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The Cumberland Islander Jun 9, 1923

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 TT
ISLANDER   tl
With which Is consolidated the  < umberland News.
FORTY-SECOND  YEAR.—No.  23.
CUMBERLAND. BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 9th, 19J3
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Strenuous Game
Ends In 2-All Tie
ROYSTON NEWS
Nanaimo and Ladysmith Play
Spectacular Game Last week-
End.—Game    replayed    this
—Week-End.
When two football teams can keep
fully three thousand people out of
their Beats for a good part of the
game, standing up to see every possible play, aud applauding, imploring and advising, they are playing
football that Is worth seeing, and
that was what huppened last Saturday afternoon, when Ladysmlth and
Nanaimo City battled full time for the
first game tn the Connaught Cup series, oach getting two goals, and then
took the fleld for an even faster fifteen minutes each way. without either
team being able to add to their score.
During the last fifteen minutes, the
play was as fast, or faster, than at
any other period. The crowd would
be on its feet, all ready for the big
yell, a sure goal in sight for, perhaps,
Nanaimo, when, with whirlwind
quickness, the play would he switched
to the opposite end of the field, and
tho other goal in just as much danger
within the space of. sometimes, a
minute. That was really the kind of
play that went through most of the
match. There was comparatively little mid-field play, but a dlug-donc attack and defense, predominated, with
many bursts of perfect combination
thnt took the ball from tho danger
zone, up the field, and almost through
the posts. In fact, until the very last
minute, it was anybody's game. When
tlle full time had been played, the
crowd refuse to move. Both teams
went off the field, thinking that their
work for the day wns over, but Referee Jones knew his business. He
had received Instructions to run the
game half an hour over-time if necessary, and he proposed to do so. Officials of the D. F. A., the match committee, were present, and backed up
Referee Jones, after a rest, of six minutes, again got in action, and furnished a thrill for every minute of
the halt-our.
CUMBERLAND TOURISTS
VISIT THE GREAT
CENTRAL LAKES
A group of Cumberland tourists
visited the Great Central Lakes last
week-end and had a most enjoyable
lime, according lo reports brought
hack. Thc fishing was excellent, the
weather all Unit could be desired and
the scenery—magnificent, lt Is Indeed
o great pity thnt our own B.C. people
do not know enough of the wonders of
this portion of Vancouver Island.
Thousands of dollars are spent annually by tourists from our own province travelling further afield and not
seeing half of the wonders of nature
that are to he obtained by a short holiday touring Vancouver Island.
Messrs. Symonds and Splttall. we
arc Informed were tho heroes
amongst the fishers. Doth of them
being heavy on Ihe big fellows. The
Office Dog wnnts to know "bow much
they cost them by the pound?"
Amongst the Cumberland party
were noticed, Mr. and Mrs. W. P.
Symonds, Mr. and Mrs. R. Splttall.
Mr. and Mrs. Halllday, and family.
Mr. und Mrs. Ledingham.
The Board tennis court, being erected on the property adjoining Capt.
Ash's for Messrs Idlens and Ash, ls
Hearing completion, and will be one
ot the finest board courts on the coast.
The court will be for rent by the
game and It is also intended to run
a series of "Moonlight" dances during thc summer.
MAY KILL DOG
IF FOUND CHASING
OR WORRYING SHEEP
Attention ls being culled by the
government to the regulations governing the keeping ot dogs. In sheep
protection districts all dogs must be
licensed and anyone may kill u dog
found worrying or chasing sheep. The
owner of the dog Is nlso subject to a
line of $r>0 upon summary conviction.
Hon. T. D. Pattullo states that he is
determined to Increase the number of
sheep ln the province, so that It will
not be necessary to Import millions
ot dollars worth of mutton annually.
300 FOREST FIRES
REPORTED SO FAR
So far this season 300 forest tires
have been reported to the government
nnd while none hns assumed alarming proportions, Btlll Hon. T. 1).
Pattullo, minister of Lands, ls sending out fresh warnings all over the
province for citlzciiB and officials to
be more careful. If the magnificent
forests of British Columbia are to he
conserved the public must co-operate
to the fullest extent.
Dr. R. P. Christie, the well known
local dentist, Is building a residence
at Royston, and expects to be able
to move In, sometime In July or August. A great deal of other building
is going on also at Royston, and the
campers at the Beach are busy getting their places ready for the close
of school, when It is expected there
will be the usual number of Cumberland   people  in   residence  here.
Canadian Colliery Employees'
Annual Picnic To Be
Held Saturday, July 21st
THIRD SATURDAY IN JULY IN EACH YEAR HAS BEEN
DECIDED UPON AS THE CANADIAN COLLIERIES
EMPLOYEES PICNIC—A RRANGEMENTS ARE WELL
ADVANCED.
Mr. R. C. Lang, the Cumberland
Druggist Is contemplating building at
Royston, having sold his residence In
Victoria.
COMMUNITY CLUB
GARDEN PARTY
A strawberry tea, under auspices
of Royston Community Club, will be
held In the grounds of Mr. and Mrs.
F. Wllcock, Royston on Wednesday,
June 20th from 3 to 6 p.m. Good music will be provided and for those
who desire it, tennis may be Indulged
in.
A moat important meeting wis held
on Sunday morning last In the Lecture Hall of the Athletic Club when
the employees of the Collieries Company, met to decide and make   arrangements for their Annual picnic.
A representative gathering went Into
details fully, with the result that the
arrangements are well In band.    So
much   confidence   was   expressed   tn
the  officials  of  last    years    picnic,
(which was conceded to be the best
ever held in the district), that prac-1
tlcally the whole of these    officials .
were re-elected.   The following will
comprise the executive committee:
Hon. President, Jas. M. Savage; Hon.
Vice-President, Thos. Oraham; Presl!
dent.  Ed.    Hughes;    Vice-President,
George    O'Brien;    Secretary,    Chas.
O'Brien; Treasurer, E. D. Pickard;
Director of Ceremonies, Chas. Oraham.
Charman, reception committee, D.
R. MacDonald; Chairman, refreshment committee, Oeorge O'Brien;
Chairman Transportation committee,
H. L. Bates; Chairman Sports Committee, James A. Quinn; Chairman
Programme Committee, John Q.
Quinn; Chairman Grounds Committee, Andrew Pollock; Chairman Life
Saving Committee, Jas. W. Tremlett,
Judges (First Aid), Dr. MacNaughton, Dr. Hicks and Dr. Millard.
Starters:—Th(jfe. Graham, Dr. O.
K. MacNaughton, Jack Quinn.
Judges of Sports.—A. Auchlnvole,
Tom Cunliffe, Sandy Walker, A. S.
Jones, J.  Sutherland, H. Waterfield.
NANAIMO MINER
LOST HIS LIFE
Cumberland School Report
Div. I. Gains Shield 98.26
cent.
per
A Nanaimo youth, Albert Mortimer,
aged Nineteen, was killed on Monday last, whilst at work In the mines
at Nanaimo, falling in front ot a
train of moving trucks.
PRESENTATION TO
MRS. J. W. COOKE
Well-known     Local    Resident
Honored on Saturday Last.
Mrs. J. W. Cooke, wife of the popular postmaster of Cumberland was
the recipient ot a handsome laather
lined ctub bag, at a reception held In
her honor on Saturday last at the
home of Mrs. E. R. Hicks, who together with Mrs. C. Tarbell, Mrs. C.
Parnham, Mrs. G. K. McNaughton and
Mrs. A. C. Lymn were the hostesses.
The rooms were tastefully decorated broom and purple violas being the
predominant colors. Whlst was played
for a short time, the successful winners being Mrs. J. Emily and Mrs.
L. Nunns.
Tea was served immediately after
cards, many more guests coming In at
the tea hour.
On behalf of the guests, Mrs. C.
Parnham presented to Mrs. Cooke a
beautiful leather lined club bag, and
an illuminated address with the following  Inscriptions:
" Mrs. J. W. Cooke:
"On Hie occasion of your leaving
Cumberland, we, the undersigned,
ask you kindly to accept this gift as
token of our friendship and esteem,
wishing you and your family happiness and success:
Mrs. T. E. Banks, Mrs. H. Bryan,
Mrs. C. J. Bunbury, Miss M. Brown,
Miss B. Bryden, Mrs. J. Cameron.
Mrs. C. Campbell, Mrs. G. W. Clinton, Mrs. W. H. Cope, Miss V. Campbell, Mrs. A. B. Drader, Mrs. F. Dal-
by, Mrs. Jno. Emily, Mrs. Jno. Fraser,
Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. J. Frame, Mrs.
T. Graham, Mrs. Genge, Mrs. E. R.
Hicks, Mrs. J. Halllday, Mrs. P. P.
Harrison, Mrs. S. Harwood, Mrs. J.
Hood, Mrs. A. E. Jeffrey, Mrs. A. 0.
Lymn, Mrs. W. Leversedge, Mrs. G.
Ki McNaughton, Mrs. I, Mordy, Mrs.
T. H. Mumford, Mrs. F. Q. McCarthy.
Miss M. Mordy, Mrs. A. R. Nunns,
Mrs. L. W. Nunns, Mrs. C. Nash, Mrs.
W. A. Owen, Mrs. E. Pickard, Mrs. F.
Partridge, Mra. C. Parnham, Miss C.
Richardson, Mrs. T. Scott, Mrs. J.
Shortt, Mrs. J. E. Spicer, Mrs. C. H.
Tarbell, Miss M. Tarbell, Mrs. J. Walton, Mrs. J. J. Weir, Mrs. J. Watson,
Mrs. J. X. Wlllemar, Mrs. Urquhart."
Mrs. J. W. Cooke is the daughter of
Rev. and Mrs. J. X. Wlllemar, of
Sandwlck, and is a native daughter.
Mr. Cooke, for the past nine years
has beeu postmaster here, and much
regret Is felt at his departure to accept a position lu Vancouver.
Div. I Entrance.      George E. Apps
No. on roll 33. Attendance 98.26.
Lates.—None.
Neither absent nor late.: William
Brown, Ellen Burns, Lorna Camp
bell, Alex Clark, Elizabeth Clunliffe,
Oresti Frelonl, Marjorie Grant, La-
land Harrison, Beth Horbury, Mabel
Jones, Leslie Merrilleld, Olga Owen,
Vera Picketti, Olive Richardson,
Norman Robinson, John Strachan,
George Brown, Albert Gomm, Helen
Parnham,
Honor Cards:—Proficiency: Edith
O'Brien, 78 per cent; Beth Horbury,
74 per cent.; Ellen Burns, 72 per cent
Caroline Gozzano 70 per cent.
Progress:—John Strachan 14 per
cent. ;■ Albert Gomm, 12 per cent
j         G.1
N. V. A. NOTES
Meeting every Tuesday
at 7.30  p.m.,    visiting
1   members  of    all    ex-
» service  mens'  drganl-
$&£&
m zatlons are welcome to
S attend.
r                    •    •   «
<5M8|S^
9 The G. W. V. A. Club
CANA0A
"*•• a. ■«-'■•
is open every evening
from 7 p.m
to 11 p.m. for ex-service
men only.
all returned men are ln-
vlted  to become a member of this
club.
*    *    *
Div. II. Marion H. Pearse
No. on  roll,  39. Percentage 94.07.
No. ot lates 1.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Isao Abe,   Willie   Bennie,    Lilian
Banks, Jessie Brown, Charlie Bobba,
Mary Conn, Alma Conrod, Leslie Dando, Archie Dick, Norman Gomm, Mary  Gozzana, Walter    Hughes,    May
Hughes,    Margaret    Halliday,    Jean
MacNaughton,    Alastlr    MacKinnon,
Kate Robertson, Edna Smith, Gordon
Walker, Robert Yates, Willie Mossey.
Honor roll: Seniors.—Charles Bobba, Margaret Halllday, Jessie Brown.
Juniors: Jessie Grant, Isal Abe, A-
lastalr MacKinnon.
Div. HI. May 1923. H. C. Murray.
Sr. Grade, 1st and 2nd Term.
No. on roll 41.
Percentage of attendance 92-11.
Lates.
Perfect attendance: A. Class. Norman Bateman, William Davis, Sam
Davis, Fred Leversedge, Jean Peters.
Geo. Raga, Margaret Richardson.
B. Class: Peter Bardessono, Andrew Brown, Ella Conn, Harold Con-
rod, Joe Ducca, Jack Horbury, Low
Man, Wm. McNeil, Emma Picketti,
Josie Plrozzlnnl, John Sweeney,
Charles Tobacco.
Honor list: A. Class: Sam Davis,
Victor Marlnelll, Marguerite Strutli-
ers.
B. 'laiis: Kathleen Cooke, Mabel
Williams, Josie Pirozzlnl.
ILO-ILO CLOSES ON
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Div. 4. M. E. Beckwith.
No. on roll 30. Per cent attendance,
94.16 per cent.
No. of lates 1.—4th term Intermediate.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Sadakl Asao, Isuneto Asao, Louie
Hartoldl, Edna Conrod, Mary Clark,
Eleanor Davis, Nobuo Hayashl, James
Home, Lily Leveraedge, Chaarles Mac
Donald, Dick Marpole, Norma Parnham, Margaret Shearer, Mah Shun,
Sakayo Suglmorl, Fusayo Suglbort.
