BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander May 20, 1927

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068899.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068899.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068899-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068899-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068899-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068899-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068899-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068899-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068899-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068899.ris

Full Text

 ~SPE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
• m,*l*t With      tchlilh      lc      a.n.a.-.IM.i^l      M»a»      flHMhuU.!      V	
5*
With which Is consolidated tie Cumberland Hews.
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR—No. 20.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1927.
.SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Time Not iRipe For
Daily Boat Service
To Powell River
COURTENAY, May 18.—Included In
a sheaf of correspondence at Monday
night's council meeting, was a communication from Mr. Phillips, of the
department of National Defense. The
letter conveyed appreciation of the
Naval authorities to the city of Courtenay, who had previously replied to
them re supplying water to ■ naval
craft when at.Comox wharf. The cily
had then slgnilled their willingness to
give this service at Ihe^lowest possible
cost.
A report was received concerning
the much discussed proposed daily
Powell River boat. In order to ascertain to what extent residents of the
district would he financially interested
In the Inauguration of such a boat tun
the services of Mr. E. F. Thomas had
been engaged to make a partial survey of the district. Mh. Thomas re-,
ported ln part as follows:
Time Not Yet lllpc
"The success of such a boat would
depend on the ability to establish a
fre3h milk business with Powell River
from the Comox dairy herds. A number in the district consider the present
boat service very good. There are
some, particularly poultrymen, who
would be seriously affected should the
present service to Vancouver be discontinued. After carefully considering the whole question, it would seem
that although the necessary capital
.could probably be raised, this money
would be contributed hy a comparatively small number. It would also
seem that an undertaking of this
nature would be more likely to be
successful If supported by a larger
percentage of the residents of tlie
district. Taking these conditions into consideration, together with the
known amount of freight at present
offering, the uncertainty of thc
amount of extra freight and passenger
business that might develop witli a
dally boat. It would appear that. the
time ls hardly ripe for tlie Inauguration of a daily boat service between
Courtenay and Powell River unless
the undertaking were in lhe hands of
a private individual who could operate  at  an   absolute  minimum   cost."
The report was duly received.
Jubilee Celebration
To Be Held At
Courtenay, July 1
COURTENAY. .May 18.—1.1 response
to Invitations Issued by the local
assembly of Native Sone of Canada,
some twenty or more delegates front
organisations in the district met in
the Booth hnll on Tuesday evening in
connection with the celebrating of
Canada's diamond jubilee on tlie flrst
and second of July. Mr. J. N McLeod
occupied the chair and voiced a welcome to those present.
Mr. C. S. Wood, secretary, read un
outline of suggestions for thc celebration which had been prepared by
the organization at Ottawa. He said
that all Institutions within the district
had been asked to participate. Including the Indians within a radius of
fifty miles, whom it was hoped would
attend ln tribal costume. Mr. D. R.
MacDonald hoped that all bodies
would get together and make it ono
of the greatest days ln Courtenay.
Mr. Theed Pearse objected to the
Impression given which would confine
the undertaking to the Native Sons.
and wanted it made clear tliat It was
evcryones day and not confined to any
one organization. The chairman replied that the Native Sons Iiad celebrated the 1st of July for the past
few years and Intended to do so In
the future. Mr. A. M. Hilton, a delegate from the St. Georges Society,
explained that the Intention was io
celebrate the -sixtieth anniversary of
the confederation of a part of lhe
British Empire. Dr. Hicks, of Cumberland, on enquiry was Informed that
it was intended to hold the celebration
at Courtenay for the whole of the
Comox district. Mr. Theed Pearse.
the Canadian Clubs delegate, wished
to ascertain if the club wus request* d
to assist aa a club, or the members
as individuals. Several of the delegates present were anxious to know
what was expected of their various
organisations, but no definite Information was forthcoming. Mr, Filberg
asked If It was Intended to hold the
celebration for one or two days, lt
was then decided to uppolut a coin,
mlttee of three with power to appoint
chairmen of ten sub-committees. The
committee appointed wus composed of
Messrs. R. J. Filberg. P. L. Anderton
and A. M. Hilton.
The committee Inter announced a
selection of chulrmon as follows:
Sports, P. L. Anderton; Grounds, F.
McPherson; Decoration's. J. Sutton;
Lighting, E. L. Macdonald; Parade,
G. W. Stubbs; Barbecue, Win. Cook;
Dance, John Tukham; Fireworks. J.
