27*^, thereby winning thc shield for the month.
G. E. APPS, Principal.
Division 1
H. E. Murray, teacher.   No. on roll,
39; lates, 0; perfect attendances, 28;
percentage of attendance, 96.20.
Division II
T. A. Gallivan, teacher. No. on roll,
34; lates, 1; perfect attendances, 21;
percentage of attendance, 97.27.
Honor roll—Nina Shields, Muriel
Partridge, Cazuko Iwasa, Cyril Davis,
Catherine Brown, Hlsako Nakano.
Division III
C. MacKinnon, teacher. No. on roll,
34; lates, 1; perfect attendances, 20;
percentage of attendance, 95.8.
Honor roll—Archie Welsh, Margaret Smith, Bessie Nicholas, Mary
McMillan, Tom Mossey, Heleu Morrison.
Division IV
V. J. Aspesy, teacher. No. on roll,
27; lates, 3; perfect attendances, 18;
percentage of attendance, 94.6.
Honor list, Sr. 6—Sidney Hunt, Geo.
Saito, John Bannerman, Jessie Robb.
Special Gr. 5—Olga Bonora, Edmond
Carrigan.
Division Y
E. C. Hood, teacher. No. on roll,
41; lates, 4; perfect attendances, 23;
percentage of attendance, 95.3.
Honor cards, Gr. 6—Lem Hing,
Howard Wrigley, David Hunden. Gr.
Sr. 5—Yoshltoshi Kawata. Josie Wong
and Shigemi Maruya.
Division VI
B. M. Bickle, teacher. No. on roll,
38: lates, 10; perfect attendances, 17;
percentage of attendance, 89.6.
Honor list, Gr. 5 Jr.—Ada Tso.
Alice Brown, Jean Quinn. Gr. 4 Sr.—
Ina Robertson, llaru Nakano, Isobel
Vincent.
Division VII
E. M. Hood, teacher. No. on roll,
39; lates, 3; perfect attendances, 25;
percentage of attendance, 95.15.
Honor list. Sr. 4—Yasuharu Kadu-
guchl, Rose Marocchi, Cheung Ming.
Jr. 4—Heroshl Ogakl, Walter Hunt.
Freddy Martin.
Division VIII
G. McFadyen, teacher. No. on roll.
37; lates, 4; perfect attendances, 21;
percentage of attendance, 94.6.
Honor list, Gr. Jr. 4—Susuml Uchlda, David  Bell, Billy Westfield.   Gr.
(Continued on Page  Six)
Donate $200
For Celebration
AWARDED CONTRACT FOR
REPAIRS AT COURT HOUSE
.Mr. Nell McLeod has beeu awarded
a contract  for repairs and additions
  | to   the   Court   House,   Cumberland.
Two delegations waited on the City ! There will be built a garage for two
„       ,,..,, ,, ,,        n     Oars and a new coal shed, while r.e-
Councll  nt  this  weeks  meeting—Dr.      ,       ... , , ,      '
„,,,,„.      ,. ...     ,,   ... i pairs wil   be made to the Court House
G.  K,   MacNaughton  and  Mr.   E.   «.*.., ...
1 roof.   Interior   improvements   include
~Z I plnsteritig and kalsomlning of the
' agent's office, court room, and assessor's office.
MutrieCup Finalists
Play Even Match
Bickle   appearing   on   behalf   of   the j
jubilee    celebration    committee,
Mr. A.  MacKinnon  representing  the
School Board.
Dr. MncN'aughton explained that, the
success of the proposed celebration
here on July 2nd would depend
materially ou  the secretary, nnd  he
wished to obtain the council's consent ^^^^^^^
to allow the city clerk to act in this
capacity. At the same time he asked j T1'c Anal match of the Mutrle Cup
for a donation towards the general', competition over the links of the
funds. Mr. Cope, city clerk, signified ! Courtenay Coir Club, brought out
his willingness to act, and the per- some fine playing on the part of Percy
mission of the council waa therefore jBooth and Johnnie Stevenson, the
given. Some little time elapsed bc- finalists, Booth took the cup by one
fore the council could agree on a j stroke after 36 holes of play,
suitable donation, the sum of $200.00 j    '" the morning rounds the players
could not get going properly, ending
the flrst eighteen with 93 strokes each.
The  final  eighteen  in  the  afternoon
being finally given.
t'lisl of Audit too High
Mr. MacKinnon said that he ami
Aid. Henderson had been delegated
by the School Board to interview the
council in connection with the annual
audit of school accounts and publication of same. He said that tlle cost
of the audit had jumped this year
from $35 to $50, and the Board was of
the  opinion   that  this   sum  was   ex-
proved   the   thriller,   however,   Bootli
finishing up witli a total of SO strokes
to Stevenson's 81.   Following are the
scores for the afternoon rounds:
First Hound
Bootli 55544663 4—41
Stevenson    —   55544603 5—43
Second Hound
Booth 54434453 7—39
cesslve.     Mayor   Maxwell   explained I Stevenson    —    5 5 5 3 3 5 5 3 4—38
that when tenders tor the audit were j 	
opened, the council had accepted the Six residents of the district sur-
lower one without, noticing that the j rounding Cumberland appeared before
Scliool Board was being charged more ! .Magistrate T. H, Carey on Wednesday
than formerly, and the council less.: evening and pleaded guilty to the
It was a pure oversight, he said, and | charge of harboring dogs without
would be righted before the end of j having secured the necessary license
the  year.   This   was   satisfactory   to j for same.   They were fined $5.00 and
costs of $2.50 each, or lu default. 14
days.   The fines were paid.
Mr. MacKinnon and Aid. Henderson.
Streets to lie Asphalted
Warrants for their appearance wcre
Mr. W. P. Beavan, asst. district j issued on information laid on Monday
engineer, notified that the road : last by Constable Condon of the Prov-
asphalting apparatus would be In the j incial Police force. Those who paid
district at an early date, and he wish- j fines were Messrs. R. Marshall, F.
ed to ascertain what sections of the Court, F. Hutchinson. D. Hlgano, T.
I city the council proposed having done.   Kamimoto and Y. Kawaguchl.   Mr. F.
Mrs. F. Slaughter, who had the misfortune to break her arm ln three
places last week, ls progressing
favorably.
Extraordinary Feat;
Obtain Photo Of
Wild Geese At
Short Range
COURTENAY, June 8.—Messrs. J.
W. McKenzie, Wm. Douglas and C. S.
Wood have returned from a brief trip
to the headwaters of Dove Creek.
While there the party performed the
extraordinary feat of photographing
a number of Canada wild geese at a
range of about thirty feet, on Anderson Lake. Knowing the timidity and
wariness of these birds, the .pnrty is
at a loss to know why Iho geese,
seven In number, submitted to sucli
close inspection. Several opinions
have been advanced. One Is that the
geese, being entirely unused to human
beings ln this lonely spot, were consequently fearless of man. Perhaps
tlie birds nre accustomed to deer and
other animals coming to the waters
edge to drink. Mr. Theed Pearse,
himself an ornothnlogist, advances
the opinion that the birds may be
tame and may have down from their
home waters, possibly a California
park, to this more northerly latitude
for the breeding season.
An Inspection of the lake was made
to ascertain Its suitability for stocking
with Kamloops trout, of which a consignment of fry will shortly arrive
from the Department of Fisheries.
Anderson Lnke was, however, found
to bo already stocked with fish. It
is therefore probable tllat the fry on
arrival wlll be taken to the Goose
Lake group which are known to be
without fish, and It Is thought to bc
most desirable to stock these water.!
with trout. Although these lakes
were recently frozen over and covered
to a depth of four feet with sninv,
Mr. Douglas thinks It probable that
the recent summer-like weather will
have completely changed the condition.
lt was decided to have Dunsmuir Ave.
re-coated from the city buildings to
Fifth Street, and Fourth Street from
Dunsmuir Avenue to the city limits
near No. 5 Japtown. The lower
block of Dunsmuir Ave. will be extensively repaired before the asphalt
is laid.
Aid. Williams, for the Health Committee, reported one case of scarlet
fever. A list of work being done by
the Works Dept. wns also submitted,
aud Aid. Mumford reported that there
appeared to bc no likelihood of a
water shortage this summer, as water
is running over the spillway at 2nd
dam and the lakes in the vicinity havo
been raised considerably.
Young People Take
e of Service
At Cumberland
United Church
Kato appeared for Messrs. HJgnno ami
Kamimoto.
Gideon Hicks To
Give Recital At
Courtenay, June 18
Comox District is annually visited
by an imposing array of well known
ringers and entertainers, yet it can
lie truthfully asserted that not one of
these visits is looked forward to with
as much interest and pleasure as are
the none too ofteu visits of Gideon
Hicks, the gifted baritone. Music-
lovers here will consequently he
delighted to know thnt Mr. Hicks will
give a recital in the Gaiety Theatre .it
8:15 o'clock on the evening of Thursday, June 16th, when he wlll be
assisted by his talented daughter, Miss
/"«1 p p> • I Dorothy Hicks.   Both artists ore well
Charge Or OerVICe    'and favorably known throughout this
* j Province and the Pacilic States, and
have been acclaimed by music critics
i in every city they have visited.