Honor roll: Norma Parnham 76%,
Mah Shun 75%, Eleanor Davis 69.8%.
Lily Leversedge, 69.4%.
Progress: Ethel Hunt, Sadako Asao,
Edna Conrod, Dick Marpole.
During  the  summer months,    the
Ilo-llo will close on Mondays, Thurs- ,
days of each week until further no- J
tice.
Div. 5. Marjorie Mordy
No. on roll 39. Per cent 92.83%. No.
of lates 1.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
(Continued on  page  7)
Tbe following extract from our
Provincial Command letter ot this
week will be of Interest to members
who wish to attend the Re-unlon
week celebrations. •<
We have JUst received an official
wire from our National Headquarters
advising us that the reduced rate of
one cent per mile over all railways
haa been authorized for the Dominion
Convention. The selling dates for
B. C. are from June 30th to July 2nd,
return limit July 15th. Tickets will
be obtainable on presentation ot
Identification certificate issued by the
Dominion Command. We have wired
our National Secretary to make a
large distribution of these certificates
to all branches, thus making each
man who wishes to attend Reunion
Week, a delegate to the Convention,
but limiting the voting power to paid
up per capita of the branch. We
would therefore respectfully request
that all branches make their per capita tax returns up to date, to this
office immediately.
Arrangements have been completed, tor the Drumhead Service to
be held on July 1st, at which Canon
Scott, D. S. O. of Quebec,'wlfl take
the service, assisted by other overseas Padres.
On Monday July 2nd, the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia
will open Re-unlon Week, after which
a Military Sports Programme will be
gone through with and a special display given by the Royal North West
Mounted Police. It Is expected that
Wednesday afternoon will be devoted
to Sports and Competitions amongst
ex-service men and members of the
American Legion. An International
Boxing Bout Is being arranged for
the same evening. The Vancouver
Riding and Driving Club and other
organizations are preparing tor entertainments during the evenings of
that week. On Saturday, July 7th, a
grand rally of all ex-service men will
take place and presentation ot prlz-
COAL PRODUCTION IN B.C.
Coal production ln British Columbia during April shows a marked falling oft as compared with the March
figures, the decline amounting to
05,246 tons. The weakness ot the
market is reflected ln the output ot
each ot the three chief coal fields of
the province. At present there are
no signs of improvement. All the
Vancouver Island mines are working
half time and the crews of most are
being reduced. The only exception
to this ls the East Wellington Coal Co
operated by J. Grant, which Is included among the producers tor the first
time and which mined 1044 tons. The
Canadian Collieries (D) Limited and
the Western Fuel Corporation of Canada are the most affected in this
field. The Crow's Nest of the Eastern
Interior seems to be facing the neces-
city of slowing down also as production there has dropped from 79,509 to
56,651 tons.
The effect of slackness in trade
has knocked about 6000 tons off the
Canadian Collieries output at Comox,
7,000 tons at Extension and over 1,000
at South Wellington. It has sent
down tbe production ot No. 1 mine,
Nanaimo, Western Fuel Corporation,
hy approximately 5000; of the Reserve mine some 10,000 tons; and of
the Wakeslah several hundred tons.
It has curtailed the Cassidy Colliery
output, Granby Consolidated Mining
& Smelting Co., about 2,000 tons and
the Nanoose Wellington Colliery some
1,000 tons while even . the King &
Foster Colliery, Nanaimo shows several hundred tons less production
for April as against the March sta
tlstlcs.
Props Out of List
In the Nicola-Princeton district the
Fleming Coal Co. appears to have definitely dropped out of the list of producers. The Mlddlesboro Collieries
show a reduction of several hundred
tons and the Coalmont Collieries
mined about 2,000 tons less in April
than ln the previous month. The
Princeton Coal ft Land Co. is the only concern ln this fleld that has the
distinction of showing an Increase,
although the Improvement Is not substantial.
Practically the same Btory applies
to the Crow's Nest. The Coal Creek
Collieries show a reduction ot 7,391
tons; the Michel of 15,460 tone; and
the Corbln Coal ft Coke Co. has about
the same production. Incldently It
may be said that the output of coke
at Michel fell off In April by about
4,939 tons.
Picture Dedicated
To Chief Parnham
Attraction At Ilo-llo One of Absorbing Interest—Well-known
Players Included in Cast.
High upon the balcony she stood,
a grim spectre outlined by the search
light against the flaming, smoking
walls! Down In the teeming street,
a riot of panic and disorder, stood the
father, struck to the heart by terror
as he saw the smoke engulf his
daughter and blot her completely trom
view.   Then the thrilling rescue!
That, briefly, Is but one of the terrific action situations In the great
fireman's melodrama "The Third
Alarm," which opens on engagement
at Ilo-llo theatre Friday and Saturday, where It will be officially dedicated to Chief Parnham of the Local
Fire Department and the brave and
loyal men of his command.
' "The Third Alarm" ls a companion
picture to "In the Name ot the Law,"
a police drama of unusual proportions
which ls still entertaining millions ot
theatregoers throughout the world. It
ls built on the Bame huge lines with
far more thrilling action than was
developed ln the production which
immortalized the American policeman.
Emory Johnson produced both productions, impelled by his long and
fervent regard for policemen and lire-
men, to whom, he thought, the public
owed a great debt of gratitude which
it had long neglected to pay.
While "The Third Alarm," has been
invested with truly magnificent love
interest and stupendous dramatic
thrills, it also shows what hazards the
fireman confronts, how he struggles
manfully to support his family, how
he goes to his duty, no matter how
great the danger, and how, In the
end, the public Is all too likely to
forget what a fine and noble work
the fire-tighter has achieved. At no
time, does Mr. Johnson become preachy. "The Third Alarm" ls lirst ot
entertainment, but in the development
ot his homely theme, Mr. Johnson has
gone far beyond the mere individuals
with whom he has told his story and
shows the noble and unselfish instincts which actuate the average
fireman in the pursuit of his duty.
In the cast are such well known
players as Ralph Lewis, In the role ot
the veteran fire-fighter; Johnnie
Walker, Ella Hall, Richard Morris,
and others. F.B.O. Is distributing the
production.
OPENING OF NEW WING
ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL
St. Joseph's Hospital, Comox, will
be the scene of a reception, Grand
Bazaar and Garden Fete, when the
New Wing will be officially opened
on Wednesday, June 13th at 2.30 p.m.
The sisters and Ladies' Auxiliary
of St. Joseph's Hospital earnestly request all friends, former patients and
the public tn general to accept this
cordial Invitation to be preeent on
this momentous occasion.
Grand Bazaar and Garden Fete
At the grand bazaar and garden
Fete which will be held ln connection with the opening ot the new wing
there will be numerous stalls and attractions including apron stall, fancy
work, fish pond, home cooking, ice
cream and a guessing competition,
for which a grand prize will be given.
There will also be a clock golf competition that will appeal strongly to
the men, for which prizes will be
given.
A Business Mens supper will be
served at 6.30 for which a charge of
50c will be made.
GARDEN PARTY
WEDNESDAY NEXT
The garden party to be held on the
lawn at the vicarage of Holy Trinity
Church on Wednesday next Is expected to be quite a social affair. The
ladles are sparing no pains in their
efforts to make it a success. The
grounds surrounding the vicarage
have been greatly Improved this
spring and summer, and patrons of
the garden party to be held on Wednesday, June 13th will be able to en-
Joy themselves amidst pleasant surroundings.
Fruit Salads, lee Cream and afternoon ten will he served. There will
also be one or two novelty Ideas In-
trodu'eed—8 gnrgnln In every novelty.
SOCIAL THIS EVENING
NO SERVICE SUNDAY
The Grace  Methodist Church   will
: be closed for the morning and evening services, owing to a delay In the
! arrival ot the new minister. Sunday
j School will be held as usual at 2.30.
A whist drive and dance will be
held tn Ihe Anglican Hall tonight
(Friday) commencing at 8 o'clock
sharp. Whilst the weather Is a little
warm for dancing, there Is sure to
be a good crowd present, as lhe
whlst drives held at thc Anglican Hall
are amongst thc most popular held
In the district. Whlst starts at 8 and
dancing at 10. Refreshments will be
served.
SCHOOL TRUSTEES TO
HOLD SPECIAL MEETING
Information ls sought as to the
whereabouts of the following Comrades:
Wilbert Hammond 35. Battalion and
3rd Machine Gun Co. 482087 Pte.
Chas. Frederick Ferguson, 25th Battalion.
Pte. McLeod, 15th platoon D c|o
72nd Battalion C. E. F.
SUCCESSFUL PARTY
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dangerfield and
son Fred arrived on Monday trom
Port Angeles on a visit to MrB. Dang-
erfleld's sister, Mrs. T. E. Banks.
Miss Juanlta and Mr. William Danger-
field arrived on a visit from Victoria.
The Ladles Aid of Grace   Metho-
< dist Church held a very    successful
Garden Party and afternoon tea on
Wednesday on the spacious lawn of
Mrs. H. E. Mounce.   The attendance
was   large,   weather   delightful.   No-
' vclty trees quite an attraction. Straw-
: berries and Home Cooking delicious.
| Receipts    J75.00.   which    apparently
satisfied the expectation of the Ladies
In charge of the day.
It ls said that the courteous ob-
: llglng  and  up-to-date  waitresses  of
! the Girls Club had a great deal to
do with the success of the afternoon.
Alex. MacKinnon, Secretary of the
Board of Trustees of Public School
has secured thc following resignations :
Misses lleckwlth, Harrison. Colman and Dalton to go into effect on
June 30th.
Mr. C. B. Wood. High School Principal wns granted 12 months leave ot
absence at the last meeting or the
Trustees.
The Cumberland Board ot School
Trustees will hold a special meeting
in thc Public School on Wednesday
evening to consider the applications
received for positions on the Public
School  teaching staff. ■■■■
TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  JUNE  9th  1923
News of Courtenay and Surrounding  District
BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
THIS WILL KILL
ROOT MAGGOTS
Saves   Cabbage,
Etc.
Cauliflower,
The garden.—Just about this time
lhe gardener Is Betting out his cabbage and cnultflower plants. Often
he has trouble with the root-maggot.
To prevent this make a solution of 1
oz. of bichloride of mercury to 10 gallons of water.
Preparation: Take 1 gallon of boiling wnter and place it in an earthenware, enamel, or wooden receptacle;
crush the mercury salts and tie in a
piece of cheese-cloth nnd suspend just
under the surface of the boiling
water; when dissolved add balance of
the water.
Application: The (Ulute polBon may
bo conveniently carried in n coal-oil
ran or similar container and applied
first application three days after the
plants have been set In the fleld by
pouring a small quantity of the poison at the base of each plant (thc
surface of the soil should be moistened round and touching the plants).
About Vi pint of the poison is ample
for each plant at the first application.
Give three further applications at ten
days intervals.
Note.—This mixture Is poisonous
and corrosive nnd must be handled
with great care.
Small Fruits.—When you are hoeing or cultivating in amongst cane-
fruits nt this time of the year you will
notice that some of the young Bhoots
are beginning to droop. Upon examination It will be found that tho shoot
has been girdled a short distance
from thc tip. This is caused by thc
raspherry-enne maggot (Phorbln ru-
hlvoro). When stalks are noticed that
hnvc been uttacked they should be
removed and destroyed.—From "Agricultural Journal published by the
Department of Agriculture.
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Amolee have relumed to Shushartle after spending
the past two weeks with Mr. and Mrs.
Thos. Bcchensell, Comox.
Mr. Thomas Booth left on Tuesday
for Vancouver to spend a week's vacation. Mrs. Booth has been there
for some time.
r—
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
WHITE COAL
Use White Coal during the hot months—
— We Stock —
RANGES, PLATES, TOASTERS, FANS, IRONS, ETC.
RADIO PARTS
FIXTURES, WIRING, ESTIMATES
Call and Inspect Our Stock
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Phone 164
Courtenay
Prevent=
Forest Fires
The fires that start each summer might have come
from YOUR cigarette-stub.
Thc Forest charred and burned might have been the
result of YOUR camp-fire.
The wooded hillsides might have been blackened by
.    YOUR lighted matches.
The burned farms might be the wages paid by YOUR
thoughtlessness.
Idle logging camps might be the result of YOUR momentary carelessness.
If forest fires annually destroy our natural wealth, if
money is to be spent in fighting fires instead of
building up the Province, then the loss is YOURS
and that of the generations to come. Be careful.
IT   PAYS
AS SEEN BY COURTENAY
Cumberland 14.—Courtenay 9
Last Sunday the Cumberland Baseball team visited the fair city of
Courtenay and though the miners
scored more runs than the cowboys
It was not the fault of the boys of the
Valley Hub. Misfortune could not
have overtaken the team at a more inopportune time, for the cowboys were
there with the batting eye, annexing
fifteen hits oil Larson and Hunden,
an eveu dozen being obtained off the
delivery of the port sldcr. It was
certainly unfortunate that Smith who
started on the mound for Courtenay
could not continue. He delivered
only two balls, then retired In favor
of Johnny Robinson who "lasted
quick." Then the surprise of the
gome was sprung when Johnny Cummins went into the box. Nobody
knows exactly what John had on the
ball, but he had some of the Cumberland boys looking foolish. Then
Courtenay's prodigal who did the
heaving for his new teammates has
nothing to write home about on his
performance ot last Sabbath.