Thomson; Dance floor, J. McKenzie;
Music, Mrs. M. B. Tribe. The matter
of selecting suitable speakers for the
occasion was left with the chairman"
and secretary. Some of the chairmen
selected announced their Inability to
act and it was thought by some thai
lt would have been n good deal better
had the various organizations been
asked to asssit .as bodies. Instead of
asking some of those present to act
as individuals. I
Cafe Chantant A
Wonderful Success
Mrs. Carey, of Royston, Invaded
Cumberland, on Wednesday evening
with her orchestra of Panpipers and
made a decided hit before a capacity
house which more than taxed the
seating accommodation of the Parish
Hall. The entertainment was given
under the auspices of the Women's
Auxiliary of Holy Trinity Church, and
was something entirely unique in the
history of Cumberland's social life.
The hall was very prettily decorated
and the audience was seated at tables
which were ready when the time came
for refreshments ln tlle intermission,
lt gave one the impression of the Interior of a modern French restaurant,
hence the name "Cafe Chantant," and
the proceedings were delightfully In-
! formal.
| The programme opened with the
singing of the National Anthem, followed hy a march played by the full
orchestra. From then on the success
of tlie evening wns assured, and there
was a continued demand for encores.
Amongst those who contributed* to the
programme must be mentioned the
Misses Parnham, whose pianoforte
j solos were sympathetically rendered.
Miss Burroughs' singing well deserved
the applause if received. Master Willie Merrlfleld and Miss Audrey DeCoeur amongst the Juvenile artistes
came in for a special round of
applause. The dancing of the Misses
Moore showed decided talent, especially tlic dance given by Miss K.
Moore after the Intermission. Other
juveniles who contributed to the success of the programme were Florence
Aitchison and Annie Sehulson, who
both reveal promise on the violin.
Mrs. Carey ls to be congratulated on
the way in which she has trained the
Panpipers orchestra which has only
been practicing for two months, and It
is hoped that this entertainment will
be but the forerunner of many similar
ones to be held in Cumberland. Mrs.
Finch and Mrs. Robinson acted as
accompanists for the evening.
During the afternoon the Women's
Auxiliary held a tea and sale of work
iu the Parish hall, which, in spite of
the inclement weather, proved a great
success.
Only Good IVeat her Needed Victoria Day Fund
To Assure Celebration Succesx  Qnw!*!'*r
No matter where you are or who
you are, Cumberland Invites your
presence on the 24th of May, for on
that day all roads will lead to the
Recreation Ground here to the biggct
celebration that has ever been attempted locally in commemoration of the
birthday of Queen Victoria. On behalf of the celebration committee, the
Islander extends an invitation to
everyone to attend, and you can be
assured that there will be no Idle
minute during the whole day's programme.
From the six-year-old to the sixty-
slx-year-old the sports committee has
forgotten no one in the matter ot
racing for valuable prizes, and added
to this will be shoe scrambles, egg
and spoon races, tug of war, pillow
fights, high jumps, broad jumps, nail
driving contest (for ladies), bicycle
racing and physical drill contest,
climaxed by a five-a-slde football competition "and a baseball game between
Cumberland and Bevan. But a great
feature of the day will be the morning
parade of school children, decorated
floats, cars and individuals, which Is
scheduled to start at the school at
9:30 o'clock. No doubt remains that
the parade will be a big one, for the
prizes offered (see page four of this
issue) are bound to attract competitors not only from this city but from
Courtenay and the surrounding district. It ls planned to have the parade, marshalled by Chief of Police
Cope, proceed from the school up
First street to Windermere Ave, and
Since last week the list of donations
along past the Hospital to Second St. it0 tlle May 24th 8ports tmd has <"*
and down this to Maryport Ave.,
thence along Maryport to Third St.,
thence down to the Post Office and
up Dunsmuir Ave. to the Recreation
Ground.
An old-fashioned and ever-popular
ceremony will be the crowning of
Queen Helen Magnone, which takes
place Immediately upon the parade
reaching Its destination, and the subsequent may pole dancing nnd foil-
songs. Union Bay has charge ot the
regal party and no pains have been
spared to make it one of tlie most
beautiful and picturesque seen here in
past years. Queen Helen will bo
attended by Miss Jessie Marshall as
Lady in Waiting, and by two Maids of
Honor and two Pages. The float upon
which the royal party will ride will
be most attractive, and those who are
not on hand early enough to Bee the
parade will miss a rare treat. All
traffic on Dunsmuir Avenue will he
stopped while the parade is passing
through, and It is hoped to have the
street cleared of parked vehicles so
that the spectators will have an unobstructed view. Owners of automobiles are asked to kindly comply
with this request.