I    Miss Hicks' voice is a lyric soprano,
j clear, pretty, and of good quality and
1 range.   She has an excellent sense ol
  I pitch and line musical feeling, and her
i diction   is   most   praiseworthy.    Her
The Young People's Society of Cum- j debut  wus  recently made In  a song
'recital given ill tlle Empress Hotel,
berland United Church took charge of j Victoria, when she wns accorded a
the service on Sundav evening, wor-   "lost    enthusiastic    reception.     The
noble quality and beautiful tonal
ship being conducted by Miss Mann, colour of her distinguished father* -
Mr,   S.   Mounce   gave   the   scripture ! voice   Is   too   well   known   to   bear
repetition here, but It Is Interesting to
reading and asked God's Blessing on ! vea(i a fcw excerpts from tlie press of
the Church, Its Pastor and Its several i various cities In which he has sung:
organizations. "When I survey the ; ,„"?•• c«*'**'* <?lUb Presented Gideon
i „.    , _      „ ,     ...    I Hicks,  whose beaiitilul,  lluelv  niodii-
| Wondrous Cross' was sung by Miss L^ vok.t, .,,„, ,.,,n, ,,rlls„.y won ,„,
i Hood. Messrs. G. Brown and J. I him tpstant appreciation, and gave to
Auchterlonle received the offering, [his hearers tho delight of listening lo
during which the choir rendered an J 'I?****" whoso musicianship is oqual
• to Ills vocal gilts and who gave cverv
I anthem. I number with sucli poise and mastery
Miss C. MacKinnon ably addressed as to arouse the highest admiration."
the    congregation    on    the     Young j -£"*vs ™',U,"A!'"''"'".!'„,        ,„ ,
I ■   ■ I    From   Salem.  Ore.:   "Gideon   Hlckl
People's Society, Its organization. Its „ „„, „r lh(. mo„ delightful singers
work and Its several divisions. In'who ever came In Salem. He has a
conclusion, Miss MacKinnon outlined | bass voice with the range ot a good
the work Cumberland Young Peopt
Society   has   accomplished,   showing
tenure robusto. smuoth us silk ami
accurate, and he gave a concert of thc
rarest sort.   Mr. nicks is a finished
how they bud endeavored faithfully to ; artist  who earns all the commends
[carry out the ideals set before them, tion that  brought blm to Salem."
,.,„..„, , .      "Gideon illeks won the favor ol a
Miss O. MoFadyen gave an eloquent I large 8„d.ance nl „R, Metropolitan
j address on the Young People of today. ■ Theatre last night when called upon
'touching   on   their   influence   In   the j to sing in place of Louis Kreldler.   ln
Church, the home and the social lite r\8f0"8*  U7 ,""'   >'ra>™f*''1   "■■•'■■■^'l
,    ' , ; which greeted each offering, the artist
of the community,  bringing   to   our responded  with many encores." -The
notice that one of the earliest Christ-J Seattle Times.
Ian martyrs died at the early age of i    "Cldeon   Hicks,  seemingly  Inspire*
thirty-three years.
by tho superb accompaniment of the
famous organist, reached magnificent
On    Monday   evening   the    Young   heights   and   evoked   unbounded   on-
Peoplc closed their »»■•■■■ »">'l' u-ub 1 thusiasm."- Joint   Itecltal   with  Chns.
a social evening in th
hall.
year's work with  thuslasm."- .loi
.'    ..... r..      I    M. Coiirboln.
he United Church ,    „H|g „t|ltry
throughout was abovi
criticism."—Art   Song   Hccltul.
Lang Trophy Is
Now Property Of
Public School
Cumberland made an excellent
showing ut tlie School sports held ln
Nimainio last Friday, coining home
with a total of 72 points lo Nanaimo's
77. However, the local teachers protested Ave events, and these protests
were heard at a special meeting held
on Tuesday of tliis week al Qualicum.
In order to preserve good feeling and
not endanger losing interest In future
meets, Cumberland agreed to drop ull
but two. These two, in which deliberate coaching or pacing was done by
teachers, were vigorously pushed and
as a result the two events will be run
in the near future.
A list of Cumberland School winners follows:
Firsts  (•'! point-, for .School)
Throwing baseball. Jas. Williams;
100 yard, George Brown; Shot put,
George Brown; Egg and Spoon, Catherine Brown; Nail driving, Annie
Brown; First Aid. J. Watson, M.
Brown, H. WeBtfleld, 10. Carrigan, T.
Mossey. (Instructor, Mr. Brown);
Drill. J. Bannerman, w. Auchterlonle,
II. Irvine, B. Parnham, S. Kiyona, W.
.MacNaughton. U. Baird, P. Bruce, W.
Brown. T. Conrod. S. Merlettl. A.
Francesclnl.
Seconds ('.' points tor Scliool)
Girls' relay. II. Martin. M. Graham,
M. Westfield, M. Webber; 220 yd. race,
Tadao Doi; Boys' relay. G. Brown, J.
Davis, T. Doi. J. Watson; Football. L.
Bartoldi, A. McDonald, T. Doi, J. Wat-
sou and G. Brown; High jump, Alex.
MacDonald; Tug of War, G. Brown,
L. Bartoldi, J. Watson, T. Dol, V. Tomassi. T. Robertson, J. Davis; First
Aid, B. Westfield. K. O'Brien, H. Horbury, lt. Devoy, A. Brown, i Instructor
Mrs. Hudson).
Thirds II point for School)
Boys 880. Victor Tomassi; Boys
relay. James Monks. P. Bono. W. Tobacco, J. Choe; Broad jump, Tadao
Dol; 220 yards, Catherine Brown;
Broad jump. Marguerite Herd.
Total Point Score
1 point for each entry   32
3x7 firsts   21
2 x 7  seconds   14
1 x 5 thirds     5
Total points   72
The Lang trophy for Strathcona
Drill was won lor tin- third time by
Miss Aspesy's team and now becomes
the property ol* Cumberland Scliool.
Tiie Boys First Aid cup also conies to
Cumberland this year, and if the relay
re-trial is won by Cumberland there
will be a third cup. Although the
showing of cups is rather small, Cumberland Public school is proud of the
wonderful showing of ihe pupils.
Local Confectioner
Installs a Frigidaire
In keeping with its general policy
of cleanliness, sanitation and service
to tlie public, tin- Royal Bandy store
has Installed lhe latesl refrigerating
device on tlie market- "Frigidaire,"
a product of General .Motors Ltd, As
the name implies, air reduced to an
extremely low temperature is the
cooling medium, and does away with
all tlie bothersome labor nnd worry
coincident   Willi  tile  use  of  ice.
The new device is advalitngeous ln
.hat it works automatically, thereby
assuring a temperature never too high
or too low. so that ice cream kept in
tin- refrigerator will never be too soft
or loo hard, li will now bo possible
for ihe Itoyal Candy to keep on hand
several different varieties of be
cream, such as vanilla, strawberry,
chocolate, or whatever the public
taste demands, Heretofore it was
Impossible to piirelni.se be cream iu
bricks in Cumberland, but that is
now a thing of the past, as with
Frigidaire Ho- bricks can In- kept ill
excellent condition nnd served like a
pound of butler. These bricks are
already on sale at the Hoyal Candy
In popular size- nnd prices. Ice
cream sandwiches can also be kept
Indefinitely, so that in future these
delicacies wlll always be on hand and
served as easily ss chocolate bars,
with no wait ina whatsoever.
ai ihe Itoyal Candy, Ice cream In
wooden tubs packed witli ice and salt
is a thing of tho past, a further
advantage lies in tin- fact that frozen
products may be obtained the year
round, regardless of whether ice
plants dose up or keep running.
Frigidaire will prove n boon In the
Winter when toranlen ure in season,
keeping them frozen and therefore
always  fresh  until  ready  I'or use.
Mr. Hudson, proprietor of the Itoyal
Candy,  Is justly proud of this new
addition t" hi** equlpn i. and will be
pleased lo show 11 to anyone who
cares to look it over.
SSfweW Richard Dix~/>T"The Quarterback" SK^M SS PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1927.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY. JUNE lo. 11127.
BRITISH COLUMBIA AND CONFEDERATION
After the union of British Columbia and Vancouver Island in I860, some of the restless spirits
there visioned a wider union as* the result of
Confederation, which would include their Province and the Middle West, then Hudson's Bay
Company territory. Sir John Macdonald, too,
was anxious that Confederation should thus be
rounded out. There were several obstacles—the
dilatoriness of the Hudson's Bay Company in
negotiating for the sale of its interests in Rupert's
Land to the Dominion, the indifference, antl to
some extent the opposition of Governor Seymour
and the active opposition of the old officials of
British Columbia. Sir John Macdonald urged the
Imperial authorities to replace Governor Seymour
by Anthony Musgrove, Governor of Newfoundland, who was heart and soul with the movement.
The difficulty was unexpectedly removed by the
death of Seymour,'and Musgrove was appointed
in his stead. In the meantime the proponents of
union on both mainland and Island had been
active. It was a matter of diplomatically arranging details, in which Governor Musgrove was an
adept.
At this time British Columbia was in a situation of almost complete isolation. After the decline of placer mining business became stagnant.
There was only a limited export market for lumber. There was practically no fishing industry,
and agriculture was in its merest infancy. British ,
Columbia desired communication with eastern
Canada by railway in order to find a market for
its natural resources and to enable it to expand
in population and industry.
When terms had been discussed in the Legislative Assembly, three men—the Honourable
Joseph Trutch, the Honourable J. S. Helmcken,
and the Honourable W. W. Carral—were sent as
representatives to the Federal Government at
Ottawa. The crux of the proposal was a railway,
but the delegates did not expect a railway right
away. They thought of a wagon road to the
Great Lakes, to be followed by a railway as soon
as possible. They were, however, met more than
half way by a full-fledged railway to be completed
within ten years. This was acceptable and the
rest of the details, with a few minor alterations,
were speedily agreed upon. The railway, a private enterprise, was to be assisted mainly by a
huge grant of land. This grant, in addition to a
small cash subsidy per mile, failed to attract the
necessary capital. The opposition to the scheme
was very great, and the Pacific Scandal, which
followed shortly, brought about the defeat of the
Government. The MacKenzie Government did
not believe that the terms could be fulfilled literally and proceeded with the railway as a Government enterprise, by degrees its finances permitted,
taking advantage of the "waterstretches." This
resulted in strained relations between British Columbia and the Dominion. Upon the return of
Sir John Macdonald to power a new policy was
adopted and in 1880 a syndicate was formed in
England to build the line, wliieh was completed in
five years.