If the harvest of hits secured makes a pitcher a cussess
then the newest acquisition of the
Miners surely delivered the groceries. Twelve hits in six innings is a
real record and the Cortenay boys
say that is as near as the left handed
one will get to a no hit no run game
this season. There were some good
fielding stunts on both sides but the
Cowboys will have to Improve ln the
base running department. Tucker
James at second sack tor the visitors
fielded his position in superb fashion
and Brown for the homesters caught
his best game this season. Andy Robinson and Millard also fielded well.
Hughie McLean had nothing to do in
the garden. There were three hundred baseball fans present. Mr. R. 11.
Dixon umpired and came through
Uie ordeal without being hit with any
pop bottles. Courtenay goes to Powell
River on Sunday, the 10th instant for
a league game with the papermakers.
There has been only one league game
played to date the Cowboys winning \
that one, so the loss of the game last
Sunday does not affect their leadership In the league race. It Is hoped '
that the regular lineup will be In ac-
tlon next Sunday and that the boys
will bring home the bacon.
OBSERVATIONS OF A
FEDERAL MEMBER
NO CELEBRATION
DOMINION DAY
The regular meeting of Courtenay
Assembly, No. 3, Native Sons of Can-.
ada was held on Monday evening last
when it was decided that Instead of
holding a celebration on Dominion
Day, the members of the Assembly
would go to Powell River in a body to
help the good people of the town
across the gulf to celebrate Canada's
birthday.
May 18th.—A. W. Neill (Comox-Alberni) moved the adjournment of the
House for the purpose ot calling the
attention of the Govt, and the House
to the claim that the Powell River
Paper Co. had discharged offflclals ot
the local Papermakers Union aud
had notified all members that unless
they surrendered their chartor before
the 20th Inst, they would also be dismissed. .
Mr. Neill pointed out that there was
no strike on and that the right of
workers to form a union had been recognised for many years and that
to seek to forbid such organization
by threat of discharge was tho surest
way to make men turn Bolshevists.
The Minister of Lubor promised to
take the matter up and the Premier
supported the rights of tho men.
Later reports Indicate that an official will bo sent up to Investigate
matters fully on thc ground.
May 23rd.—Budget debate ended
after 13 days discussion. Allowing
for holidays, 8 days of actual debate
in which 61 members took part. Mr.
McMuster, Liberal member for
Brome, announced he would no longer sit with the Liberal party as he
considered they had not kept their
promises of Free Trade which he
considered should be immediately in
troduced. Mr. Hudson, Liberal from
Winnipeg also announced that he
would not support the Govt, on the
Budget because It was not Free Trade
enough.
The Premier in the final speech
declared that the Country could not
adopt a policy of ahsolut free trade
at the present time with the United
States having such a high tariff wall
against us.
On thc amendment proposed by the
Progressives declaring for free trade,
the vole was 61 for the amendment
and 162 against it, the Conservatives
voting with the Govt, against the
Progressives.
On the main motion, the passage
of the Budget, the Conservatives nnd
Progressives united against the
Govt, for very opposite reasons, thc
Conservatives because the Budget
was not enough protection and the
Progressives because it was too much
protection. The vote was 114 for the
Govt, and 106 against, a Blim majority of 8.
Thc whole membership of the House
was cither present or paired with
the exception ot 3 Progressives absent, and one seat which is vacant.
The Budget does not offer very
much for benefit of BrltlBh Columbia,
except the bonus on copper rods
which will stimulate the development
of the copper properties on Vancouver Island and the Mainland, but to
defeat the Govt. In favour of a Free
Trade amendment does not seem to
offer any Improvement.
St. Joseph's Hospital. Comox
RECEPTION AND OPENING OF NEW WING
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13TH AT 2.30 P. M.
The Sisters and Ladies' Auxiliary of St. Joseph's
Hospital, Comob, earnestly request all friends, former
patients, an dthe public in general to accept this cordial invitation to the Formal Opening of the New Medical Wing on Wednesday, June 13th, at 2.30 p.m.
Grand Bazaar and
Garden Fete
APRON STALL, FANCY WORK, FISH POND,
HOME COOKING, ICE CREAM, GUESSING
COMPETITION
Grand Prize
PREPARE YOUR CHILDREN
NOW FOR THE
Summer Vacation
totototototototo
WE STOCK
CHILDREN'S BLOUSES — CHILDREN'S SHOES
CHILDREN'S HATS and CAPS,
CHILDREN'S TIES
AND OTHER GALA-DAY WEARING APPAREL
We can also outfit adults and our Prices Are Right
Open Saturday Night till 10 o'clock
totototototototo
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
Mr. Walter Woodhus and Miss
Woodhus, of Oyster River, were In
town on Thursday.
Say It with moonshine—the flowers
will come later.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars In for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with beat
"Service," reasonable prices,
and beat and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B. O.
FOR SALE
FOR      SALE-FISHING      LAUNCH.
27' 6" x 7' 6". Equipped with 6—7 |
Palmer Engine. Complete with galley stove, trolling poles, anchor and {
painter.  This  launch  has a large
raised deck,  forward cabin,  bulkhead amidshlp and raised deck engine cabin aft.   Just   been   over- I
hauled and repainted Inside    and |
outside. Offered    as    bargain    for I
quick  sale. Enquire P. 0.  Drawer^
430.   The   Islander  or   Phone    27,
Courtonay.
FOR SALE—CHEVROLET CAR, 490 j
model in splendid condition. Price]
$400. Terms arranged. Apply P. O.
Box No. 2, Cumberland, B. C.
J.tel
FOR    SALE:—HOUSE    IN    FIR8TJ
Class  condition,    containing    live]
rooms, parlor, etc. For further particulars, apply P.O. Box   326,    or|
phone 164, Cumberland, B. C.
FOR SALE-BARRED ROCK HATCH I
ing Eggs, from good layers. 10c each. I
Apply Stalkers Ranch, Happy Val-f
ley. Phone 93 M.
FOR SALE—ONE KITCHEN RANGE]
and Two Heaters. Apply to Mrs. J.\
Dando, Derwent Avenue.
J. 9.  *
HOUSE AND FURNITURE.—APPLY!
to Mrs. Edward    Jones,    Penrith |
Avenue.
J. 9.
FOR SALE.—A GOOD SECOND 1
hand piano, made by Fisher, Newl
York. Tuned and delivered to youi I
house. (150.00. Terms arranged I
Marshall Music Co., Cumberland!
and Courtenay, R. C. J 16 f
Speaking
of Service
—Do you know that we not only make Delicious Chocolates
and all sort of Delicious Candy.
—But likewise we serve Light
Lunches and Ice Cream.
—BUT. This is a Confectionery j
Store.   That is a Joy to all,! for   sale—Chevrolet   tour-J
who know it I    lnB Car ln A' h Bhape' Price *mM'
wno Know n. p 0 „ox 343 Cumberland B c
FARM TO RENT.-70 ACRES OO■!
Ing concern, 12 cleared and fenced]
and In crop this year. Over ar I
acre in bearing Orchard, owneij
took more than 1200 last year. Four!
roomed house, two large barns, 51
cows, team, chickens, etc.—1360 pel j
annum for two or five years.
—FARM FOR SALE, COMOX.-
One Acre, % cleared and all fence* I
spring water and buildings foil
quick sale at Kye Bay. $1100. cash I
Apply F. R. Fraser, Blscoe, Courte-1
nay, B. C. T.f.n J
Bee
Confectionery!—
WANTED:—HORSE, HARNESS ANtl
Buggy. Horse must be suitable fori
general  ranch  work.—C. J.  Fern
mice, Happy Valley Road.
COPKTBNAV, tt. C.
Next to Malpaa & Wilson
FOR RENT:—FOUR ROOM HOUSE]
and two room cabin (Beaver board]
ed) Apply 100V4 Dunsmuir Ave.
J. 9. SATURDAY,  JUNE   9th   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
1"°
THREE
Mmttttkw.kMlt
AcUttuUuv
Maintains Itself
SootH.ith.aUn
These Quicker Shaves
Mean Younger Faces
FREE
Enjoy 10 quicker,
easier shaves at
our expense
Ordinarily, shaving ages the skin—adds
years to a man's looks. By giving them a
shaving cream soothing to the skin we
wiped years from millions of men's faces.
At the same time we cut down shaving
time for them.
We spent 18 months—made 130 experiments—perfecting a cream with 5
distinct advantages:
It softens any beard in one minute—
without rubbing-in.
Multiplies itself 250 times in rich lather.
Lather lasts, if necessary, 10 minutes—
doesn't dry away.
Strong-walled bubbles hold hairs erect
—for easier cutting.
And the after-effect is lotion-like—
skin-soothing.
That's why millions of men today use
PALMOLIVE SHAVING CREAM.
We ask you to try it at our expense. Test
for yourself the truth of our claims.
Mail coupon for
free 10-shave tube.
OFFICE CAT
BY JUNIUS
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
Montreal, Que.        Toronto, Ont.        Winnipeg. Man
PALMOLIVE
SHAVING CREAM
10   SHAVES   FREE
Simply fill in your name and null to
The Palmolive Company of Canada, Limited
Depi.    D   Toronto, Ont. *
404
Cascade
OR
U. B. C. Beer
PURE FULL-STRENGTH BEERS
*Ub
&F-fc
REVISION OF VOTERS LIST
Comox  Electoral District
NOTICE Is hereby given that I
shall, on Monday, the 18th day of
June, 192.1, hold a Court of Revision,
for tho purpose of hearing and determining any and all objections
against the retention of any name or
names on the Register of Voters for
the Comox Electoral District. Sucb
Court will be open at the Court
House. Cumberland, at 10 o'clock In
the forenoon.
Dated at Cumberland, B. C. May
7th, 1923.
JOHN   BAIRD,
Registrar  of Voters.
They Wear Well
On the Market as long as the Oldest inhabitants remember and still the most
POPULAR    BEERS
Sold in British Columbia
Do You Want
to Marry
ContlJdental details. No trifling.
Highest references. Honorable. Helpful. Only bureau in B. C. Use assumed name at Ilrst, if desired, to save
enibburrassment. Write The Ruth
Foster Syndicate, Box 340 Vancou.
ver, B. C.
Two Epitaphs
Here lie two men, who we agree
hove won the out-class bonnet,
The first of them blew out the gns.
The other stepped upon it.
Here lies an early riser,
Who nevermore will squirm.
He thought he was the early bird;
Fact was, he was the worm.
* #     * •
"Who is the meanest man In the
world?"
"The guy who proposes, to an old
maid over the telephone and after
she accepts htm, tells her he has the
wrong number."
* *     *
I'n strung!
"You can't string me,"    said    the
green bean to the cook as the twine
fell off of the wrapping paper.
* *     «
Society girls, says Thomas should
remember they will soon be 28
years old and looking for a job.
* *     «
When the family wash was hung
on a Courtenay clothesline the other
day, says Jepson, nearly a dozen Pullman towels fluttered in the breeze.
«     «     *
When  Mother  takes In boarders,
Paw should be known as the deadhead of the house.
* *     * •
The fellow who goes around looking for trouble, usually labors under
the Impression that he Is in pursuit
of happiness, says Robertson.
* *     *
Richards says If you will keep a
stiff upper lip you will not run any
chance of showing false teeth.
* *     *
"Did you notice her father's brogue?" "Notice It! I felt It!"
Golfing adds to a man's physical
assets. It also increases his liabilities, thinks Dutton.
* *     »
Lelder says the differences between our last year's suit and our
this year's suit Is merely a matter of
time.
ft 4 ft
Germany is sending us canary
birds much to the delight of American cats.
* *     *
Hero—Any man who lets other
people lie for him.
* *     •
Spanktlfled
They called It the wool-shed
Back In our boyhood years;
But  we'd  always shed  while  there,
instead,
A quart of salty tears.
* *     *
Think often of your friends; but
talk about them rarely—and thena
only of their virtues.
* *     *
A man is your friend, when knowing your sins, he can keep a closed
mouth.
* *     *
No, Barney Google, a spark   plug
isn't always full of carbon.
* «     *
Jlggs says the man who boasts that
hardship made him what he is, ls
determined that his son shall have a
much easier time.
* *    *
"Ah, this will be confining employment," remarked the prisoner, as he
entered his cell.
Any man who drinks liquor in Turkey gets thirty strokes of a whip.
Over here he Is liable to get just one
stroke—of paralysis.
* *    •
That sardine cannery that is adopted efficiency methods might study
the way a street var conductor
handles Ihe situation.
* *    *
What has become of the contended
housewife? asks Tlmkins.
* ft     *
Passing of Ihe Horse
I'd hate to be a horse fly,
And with the horse flies buzz;
Tho picking for the horse fly
Ain't what It used to was.
* *     *
Sparkes says some of the new neckties remind us that long whiskers hod
their uses.
* *     *
There are more highflyers on the
grounds than in the air.
Sharks says there is no broadcasting station like the neighbor woman
who hears a piece of scandal.
* *     *
Even if a girl does not want to get
married she usually likes to be engaged.
* *     *
Jones advises that, when in doubt
whether to kiss lhe lady good night,
you should give yourself the benefit
of the doubt.