The various committees have been
working faithfully for some time past,
with the result tbat all is now in
readiness for one oi the grandest
celebrations yet attempted. All that
remains Is the actual day Itself—and
good weather.
Considerable Damage To
Beaufort House By Fire
CUMBERLAND REVIEW
PRAISED FOR WORK AT
PROVINCIAL RALLY
About thirty officers and guards of
the local Review of Women's Benefit
Association attended the "Great
Rally" of the Provincial Reviews held
at Vancouver Tuesday of this week,
sessions of which were held ln the
spacious ball -room of Hotel Vancouver. Lieut. Supreme Commander
Adyelotte and Deputy Supreme Commander Bnker, of California, were
guests of honor. Special ritualistic
work given by Cumberland Review
was declared by these officers to bc
the gem of the rally. A feature was
the display work of massed teams of
ull Reviews, about 200 guards and
flag bearers taking part. The varied
colors of their hats and spear decorations created a scene beautiful beyond
description.
Cumberland members returned on
Wednesday evening, stopping at Nanaimo en route, where Chemainus and
Cumberland gave special work at a
meeting of St. Cecilia Review.
EXCELLENT PROGRAMME
PROMISED FOR DANCE
Following Is the programme of
dances to he played by the Byng Boys
al the dance in the llo-Ilo Theatre on
tlle evening of May 21th:
1, Waltz. 2. One-step, 3. Foxtrot,
4. Brownie. r>. Wnltz. 6. One-step. 7.
Sohottlscho, 8. Moonlight Waltz, 8.
Foxtrot, 10. Interval Wallz, 11. One-
step. 12. Rrownle. 13. French Minuet,
14. Foxtrot, 15. Moonlight Waltz. 16.
One-step, 17. Waltz, 18. Foxtrot, 18,
Three-step, 20. One-step, 21. Waltz,
22. Foxtrot, Home Waltz.
Don't forgel lhe usual Saturday
dance In the llo-Ilo tomorrow night.
Gentlemen 60c, Indies 25c, and three
hours of dancing, from 0 to 12.
Dong! Dong! Dong! It was too
early for curfew, so there was only
one conclusion to come to and that
was that the Are bell was ringing.
This was conflrmed a few seconds-
later by the opening of doors and
windows from which anxious eye*
peered, nnd. from which young and
old emerged to catch the sound of the j
Fire Brigade passing by. The bell
had scarcely stopped ringing when
there was the familiar burrrrr of the
engine nnd the screech of the siren
which showed that "the boys of the
old brigade*' were right on the job.
Where was the Are? It was only
necessary to follow as fast as one
could In the footsteps of sprinting and
excited youngsters to find the answer.
There on the top of the hill overlooking the town stood Beaufort
House, the residence of Lt.-Col. C. W.
Villiers, manager of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited. From
the gable roof on the west side there
poured a thick column ot smoke.
Flames fanned by a high wind and a
cold one were making headway. It
wos problematical whether the building would be saved. The firemen
recognized they had their task cut out
if they were to succeed. The thought
called for extra determination and
effort, and the full force of water
power and hose were called Into use.
Did the flames break out In one spot
they were met with u flooding spray
of wnter; did they break out ln another place, it was the same. Up on
the roof in little groups of twos and
threes, buffeted by a cold wind and
dripping from head to feet, were men
playing the hose on the fire. Below,
Charlie Parnham could be seen superintending the work, assisted by a
number of willing volunteers. From
the front doors as well as the back,
there were coming and going thoso
who wcre saving the furniture. Out
on the lawns nearly all Cumberland
had assembled to watch the lire and
conjecture on the outcome of it. At
times the case seemed hopeless, for
ll looked as lf nothing could quench
the fury of those flames burning In
the root. At other times It seemed
ns if tlie fire was under control. So
the battle waged until bit by bit the
firemen gained the upper hand.   Grit
| and determination won the day.
Beaufort House presented a desolate
I appearance.     The   front   steps   had
those who ventured within. The
damage has not as yet been estimated
but it is figured lt may be somewhere
in the neighborhood ot $5,000. It Is
understood that both the building and
contents are fully covered by insurance.
The greatest credit Is due to the
Cumberland Fire Brigade for the
quick way they responded to the call
and the splendid work they did in the
face of a very difficult and serious
problem. Cumberland is fortunate in
having this fire defense force nt Its
disposal.