In 1884, a number of outstanding matters between the two governments were settled by what
is known as the Settlement Act, acceptable at the
time, but which British Columbia now claims was
not a just settlement. However, the building of
the C.P.R. and its subsequent highly successful
operation was not only a godsend to British Columbia but had perhaps the most important and
far-reaching influence on the economic destinies
of Canada of anything in its whole history.
Lyche, Bernadine Shannon, Gladys
Trotter.
The Bell Hops — Fred Stephens and
Vic Spencer.
The Cashiers — Beatrice Catchpole
and Frances Smith.
The Soldiers — J. A. Tborimbert, Elmer Orr, Chas. Sutton and Art. Con-
table.
Guests from the Embassy — Margaret
Duncan, Gwen Noel, M. Jean Boas-
ley, Wynne Ball, Messrs. Robert
Wm. Ball, J. C. Sheasgreen, Lloyd
Geidt, R. P. Christie.
The Gypsies — Peggy Wood, Gwen
Smith, Beatrice Catchpole, Teddy
Lyche, Messrs. Chas. Sutton, Vic
Spencer, E. H. Tull, Elmer Orr.
Patrons of the Theatre, Peasants, etc.
— Mrs. J. W. McKenzie, Dorothy
Thompson, Fanny Winger, Isabelle
Moncrleff, Peggy Wood, J. A. Tlior-
imbert, R. A. McKee, Robert Sutherland, Robert Wm. Ball, Peggy
Cessford, Gwen Smith.
Synopsis of Scenes
ACT I—Foyer of a London Theatre,
A performance is just closing.
ACT II—Private suite ill ti St. Petersburg hotel.
ACT III—Grounds of the Winter Palace,   St.  Petersburg.    Tlic   Ann mil
White Fete Is In progress.
Musical Numbers
Act I
Finale of the Music Hall performance.
"Yesterday" (and a hint of "To-day")
—Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Christie. Dancers and Chorus.
"Never .Mind Singing, Just Dance, My
Dear." — — Yvette and Johnnies,
"When   Woman   is   the  Question"  —
— —   Varvara,   Basil   and   Baron.
"I'm a Wonderful Man in Yonkors" —
— —  — — ——  —  Colonel   Butts
"We Will Go. Go, to Go-Go —
— Yvette, Oswald and Troubadours.
"They're  Rushing  off  to  Russia"  --
— Ensemble.
Act II
"On the Avenue of Palms" —Chorus
"In  Society   It's  Always   Dress  Parade" — Anna,  Princess, Countess,
Butts and Guests of Embassy.
"Yon  and  1" —  Yvette  and Oswald
"I Love You" —
— Anna Varvara and Basil
Finnie — — Ensemble
Act  111
"ln a Kingdom of Our Own" — Misses
' "'fee**
Sutton and Smith and Gypsy Chorus
"Russian  Dance" —
— Gwen Noel and Val A. Dalby
"That Haunting Walts" —
— Princess and Soldiers
"We Are Nihilists" —
— Popova and Nihilists
Finale.
■ni^^^i
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone ISO
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
Red Widow Show
Proved To Be A
Masterly Effort
(Continued  from  Page One)
Secret Police — — .,. n. ..,„,,„,.,,.-
A Butler Robert Sutherland
Princess Sophya — Isabelle Moncrleff
Countess Alexandria — M. C. Christie
Manager of Music Hall — E. H. Tull
A Carriage Driver R. A. McKee
Adyk. a Nihilist — Robert Wm. Ball
Paskoff,   a   Nihilist  —   R. A.   McKee
Ovak, a Nihilist R. P. Christie
The Ushers — Gladys Trotter, Teddy
Lyche. Wynne Ball. Mrs. A. Smillie
The "Yesterday" Dancers — Peggv
Cessford. Mary Sutton, Margaret
Duncan. M. Jean Beasley, Messrs.
Chas. Sutton. Art. Constable. J. C.
Sheasgreen. A. Smillie.
Tlie "To-Day" Dancers — Evelyn Annand.    Kathleen    O'Rourke,    Owen
m
AUCTION   SALE
MONDAY, JUNE 13TH, AT 1:15 P.M. PROMPT
Favored with instructions from Mrs. H. Farmer. I will sell by
Auction, at her residence. Pendrlth Ave., New Townsite. Cumberland, her excellent and  well  kept  Furniture    nnd    Effects.
described as follows:
Fine Oak Extension Table, round; sel of 0* Oak Dining Chairs,
leather seats; Oak Rocker, leather cushion; Oak Rocker; Oak
Armchair; Morris Chair, with velour cushions; handsome China
Cabinet; very line Oak Davenport, upholstered in leather; Lino
Rug !i' lo'll"; Lino Runner; several Lino Mats; Occasional Table
Oak Umbrella stand; Jardinere stnmls; several line Jardlneres;
large Statue; Electric Reading Lamp; number of Cushions, Curtains anil Blinds; line 3-ln Double Bed. good Spring and Mattress; good Double Bed, coil Spring and Mattress; Oak Dresser,
oblong bevel plate Mirror; Oak Chitlioiiier with bevel plate
Mirror; new Bedroom Lino; ii Kitchen Chairs; Kitchen Cabinet
Tabic; 6-hole Mcl.ary Kootenay Range, white enamel back with
hot water pump; a McLary brick-lined Hot Blast Heater; Electric Washing Machine, ns new; Knives and Forks; Crocks;
Cooking Utensils; Flour Bin; Bread Tin; Garden Tools; Step
Ladder; Sprinkler; Screen Doors; 4-foot Wire Netting; also a
Garage 12 x IS.
TERMS, CASH.   Further particulars  trom   tlie  Auctioneer
F. C. PEARCE P. LEO ANDERTON
Insurance. Notary Public
Real Estate
0, 2*1. 117 or Till-'. Courtenay.
Auctioneer
=w
3i5Ej3E!a3iaKHiEjaaMEKraJEjsiaj''M
RILEY'S TRANSFER
COAL     —
GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
—     WOOD
Noel, Honor Fechner,
The Stage Door Johnnies — Elmer
Orr, E. H. Tull. Robert Sutherland.
Sid Williams. Vic Spencer.
Following the "To-Day*' Dancers —
Fred Stephens, Elmer Orr, Val H.
Dalby. Vic Spencer.
Hawaiian Troubadours — Isabelle
Moncrleff, Bernadine Shannon, Evelyn Annand, Teddy Lyche, Mrs, H.
Strachan. Honor Fechnor, M. Jean
Beasley, Lloyd Geldt and R. A. McKee.   Hula  Dancer. Gwen  Noel.
The Waiters — Elmer Orr, G. Thomas.
Val Dalby, R. A. McKee.
The  Maids   —   Peggy   Wood, Teddy
David Hunden, Junr.
Orders left at  Henderson's Candy Store will receive
PROMPT ATTENTION      ' ,?^
aK!***rai*'BajaiEEM'-*'MMa^
-'iJUiT*,1!}' -"---'J.' L-VVj.*'.11!'.'!.' 'rJ.'£*.' '.'J.' 'LS ''J-'-'l'.' -}- -]! 'Q'l771i&7&7Q'il!i-
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor-
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very     I
prompt attention,    Furniture antl Piano
Storage if desired. K
Phones 4 and Gl Cumberland, B. C.     |
  B
u ss: i*. aarnrara ^3M^i^TO,"ui;*ji iE;r^S5ajaas«
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIUER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than whon new.
1 aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDaCTAMEHNTS
PKE-E.MPTIOSS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
Britisli subjects over 18 years of age
and by aliens on declaring intention
to become British subjects, condi
tional upon , residence, occupation
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information eonci-rning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Uecords will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of tlie Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of lhe Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner,
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
fivo years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant aud unreserved
Crown lands, not being t imberland.
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land ls $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing.)
land 12.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given iu Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory!* or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stum page.
IIO.MES1FU) LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been  surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may he leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits aro Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form assnciaiions for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers   and   travellers,   up   to   ten
h (Itontberlarjd "
•Hotel
Kates
Reasonable [
ACCOMMODATION TIIE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
*!*Ji3raiS*f5MS13ISM2I3JMMSlL^JS13raiiiJ^ISn31
24 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Licensed Taxi Driver
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C
PHONES|^
Night calls: 134X Courtenay
Olllce: 159 Cumberland.
I
I
l^S
Ask for and see that you are served with
Comox Pure
Jersey Ice Cream
—because there is none better.
—>—*=■>—>—^—»—>—>—>—>—>—>—>—!—i—.—>—1—»"l—1
AT YOUR FAVORITE FOUNTAIN
Support a home industry-get the best
maum >-«■■* * xj-a-gagaaB3tawwe«3«ata«t3t
aeeaeatsesaas
Comox Creamery
Association
Ccurtmay.
i_t^g_iuuufJU!-j^iw=<«j**ui--a--AJ_a^
5S3 FRIDAY. JUNE 10, 11127.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
Confederation and After:
Sixty Years of Progress
Will Give Medal
To Every School
Child In Canada
First Hatch of ;i00 Kent to Remote Portion of the Dominion
from Mint at Ottawa.
LADY WILLINGDON MOVES
LEVER MAKING IMPRINT
Vice-Regal Parly Sees Wonders
of Money-making Plant on
Tour of Inspection.
Ottawa, Can.. May 30, 1.127.
Lady WtlUngdon si ruck tlie flrst
Confederation Jubilee medal ut tlie
mint tJiih morning. With her own
hanclH Bhe moved the lever that imprinted on the bronze thc commemorative words antl ricHi-gjiH that will
go oul iii a bi:t(,:li of 300 medals to
the school children of Vulcan territory tonight. It Is intended subsequently to give one to every school
child in Canada.
The ceremony took place this morning at the Hoyal Mint i.i the presence
of His EJxcelleucy Viscount Willing-
don. as well as Sir Montagu and Lady
Allan, officials of Government House,
officials of the Mint, und members of
the press. Upon their Excellencies'
arrival they were talcon on a tour of
Inspection through tlie mint. JThe
first point of call was a little truck,
on which was heaped $000,000 worth
of gold in solid liars. Each bar was
worth more than $10,000, tbe exact
value by weight being slumped on
each. Alongside were other bara, or
bricks, containing about 80 per cent
gold.