* •     *
"It takes so little to make an editor happy," says Merrilleld. "Just
tell the poor boob that you read one
of his articles and you need not say
you liked it; a smile of child-like joy
will pervade his whole being.
* *     *
Kennedy says it's those getting up
exercises thnt bother us ot a morning.
.     .     .
It is sometimes fortunate that the
"life of the party" doesn't know what
the other members of the party think
about him, Leider has discovered.
* *    *
A lot of us would be gentlemen if
we could only hide our meanness.
* *    •
It ts estimated tbat alarm clocks
added 500 cuss words to our language.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Old Friends Are Best
Leave Your Order at any Government Store   —
WE   DO  THE  REST
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leaving Cumberland at 8 a.m.
1 oz. or 1 ton ?
One ounce of Royal Baking
Powder is worth a ton of
cheaper baking powders
when you consider the superiority in the quality,
healthfulness and taste of
food prepared with it.
P. P. HARRISON
lturrister and Solicitor
Notary PubUc
CUMBERLAND - • B. C
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    (leaning    .    Repairs
Telephone I.     •     F. 0. Bex 17
CUMBERLAND, B. 0.
Baking IWder
Made from Cream of Tartar
derived from grapes
Contains No Alum—Leaves No Bitter Taste
MADE IN CANADA
1
For Results Advertise in The Islander
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WM.MEBHIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
nunsmulr Avenue, Cumberland
Impossible For You to Get More
Tire Value—Needless to Get Less
DUNLOP
TIRES
Matchless
Minimum price ot first-clans land
reduced to $.r. an acre; second-class
to $2.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which Is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with Joint residence, but each
making necessary improvements on
respective claims.
i'ro-emptors must occupy claims
for five yearB and make Improvements
tn value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivation ot at least 5
acres before receiving Crown Orant.
Where pre-emptor ln occupation
not less than 3 years, and has made'
proportionate improvements, he may,
because ot ill-health, or other cause,
be granted intermediate certificate of
Improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent
of $360 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than fi years, and improvements of $10.00 per acre, including
5 acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Orant
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land In conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory Improvements
made and residence maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as homesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial Bites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate of one-half of
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purchase price, is made.
I're-Kmptors' Free (irants Act.
The scope of this Act is enlarged to
include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the helis or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under Ihe Act Is extended from for one year from the death
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege Is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions
are due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes nre remitted for five
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 1014, on account of payments
fees or luxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest ou agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March .11, 1920.
Sub-Purchasers of Crown Lands
Provision made for issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers nf
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase. Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Application*
must be mnde by May 1, 1920.
Grazing
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock Industry
provides for grazing district* and
range administration under Commissioner. Annual grazing permits issued based on numbers ranged; priority for established owners. Stock-
owners may form Associations for
range management. Free, or partially free, permits for settlers, campers
or travellers, up lo ten head, FOUR
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   JUNE  9th  1923 ',
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning al
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY,   JUNE  9th  1923
BETTER NOT SAY IT!
Bad news travo* faster than good
news. There Is an old saying, "No
news is good news." Let a man be
converted at a church service and
there is not much of a stir, but let a
resident be convicted of some crime
and the news leaps by word ot mouth
from ono end of thc community to the
other.
How thoughtlessly unkind wc sometimes nro when neighbors ot ours
suffer misfortune! Troubles arc
bound to come to us all III some
shape or form and what we say about
our friends and ncquaintanscs today
may apply to us tomorrow. News Is
no respector of persons.
We arc prone to consider the ways
of others not our ways when we
should he watching our own step.
What folks say of one another sometimes hurts more than anything they
could have done. News, either good
or bad, grows and becomes exaggerated and distorted with peddling.
When thc news is good It makes no
material difference how it is exaggerated or distorted—It can never do
anyone positive harm. But bad news,
given wings, may bring sorrow and
ruin upon people who certainly arc
not deserving a punishment beyond
the penalty of their mistake.
More charity for others will mean
more charily for ourselves and we
will gradually come to take a keener
delight in reporting something good
of some person than something bad.
Good Is constructive, bad is destruct
ive, Just before you are about to let
out a bit of "bad news," stop and
think a moment. See if you can't
think of something good to say in
place of it. The chances are ten to
one that you can and that you will.
PESSIMISM TO THE FORE
"The owlet. Atheism, dropping his
blue-fringed lids, and hooting at the
glorious sun in heaven cries out:
•Where Is it?'" So said Coleridge, or
something like it.
The sun was there, in the heaven,
nevertheless; il always will be there
—the sun of hope, truth, aspiration;
the healer of all evil humors, the
source of light and life.
But day by day we read, or hear,
the despairing proclamations of
those who. If they have not wholly
lost sight of tho sun of faith which
vivifies humanity, behold It only
through darkened glasses.
Thc mournful wail from Europe
is practically unanimous. The appeals to Justice and rational human
effort to find a way of national salvation arc half-heartedly made. Confidence in work and virtue seem to
have been lost. Leaders who strove
with titanic strength and sublime
courage during the' war, now are
babbling for ghostly help, for the assistance o fthe gods, lest clllvlzatlon
sink into the void of barbarian chaos.
Where is the guiding, saving, vivifying sun? Just where lt always has
been, where it always will be—In the
heavens of human consciousness.
Of course the world Is sick-
through its own fault—but It has
been healed of infinitely worse sickness in the tremendous past. And the
gods did not heal it. Men healed lt of
all its Ills. The advice of Hercules to
the carter still holds. By labor we
reach the stars, is as true today as
at any time through the past centuries.
Mr. Lloyd George is wrong, Dean
Inge is wrong, Dr. Spurr is wrong;
all the blinking bands of English,
German, French. Italian and American hooters at the—to them—obscured sun of righteousness and progress are wrong.
God never failed thc world unless
men failed tn themselves to justify
their right to inherit thc glories of
the earth.
THE MENACE OF
THE HUSTLER
A prominent Englishman in addressing the students of thc Royal College, recently took for his subject,
"The Menace of the Hustler." Here
is a new theme and one worthy of
discussion.
Today mankind is so anxious to
find short cuts to everything that we
haven't time to devote to the quiet
contemplation of things, which Is the
only means of gaining stability and
wisdom.
The danger ln this age is hurrying,
but there Is no short cut to tho
trained mind of the artist, and work
done in a hurry Is never half so well
done as that at a steady pace. A general desire to speed up everything,
get everywhere, do everything, see
and hear everything In the shortest
possible time, with the least possible
trouble to ourselves, puts us all at
the mercy of the hustler.
We spend our lives getting In each
other's way, treading on each other's
toes, trying to get hold of each other's
belongings, and generally behaving
In an undignified manner. We call
this human progress, and we are
proud of it. We know it Is uncomfortable and unhealthful; we all know
we would rather be alone In the wilderness, contemplating nature In Its
majestic loneliness, but we all say the
same: "Give me city life; give mc
mankind in the bulk."
UNVEILING MARTIN MEMORIAL
Ahovc,  C.P.S.K.   "Entprcu  ol   Scotland"  arriving-   at   Qu
ing prior to tht unveilint.    Inact, th* Memorial.
WHO was Abraham Martin'.' Had that question
been asked one year ago probably not one Canadian in a hundred thousand would have been able to
answer it. Today it is different. Most Canadians now
know he was first King's pilot on the St. Lawrence
river, and the first known Canadian of Scottish extraction—two claims to distinction cither one of which
might have made him famous. Latterly other things
to his credit have come to be known, and they will be
recorded in their due place.
ln the meantime is it not remarkable how little
Canadians know of Canada's history —us rich a bit of
nation history as ever was crowded into a space of
three hundred odd years. Thc high points of the
splendid story some of us know fairly well, but the
little byways and side-lights, so full of human interest
they lie in a deep obscurity from which they are being
rescued one by one, ut the patient digging nf this or
that person or institution actuated by a love of tin
heroic past and a realization of its value in building
the national life of the future.
Abraham Martin was some figure of a man in his
day although most of his just claims to farm- seem to
have been thrust upon him. It was hardly more than
a matter of accident that thc "Plains of Abraham"
should come to he named after him, atul yet that was
plenty to set all good Canadians wondering who he
was and what manner of life he led. Much digging
in the archives of Quebec, and there are none more
interesting or more faithfully kept, has brought out
much information about the man and his times. He
was born In France, his father being a Scot, which is
probably why Jesuit writings of the times refer to
him as "Abraham Martin, called the Scot." His father
probably came from Perthshire and was one of the
Scottish Guards of Louis XI. In 1014 Abraham brought
his French wife to Canada and that he saw the actual
founding of New France may be gathered from the fact
that his name was on the list of the 31 white persons
who lived in Canada from l(>2n to 1632, and he was
than known as a pilot.    He later had ten children
tbtc.   Briaw, F. L. Wanklm of the C.P.R. ><draaa« Ike IaUter-
from whom have come a vast number of descendant!
among whom are numbered some of Quebec's best
families and leading citizens. Bishop Tache of St.
Boniface is one of his descendants in direct line.
Champlain gave Martin a deed to thc farm land nn
the Plains of Abraham, and documents telling of his
living there still exist. He apparently travelled greatly
up und down thc river for Cape Martin in the Gulf
of St. Lawrence is also named after him.
All this was distinctive enough to justify Uie memorial which has been raised to Martin in tbe Harbor
Square at Quebec. The handsome shaft of granite,
designed by Henri Hebert and T. Roxburg Smith,
whs unveiled early in May by Hon. Athanase David,
Quebec's Provincial Treasurer and the event was
marked by a gathering of notables including the Governor of Quebec, Sir Charles Fitzpatrick. Among
those who spoke were F. I.. Wanklyn, representing
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company by whom the
memorial was erected. Lieut.-Col. Alex. Fraser,
A.D.C. to the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, Lawrence Burpee, President of the Canadian Historical
Society and Monseigneur Laflamme, Cure of the
Basilica, The latter spoke as the successor of the
first Cure of Quebec who was Martin's parish priest
and who was afterwards martyred by the Iroquois.
He read the baptismal certificate of Abraham Martin's
first child who was also the first white child born in
Canada. He also read the baptismal certificate of
Martin's third child upon which appeared the name
of Samuel de Champlain as godfather. The memorial
has been set up by the Canadian Pacific in honor, not
only of Abraham Martin but of the stout-hearted
pilots who for over three hundred years have done so
much to make the St. Lawrence River a safe and
speedy route to and from Europe. That Company
uses the route more than any other, and the arrival
at Quebec of the great liner "Empress of Scotland"
on her first trip of the season with 731 passengers
from Europe later in the day of the unveiling emphasizes what has been accomplished in the making of
the St. LawTencc route a great highway for ocean
home commerce.
WJWM
McMullen
Dorothy Dare and
Billy Burke Dresses
In SILKS, CANTON CREPES and CERPE
with PAISLY SILK WAISTS
Gingham and Organdie Combinations
Newest Styles Arriving Weekly
FRENCH LINGERIE
Gowns in Fine Nainsook Hand Embroidered
BLOOMERS, BOUDOIR PYJAMAS,   UN-
DERSKIRTS STEP-INS ENVELOPE
CHEMISE
SILK LINGERIE in Camisoles, Envelope
Chemise Step-ins
Undervests and Bloomers
SILK HOSE—
Special Bargains in odd lines of Ladies Silk Hose
Values to $2.75, to clear, per pair	
MENS' DEPARTMENT
New arrivals in Mens' and Boys' SUITS, HATS, CAPS, SHIRTS
SHIRTS.
I
$1.25
and   SPORT
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Pure Strawberry Jam, 4 lb. tins .... 90c
Raisins, seeded and seedless, 15 oz
pkts. 2 for  35c
Greengage Plums, in heavy syrup
2V/s tins 2 for 55c
Nice juicy Oranges, 3 doz. for....$1.00
Rolled and Boned Shoulder Hams
in piece per lb  28c
Royal Crown Cleanser, 2 tins 25c
Sesqui Matches, per pkt 40c
Camouson Sour Chow and   Mixed
Pickles, per bot _ 25c
Fresh   Tomatoes,   Cucumbers,   Head
Lettuce, Bananas, Grape Fruit,
Cherries, Rhubarb, Green Cab-
Picnic Plates, etc.
THE  PRUNING OF ROSES    growths,   the   branches
In the culture of roses, the quality
of bloom depends not only upon good
varieties and rich soil, but on a careful system of pruning. One may
choose between a crop ot many small
blooms or a smaller number of fine
flowers. Some varieties require
harder pruning than others, but no
rose bush should be allowed to pass
the spring without pruning. Branches that have been damaged by the
winter weather are no longer ot use
and should be removed. The small
thin branches do not produce bloom
and they should also be taken out If
left on the bush they will take up
the nourishment that should go to the
stems producing roses. Besides removing the dead wood and the weak
should be
shortened. It ls a very good rule,
with bushes that are well established
to take of fall wood that ls smaller
than a lead pencil. In young bushes
When  removing limbs egoo   c
such hard pruning is not desirable.
When removing limbs they should be
cut close to the main stem, that is,
without leaving stumps. Strong
growing Hybrid Perpetuals require
less pruning than some of the other
sorts, as If heavily pruned they tend
to a more vigorous growth of sappyp
wood, making an even larger bush
than before. Moderate pruning ls
therefore better for roses of this
class.