Fire Chief's Action
Debated By Council
COURTENAY, May 18.—Reporting
for the Fire Department at the city
council meeting on Monday night.
Aid Douglas opened up an important
question. He referred to a circular
letter which bad been sent out by
Fire Chief Thomson. This letter Invited contributions towards the purchase of a chemical truck and the
upkeep of the department, ln return
for which lt was proposed to guarantee assistance at fires outside the city.
Aid. Theed Pearse pointed out that
there was no authority for the issuing
of this circular; no city official had
the right to employ the city's fire
fighting equipment, the property of
the ratepayers, outside tho city. A
letter from D. A. S. McGregor, district
manager of the B. C. Fire Underwriters' Association at Victoria, conflrmed Aid. Pearse's attitude. Mr.
McGregor's letter was a response to
nn invitation to the Association to
assist ln the upkeep of the volunteer
brigade. His letter however, pointed
out that the ratepayers of Courtenay
were getting the benefit in the form
of a   proper  reduction   In   Insurance
(Continued on Page Five)
most doubled, and from the following
it may be seen that the amount received to date ls an even thousand
dollars. The finance committee has
made a thorough job of the collecting,
but a few more dollars may come ln
before the week is over.
No. 4 Mine employees  1233.01)
City of Cumberland   150.00
Balance fionj. 11)26 Sports  76.no
I'nlon Bay employees (estlm'd) 70.00
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd. 50.00
Employees of Royston Sawmill
(estimated)     35.00
Misc. employees. C. 0. (D) Ltd. 25.50
Edward W. Bickle   25.00
Royston Lumber Co., Ltd  25.00
Silver Spring Brewery   25.00
Cumberland Electric Light Co. 15.00
Cumberland Water Works Ltd. 15.00
Thomas Graham   15.00
George W. Clinton   10.00
Victoria   Phoenix  Brewery Co. 10.00
Campbell  Bros.   (Goods)     10.00
Comox Creamery Association... 10.00
J. Sutherland   (Goods)    7.50
Cavin's Shoe Store (Goods) .... 7.00
F. Dallos (Waverley Hotel) .... 7.00
Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton   6.00
James   Dick     5.00
Dr. E. R. Hicks   5.00
Robert   Yates     6.00
Dr. W. Bruce Gordon,  5.00
Tommy Nakanishi    5.00
Vendome Hotel   6.00
Matt.   Brown     5.00
Frelone's  Grocery Store   5.00
Marocchi  Br03  6.00
Wm. Merrifield  .:  5.00
L. R. Stevens (Goods)   5.00
King George Hotel    5.00
T. H. Mumford   6.00
Lang's Drug Store (Goods)  5.00
A. MacKinnon (Goods)   6.00
Royal Candy Store   6.00
C. H. Tarbell & Son  (Goods) 5.00
City  Meat  Market    5.00
William   Douglas   ....*..;.  5.00
Mann's   Bakery    3.00
Union Tailor (U. Watanabe).... 2.50
Cumberland Supply Store   2.50
G. Curwen     2.50
M. Shiozuki, Jeweller   2.50
E. Aida (Cumberland Tailor).... 2.60
J.  H. Cameron    2.50
Harling & Ledlngham   2.50
Wilcock Bros.   .._  2.50
Alex. Henderson   2.50
Jos.   Aspesy.    2.60
William. Hutton  2.60
Jay-Jay Lunch Room   2.50
Eagle Candy Store   2.00
T. E. Banks  i  2.0U
Wm. McLellan Sr  2.00
Fred Pickard  2.00
Peter  McNlven     iM
Charles Spooner   2.00
E. L. Saunders   2.00
J. C. Brown   2.00
John  Ninatti    2.00
Chow  Lee    2.00
Kam Sun Low   2.00
Lai   Fung     2.00
i Chinese Masonic Hall   2.00
Foo  Yuen    *.*.  2.00
Wong Why'   2.00
T.   Nakano     2.00
M. Iwasa   2.00
Wing Chong   2.00
.Mrs. L.  Francescini    1.30
Frank  Scavarda     1.00
Tom   Kee *  1.00
Kee Fung    1.00
Sun On  Wo Co  1.00
Sun Chong Club   1.00
Ho  Hee    1.00
Chew  Tai  Co  1.00
Lam Kee  50
Hop  Ucli   60
Yee Yuen Sheng Kee  50
$10|ForLargestFish
From Comox Lake
A prize of $10 will be nwrded to the
member of the local Rod and Gun
Club catching the largest lish in
Comox Lake during the season, the
lish to be weighed and recorded at
Mumford's store. This wos decided
at the monthly meeting of the club,
held In thc Athletic hall on Sunday
last.