Then tlic entourage passed on to
the room where the moulds were
contained. Men In heavy woolen
clothing, their hands covered by huge
mittens, poured oul the molten nml
hissing bronze as cooly as it ii wero
tea.
Made  Hairy  Friends
Here Lady Willlngdon showed her
democratic spirit when, thanking the
workmen for showing her the modu*
operandi of that department, she
shook hands With them all, grimy
handed as they were. She may have
soiled a pair of gloves, but sh^ made
many friends.
Amid the whirr of many machines.
the vice-regal party watched tho
bronze liars being flattened out and
rolled to the proper consistency. During her tour of inspection Lady Will-
i ingdon asked a great many questions
| and seemed tremendously interested
I In all the various processes.
j Finally the room where the medal
i was to be cast was reached. Strong
flights were focussed »n the machines
| und on the party and the cameras
j started to grind and click as Lady
; Willingdon stepped forward with a
! blank bronze circle. She shoved it-
into tho proper oval and then looked
j for the assistant to give the sign,
j Thla he did. the medal was struck
.and the brief ceremony had ended,.
I Lady Willlngdon threw her hands
in the air triumphantly and then
scrutinized the first medal.
| "It's fine of the King, but. 1 have
jseen better ones of Queen Mary," VIs-
| count Willlngdon was heard to say.
; He had a good laugh, as did others
i about him, when he was told It waa
Queen Victoria and not Queen Mary.
I Some of thc coins were iminediate,-
! ly put iu little envelopes to begin
| their long journey to the rim of tho
j Artie, Lady Willingdon herself Ailing
J a few. Meanwhile, Mrs. George 1'.
i Graham struck a medal, as did Mra.
i ('. G. Cowan, wife of the honorary
i uecretary of the jubilee committee,
land so did Mrs. R. 11. Osborne, lady-
lu-waltlng to Her Excellency.
This ceremony being over, the party
|inspected several other pieces of
! delicate machinery. Lady Willingdon
Hieing particularly impres.sed with the
| weighing machine that casts the over-
i weight 2a cent pieces in one bin and
'the underweights In another,
The serious work of tlie morning
! being over, some fun was had posing
i i'or the cameramen. Lady Willing-
| don held a bowl of shimmering
medals which she distributed about
to the party like the feudal lords of
i old distributing largesse to their re-
retainers. Hon. George P. Graham
and Sir Montagu Allan wre the particular recipients of Her Excellency's
bounty.
After the vice regal party had departed. Mr. J. H. Campbell, deputy |
master of the mint, told the press that '
tlie medals were going to schools in
i )awson City that he had built when
he was up In the Yukon iu the old
gold days.
The medals contain on one side a
picture of Queen Victoria as she wiu
in   lSi>7  and  one  of  King George  a;
lie   is   at   present.     Confederation   is
printed on the top and Canada on tlie
bottom;     1S07    is    printed    opposite
Queen   Victoria,   and   1927   opposite
King Oeorge.   On tlie reverse side Is
a shield containing the Canadian coat
of arms, surrounded by maple leaves, j
On the same side is the motto ior the |
coat of arms. "A marl usque ad mare." j
2,000,000 Medals
Two million of these will be struck
nnd. commencing tomorrow, they will
lie turned  out  ut  the rule of 500 a
minute and 100.000 a day.   They will I
not   he   distributed   locally  till   near!
Confederation   date,   a   Mint   official'
] explained, lest some private concern
get hold of the medal and print them,
j which would spoil the whole effect.
The medals were designed by Pritchard and Andrews, local engravers.
Those in the party that witnessed
the medal being struck were: Their
Excellencies Viscount and Lady Willingdon, Sir Montagu and Lady Allan,
Major Willis O'Connor, aide de camp
to His Excellency; Mrs. R. B. Osborn.
hidy-m-wuittng to Her Excellency;
j Mr. E. C. Melville, secretary to the
! Governor Generul; Right Hon. Geo.
|*P. Graham, Chairman Jubilee Committee und Mrs. Graham; Mr. C. G.
Cowan, Honorary Secretary Jubilee
Committee and Mrs. Cowan; Mr. Jean
Desy, Honorary Secretary Jubilee
Committee; Mr. E. H. Scammell,
Member of Executive Committee; Mr.
J. H. Campbell, Deputy Master of the
.Mint; Mr. A. J. Baker, Chief Clerk
and Accountant; Mr. L. Entwhistle,
Assayer; Mr. H. E. Ewart, Engineer; j
Mr, P. W. Bond, Refiuer; and mem- j
hers of the press.
Deer Season Will Open
Thursday, September  15th
VANCOUVER, B.C., June 5.— A
meeting ot* the British Columbin Game
Conservation Board has been called
for June 9 and 10. There will be a
public meeting at the Court House,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m., June 9, to hear
representations on the open seasons
for quail, pheasants, partridge and
grouse. The Board will meet in private the following day to draft its
recommendations.
Regulations for big game resulting
from the recent sitting of the Boord
have now been published. One important change is the division of the
Province Into two districts instead of
three. The Western district now Includes that portion of the Province
west of thc summit of the Cascade
Mountains and south of the electoral
district of Atlin.
All of tho rest of the Province, Including most of tho old Northern District, ls now known as the Eastern
District,
WESTERN DISTRICT   .
Following are the seasons set for
big game In tlie Western district:
Mountain goat—September IB to
December 15 (except Vancouver Island).
Bear, except  white or Kermodel—
September IS to June 15.
Deer, mule, white tail and coast,
bucks only—September 15 to December 15 (except Queen Charlotte Islands and Saanich and Highland
Districts of Vancouver Island.
In the Saanich and Highland Districts the season is from September
15 to October 31.
Bag limits In Eastern and Western
Districts remain unchanged.
PAPER MILL ON ISLAND
TO COST TEN MILLIONS
With a view to enlarging the present pulp plant at Beaver Cove, northern part of this Island, a prominent
flrm of engineers has been engaged
by the Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
to make a complete survey of the
water power situation at Nlmpklsh
River. Announcement was made to
this effect at the annual meeting of
the company ln Vancouver last week.
It waB recently announced that development work and   extensions   of
ffi
plant would be undertaken at Beaver
Cove, shortly. It is proposed to expend from $10,000,000 to $15,000,000
in the development of a huge pulp
and paper mill. The extent of tnd
development, it is understood, is dependent on the amount of power
available In Xlmpklsh River. The
present plant has a capacity of fifty
tons a day.
Where Shall I Walk?
By WILSON*  MacDO.N'ALD
In the June Scribner's
Where shall I walk with my new love?
Not by the sea;
There my old and faithless lovo
Used to walk Willi me,
Shall  I meet  her In  tlle wood?
Better elsewhere:
By yon tree my old love stood;
She will still be there.
Shall I climb with her this hill
Warm with autumn's gold?
Nay I cannot: she I loved
Walked there once of old.
Where then shall  I go with her?
Up-a city street:
The (read of hosts who travel there
Will drown my old love's feet.
Cumberland /
Supply...
The Cash Store
KICKSON'S OLD STAND
CUMBERLAND
You cannot exceed the best and we
have the goods at the BEST prices.
Our stock is replete with new and
fresh goods. Our prices are for Cash
and you are saving at leatt from
5% to 10%
Libby's Roast Beef, ls, per tin  20c
Clark's Tomato Catsup, per bottle  24c
Libby's Corn Beef, ls, per tin  280
Libby's Meutwich (medium), per tin.... 200
Libby's Tomato Catsup, per bottle  270
Devilled Meats, assorted, .1 for   250
Good B.C. Pink Salmon, per tin      00
Horse Shoe Salmon, 2 tins for   450
King Oscar Sardines, per tin   150
Brunswick Sardines, per tin      00
Heinz Tomato Ketchup, per bottle  310
Frey Bentos Corn Beef, ls, per tin  800
Helmet Corn Beef, ls, per tin  230
Blue Point Oysters (new pack)   370
Toilet Paper, 7 rolls for   250
Brooms 500; Better Quality   050
O'Cedar PollBh, 12-oz., per bottle  450
Wash Boards, glass   750
Spring Clothes Pins, 3 dozen for  150
Sliced Pineapple, 2s, per tin  170
Delmonte Sliced Peaches, 2s, per tin.    300
Rogers' Golden Syrup, 2s, per tin  23c
Rogers' Golden Syrup, 5s, per tin  500
Molasses, 2s, per tin   100
White Star Baking Powder, 12-oz..  250
Magic Baking Powder, 12oz., per tin. :{((.•■
Royal Baking Powder, 12-oz., per tin.. 55c
Magic Baking Powder, 2%-rbs.. tin      000
LOOK AT OUR SOAP BARGAINS
Jasper Park Lodge. Jasper .National Park, Now Open
Pels Naptha Soap, per carton  800
White Swan Soap, 6 cakes for   250
Royal Crown Soap, carton of 6 cakes 200
White Wonder Soap, 4 cakes for  250
Life Buoy Soap, 3 cakes for  250
Lux Soap (Flakes) 2 for  250
Lux Toilet Soap, 3 for 850
Palm Olive Soap, 3 for 250
Sunlight Soap, per carton  250
Old Dntch Cleanser, 2 for  230
Royal Crown Cleanser, per tin  100
Royal Crown Washing Powder   2Kc
Gold  Dust,  large package    3SP
Ammonia, quart bottles   IOc
Pendray's Dry Ammonia, per pkg  2.'$c
Round Trip Fares
lu Canada and the United Stales
Also
Edmonton-Calgary
and
Thc Triangle Tour
YAM'H",''•:.I I'HINIT lil'I'KHT .TASl'KI!