Under the head of pruning, Bulletin No. 17 of the Department of Ag-
SE
it
a
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People  Trade
Strawberries
Fresh picked Vancouver Island Strawberries arriving Every Dar.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR PRESERVING
BERRIES
NOW
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford
J. Walton
rlculture at Ottawa, entitled "li
Roses," explains that roses   ol]
hardiest group nearly all blooii
wood of the previous year's gfl
or wood several years old.    It j
commended   that,    ln    addition
heading back and thinning out,
well to remove some   of   the
wood each year, cutting the bra
out at the ground, thus making
and letting in air so that the
stems will develop well.
FORESHORE LEASE
Nanaimo Land District
District    of  Newcastle,    Vane
Island, B. (;.       ' j
TAKE notice that the Co:
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limit
Victoria, B. C, occupation
Owners, intend to apply for p
sion to lease the following dei
land:—
Commencing at a post plant'
feet North (Ast.) from the
West corner ot Lot 1, Newcasi
strict, Vancouver Island, B, C.'
approximate high water mark
point of   beginning,    thence
(Ast.) to low water mark, an
«
xlmate distance ot 752 feet mi
less, thence meandering alon
said low water mark, northei
northerly, northwesterly and j
westerly to the Intersection ot i
produced North (Ast.) from th
boundary of said Lot 1, thence
(Ast.) to approximate high '
mark, a distance of 168 feet n
less, thence northeasterly, ej
southeasterly and south w
along Bald approximate high!
mark to point of beginning, ail
taining in all 42 acres more a
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (1
MUIR)  LIMITED. •    I
Date, May 14th, 1923.
Albert  Crompton Lymn,  A
J>
RHEUMATIS
BANISHED BV OHIROPRA
See Me at Clarke's Resident
Union Hall, Any Day Bert1
4 and ft p.m.
E. 0. HAl'KEDAL, Chlropr SATURDAY,  JUNE   9th   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
lol
FIV1
Howdy folks, "Saved by a hare,"
said the little bunnies as their mother hid them from view.
.    *     .
"Street-car plunges off the track"
So ran thc headlines bold tonight,
Now that they have got It back
Just where did the elcctrlc-light?
* *     *
Jackmnu thinks the meanest man in
the world Is the ono who Is too honest to praise thc possession another
man delights in.
.     .    ■.
Ruddle says In a small town there
are very few things more important
than the committee on refreshments.
* *     *
Right in the faces of the new graduates, Tonikins says a college man is
ono who studies Greek and ancient
philosophy for four years and comes
home uud works In his father's grocery store.
* *     *
"Scclcts Racing Car Instead of Wife"
Philadelphia   Pa.   Ledger:   This
may also turn out to be a flivver.
+     *       *
Why go on a vacation, asks Bryan,
when for the same sum of money you
can he equally uncomfortable nt
home?
* *     *
Sins disappear as conditions change
There are fewer Peeping Toms ln
this era of sleeping porches.
* *     *
Thc reason Ideas die quickly tn
some heads, thinks our Cop Is because they can't stand solitary confinement.
* *     *
It takes a lot of nerve, however,
for a country strangled by red tape
to scold a country strangled by red
theories.
* *     *
The world probably Isn't getting
wiser. It just seems thnt way because there Is less reverence for
oratory.
* *     •.
One consolation about the longer
skirts; the mosquitoes won't have
such an easy time of It this summer.
»     *     *
Well, By (ium!
The manager of a Tennessee electric railway claims to have received
the following letter:
"If tho simpering, snub-nosed,
tlght-sklrted, face-be-daubed, tittering little ninny, who stuck her gum
on the street car seat last Thursday
evening, and permitted me to sit
down on it, will call at my office In
the x building, she can have the
gum back. It Is on the southern
front of my spare trousers. It she
can't get the gum off, she can have
the pants too.
* *     *
When a profiteer sings his national anthem, the public Is expected
to stand and deliver.
Man is the only creature endowed with reason nnd a yearning
to do things his reason tells him are
harmful,
* *     •
J. L—r says "I cannot sing the old
songs—I've forgotten the words.'
* *     *
Jones says when a man begins to
talk enthusiastically about the old
days, what he really moans is the
old nights.
It Is all right to lay up treasures ln
the next world, but don't forget the
Insurance policy in this, suggests
Murray.
.     *     *
Henry Ford has bought a glass
factory. Cameron hopes he intends
to make some ot his trucks out of
glass—maybe it will Induce the grocers' delivery boys to back out of an
alley more carefully.
*     *     *
Correct this sentence: "These bis-
quit," said the groom, as they began
their first meal at home, "are the
finest I ever tasted."
CHANGES MADE IN BRITISH FOOTBALL RULES
The proposed alteration regarding
substitutes taking the place of Injured players hy arrangement heforo
the start ot a match, providing the
match Is not In any competition, was
agreed to.
The proposal that when the taking
ot a free kick all players with thc
exception of the goal keeper, stand
outside the penalty area and inside
the Held of play and no plajcr with
the exception of the kicker can approach within ten yards of the ball
■also was agreed to.
FOOLS AND FOREST FIRES
Tommy and Tony  were two prettty
pets;
They went to the woods    and    they
smoked  cigarettes.
They tossed matches here, and they
tossed the stubs there.
Till suddenly wicked flames filled all
the air.
These flames burned the forest;- they
burned up the crops;
They burned up the homes and the
factories and shops.
They burned up the church, both the
nave and the steeple;
They burned up thc village, and, alas!
many people.
Now when you go  into  the    foreBt
shades, cool,
Don't as Tommy and Tony, act like a
tool.
Don't be careless with lire, don't toss
cigarettes,
Then the foreBt won't burn and you'll
have no regrets.
As for Tommy and Tony,   they'd   c-
scaped once before,
And carelessly thought they could do
tt some more;
But found, to their sorrow, public feeling had risen,
So, now,    they    are    spending    six
months ln a prison.
JAMES   LAWLER.
SLAT'S DIARY
By Ross Farqnhar
Friday—Had a lot of Xcitement after skool was left out. Wile we was
on are way homo Pug
and Jake gets Into a
flte and Jake blacked
Pugs eye and Pug
nocked 4 teeth out for
Jake & lt wood of ben a
lot better flte only they
was 2 men cums along
and divides them and
made them stop. Jake
got a little bit the wirst
of the deal but Pug
was a good sport. When
ever he nocks a fellows
teeth out or any thing
he never runs oft like
a quitter but stays and
helps pick them up.
That ls if you nre one of his good
friends.
Saturday—Tonite ma had the hed
ake and as she lied on the davlnport
she had pa read to her by request
frum a book of pomes and etc. They
was a lot of foolishness and all I can
remember was sum thing about H-ell
has no Fury like a woman's Corn.
Then I went to bed.
Sunday—Forgot my bath las nite
and had to take It this morning. The
most dlscomforble thing about take-
ing baths is that no matter how many you take they are all ways just
us many left ns they were before you
tuk them.
.Monday—2 new kids cum to skool j
today witch had ben adopted by a'
mini and his wife. They have ben or-
fants ever since the deth of there!
parents. 1 of them is a nice looking
girl and If I do what I am tawking
about Jane is a going to have a op-'
pertunity of getting jellus.
Tuesday—Uncle   Hen   has   bought
him a house here in town and he sed i
he got a bargan and the real estate ,
Co. ls so generus and fair and etc.
They have got it drew up In the con-
tract so that any time he fails    to
make up his payments they will take
the proplty off his hand.
Wensday—Went to the pitcher
show tonite and tawk about a good
pitcher, It was a Cereal and before
the 1st real was done 8 men was killed and all threw the show the hot
and cold Chills run up and down my
Spine. Ma Is done but pa says we
will go nex Wensdny nite.
Thlrslay—Sum 1 rung are door bell
und I herd a bay ast pa did he want
to by a Flrey Cross and he replyed
and sed No 11 Is plenty warm In here
now. Cum back nex fall. Ma & me
casted glnnri s at each another.
JACK MINER
ON CONSERVATION
"I am a forest conservation first,
last and all the time," said Jack Miner, the noted wild-life advocate, in
a recent Interview. "A man could't
run fast enough to give me a home
where the trees are already grown.
I want to grow my own. Ihave studied the woods all my life, and, while
I have never read any booka on forestry, I have done some tall thinking
and studying In the woods themselves. In the last ten years I have
planted fully ten thousand trees on
my own place at Klngsvllle, and I
just want to say that I consider lt
one of the most Important and satisfying jobs I have ever done. The last
four thousand treeB I got I planted in
clay soil where trees wouldn't grow.
This had been proved because another fellow's father, and Uncle
Dave, had tried lt and found it
couldn't be done; but by old backwoods education refused to be discouraged. I planted these trees in
1914, and although, when planted,
they were no higher than ordinary
tomato plants, they are now, in the
eight year, twelve to sixteen feet
high, and the naked clay fleld, as it
was in 1914, now attracts the public
so, from far and wide, that I have
had to fence it in, something I never
dreamed of doing."
Dr. Prices' Baking Powder can sure
raise the dough. (Ad. not paid for.)
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
T.WHERRY
^TANNER
turn, test prlot U»t °t
werfc—fflanat In a
hMla. tn.
«2» Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, B, C. a
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
MAY WE SERVE YOU
AT OUR
SODA FOUNTAIN?
As we serve many others in Town and Country.
The Summer Comforts at our store will keep you
cool.
A delicious dessert which is all ready prepared for
you.—"We use the best to make the best."
Special This Week
FLORIDA DELIGHT SUNDAE   50 Cents
BKItM&WIEiaSlfflSEIBIEiai^^
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL STORE
Send us Your Mail Orders.—Phone 23.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
Summer Goods
Ladies Vests—Cumfy-Cut at 40c, 50c, 65c, 75c, 95c,
$1.15 and $1.25.
SILK-LISLE HOSE—in Black, Brown, Sand and White,
at 50c per pair.
COTTON HOSE—in Black, White, Brown 35c per pair.
SILK HOSE— 90c, $1.15 and $2.50 per pair.
CORSETS—in all sizes, $1.50, $245 and $3.50 per pair.
GINGHAMs—New colors and patterns, 32 inches wide
per yard 40c.
BATHING SUITS and CAPS.
MEN'S WEAR—Khaki Shirts and Pants in all sizes,
just the thing for the hot days.
CASHMERE HOSE—special at 50c a pair.
WORK SOCKS-^1 pairs for $1.00.
MEN'S CAPS—a good assortement of colors and shapes
UNDERWEAR—for the warm weather 90c and $1.25
per garment.
LECKIES SHOES—for men and boys.
A new stock of Curtain goods in Scrims, Muslins,
and madras just opened out.
Colored Bed spreads $3.75 and $3.00.
White Bed spreads at $3.50 and $4.25.
Linoleums, Carpet squares and Rugs.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
Our   Shoe   Sale
Is Still On
Your attention is invited to a few of the many
BARGAINS that are being slaughtered.
BOYS Strong ALL Leather School Shoes 11.12
and 13 (fin qa
reduced to       <P*Wa>«/U
Boys Solid Leather do. l's to 5's. Regular price $5.00.    IB
J8"" $3.50 . $3.90
Mens Heavy Work Shoes, Solid (fiA QA
Leather, reg. price $7.50 now selling at   «Jrt.t/U
Many other lines of Shoes on our Bargain Counter at
sale prices.
LOWEST PRICES ON OVERALLS—
Boys Bib, blue with white stripe and black per pair
Sl.OOand    1.25
Mens Overalls in black, and blue without bib at
tpl./D and tpZeZt)
Mens Overalls with Bib, in blue and white and black at
$2.25   and $2.50
NOW SHOWING LADIES SWEATERS, (in Pullover
and with Collar) in Pure Wool in the newest colorings
$3.50 and $4.75
Less than Vancouver Prices
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
FRANK PARTRIDGE
CUMBERLAND
BREAD!
We could not get along without it.
It's the old "Standby"—
Why? Because it is all substance and nourishment.
Because   it   satisfies   when
other foods do not.
Ours has a real bread flavor
and a good substantial slice.
Call up your grocer. He has
it.
Bread is your  Best Food-
Eat more of it.
Eat
Exclusively
Refraction and Muscular
R. Kaplansky, O.D
OPTOMETRIST and OPTICIAT
EYESIGHT SPECIALIST
Graduate Canadian Opthomc
lie College. Registered by Ext
initiation in B. C. Governmen
Board of Examiners. — Cor
sultations and office hours 1-
5.30 and 7 to 9.30 p.m., or b;
special appointment.
Phone to Cumberland Hotel o
HALLWAY'S BREAD     B. Forcimmer
•The Bread that Builds'*
NANAIMO, B. C.
TI4F   MFW HftMF !lBt and 3rd Monday and Tues
RAKERY day °f every month at
Wood for Sale
r.LEL0AD $6.oo
Any Length Requiied
Cumberland
Hotel
Parlors
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For l'rtcex to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 2020 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C,
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments ot than high-
trad* contectlom errlie tv.ry
two weeks, ensuring train goods
all the time.