The Club intends purchasing a
quantity of wild rice and celery seed
to sow around Ihe different swamps
und lakes in the neighborhood. It is
claimed that this sort of food will
keep large numbers of wild duck fn
the vicinity during the winter. Tho
matter of re-stocking Comox Lake
with trout was brought up. -It WU3
decided to ask tlie Department of
Fisheries for some Kamloops and
Cut-throat trout to re-stock with.
There are no Kamloops trout fn Comox Lake at present, bul tlle general
opinion Is that this species should do
very well here.
Constant reports have been coming
in about dogs running deer, and it
was decided to report them to the
game warden for investigation. Tlie
shooting of grouse during the breeding season was also bruughtup, and
as there seems to bc a considerable
amount of ihis practice going on, it
was decided to help the game warden
try and put a stop to it.
" The president, Mr. It. Coe, stated
that there were over 50 paid up members in the club and that the linances
were in excellent condtlon.
lt has been reported to the Guu
Club that male grouse hove been shot
ln large quantities, and members of
the local club have placed themselves
on record "to Inform the provincial
police of anyone they know of doing
such nn unlawful act, irrespective of
their standing in the community."
CUMBERLAND LOST IN
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
TOTAL  (to date)    *I,(NHMMI
'THE RED WIDOW" WILL
BE PRESENTED HERE
Baseball for the 1027 season was
officially ushered In hist Sunday
afternoon when Cumberland and
Bevan met In an exhibition match
before a large crowd, on the Recreation Ground here, lt was the flrst
gome played In this city since the
1925 season and Incidentally the players on both (earns showed signs of
lack of practice in their fielding, although tlielr hotting seemed not to
be greatly affected. Cumberland
came out on the short end of a 12-8
score, nearly nil the runs heing the
result of a flock of errors. Bennie
and Hunden pitched four and Ave
Innings respectively for the locals,
with Altken going the whole route for
Bevan, while "Bee" Westfield and J.
Robertson were the respective catchers.
Thcse-two leoms will meet again on
May 24 as a feature of the sports here,
and by that date it is expected that
they will be settled down into something like mid-season form.
Successor to "The Beauty Shop"
AFTERNOON TEA
WELL ATTENDED
Just a year ago tlie Courtenay lodge j
of Elks, assisted by some sixty-five of
the leading singers and entertainers i
of Courtenay and Cumberland, presented tbe rollicking musical comedy.
"The Beauty Shop," in these two
citie.s, and it met with unusual success in every particular. This same
organization has now secured tbe
same directors who produced "The
Beauty Shop," and hnve enlisted tlic
services of more than sixty ladies and
gentlemen and they are hard at work
hold day and night on a new but
similar affair for this season. Tbe
title of tliis new production In "Tbe
Red Widow" and it will be good news
to know it was written in its entirety,
book and music, by the same writers
DANCE ANNOUNCEMENT
Imperial Pavilion wish to announce I assumed a rakish angle, the windows
thai starting Saturday, May 21, thero | were Windless and curtninless, whilst
will be a dance In the Pavilion every ! holes appeared at various places in
Saturday night with lhe orchestral the roof where the firemen had heen
the best procurable. Don't forget the compelled to hack out the shingles,
big Holiday Dance on May 24th,-and i Inside was a flood of water, which
this Saturday, May 21st. | poured relentlessly on  the heads of
,    ,    ,    , i who wrote "The Beauty Shop."   The
In   spite   of  yesterdays   liiclemcnt I |)jp(,e !(1)Ilull(is, ,„ ,.|eVei* comedy linen.
weather, quite a number attended the j (unny    situations,    contains    twenty
afternoon tea which was given by Dr. snappy singing and dancing hits and
Is elaborately dressed aud staged.    II
lias recently been a  huge success In
Saskatoon, Regina and other eastern
cities and wlll. no doubt, meet with
success   here,   inasmuch   as
patrons  of   lasl   year's   performance
i still remember It with pleasure.   One
performance will be given iu the No-
I Ilo   Theatre   nn   Thursday   evening,
and Mrs. E. R. Hicks In aid of the
Cumberlad Tennis Club. Fortunately
the weather cleared up ln the late
afternoon, and those who hud taken I similar
along their racquets were able to
enjoy a few sets.