Tickets on Bale daily to Sept. 80. Final return limit Oct. 81
Canadian Nationals
■SEE CANADA  IN CANADAS DIAMOND JUBILBB YBAR     I867-I92I"
For full particulars apply
I'liinlicrliiml I*. IV. I'MM.i: Telephone "'>
Or write c. v. Earle, District Passenger Agent, Victoria.
Tea:
Nabob Tea, per pound   750
Blue Ribbon Tea, per pound   7.50
White Star Tea, per pound   650
Coffee:
Try Blue Ribbon Coffee, per pound     700
Fresh Ground ColTee, per pound 550
SOMETIMES THE
INFORMALITY ..OF THE
Si'OKEN WORD IS
MORE EFFECTIVE
THAN A LETTER.
"LONG DISTANCE, PLEASE"
IJ. (J. TELEPHONE COMPANY
HERE ARE SOME REAL BARGAINS IN CANNED GOODS
Royal Purple Tomatoes, small   130
Royal Purple Tomatoes, large   170
Peas, per can 170; Corn per can  150
Asparagus Tips, green or white, tin.... 250
String Beans, per tin   17(J
Spinach, large, per tin  250
Carnation, St. Charles Milk, tails,, tin 120
St. Charles or Carnation (baby), 3 for 200
Campbell's Assorted Soups, per tin... 150
Heinz Tomato Soup, 2 for   250
Quaker Pork and Beans, Ind., 3 for... 230
Heinz Pork and Beans, flats, 2 for  2:<c
Northwest Soda Biscuits (salted) 100
Red Arrow Soda Biscuits, per pkg.     2.'lc
Christie's  Soda  Biscuits,   (tins)  48c
Regal Salt, 2 for   25c
SPECIAL, this week only, 3 dozen Oranges for 75c.
jfl Shelly's Bread and Cakes ^     I       J^ "Id «aTklTe»ch 11 $2.75 ^
Our Men's Work Pants, Shirts and Gloves are worth seeing before
Men's   Black   Denim   Pauls.   t*T»-|    tf\tT ••»••    L....,   »Laa...L»aa. Men's Blue Denim Bib Ovcr- (Tsf\   p/\
s-oz. per •    Jbl.95      y°u buY elsewhere     nllB. ,,,„,, Pl, palr...    $2.50
Men's Blue Denim (!l-oz) Red (t>C*  OCT        Men'B Blue  Denim Comblnn-  (pO  AP        M°"'"  W"rk 0I"V0" €1    *-\(\
Bucks, per pair     ^2,25       tion  Overalls, per pair  $Z.95       B°°' 7B°' 'U° """ fcl.tW
These are best values in the District.
Men' Blue Denim  (!'-oz)  Red (b<\   J»»/\        Me„ia nIll0 r,cnlm B|„ 0ver- a-J»-|   Qp»       Men's Work Shirts (Jftrt   f>n
Back  Jackets,  each     tJJ*™<.Ovr       alls  (8-oz.), per pair   (PX«t/D       1MB, 1.95. 12.25 and H>a£.OU
TO BEVAN AND UNION BAY
CUSTOMERS:
We will allow you the price of
One gallon of Gasoline on a $5.00
Grocery Order
Come to   .   .   .
*•»—»-"—'-"•
CUMBERLAND
SUPPLY
The Cash Store
Telephone 155 PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1927.
Ilo-llo Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
the Quarterback
mm ESTHER RALSTON
on tern ar  fRED NEWMEYER     ■■■• - ■""*"■'" turn... iimi taw
Monday and Tuesday, June 13 -14
i
A monumental
production of
spectacular
beauty and rich
Oriental color
!
BRID
STORM
with
Dolores
Mi.i
Costello MM
Wednesday, Thursday, June 15, 16
Madge Bellamy
in
Bertha of the
Sewing Machine
Movies
•5rt=5rtsac5a»«j^5ass=i««««^^
Attractions for the
Coming Week
A MOVIE TREAT
"Millionaires,'' the Warner Bros
production featuring Oeorge Sidney.
Louise Fazenda and Vera Gordon,
will be shown at the Gaiety theatre
next Monday and Tuesday, June 13-14,
which means that picturegoers will be
offered a movie treat in thla entertaining comedy-drama.
Herman Haymaker has so skillfully
and understanding^ handled the
direction of "Millionaires." that even
while you are laughing at the blunders of this Hast Side family suddenly
come into wealth, you are sincerely
sorry for their difficulties and mistakes in their attempt to bombard
Fifth Avenue's social circles.
The supporting cast Is an excellent
one. Helene Costello and Arthur Lubin make, a charming pair of young
lovers; Jane Wlnton a fascinating
modern Lorelei, and Nat Carr an
amusing stock salesman.
AN EXCITING MELODRAMA
Her lover lying where a blow had
felled him in the room below; old
Jacob, her protector, and the only one
in that god-forsaken place who had
ever shown her any kindness, throttled by the loathsome, hunchbacked
beast of a son; Piet, now breaking
down the door to her room; Plet's
idiot son gone amuck hacking at the
supports of the rickety old lighthouse
after having started it ablaze by turning over the lamp; Mynheer Tom shot
dead and thrown in thc raging waves
below—what a dreadful position for
a young girl of delicate sensibilities
and high strung temperament.
That is the position in which Faith
Fltzhugh, played by Dolores Costello,
finds herself at the tremendously
powerful and gripping climax of I.
Stuart Blackton's production for
Warner Bros., "Bride of the Storm,"
which shows at the Ilo-llo theatre
next Monday and Tuesday, June 13-14.
John Harron portrays the young
U. S. Navy lieutenant who has come
with the dazzling splendor of the sun
into her life, darkened by the evil
and relentless forces which hover
round her as the slavey of three ignorant, brutal Dutchmen in the
wretched lighthouse on barren Pag
Island. Young Mr. Harron gives the
best performance of his career in this
tale.
Nation' 1 came just to Mr. Walthall's
ear," says Miss Gish; "und now 1 am
actually taller than he is."
Miss Uish was only fifteen when she
played the old role, hut ut lhe time
kept Ibis age a secret.
She plays Nathaniel Hawthorne's
tragic heroine, "Hester Prynne," ln
the new Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production which comes to the Gaiety
theatre this week-end, June 111-11. It
Is a dramatic story of u Puritan
woman who. to shield the man she
loved, bore a brand of shame on her
breast for a lifetime.
Victor Seastrom directed the play,
in which Lars Hanson, the famous
Swedish star, Is making his American
debut. The cast Includes Walthall,
Karl Dane. William H. Tooker, Mnr-
celle Corday, Mary Hawes, Jules
Cowles, Joyce Cond, Fred Herzog,
James A. Marcus and others of note.
The production was staged on a
lavish scale, hundreds of people appearing In the big pillory Bcenes that
climax the dramatic story.
An entire and authentic duplicate
was made of an early Puritan village.
New England libraries yielded accounts ol* the minute details of community life under the later Winthrops
and Carvers, and Victor Seastrom
director of such previous successes as
"The Tower of Lies" and "He Who
Gets Slapped," was painstakingly
faithful to the traditional background
of his story.
"THE QUARTERBACK" A
PAST FOOTBALL FILM
Say.*'
you can't
Kid Boots
—But Eddie
Cantor can
Watch for him at the Ilo-llo
next Friday and Saturday
The newest and funniest
face in motion pictures
COMEDY ROLE FOR
NORMA TALMADGE
Norma Talmadge, in the title role
of "Kikl," coming to the Gaiety next
Friday and Saturday, June 17-18, now
reveals herself iu a new light—that
of a comedienne. She ls supported by
noted players, including Ronald Colman, Gertrude Astor, Marc MacDer-
niott, George K. Arthur, Mack Swain,
Erwin Connelly, Frankie Darro and
William Orlamond.
Luck played a big part in the life
of Klkl, a Paris street gamin, but she
had to fight for what she got. The
waif did not hesitate, when battling
against odds, to resort to all sorts of
tricks In her efforts to overcome her
poverty and reach thc estate of a
"great lady."
Love was a stranger until she met
Victor Renal, manager of a Paris
theatre. The girl lost her Job in the
chorus of Renul's theatrical troupe,
but he. smitten by her charms, took
her to his home. How Kikl foiled
her rival, Paillette, a stage star, and
nipped a conspiracy between Paulette
and Baron Rapp to kill Renal's love
for her forms a delightful and exciting story.
LITTLE MISS GISH
HALF FOOT TALLER
Lillian Gish has not only grown In
fame, but nlso in stature since her
lirst phenomenal success in "Birth of
a Nation." During her rise to fame
she has grown between six and seven
inches.
This was disclosed during the making of her new vehicle, "The Scarlet
Letter," when she and Henry B. Walthall played together for the flrBt time
since the story that made them both
celebrated.
When  we  playod   In   'Birth  of a
Football's In the air. Don't you see
those pigskins sailing? Can't you
hear the crowds a'cheerlng? "Come
on, Colton.   We want a touchdown!"
Well, if you go to the Ilo-llo this
week-end you'll see it all.
"The Quarterback," a corking college comedy brought Richard Dix
back to the screen. The highest
praise to give this film Is to say it's
better than "Lets Get Married." That
is praise enough.
Dix Is the son of a man who has
beeu attending university since lSWi
because he promised his wife that
he'd stay at Colton till their eleven
beat the crack State squad. Twenty-
seven years have oozed by. His wife
is dead, his son is now the college
quarterback—and he ls still studying!
Needles to say, Richard loves tlle
prettiest girl in the State—Esther
Ralston. Everything is all set for the
annual Colton-State contest when a
newspaper accuses Dick of professionalism. Esther is the only person
who can prove his innocence. At the
last minute he is shoved Into the lineup and the game starts In a veritable
sea of mini. Laughs, spills and thrills
vie with each other.
CLARA BOW SEEKS
CINEMA SYMPATHY!
The alluring cling of sllk and tlie
numerous frills of women's attire arc
not for Clara Bow.