Henderson's SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  JUNE   9th  1923
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, June 8th and 9th
At Last
The picture sensation
of the century
"TheThird
Alarm"
Don't miss this drama
of terrific emotions that
will shake every beholder
to the depths of the soul
Greater than the PASSION PLAY in its human appeal—greater than
a dozen dramas in its
stupendous thrills and
situations.
See the mad dash of
the Are horses through
the teeming city streets
See the thrilling rescue
on the swaying ladder
while hundreds look on.
Honest folks! This is
some picture.
r
HALPHvJLEWIS
,.„.,: /N A   THRtLUkS MOMENT IN     ,
VTHE ^HIRRIAMRM"
Modern Golf
^^(^rank^hompson
NOTED CANADIAN GOLFERS ^
«OLF COUEISM
3 reels of comedy will be screen ed with this big feature.
Matinee Saturday 2.30 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday, June 12—13th-
HOOT GIBSON
—in—
The Gentleman From America
here is a fast moving story full of excitement and brimming over with good clean
comedy.
Comedy pictures and other interesting subjects will be screened also.
I.
Coming next Friday and Saturday June 15—16th
"Hearts Aflame"
.
A forest fire so vivid you feel the heat and hear the trees fall, never in the history
of the screen has anything so vivid been attempted.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
—  ■   ■». ■   ...
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cats For Hire Phone 25
We Have Moved, and Are Now Situated Opposite the
Gaiety Theatre
Light Lunches and Refreshments After the Show.
Mrs. Corbett's Home Cookery
COURTENAY, B.C.        OPPOSITE THE THEATRE
Car   For  Hire
A( Reasonable Kales
The time element in golf 1ms more
In ilo  with Its fascination nnd enig-
raatic character than any outlier fac-
tor.   Substitute that moving hall for
lhe stationary one  (with the appro-
j iirinto changes in the club) and you
have, by  reducing the time element
i solved   the mystery  of golf.  Several
seconds  elapse  between   the  address
and tiie despatch of the ball in which
a thousand and one thoughts may oc
cur.    If there were no time to reflect
in golf during lhe execution  of the
| stroke, but II took place more or less
automatically  and  unconsciously,  as
is tiie case in tenuis or baseball, one
j would hear less about tiie psychology
j of the game. Golf is primarily a game
i nf propultion or muscular effort, or
j a:; physiologists would say, it has to
do principally witli the motor centres,
| tvheroas reflection has to   do   with
: what is called the Ideational centres
! of the brain.
Now when we refolect how a stroke
Is lo be made at tlio same time that
we make it, there is a certain opposition between the motor and ideational centres resulting in more or
less confusion. In playing golf the
problem is to allow the motor centres
o work while inhibiting all other
entres. When we play our best golf
we just play without thinking much
how it is done, and numerous professionals have testified that while
(Irinving the ball their minds were
more or less a blank. As one said,
"I tlinna think at all, 1 just swoop
her awa'."
Somewhat of this opposition is seen
in Ihe commonplace experience of
thinking how one stops when walk-
p ing down stairs, it slows up the
pace and sometimes causes one lo
' stumble. In the language of Coue we
substitute tiie words conscious and
unconscious.
All our moral, social and intellectual concepts are the result of the
| conscious, while the action of the vi-
: fa! organs, as well as digestion, etc.,
are lhe work of the unconscious. The
unconscious never makes a mistake
in Its work.   Although it is the en
gineer, It Is dependent on the conscious for Its material. It the conscious thinks of a "hunker," the unconscious takes lt nt its word anil
realizes Its suggestions. How this is
done Coue does not say, any more
than the physiollglst can explain how
his motor and ideational centres work.
Coue Is not Interested tn why or how
suggestions works, but more In the
fact that tt does. His contribution
has been in eliminating the element
Of effort. Whenever effort ls present
there is always a certain opposition
going on The efficacy of Coue's rosary Is to keep prominently before
us whatever is desiretl.
The golfer has the same problem.
lie must keep before him the desired end which is the ball. This alone
should occupy his attention. Attention from its very nature tends to
fluclutate. It will be difficult enough
to keep thc eye on the ball without
deliberately making lt more so by
thinking of bunkers which may or
may not enter Into the game.
When one looks at the flag and
then nt the bunker, the attention
fluctuates from flag to bunker, resulting In a certain confusion, and as
Coue says, the unconscious accepts
the stronger suggestion. All short
boles are for the most part mental
hazards and are designed purposely
to distract the player. It the bunkers were removed, the player would
realize how ridiculously easy some of
the present formidable looking short
holes are. Distraction may come from
having different lines. Aim In golf Is
something far more than getting the
feet In the right position. This is
clearly seen ln the case of those
holes where there Is an out of bounds
to the right. The player usually faces
away from tiie danger to avoid it, but
instead of playing iu the direction he
stands the tendency is still to think
of the out of bounds and unconsciously he alms in this direction. The result is usually a worse slice than before. In fact the stars try to reproduce the above conditions when they
deliberately try for a slice.
The putting green is a fertile fleld
for the study of golf psychology. Due
to the fact that the putt Is the last
stroke the mistakes of the green become more apparent. It is oftentlmc
the last chance to recoup oneself
against had play In the field. The hole
Is more or less a converging point.
Players become anxious and apprehensive, for they know what It means
io hole or miss a putt. We hope we
may hole lt but wc fear that we shall
t, The agitation Ib increased if
one hnppens to have a reputation for
bad putting. The task Is made Immeasurably more difficult If some one
Insinuates, while the putt Is about to
be made, tbat It Is going lo be missed.
If one is blesssed with a good putting style and ls able to ignore such
distraction, no harm Is done. But
for the person who is laboring under a bad putting spell such remarks
are almost criminal.
Confidence on the green is more
Important than anything else. With it
wonders can be accomplished, even
with a defective style. Without it the
most perfect mechanical swing is
rendered useless. Usually when a
player feels he can hole n putt, he
does so, and the converse ls true also ot missing one when the player
thinks it impossible of holing. Coue's
explanation Is that the unconscious
accepts our fears and doubts because
they arc stronger, nnd realizes them.
The cure ls to think success. How this
ls to be done is tho rub. lt will depend largely on the Ingenuity of the
player. So long as he eliminates effort and remains quiet and calm, thc
problem should not be insoluble
Nothing succeeds like success, and
this Is the reason why a champion Is
usually so hurd to dislodge from his
position. He plays wilh such confidence. The reputation of a formidable player is an additional handicap
for the young golfer to overcome so
long ns ho dwells on It. It has well
been said: "Cowards die u thousand
times before their death, the valiant
never taste nf death but once."
Next article  'EASE RATHER. THAN
EFFORT."
Sr¥!@l»9l»li<^^
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
1
I
I
I
g
s
EASTBOUND
SUMMER  EXCURSIONS
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
WINNIPEG
MINNEAPOLIS
$72.00
ST. PAUL
DULUTH
W. T. GOARD   I
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, II. (.
Comfort   and  Homelike   service.
20   rooms,   electrically   healed.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
11. YATES, Manager.
CHICAGO   HS86.0U LONDON   *118.?5
DETROIT $105.62 TORONTO  *1H.78
NIAGARA FALLS, 111130.62
MONTREAL   $132.75 QUEBEC   $141.80
ST. JOHN $160.80 HALIFAX   $1«6.»5
BOSTON, $158.50
NEW YORK. $147.40
¥13.00 additional for ocean trip between Vancouver-Prince Rupert on sale daily to Sept. 15th. Final return limit, October
3l8t,    Choice  of routes—stop-overs nnd  side trips
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PARK
$ 10.25 Return from Victoria
E,   W. BICKLE, Agent C. F. EARLE, D.P.A.
Cumberland, B. C. Victoria, B. C.
Canadian National Railways
aJSMBiaMBJBIBlBMSlTC
Nervousness
REMOVED HY  CHIROPRACTIC
At Clarke's Resilience.
Hours: Any OiiyhVluccn I uud 5 p.m.
E. o. IIAUKEHAL, Chiropractor.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S
WEAR
lialnl) Creations at llosl Keasniinlilo
Prices
Buy Here and Save Money
ARMSTHONIi'S-Cuinlierliiiul, II. C.
lOOiA Diinnmulr Street
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Hood and Uoods of Any Kind
DellTered to All Parts of District.    !
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TBLEPHONia I
TELEPHONE   M   TBLEF
*r Leave Orders at Yenilulue  lintel.
LUMBER
ALL   BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
Wi' Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Slab Wood
(Double loud)
$4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. K. Nn. 1 Cumberland
Phone   159
Night—134-X Courtenay
A friend of   L r, whose girl had
turned him down was heard mournfully to declaim this tragedy of
words:
"She has went,
She can never come to we
Her has gone,
Us can never go to she,
Her have left us all alone.
It cannot was."
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
L'nion Bay Road
NURSING HOME
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
IS TEAKS' EXPERIENCE
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Uurtenay, B.C.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor.  of  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite  Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
sraiaaaHBvaiaEiasisMEiBiB^^ SATURDAY.  JUNE   9th   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
ley
SEVEN
TheCost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical installation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There, has to be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the BEST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with the valves of the mains of this Company, therehy
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish tn point out that It is a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending purties he apprehended, they will he prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
THE INCREASING VALUE OF YOUR
TELEPHONE
YOUR TELEPHONE is of greater value
as each month goes by. With a steady
increase in the number of new telephones
you are constantly able to talk with a
larger number of people. This applies
to different parts of the province.
It means to the business man that he is in close
touch with more people. As every telephone is a long
distance telephone, anyone on the Lower Mainland or
Vancouver Island may be reached at a moment's notice.  The conversation is direct the reply instant-
Don't overlook the cheaper night rates. Between
7 p.m. and 8 a.m., you get three times the day period
at the same price.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Job Printing
OF THE BETTER KIND
We have the most up-to-date and best equipped
Job Printing Plant on Vancouver Island. Our Employees are specialists in their respective lines—and
we are the only Printers operating a straight Union
Shop in this district. Demand this label on your
printed matter.
TRY US WITH YOUR NEXT RUSH JOB
The
Cumberland Islander
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
LAWNS AND
LAWN MAKING
Written by Mr. Jas. E. Carter,
Guelph, Ont., for the Canadian Horticultural Council.
j    Damaged lawns should be repaired
| as soon as possible In the spring, so
j that the grass will get a good start
' before the  weather  becomes  warm.
| Early spring Is also a good time to
j make new lawns, although it is some-
| times better to grow some cultivated
I crop like potatoes and do the actual
seeding In September.   This will de-
' pend upon the character of the soil.
'    Not Infrequently   buildmg   operations result in a lnrge   amount   of
stiff sub-soil being spread over the
I surface of the    ground.    The    best
plan to follow under such    circumstances Is to plow or spade In a heavy application of stable manure which
has become well rotted, with a liberal application of bone meal added.
Hare patches In established lawns
may he restored by scarifying the
soil with an Iron rake and spreading
grass   seed   thickly.   Depressions   In
the lawn can be removed by cutting
out the turf and adding good loam,
replacing the turf level with the rest
' of the surface.    A good dressing ot
| bone meal and wood ashes will help
to keep the grass in condition through
out the summer.   Nitrate of soda acts
more quickly and is especially val-
1 liable in giving a deeper colour to
j the grass.   It is best applied just be-
' tore or just after a rain, so that lt will
not  draw   moisture  from  the  grass
1 tissues.    Fifty  pounds is  about the
j right amount for a quarter   of   an
! acre.   If hone meal and wood ashes
I are  used  the  two  should  total  the
same amount.
Rolling Is of great benefit to an
established lawn, especially In early
spring when the ground Is soft. The
| use of a heavy roller will serve to
Iron out many minor inequalities in
the surface and press small stones
Into the ground out of the way.'
If a pew lawn is to be made, the
surface must first be made perfectly
■ level. It is understood, of course,
; that deep working ot the soil and the
addition "of fertilizers must have been
preliminary, Lawns are expected to
endure for many years, but they will
soon run out If the grass roots have
only a few Inches of good soil ln
which to feed.
Plenty of seed should be used   In
| starling a new lawn.   Care should be
i taken to apply the seed evenly.   The
best  time for seeding Is    generally
cither in the morning of near evening on a day when there ls little or
, comparatively no wind.    The    lawn
should  be  tampered or rolled after
seeding, to bring the seeds Into close
contact with the soil.
For quick results, sod may be used
and steep banks and terraces should
always be sodded rather than seeded,
as should also the edges of roads
and walks along a newly made lawn.
It is important that the sod be cut
as thin as possible and kept clean
and free from weeds, and that the
ground be properly prepared before
It ls laid. Sod properly cut and laid
grows very easily, provided lt Is set
firmly In the surface of the ground
I hy the use of a roller or tamper and
Is thoroughly soaked with water until established. -
Grass should be cut as soon as lt
Is a few inches high, care being taken to see thnt the mower is very
sharp so as not to pull out any ot
the grasses. This cutting should be
continued throughout the season, aud
it la particularly essential to have the
grasB short during the winter.
A good lawn will usually carry
through the season without any artificial watering, but if water Is applied, the soil should be saturated to
a good depth and then not watered
again until thoroughly dry. The
general custom of a dally superficial
sprinkling is most Injurious.