Paramount^ vivacious red-haired
featured player who appears opposite
Eddie Cantor ln the film version of
Florenz Zlegfeld's musical comedy
success, "Kid Boots," which arrives nt
the Gaiety on Wednesday and Thursday, June 15-16, and at the llo-Ilo on
Friday and Saturday, June 17-18, has
never been seen on the screen In any
of the beautiful things her feminine
sisters delight In wearing.
Poor Clara seems doomed lo don
rough skirts and mannish shirts instead of ermine evening wraps. And
—each picture carries her farther
from the delights of fine clothes.
Take "Kid Boots,," for instance.
Hobnailed boots took the place of
fragile slippers! Riding breeches
formed part of her outfit and there
was only one new addition to her
screen wardrobe—a one-piece bathing
suit. Miss Bow wore a beach costume In front of the camera for the
first time while "Kid Boots" was ln
the making.
"Kid Boots," starring Eddie Cantor
In his flrst screen effort, was directed
by Frank Tuttle. In addition to Miss
Bow, Blllle Dove and Lawrence Gray
are also featured.
Gaiety Theatre
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK
iCAM.iT LETTH
* VICTOR SEASTROM Production
Vith LARS HANSON
a Yfto($ol(ltiyn-\\®fa mcturb>
Monday and Tuesday, June 13 -14
rgflmriiiii|l||iiiiin!r|i|rrri7r;iiliiiliili'liniiiii iiiiiiu in miimi
wm
George Sydney
Louise Fazenoa'
Vera Gordon
The picture of a million laughs!
Wednesday - Thursday, June 15-16
Clara Bow, Billie Dove
and Eddie Cantor in
"KID BOOTS"
Eddie Cantov, Clara BoW.arvi Billie Dove in fiorenzZlaJMdS
•Kid Boota 'AFiaiikJuTlle Production AParamouni Ficruie
At last! The truth about why
all golfers go nutty!
Friday and Saturday June 17 -18
rtiixr ™
with RONALD COLMAN
—t
■nmn**-nssns FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Scientifically Designed
Low pressure conditions distribute most of the weight and
wear toward the outer edges of the Balloon Tread, so that
is where Firestone engineers place most of the rubber. At
the direct center is a deep grove, between two narrow flexing
rider strip3 and flanked by additional grooves, which nearly
close up when the rubber spreads out as the tire is placed
under load. Next come the wide outer rider strips with numerous sharp-edge projections for non-skid qualities. These projections are small to permit the tread to yield to irregularities
and cling to the road. The carcass of the Balloon Tire must
have the qualifications to withstand the extreme flexing
•which this tread permits. Firestone provides extra strength
and endurance by dipping thc cords of tlie carcass in a rubber
solution, which completely saturates and insulates every
fiber of every cord, insuring the highest degree of economy,
safety and comfort.
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
HAMILTON, CANADA
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
FIRESTONE BUILDS THE ONLY  GUM-DIPPED  TIRES
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
Automobile Specialists
Phone 8 Cumberland, BC.
CAMP-FIRE
PERM
THIS YEAR IT IS NECESSARY TO HAVE A PERMIT FROM SOME FOREST OFFICER BEFORE ANY
CAMP-FIRE MAY BE SET IN ANY   FOREST  OR
WOODLAND
BE SURE TO GET A PERMIT FOR YOUR CAMP-
FIRE AND FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS
PRINTED ON THE BACK OF IT
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
PREVENT FOREST FIRES
YOU CAN HELP
We have a reputation for Quality.   Purchase your
Bread and Cakes from
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
FOR HEALTH TRY OUR
PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT HEALTH BREAD,
HEALTH ROLLS AND
HEALTH MUFFINS
SATURDAY   SPECIALS
Scotch Soda Scones. Pancakes and Crumpets,
Cream Scones and Syrup Scones
PAGE FIVE
tf
News of Courtenay and District
FIRE PROTECTION
QUESTION SOLVED
AT COURTENAY
(Continued from Page One)
Would you buy  	
goods that bore no label?
Would you buy an automobile of unknown make, no
matter how cheap? Nobody
would be so foolish.
You get to trust .1 name or a
label just as you get to trust a
man, through satisfactory nnd
honest dealings. That is why kitchen and household utensils
bearing the SjVlP label aie bought
without question by millions 01
Canadians. The shield-shape
green and red -SMP trademark it
a guarantee of fuil value and best
quality. Tbe (inn behind S^t*
goods is
the Sheet Metal .Products Co. °£SgJw'
MONTREAL TORONTO WINK "G
EDMONTON     VANCOUVER     CALGARY
fa tlie Best Stores
EVERYWHERE*
new gate had been constructed at ttie
entrance to the city auto park.
The Electrical Committee, through
its chairman, Aid. Macdonald, reported that the new line from the
Power house lo the city had heen
commenced, and considerable work on
the Lake Trail had been done. To
allow the city clerk to give more time
to electrical matters, a part-time
stenographer had heen engaged, and
the department, had taken advantage
of an opportunity to secure a supply
of meters at a substantial reduction,
Scliool   Kite  (hanged
A good deal of time was taken up
In discussing the she for (he new
High School on Warren Avenue. The
Mayor and Aid. .Macdonald. after
talking with Mr. Gibson of the Dept.
i of Education, wero both convinced
that the site recommended by him
was the better one. The Mayor was
I of the opinion that there would be a
saving of from eight hundred to
twelve hundred dollars in draining,
which was a strong recommendation
for Ihe site proposed by Mr, Gibson.
The cost to the city would be about
the same for the extra lots required
in either case. The site would be between the Lake Trail and the Cumberland road on Warren Ave., at the rear
of Mr. Leighton'a and Mr. Hough's
property. It was not altogether desirable to have the school on ihe main
road where cars would be hurrying
to lhe E. & N. station to the possible
danger of the school pupils, The
matter was lel't with the Ways and
Means committee consisting of Aid.
Pearse, Wallis and Macdonald.
Aid. Fielder reported the Water
"Works to be in a satisfactory condition, hut enquired what action had
heen taken with regard to the various
nuisances reported by the health
officer. This matter was then dls-
cussed and the aldermen were In
favor of taking definite action at once.
The city solicitor will be consulted
aud the Sanitary Committee was empowered to take action.
.Mayor McKenzie, with whom the
disposal of city bonds had heen left
in   conjunction   with   the   city  clerk,
TOURISTS HUTS MAY
BE   BUILT   AT   THE
COURTENAY AUTO PARK
COURTENAY, June 8.—A proposal
was made at Monday night's council
meeting for the erection of a number
of huts for tourists' use iu the city
auto park. Aid. Macdonald. acting as
spokesman for Mr. C. H. Piggett, put
forward the proposal. Mr. Piggott
has recently returned here from California, and he wished to make provision for the city to take over the huts
in the event of his return to California. Xo definite decision was arrived
at except the appointment of a committee with Aid. Macdonald as chairman, to go further into the matter.
Owing to the public being unable to
ascertain, under present conditions,
whether or not the stores will be
dosed on certain holidays, Aid. Wallis gave notice that he will introduce
a by-law io clearly define the holidays.
The 1927 Tax by-law received Its first
and  second readings.   Other by-laws
lealing   with   the   disposal   of
property were also dealt witli.
reported that the bonds had been soli
83 Ito a Vancouver firm ut a satisfactory
«2a«irM^'3^a»iE.,-»>»n     price.
For the Choicest of Meats
try
WILCOCK BROS.
MEAT MARKET
WE HANDLE ONLY THE BEST
Our Cold Meats sliced any thickness you desire on our
NEW DAYTON SLICER
are ideal for the dinner bucket or for lunches.
-: GIVE US A TRIAL:-
ORIGINAL MERVILLE
SETTLER LOSES
HOME BY FIRE
COURTENAY, June .5.—Fire completely destroyed the home of Mr.
James Mulr, one of the original Merville settlers, on Saturday evening.
Mr. Muir was in Courtenay, shopping,
and his children were at the picture
show when three blasts of the siren
on lhe city fire hall announced an
out-of-town blaze.
The Rev. G. L. RourdllJon, of Sandwick, seeing smoke issuing from the
house as he was proceeding over the
highway in his car, was one of the
first on the spot. Together with a
number of neighbors, an efTort was
made to save the contents of the
house, hut. the interior was a mas**
of smoke and flames, making it impossible to gain entrance, and the
house and contents were a total loss.
The barn and other outbuildings were
carefully watched against falling
sparks, and the fire was prevented
from  spreading.
Mr. Muir wns joined by his brother
from England a year or so ago, who
has since taken the house formerly
built for Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Fenwlck,
who left for Xew Zealand following
the big fire in 1922 when thirty of the
settlers lost their homes. The origin
of the lire is not known, but Mr. Muir
thinks it started at the back of the
premises. It is possible that the
Land Settlement Hoard lias tho
dwelling covered by insurance, but
the furniture nnd all the household
effects are a loss to the owner. Mr.
Muir expects to rebuild again iu the
near future.
formance after a very short time for
rehearsals.
The play is full of amusing situations and incidents, Mr. G. Stubbs,
nScCol. Cicero Hannibal Butts, a part
thai might have been specially written for him. lost no opport unity to
make the most of it. The other leading parts were taken by Mrs. Harnett
Harvey in the title role, and Miss
Edna Rossiter as wife of Col. Butts.
A high standard of amateur acting
was sustained throughout, which reflects great credit on the producer
and those who took parts.
"THE RED WIDOW"
PLAYED TO CAPACITY
HOUSE AT COURTENAY
COURTEXAY,  June   4.—The   "Red
Widow" played at Ihe Gaiety theatre
on Tuesday aud Wednesday, packing
the house to capacity. In fact, neither
the scaling or stnge accommodation
were adequate to till the need. The
"Red Widow." a clever, witty and
catchy play, provided a lull measure
of entertalnmenl for those attending.
Under the auspices of ihe Courtenay
Elks Lodge, sixty local people under
the direction of Mr. Lewis succeeded
in   producing   this   remarkable   per-
CLIFFE - BELANGER
FIGHT ARRANGED
FOR JULY 1 OR 2
COURTENAY, June s.—From all
accounts, lhe Cbinox District purposes
celebrating Canada's Diamond Jubilee
In a manner fitting to thc occasion.
The posters giving ihe preliminary
announcements predict a pageant depicting the blstory of tlie country
cit.v I from a time when if was In the possession of the red man, and will
demonstrate the various stages
rough which this country has passed Up lo the present time. The coming
of the white man, the fur trader,
agriculture, lumbering, fishing, mining and the industrial life in general
into which it has now entered.
An address will he delivered by a
prominent speaker on Canada's history, followed hy short discourses by
those representing the various organ-
izatlons who are uniting to assure a
successful two-day celebration. Thero
will be a varied programme of sports.
There will he competitions for which
British Columbia championship prizes
are heing offered for various items
applicable to the lugging industry.
Bands will be in attendance from
morning till night, and there will bo
a dance each evening. During the
cour.se of each day, a real old fashioned barbecue is to be featured, and
each evening as a wind up to the
sports and preliminary 10 the dancing
a monster fire works display will be
given.
Cumberland, Comox, Union Bay, In
fact all quarters of ihe district from
Sayward 10 Qualicum are uniting in
1 grand effort to make the occasion
thc success it deserves.
Various committees are working
hard, viehig with each olher for success, and those who know tlie hospitality which Comox District has
shown in ihe past cannot fail to
respond to the earnest Invitation now
being offered Io all who are able to
participate in Courtenay's Diamond
Jubilee celebration. To the boxing
fans it will he good news that Roy
Cliffe and Charlie Belanger, who have
already met on several occasions, are
to mix again at the stadium on the
flrst of July. Details of tbe sporting
events will soon  lie available.
LOGGERS EVENTS
FOU CHAMPIONSHIPS
Leadership
FOR
OVER
20
YEARS
Cue tall cr.n
(with an
equal quantity of water)
gives you 4
cupsofpurc, full-
ucam milk. Always use it in
baking.
Write Thc Borden
Co. Limited, Vancouver, fur Free
Recipe Book.  3U27
The B. C. Loggers' Association have
placed their oiiicial sanction ou tho
loggers sports at Courtenay on Dominion Day as being for the championship of tbe province aud they will
add very handsome prizes iu addition
to those already provided. The events
which will hf associated with the
championship an* for splicing, chopping and log rolling. McQulnn and
Downey won the splicing contest for
the Tae ilic Coast at the Loggers' convention iu Vancouver last year hut it
is likely that they will have stiffer
competition here this year as the
prizes will attract attention from
a wide radius. Judges in the contest,
will be Major L. R. Andrews, of Bloedel, Stewart and Welsh, Limited; Mr.
R. L. Cobb, International Timber Co.;
Mr. Cooke, Thomsen and Chirk Timber Co.; Mr. Jas. Dollar, of the Canadian Robert Dollar Co.; Mr. it. J. Filberg. of the Comox Logging aud Rull-
way Co.; Mr. J. Lamb, of Lamb Bros.
Logging Co. and Mr. R. Richardson, of
the Campbell River Logging Co.
Comox Argus.
ST.CHARLESMILK
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Denial Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Av«.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUJlUEni.AND,  B.C.
BEST BUYS
AT
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
Phones 46 & 182 Courtenay, B. C.
NO ONE IN CANADA NEED
DRINK IMMATURE
WHISKY.    THE AGE OF    I
Whisky
IS GUARANTEED BY THE CANADIAN
GOVERNMENT
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1927.
Bathing Suits
Boys and Girls Bathing Suits in Navy, with colored trim- CQf»
niings; sizes from 22 to 32; all one price, oath   tJt/Xu
Children's Wool limiting Suits in small sizes, priced (PI   HK.
nt $1.50 and   (DLI-d
Children's Bathing Suits, all wool, In Navy with con- flJO (?A
trusting colors;   $12.25  nnd     uDmltOV
.Men's and Ladles' All-Wool Bathing Suits in an assortment of
the hest colors, guaranteed to give satisfaction, nnd (J*Q OK
priced at-$2.05 and   -iSO.itO
Something diii'erent A striking Bathing Suit with (PC CA
lots of colors; quite an assortment ol the newest at ■tBO.U'l*'
HATCHWAY GARMENTS
For Summer wear we have received our new stock of Hatchways famous no-button Combinations for .Men, all (PI   CA
sizes from 34 to It; nt per suit   uJl.tJU
Buttonless Combinations, most sizes, a very special (P*! AA
Garment at, per suit,          «15A»vv
MEN'S SOX
A snap In Men's Sox, mercerise*] silk and lisle in "shades COp
of fawn and blue, per pair       tlW
LADIES' KNITTED DRESSES
Ladies' Knitted An Silk Dresses, two piece skirt on bodice; a
special snap just procured from a Traveller, only a few left
und the price is very much under the regular (PI O QC
price.   See tht!m.    Prices $!>.5<> nnd       tDLtMi.VO
LADIES' PURE SILK HOSE
Ahout ten dozen pure silk hose in most colors; a regular ?1.G0
hose, hut for those who do nol require a silk to the <*Pl AA
knee this is a real bargain and will lie a gooil buy at «l5J-»"v
For New Goods antl Novelties, Call at
Personal Mention
Mr. John Sutherland and Mr. Doug-
lay Sutherland returned last week
from Portland.
* *   *
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Wood spent Sunday
last at Minto with Mr. and Mrs. J.
Sharpies.
* *     4
Strawberry Social June 22nd.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISH1NOS
P.P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Offlce
Courtenay Phone  25S
Local  Offlce
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings.
Telephone  115R   or  24
DINING ROOM I
j Our Dining Room offers good food,)
j good  service,   reasonable   charge.)
King George Hotel!
.Miss M. Redford, a former member
of the Cumberland Hospital nursing
stall, was a visitor to the city on
Tuesday of this  week.
POR SALE—Empty Steel Drums, 50-
gnllona, $3.00 apiece. Buy now,
don't wait for the fire season. Pidcock & McKenzie Oarage, phone 25.
Courtenay. U. C, 22-24
COWS Kill! SALE—Over-stocked with
Purebred Cows, several (resh. Will
sell al reasonable prices. Select
what you desire to purchase. For
further information appiy telephone
stll.,, Cumberland. 21-21.
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland) B. C.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Pbone li> I'hone 15
A strawberry social and afternoon
tea will he given by the L. A. ln the
Hall of the United Church on Wednesday, June 22nd, at 3 p.m.
After the council meeting on Monday evening, the Police Commissioners
held a short meeting. Mr. Brown,
night watchman, applied for his two
weeks' holiday, and Mr. James Hoyd
was appointed to Illl the position
during Mr. Hrown's absence.
*****Hj3!=Mrtj***s***«**-*w=w*M
Johnson's Wax
Electric Floor
Polisher
Phone IU
CITY MEAT
MARKET
Qualitu and
SERVICE
Quality the BEST only
Service, none
BETTER
Cold Meats for
Picnics and
Lunches
J££   to keep
1 things nice
GIVE US A TRIAL
Phone 111
• Mr. H. Farmer and son, Leslie, left
this morning for Cadomin, Alberta,
where they will reside ln future.
* «   *
Mr. Findlay MacKinnon arrived iu
Cumberland during the week and Is
the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
A. MacKinnon.
.   .   .
Mrs. It. Strachan Jr. and small son
are here from Vancouver on a visit
to Mr, and Mrs. H, Mounce.
.   *   *
Arrangements have been made
whereby the "Red Widow" will be
produced in Campbell River next
week with very much the same cast
as was seen in Courtenay and Cumberland.
* *   •
Henry "Toots" Plump, a well
known ligure round Cumberland, left
this morning for Victoria where he
will reside in future. "Toots" wuh
one of the best all-round athletes In
Cumberland, and was a member of
tlie famous Cumberland United Foot-
ball team.
* *   *
The weekly teas in aid of tbe Cum
berland Tennis Club, continue to be
populnr. Yesterday's was given by
Mrs. H. Bryan and Miss C. MacKinnon
at the home of Dr. and Mrs. MacNaughton. Mrs. James Hick and Mrs.
J. H. Cameron will he joint hostesses
at next week's tea. which also will be
held at Dr. and Mrs. MacNaughton s
on Thursday. In the event of rain
the venue will be changed to Mrs.
Cameron's   home.   Dunsmuir  Avenue.
The Islander Is this week ln receipt
I of the following notice from Mr. John
I Hosie, Provincial Librarian and Ar-
jchivist, Victoria:
"Please broadcast the official information that Saturday, July 2nd,
{has heen proclaimed a Public Holiday
I by the Dominion Government under
■ Section 13 of the Diamond Jubilee Act
i and hy Proclamation of the Govcrnor-
lln-Councll issued May 18th and pub-
, lished ln the Canada Gazette, .May
|28th. 1927."
SCHOOL REPORT FOR MAY
(Continued  from   Page  One)
Beautifies all your Floors antl Linoleums
quickly, without stooping, kneeling, or even
soiling your hands.