CUMBERLAND
SCHOOL REPORT
(Continued from page 1)
Reggie Davis, Bert McLellan, Tom
Combs, Edna Davis, Fee Lung, Norman Frelone, Sarah Lawrence, Lem
Jam, Jack MacLean, Lena Merlettl,
Peter Mossey, Nakouru Tahara, Margaret Salmon, Mary Sweeny, Willie
Thompson, Annie Walker, Doris Waterfield.
Honor list: Proficiency—Edna pa-
vis, Mary Hunt, Norman Frelone.
Progress:—Willie Thompson, Reggie Davis, Jean Braes.
Div. VI. M. C. Bannerman.
On roll 31.
Percentage 94.13. Lates 2.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Jean Brown, Isabel Brown, Beatrice Cavallero, Herbert Jones, Yoshlo
Knwaguchi, Margaret McDonald,
Kathleen O'Brien, Hitoshl Sagimori,
Mlnoru Tahara, Victor Tomassi, Mildred Lockner, Hugh Braes.
Grade Second term inter.
Honors: Beatrice Cavallero, Reta
Devoy, Isabel Brown, Kathleen 0'
tlrien Hazel Gibson, James Brown,
Annie Taylor.
1st Inter. Div. VII.
A. J. Colman.
No. on roll 43. Percentage 92.3.
Lates 3.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Matsuyo Abe, Annie Brown, Josie
Burghiner, John Comb, John Davis,
Alven Frelone, Elsie Mah, Tom Mossey, Tokio Nakano, Kitty Prior, Willie Shearer, George Strachan, Willie
Sweeney, Roslna Thompson, Tommy
Tobacco, Llna Tomassi, Elsie Water-
Held,  Harry  Westfleld.
Honor   roll:   Kitty  Prior  73%
Clarence Lewis 66%
Josie Burghiner 62%
Elsie Mah 627c
Matsuyo Abe 61%
Rudl Bonora 60%.
For progress: Matsuyo Abe, Douglas Balrd, John Comb.
Nurse—Good    gracious,     Daphne |
What have you been doing?
Daphlne (tearfully)- 1 f-fell In a
puddle.
Nurse—What! With your best dreBs
on?
Daphne—Y-yes, I didn't havo time
to change.
With The
Churches
CUMBERLAND, SUNDAY  JUNE  10.
HOLY TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
Holy Communion, 11 ajn.
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Eversong, 7 p.m.
For Results Advertise in The Islander i
ST. GEORGE'S PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. James Hood
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class 1.30. Sunday School 2.30
Evening Service 7 p.m.
Div.   VIII. Edith   Horbury.
No. on roll 39. Lates 4.
Per centage 93.3.
Perfect attendance: Edith Cavallero, John Burghiner, Catherine Brown,
Albert Cooper, Irene Davis, Cyril Da
vis, Donald Graham, Doris Hannay,
Cazuko Iwasa, Tukeru Kawaganchl,
Second Merlettl, Eunice MacKinnon,
Hlsako, Nakano, 7.ung Chong, Mina
Shields, Edna Watson, Itatsue Matsukura, Norlv Herose, Teruko Dol,
Hugh McNeil.
Honor roll:Nina Shields, Cyril Davis, Catherine Brown, Albert Cooper,
Improvement: Second Merlettl,
May Beveridge .
Div.  IX. I.   McFadyen.
No. on roll 34. Percentage 87.76%.
Latea 8.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
nle Lawrence, Choo Foo Lung, Ben-
Marlon Combs, Alfred Jones, Jennie Nicholas, Hirshl Okuda, Malla
Tomassi, Shigeura Yaganchl, Ellen
Morrison,  Mamoru Tahara.
Grade—Jnlor.
Honor roll:—Doris Drew, Jennie
Lawrence, Hiroshl Okuda, Mah Duch
Lung, Muriel Harrison, Sidney Hunt.
OVERSTOCKED
As we find we are overstocked in certain seasonable
lines, we will reduce these goods now in order that we
may not carry the stock over un til next season.
Order Early, Before Your Size is Sold Out!
SHOES
$350 value Ladies White canvas Oxfords for .... $2.75
$2.40 value Misses White and Brown Canvas for $2.75
SLIPPERS—
$3.25 value Ladies Black and White Canvas slipper with buckle strap $2.75
$2.25 value Boys Brown Canvas Sneakers $1.75
$1.75 value Childrens White Canvas   Balmoral
Shoes   $1.30
$1.50 value Childrens White Canvas Fairy Slippers  $1.10
DRY GOODS
$1.00 value Mens Summer Underwear for 75c
$1.50 value Boys Khaki Blouses for $1.25
$1.50 value Boys Blue Chambray Shirts for $1.25
$1.50 value Boys Khakie Pants for $1.25
New Swiss Organdie at 75c per yard
g o rIdo N ' s
Phone 133
NEW MOTORING
BODY FORMED
Provincial Auto Owners to Join
in Big Organization,
Vancouver, Victoria and New
Westminster Auto Clubs Join
H. I. Harrison
Div. X.
No. on roll, 37.
Percentage, 89%. Lates 5.
Pupils making perfect attendance
tor month.
Klyoka Abe, John Earl Bannerman,
Harry Cunliffe, May Graham, Okea
Matsunaga, William MacNaughton,
Bryson Parnham, Jessie Robb, George
Salto, William Slaughter, Jackie
Wong, Annie Cheung.
Honor list: Chrissie Robertson,
William MacNaughton, Agnes Mac
Klnnnn, Annie Cheung. Muriel Thomson, Thora Kceler.
Div.   XI. C.  Richardson
No. on roll 36. Percentage 94.
Lates  13.
Perfect  attendance:
Willie Cloutler, Charlotte Hoffelnz,
David Hunden, Insugno Matsukura,
Jackie Morrison, Lome Murdock,
Henry Salmon, Heromitsu Salto,
Echlro Shi, Alex Sommervllle, Margaret Westfleld, Willie Home, Takeshi lyein, Willie Johnson, Susumn
Kawaganchl, Harry Waterfield.
Honor list:  Leslie Mali, 90%
Albert Drew, 89%
David Hunden, 87%
Harold Hughes, 84%
Willie Home, 84%
Wllle Logan 83%.
Div. XII. J. E.  Robertson
No. on roll, 33.
Percentage 93.6.
No. of lates, 9.
Pupils  making  perfect  attendance
Gwen Abrams, Gordon Anderson,
Leland Bannerman, Petor Bono, Madge Bryan, Norah Cooke.
Joyce Haycock, Margeurltc I.uri-
gan, Billie Prior, Muriel Shortt,
Robert Walker, Rhoda Walton,
Joslo Wrmg, Wong Ylng Mannla
Syelrl.
A league of motorists embracing
for the present the automobile clubs
of Vancouver, Victoria and New Westminster, but which will be made
province-wide In its scope as soon as
possible was brought Into being on
Friday night, when a meeting of delegates from the three Interested bodies met In the Vancouver Automobile Club headquarters.
The meeting did not definitely decide upon a name for the new body,
this task and other matters pertaining to organization being left to a
committee composed ot Mr. T. II.
Ulrk, Vancouver Automobile Club;
Mr. R. R. Yebb, Victoria Automobile
Club, and Mr. J. R. Agar, New Westminster Automobile Club. This organization committee will report back
to the main body on June 15.
Means Extension
Hardly a town in British Columbia
will be too small to support an automobile club under the plan put forward at the meeting. Whereever
there are twenty-five motorists willing to band themselves together Into one body they will bo granted a
charter by the new organization.
In places where automobile clubs
now exists in a more or less dormant
condition every effort will be made
to revivify and reorganize them into new activity for the benefit of
motorists. An organizer will be appointed by the new body to travel
throughout the province to aid ln the
formation of the outside clubs.
The new body has for Its objects
Ihe improvement of roads throughout the province, the solution of traf
fie problems, the encouragement of
motor touring, the preservation of
natural beauties and the safeguarding of the interests of the 35,000 car
owners throughout British Columbia.
For the benefit of the public at
lnrge, it was deemed advisable to [
point out Ihat the province with a
membership of over 3,500 Is In no
way connected with the organization
known ns the 11. C. Automobile Association.
Thc Delegates
Mr. Stunley E. Peters, vice-president of the Vancouver Automobile
Club, presided at (he meeting. Other
delegates were: Vancouver Automobile Club, Mr. C. N. Lee, Mr. F. G. T.
Lucas, Mr. F. R. McD. Itussel, K. C,
Mr. T. H. Kirk, Mr. Newton J. Ker
and Mr. Percy Gomcry. From New
Westminster, Mr. J. R. Agar, Mr. W.
T. Reid, Mr. J. Mayers, Mr. Walter
Bcws, Mr. F. H. Trapp, Mr. James
A. Blair, Mr. D, E. Mackenzie and Mr.
J. W. Cunningham. The delegates
from Victoria were Mr. Norman Yarrow and Mr. R. R. Webb.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons  • •    Proprietor
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent tor—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean sr
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and Bee Mr, Sutherland, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you nn any work yeu wish
to have done.
Our   Work   and   Service
Will  Please Yon   it   tt
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, a C.      <      Phone SU03
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
1)09 B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.
PHONE SHIS      VICTORIA, B.C.
tin, Jamey Mali, Jean Quinn, Mana-
hu Shegeml, Cheung Wong, Tommy
Honor list.—Mitsuo Abara, Joyce
Haycock, Johnny Hah, Short Kcyona
go, Billy Prior, Shelgcml Maroya,
Gweu Abrams.
Div. XIII Eva G. Drader
No. on roll 39.
Percentage 91.4.
Lates 12.
Pupils having  perfect attendance:
Alex. Mossey, Alice Brown, Leslie
Coe, Audrey DeCoeur, Jncklo Graham, Margaret Marpole, Freddie Mar-
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   •   'Phone 116.
Daily They Come To Me
Tattered and Torn
Back They Go Looking
Like New The Next Morn.
From The
Family Shoe Repairer
S. DAVIS, "SjJSS
Wong,  Yasushl  Yamashkl, Elizabeth
Mnlposs, Robert Mossey.
Honor roll.—Rosle Mnh.
Cheung Wong,
-   Audrey DcCocur,
Billy Merrilleld,
Gordon Robertson,
Buddie Biggs. EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  JUNE   9th  1923
FOR THE HOT DAYS
LADIES New Dresses made of Gingham in
a great variety of plaids and checks,
made up in the new designs and styles
a wide range to choose from, prices
according to quality, call and see them.
NEW GINGHAMS—our range   of   Ginghams are very wide and   comprise a
choice selection of checks and stripes
in both wide and medium widths.
Prices
35c to 55c
LADIES UNDERVESTS—Our stock is
practically complete for summer wear,
and include Ladies Combinations from
. $1.25 to $2.75
Ladies Vests each
35c   TO$2.75
You can have your choice of a good quality
at a reasonable price.
LADIES SUMMER BLOOMERS
50c  TO$1.50
per pair.
LADIES FINE COTTON NIGHT GOWNS
well made and trimmed embroidery.
Price, d»1   OK
each         tDl.£U
LADIES   COTTON   HOSE—in     Brown,
Black and White at 35c per pair or 3
S?  $1.00
LADIES LISLE HOSE—in the new shades
50c pair.
LADIES ART SILK HOSE—in White,
Brown and Black at 75c per pair.
LADIES VENUS SILK HOSE—in a new
assort ment of shades at (fin AA
per pair         $£.1/1/
LADIES UNDERSKIRTS—made of a good
even thread Cotton and nicely embroidered Q^lf*
Special each    t/tlv
LADIES BUNGALOW DRESSES—about
50 of them to clear at $1.95 each. All
of them are good value.
LADIES VOILE AND COTTON BLOUSES—in a good variety of designs and
made of serviceable   materials   from
$1.95 up to $6.95.
MENS AND BOYS' UNDERWEAR-in
fairly good assortment of weights, call
and see our stock.
BOYS' SPORT SHIRTS—with open necks
just what all boys desire with the hot
days. Prices $1.25 and $1.50.
BOYS' KHAKI PANTS AND SHIRTS—Lo
match every boy desires a suit of long
pants and sport shirt for good hard
wear for the hot days, call and see our
line.
L
J. Sutherland
Dry Goods and Gents'Furnishings
Local Briefs
Miss Irene Cope, surgical nurse
at the Vancouver General Hospital,
who recently returned from Calcutta.
India, paid a visit to her brother,
Corp. W. II. Cope, of the R.N.W.M.P.
on Saturday last, returning to Vancouver on Monday.
Mr. A. H. Webb and Mr, Harold
Murray motored to Nanaimo on Saturday morning last and caught the
early lioat for Vancouver where they
spent the week-end. returning on
Monday evening.
Mrs. J. W. Cooke, and children left
on Monday last for North Vancouver
where they will reside in future. Mr.
Cooke expects lo join them in about
10 days' time.
Earl Fletcher, of the G. A. Fletcher Music Co. of Nanaimo, was a visitor lo town on Saturday last.
T, Kennedy and W, Squires spent
the vacation In Vancouver, returning on Monday last.
Mrs. Johnson B. Sharpies left on
Tuesday last, for Nanaimo. where she
will visit with friends for the next 10
days-
Mr. and Mrs. T. II. Mumford motored to Victoria on Saturday last, returning on Monday.
Mr. H. Kuappet, Misses 0. Dalton,
Elsie Dalton (Vancouver) and M,
Knuppett, (Victoria), spent the vaca-
tlon at the Groat Central Lakes,
where they "caught a lot of fish."