Price complete, with Johnson's Lamb Wool
Mop for spreading Wax;
$48.50
Kent it or buy it from
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
itSj^w^*.^-.— ■_—__ .__ ^,^^^,—ur^^sttSirtcrWrtiij.
iijaiiv,— ■—.-•— _*.-*._*. „*.■_*.■_*. ■_,_.__* _—_;_.' w^w_^^;i*srt»s5Kijs
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '.o-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems i'or relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Rod Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection,
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director,
■aE=8=s****eMWW»ww»«aK^^
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladies' hair cut, any ityle 60c
Children's hair cut any style Ke
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM  MONTREAL
To I'lyiiioulli-Clieibourg-London
Antonla June 17        Ascanla June 24
1'»  larifiist-l.i-icrpo-il-t'ln-iKow
Athenla June IT      'Auranla June 21
KltOM NKW YORK
To Qiicenslonn nnd Liverpool
Scythla June Is"        Samaria June 25
To llicrbmirg and Southampton
Afiuitania June 22, July 9, Aug. 1
Borengnrla June 2Ci July 20, Aug. 10
••Mauretanla July tl, 27, Aug. 17
To Londonderry nnd Glasgow
Caledonia June 18
Transylvania June 25
To  Plymouth-Hillre-London
Caronla June 18     Carmania June 25
FROM BOSTON
To Qneonstoivn and Liverpool
Samaria June 20        Laconia July 10
* Glasgow and  Liverpool only
*>* Calls at Plymouth, east hound
Conducted
Tourist third cabin excursion
GLASGOW  &° LIVERPOOL
"S.S. Andania"
from Montrenl July 8
Ocean Fare Single $95
Return JJ5170 (plus tax)
Leaving Vancouver July 2nd, personally conducted by Mr. Frank
Lefeaux  of our   Vancouver  office.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Full Information from local agents or Company's Offices, 622 Hastings St. W„
Vannouver, B. C.
Sr.  3—Masako   Iwasa.  Charlie  Choe.
Betty O'Brien.
Division  IX
C. Carey, teacher. No. on roll, 34;
lates, 3; perfect attendances, 24; percentage of attendance, 95.6.
Honor cards, Jr. 3—Cameron Wilson. Albert Hicks. Violet Scavardo
(progress). Sr. 2--Norma Cavellera,
Itouald Spooner, Minoru Nakanishi
(progress).
Division X
P. Hunden, teacher. No. on roll.
39; lates, 12; perfect attendances. 14;
percentage of attendance, 91.58.
Honor list, Gr. 2 Sr.—Fanny Toi.
Bertie Marshall, Dorothy Hunt, Gilbert Davis (improvement). Gr. 2 Jr.
—Dorothy Prior and Jack Thomson.
Dorothy Lobley, Charlie Scavardo
(improvement).
Division XI
J. E. Robertson, teacher. No. on
roll. 37; lates, 5; perfect attendances,
16; percentage of attendance, 92.85.
Honor list, Jr. 2—Lizzie Baird. Sr.
1—Evelyn Stacey. Jackie Williams.
Guy Curwen. Dennis Shields; Dot
Thomson and Dot Smith (Improvement).
Dlvlsoin XII
C. Richardson, teacher. No. on roll,
36; lates, 5; perfect attendances, 21;
percentage of attendance, 90.34.
Honor roll, Gr, IA—Jenny Cheung,
Masato Sora, Kakulchlro Suyama.
Gr. IB—Belle Wong, Chlzuru Okuda,
Toyoko Yano.
Division XIII
Eva G. Drader, teacher. No. on roll,
30; lates, 9; perfect attendances, 10;
percentage of attendance, 88.
Honor roll—Ethel Shellito, Barbara
McNeil, Laureen Freloni, Lilian Saunders, Frank Mobley, Marguerite Good-
all.
CAMPBELL RIVER NEWS f
*—* <!*
Miss Madeline Swan Is it present
visiting with frlendB here.
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Holmon returned
early In thc week to their home at
Santa Monica.
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Wolfe and
Miss Slgna Holm, of Seattle, are at
present guests of irr aud Mrs. Zelgler.
Mr. and Mrs. David Van Slonc returned from a short visit to Victoria.
Miss Mildred McQuillan, of Ilerlot
Bay, visited here early in tllc week.
Mr. C. A. McRae left Wednesday for
Vancouver.
Mrs. C. E. Witter and Mrs. Brooke
and families, of West Vancouver, nre
visiting here for a few weeks.
Mr. Robert Shouse, of Vancouver,
is at present here on business.
The Misses Elln and Lillie Thulin
entertained at a Variety Shower in
honor of Miss Ruth Wlckstrom on
Wednesday evening last. The following guests were present; Miss H. M.
Feeney, Mrs. Carl Peterson, Mrs. L.
W. Weeks. Mrs. M. Peterson, Mrs. D.
M. Parkes, Mary Louise Parkes, Mrs.
C. H. Fitzgerald, Mrs. E. Gillespie,
Mrs. Jas. Parkin, Mrs. E. H. Masters,
Mrs. J. Brunton, Mrs. J. Mort, Mrs.
Annie McNeil Sr„ Mrs. Carl Thulin,
Mrs. E. Sundnulsh. Mrs. R. Olson,
Mrs. N. C. Pease, Mrs. W. A. Crawford, Miss D. A. Townsend, Miss G. M.
Smith. Miss B. Landry, Mrs. 11. Zelgler. Mrs. Allan Cross, Mrs. F-. Gran-
lund, Mrs. N. J. Johnson. Mrs. E.
Banner. Mrs. J. English, Mrs. J. S.
Wallace. Mrs. M. Morrison, Mrs. Robt.
McCualg, Mrs. J. R. McNeil, Master
Charles Duncan McNeil, MrB. F.
Smith. Miss Mabel Smith, Mrs. E. Lee,
It Pays to Deal at
Lang's
Specials in
VaguuM
BottleS
Bathing Caps
Large assortment of styles and colors
Prices range OP-       d»-|   *>{?
from       LiOKu to -Ipl.^O
I-pt. size. Green, special  96<>
1-pt. size, Nickled, special .... .S51.16
1-qt. size, Green, special   $1.98
1-qt. size, Nickled, special .... $2.57
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Have you cashed your Discount Bonds
Miss Margaret Forbes, Miss Madeline
Swan, Mrs. Chas. Thulin, nnd .Misses
Elln nnd Lillie Thulin. The bride-
elect was the recipient of many useful and pretty gifts.
CAMPBELL RIVER, June 8.—The
school picnic hold out on the Spit on
Friday afternoon gave much pleasure
to the parents as well as to the children. Much credit is due Mr. und Mrs.
Ivor Parlltt, Miss Mayne Feeney and
Mr. Jas. Graham. The following were
winners of prizes:
Girls race, 6-8 years—1, Flo Mc-
Callum; 2, Kathleen Masters; 3. Lorraine Forbes.
Boys' race, 6-8 years—1, Gordon
Forbes; 2. Herb MacKenzie; 3, Doug.
Suiter.
Girls. 9-12 years—1, Anna Peterson;
2, Edith Wilson; 3. Venus Hall.
Boys.   9-12  years—1,   Willie   Gran-
lund; 2, Ernest Banner; 3, Albert
Peterson.
Girls, 13 years up—1, Marguerite
Dawson; 2, Evelyn Wlckstrom; 3,
Margaret English.
Boys, 13 years up—1. Clarence
Zelgler; 2. Jack Furniss; 3. Edward
Van Stone.
Girls relay race—1. Marguerite
Dawson. Ruth Olson, Margaret Forbes
and Evelyn Wlckstrom; 2, Mary Kuwaiti. Venus Hall. Viola Hall and Ena
Beach.
Boys relay race—1. Rupert Fitzgerald. Clarence Zelgler. Jack Furniss
and Lloyd Higgins; 2. Clnyton Lee.
Henry Peterson. Willie Grnnluntl and
Ernest Banner.
Boys wheelbarrow race—1. Jack
Furniss nnd Rupert Fitzgerald; 2.
Clarence Zelgler and Lloyd Higgins;
3. John Haiuborne and Harold Olson.
Girls wheelbarrow race—1, Verona
McNeil and Elsie Wlckstrom; 2. Mur-
giiret English and Evelyn Wlckstrom.
Bovs three-legged race—1, Allison
McNeil and Willie Granlund; 2. Ernest Banner and Edward Van Stone;
3, Henry Peterson and Albert Peterson.
Girls three-legged race—1, Venus
Hall and Mary Kuwald; 2, Ena Beach
and Viola Hall; 3. Ruth Olson and
Anna Peterson.
Boys sack race—1, Clarence Zelgler; 2. Rupert Fitzgerald; 3, Allison
McNeil.
Girls sack race—1, Ruth Olson; 2,
Marguerite Dawson; 3, Evelyn Wick-
strom.
Girls shoe scramble—1, Ruth Olson;
2, Bernice Crawford; 3, Marguerite
Dawson.
Boys Bhoc scramble—1, Harold Olson; 2, Allison McNeil; 3, Campbell
Crawford.
Egg and spoon race—1. Ena Beach;
2. Marguerite Dawson; 3, Evelyn
Wlckstrom.
Boys potnto race—1, Jack Furniss;
2, Lloyd Higgins; 3, Willie Granlund.
Girls potato race—1, Margaret English; 2, Evelyn Wickstrom; 3, Marguerite Dawson.
Boya H-mile race—1, Clarence
Zelgler; 2. Willie Granlund; 3. Lewis
Joyce.
Girls Vfc-mlle race—1, Margaret
English; 2, Marguerite Dawson; 3,
Viola Hall.
Boys high jump—1, Clarence Zelgler; 2. Jack Furniss; 3, Edward Van
Stone.
Girls high jump — 1, Margaret
Forbes; tie for second between Anna
Peterson and Margaret English.
Boys broad Jump—1. Jack Furniss
nnd Clarence Zelgler, tie; 2, Rupert
Fitzgerald.
Girls hop, step and jump—1, Ena
Wlckstrom; 2, Margaret Forbes; 3,
Marguerite Dawson.
Boya hop. step and jump—1, Clarence Zelgler and Jack Furniss; 2,
Rupert  Fitzgerald.
Married Ladles race—1, Mrs. Chas.
Thulin.
GIDEON
HICKS
FamouB Canadian Baritone, In Operatic, Classic and Modern
Songs and Ducts, with
DOROTHY LETITIA HICKS
Lyric Soprano, In Song Selections in Costume
BEATRICE HICKS, Accompanist
One Night Only
Thursday, June 16th
GAIETY THEATRE
COURTENAY
Admission:  Reserved Scats, $1.00
General: Adults, 76c; Children, 25c
Mason & Rlsch, Canada's Greatest Concert Grand Piano, used.
■■

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