Mrs. Harry Bryan left on Monday
last for a short visit ln Vancouver.
Dr. R. P. Christie motored to Duncan on Saturday last, being accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. L. Finch, and
returned on Monday.
The Itev. E. and Mrs. Nunns spent
last week-end at Campbell Itiver, being accompanied by their son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. nnd Mrs. A. It.
Nunns.
Campers are busy getting their
places in shape at Gartley Beach. Several families expect to move In immediately.
Mr. John Denholm who was operated on tor acute appendicitis on
Monday last Is progressing favorably.
His many friends wish him a Speedy
recovery.
Rev. G. 11. and Mrs. Kinney left for
Ocean Palls on Wednesday morning
last, where Mr. Kinney will take
charge of (he Methodist Church there.
Itev. .). Butler, of Duncan who
conies lo Cumberland to take over the
Grace Methodist Church, will not assume his duties here until June the
17th. Mr. Butler's arrival here lias
been delayed owing to an accident,
when his young son was knocked
down hy an automobile and injured.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Sutherland and family spent last week-end at the
Great Central Lakes, returning on
Monday.
I
The Rev. Thomas Menzles, M.P.F.
who has been In the district for sonv
days left on Wednesday for Victoria.
Rupture
EXPERT HERE
SEELEY, FAMOUS l>  I'"1** S?ECI-
AMI, CALLED TO VICTORIA
MOTOR MEMOS.
The British Columbia Automobile
Association has grown so rapidly in
the past two months that It has already become necessary to enlarge
the premises occupied by it. Several
new branches have jyen formed lately Including one at Abbotsford, another at Matsqul and a third at Chilllwack. This makes the total number
of branches nine in number while
the close of the month should see
several others added to (his lists.
The weekly average of new members secured hy the organizers for
the British Columbia Automobile Association during the month of May
exceeded one hundred. In addition,
states Manager Slgmore, this number
will be doubled each week.
Mr. Shearer, chief of U. S. Immigration service, has arranged to have
an immigration officer stationed at
Lyndon on Dominion l)ay. July 1st.
for the convenience of Caundian Motorists crossing the line.
G. L. Asquith lias been placed in
charge of the Information Bureau of
the British Columbia Automobile Association at Sidney. Everyday he Is
in receipt of congratulations on the
efficient manner which the Association looks after the needs of the
louring motorist.
The new International membership
sticker of the British Columbia Automobile Association has met with very
favorable comment from visitors
south of the line. It consists of the
t'nion Jack and the Stars and Srlpes
intertwined and flanked at each corner by the national symbols of Canada and the U. S„ a beaver, and eagle,
a maple leaf, and a crown. Tlle
words British Columbia Automobile
Association are inscribed on the upper folds ot the flags. International
in the centre and the wheel of Progress flanked on cither side by the
Ilgures of the year of issue on  the
FORTUNES WDN
ON THE DERBY
Working Woman Won $160,000
Hotel Keeper Becomes a Millionaire.
London.—A little sweepstake ticket,
combined with Derby luck, has placed
a fortune of £32,000 in the lap of a
Yorkshire woman mill worker, Mrs.
Nellie Ford by name, who drew Papyrus in the Otley' Club's £80,000
sweepstake, in which more than
200,000 persons had taken a chance.
Mrs. Ford is a hard working woman, who has spent most of her life
working in a mill in order to help to
support her large family. Yesterday
she was offered £3,000 for her
chance, but refused, as she had a
dream that a fortune awaited her.
The second prize nf £115,000 and a
third of £ 8,0110, were won by two
men of moderate moans.
Plymouth, Etig — A Plymouth ho-
telkeeper was the envy of all Britain
He Is the hero of one of the most
unusual turns of fortune in British
racing history.
Some time before the running of
I the historic Derby at Epsom Downs
he subscribed to three sweepstakes
on the race. He drew Papyrus, winner of the classic in each pool.
As all sweepstakes in the Derby are
heavily played, indications are that
the botelkeeper will collect enough
money to place him within striking
distance of the millioatiaire class.
"Lightnin'" struck us as being a
thundering good show.
lower. Lieut. Gov. Coyle, of Washington, was so pleased With the emblem that, lie promised to have one
framed and placed over the executive
desk In the Stale Capitol of Olympia.
F. H. Seeley. of Chicago and Philadelphia, the noted truss expert, will
personally lie at the Empress Hotel,
and will remain in Victoria this Tuesday and Wednesday only June 12—13.
Mr. Seeley says: "The Spermatic
Shield will not only retain any case
of rupture perfectly, but contracts
the opening in 10 days on the average case. Being a vast advancement
over all former methods-exemplifying instantaneous effects immediately appreciable and withstanding any
strain or position no mailer the size
or location. Large or difficult cases,
or Inclsslonnl ruptures (following
operations) specially solicited. This
instrument received the only award
in England and In Spain, producing
.results without surgery, injections,
medical treatments or prescriptions.
Warning—All cases should be rati.
tinned against Hie use oi any elastic
or web truss with understrnps, as
same rest where tlio lump Is and not
where the opening Is. producing coin-
plications necessitating surgical operations. Mr. Seeley lias documents
from the United Stntes Government,
Washington, ». C. tor inspection. He
will be glad to demonstrate without
charge or lit them if desired. Business
demands prevent stopping at any
other place in this section.
P. S.—livery statement in this notice
has been verified before the Federal
and Slate Courts.—F. 11. Seeley.
Home Office; 117 N. Dearborn St.,
Chicago.
F. MeEwiin, of Vancouver, ts relieving J. Robertson, the local telegraph operator for 3 weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. Bell, spent lasl weekend at Campbell River.
Messrs .1. T. Brown. Jun. and J. Robertson, local telegraph operator left
for Campbell River on Wednesday
lasl tor a few days' lisping.
"Smiler" Pettlgrew and Johnny
Cummins have been signed on by the
Cumberland United Football Club,
ind In all probability will play against
the Davenport team of Nanaimo in
ihe Connaught cup game.
"Cotton" Miller, a local junior has
been signed on by the Cumberland
United Football tenm.
Jiimes M. Savage, General Manager
il' the Canadian Collieries, Dunsmuir
Limited, arrived on Thursday.
F. A. McCarthy, Manager of the local branch of The Royal Bank of
Canada accompanied by Mrs. McCarthy left on Thursday for Vancouver and Sound cities on a two weeks
vacation.
Mr. E. J, Vandenvater. relieving
manager of the Royal Bank of Cana-
:1a. arrived on Wednesday and is now
acting manager of the local branch
during the absence of Mr. McCarthy.
WAS THIS THE
ORIGINAL WHALE THAT
SWALLOWED JONAH?
A mixed party of Cumberland, Vancouver and Victoria folk spent last
week-end at the Great Central Lakes
and caught a lot of fish. In fact they
caught such a lot of fish that Fra-
zer has been led to ask: "ls this the
original that swallowed Jonah?"
B. OF T. MEETING
The usual monthly meeting ot the
Cumberland Board of Trade will be
held in the City Hall on Tuesday.
June 12th at 7.30 p.m. A full attendance is desired.
One man was lined $50 for trying,
to kiss his stenographer. If all the
girls would report we could pay the
national debt.
PTTH-' ■,    tOi^.r: Macs,       rer- -.
1 J H i . PV >
litter.* at Pile Remedy
R
FREE For-—
5 Days Only
1 pkg. Nabob Custard Powder, Tapioca or chocolate
Pudding with every purchase of one pound tin of Nabob
Coffee.
Cremetts, 2 packages for   25c •
Mothers Noodles, 2 pkgs. for 25c
Quaker Pork and Beans, 4 sizes.   Good
value at 10c, 15c, 20c and 30c per tin
Pendrys Cleanser, 2 tins for  25c
Peanut Butter, per tin 25c
Horseshoe Salmon per tin 25c
Oranges, 3 doz. for 95c
50c, 75c and 90c per dozen
Large Lemons, per dozen   50c
Full stock of Fruits and Vegetables in season.
Refreshing drinks that will keep you cool, Lemonade Powder and Sherbit, Raspberry Vinegar,
Lime Juice and Lime Juice Cordial, Grape
Juice, Loganberry Juice, Hires Root
Beer, Lemonade, Ginger Ale, Ginger
Beer, Shandy, Hop Ale, Etc.
Burns  & Brown
SERVICE
B. & B. Grocery
PHONE 38
QUALITY
CUMBERLAND MAY DAY CELEBRATION
1923 Accounts
Distributed Expense—
ltuynl Group— Campbell Bros. 2!i yds. Cream Serge    $29.00
Sutherlands   Silk,   25.35,   4-silk   hose.   5.00,   Queen's   Silk   and
Serge 30.00   '      60.35
Miss Haywood. Tulle for hats 0.00. Ribbon for hats. 3.40, Wire
for hots, 0.60, Labor for hats 6.00       16.00
Mrs. T. Mordy page costume, 7.50—Mrs. Jas. W. Tremlett page
costume, 7.50          10.00
Balance of allowance due. not absorbed by material for Mrs.
W. A. Owen, 5.00; Mrs. G. Richardson, 1.17; Mrs. J. R. Gray
1.17; Mrs. Chas. O'Brien, 1.17; Mrs. Sam Jones, 1.17       9.68
DIZZI SPELLS DUE
TO UNDIGESTED FOOD
1    \.
r -ei
pi'-pplj
.\..ii Mnl 'tn,.  holla* iiml "PAX'' \.:il '.,,.
on In a plnlil imckunc
1016 Dominion Building
VANco'jvinv r. c,
Dizziness and l'ainluess after eating
show that your food is not digested
and is turned into poison nnd gas.
Simple buckthorn bark, glycerine, etc.,
as mixed in Adlerlka, expels all poison and gas from BOTH upper anil
lower bowel. Removes foul, decaying
food-matter you never thought was in
your system whicli poisoned stomach
and made you dizzy and faint. Adlerlka ls EXCELLENT to guard
against appendicitis.—R. C. LANG,
Drlgglst, i
"Raw From Eczema
Doctors Do Their Best"
"Forty years I suffered.   One left- raw
from toea to body. No living man could
believe what I Buffered.   It was D.D.D.
that relieved me, and for three years I
haven't had a eiirn of eczema."
These words are taken from the letter of Un-
fun tlarrett, Cheitervllle, Ontario. Mr. Qarrott
will answer any questions youcaie to ask him.
If yon haven't  tried   the  cooliap,  healing
D. D. I), for ckln disease we shall lie glad lo
sell you a boltlo today on our personal Hour-
antee.   * 1 .Ou a bottle.   Try 1). D. II. Soap, too.
M. lottoa for SWn Dhc^se
SOLI) AT LANG'S DRUG STORK
$130.03
Miscellaneous re-Dances nnd Drills—
Sutherlands. Braid for Poles, 3.25; Pins, 0.50        3.75
Lang's Drug Store, Dye for Braid, 1.15              1.16
Alex. McKlnnon, (i-eolls Hue for practise drills  ,...:       2.70
Alex. Maxwell Moving Piano to grounds        4.00
$11.60
Float tor Queen's Gronpo—
Sutherlands   108  yds.-bunting   ,      31.05
C, H. Tarbell & Son, tacks, 0.60; Gold Paint, 1.30        1.90
Alex.  McKinnon  8  flags        1,90
$34.85
General Celebration Expense-
Sutherland, pins for ribbons, 5 doz  0.50
R. Thomson 12 bbls, at 25c   3.00
A.  Maxwell Haulage bbls. and chairs ,    4.00
Mumfords  Grocery  potatoes  0.35
L. R. Stevens Queen's Ring   10.00
Cumberland  Islander, Printing posters, 9.75, 57  Ribbons, 20.35.
Advertising,   14.40     44.50
Canadian Collieries 1 foot ball   7.26
A. S. Jones two games referee at 3.00  6.00
Petty accounts paid by secretary, Express on prize goods, 0.75
Express on Flags, 0.90; 1 ball twine, 0.10; 2% doz. Oranges for
foot ball players, 2.00; 2 lbs. small nails for flout, 11.20; Postage
slumps for letters nnd checks, 1.72   5.67
Canadian Exp. and  Import. Co.  500 flags  52.71
A.   G.   Spalding  Bros.   Prize  goods     59.84
itnyal Bank of Canada, 112.50 Prize list, 60.00 dimes   172.50
Cumberland City Band      120.00
Sid Hunt General  Sanitation nnd preparation    of    Recreation
Grounds          10.00
$496.32
Total Accounts incurred and paid     672.80
Total of all receipts     733.00
Returned Dimes, deposited         7.00
$740.00
True Balance on hand     $67.20
$740.00
Classilied Recelps as per list as published last week   $733.00
Returned dimes, deposited, making n total of  $740.00
$740.00
GEORGE O'BRIEN, Treasurer.
In view of lhe fact, that there is a' balance remaining of the May Day Celebration Fund lt was decldod at the meeting held by the Committees last
Wednesday evening to call n meeting of all the subscribers to this fund
to decide what shall be done with the unspent balance. The meeting will
be on Wednesday evening June 13th ln the City Hall, at 7.30 P.M. Please
lake au Interest in this meeting for there is a chance to do some real good
Willi that monoy.

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