Next week's tea will  be given  by
Mrs. O. W. Clinton on Thursday, on'June 2nd.
the verandah at thc home of Dr. and | '	
Mrs. MacNaughton, weather permit- An examination for miner's certill-
tlng. In thc event of rain, the tea cates is being held this week. Mr. W.
will not be postponed but will take IG. Wilson sluing for his second class
place at Mrs. Clinton's own home, |certificate, Mr. T. R. Jackson and
Dunsmuir Avenue. Mr. It. Strachan are the examiners.
Discuss Disposal
Of Canteen Fund
At Courtenay Post
COURTENAY, May IT At thi?
meeting of tbe executive of tbe local
post of tlie Canadian Legion on Monday night, the chief topic under dh-
cussiou was ttie disposition of the
revenue from the Canteen Fund, tho
Interest of which is now said to he
greater than the amount which Is
being expended fro nit he principal,
Secretary (J. II. Capes was appointed
a delegate to the Vancouver nmveii-
tlou to be held next month. .Mr. \V.
P, Beavani the /.one representative.
also expects to lie in Vancouver for
the convention. These members will
convey to the Convention their comrades' desire that a continuation of .
the present use of the Fund for needy
cases be made, if possible nn an in
creased scale and an enlarged scope.
Tbey will also offer suggestions thut
scholarships for boys nf ex-service
men may be provided from the Fund,
also tlie possibility of ttie erection uf
a suitable recreation building for ex-
service men at Vancouver. Another
suggestion for the use of thc Fund
will he the provision of a scheme of
group insurance in the form of paid
I up life policies. This Is to betaken
up nt tbe convention witb a request
that the matter lie furlher gone Into.
Mr. F. \V. Tull was appointed a
delegate in response to a request from
the Courtenny Assembly of .Vatlve
Sons for a meeting to be held oil
Tuesday night iu connection with the
celebration  of  Dominion  Jubilee,
We're In The Navy Now, 4&Ktf£# Ho-Ilo, May 23-24 PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PRIDAY, MAY 20, 1927.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, MAY 20. 1927.
Heaven's.*name where is this thing to stop? Can
a woman neglect her child, her home and her husband to go on drunken carousals with another
woman's husband and then be sobbed over because "she was lonesome when her little girl went
to school and her husband went to work." There
are no words to express our disgust for this sob-
sister of the daily press who writes such balderdash. The woman in this case violated every law
that makes a woman the keeper of the home and
she ought to be punished swiftly and without the
miserable exhibition which has marked her trial.
A reporter, employed upon a big city daily, seeking to analyze the cause of a most revolting crime
in which a wife and her paramour killed the husband, writes: "But now that her
MAUDLIN little daughter was grown to 7
SENTIMENT and had begun to go to school,
and now that the husband went
off every morning only to return for the evening
meal, time drooped and seemed to stop for the
woman. The stillness and solitude of the home
frightened her. A woman is social, she must be
where people are. And there across the river
was million-footed Manhattan, gay with a life
that offered every experience, every adventure
and every sin."
What twaddle! And they pay people for
writing that kind of slush. If the stillness and
solitude of the home frighten a normal woman,
the institution of marriage might just as well be
abolished. If time hangs so heavy upon a married woman when her husband is at work and her
child is at school that she must yield to the temptations of the gay life the world might just as
well abandon all pretense of respectability and
decency. The position taken by the newspaper
reporter is neither truthful nor wholesome.
There is nothing which the normal woman
loves more than to manage and care for her home
and family and those who do this well have no
time for loneliness and time never hangs heavy
on their hands. The old saying, "Man works
from sun to sun, but woman's work is never done"
is still true in most parts of the country. Wives
and mothers know that the tasks most decent,
women face still require about twenty-five hours
to the day.
The bringing up of a seven-year-old daughter
is, in itself, a tremendous task. The care of her
body, the development of her mind, the super-
' intendence of her morals and manners—to say
nothing of her sorrows, is so absorbing an occupation that the average mother welcomes as a joyful and well-earned rest those few hours when
the child is at school.
It is all bosh and maudlin sentiment to excuse
a gin-drinking prostitute and murderess, who so
far forgets her duties as wife and mother, under
the plea that she was led into temptation because
of the stillness and solitude in her own home.   In
A few days ago we stood at the grave of a man
who thirty.years ago was working, ten hours a
day, for $9.00 per week. On that wage he kept
his little family, put his only
THE VICIOUS   daughter through high school
CIRCLE and paid for a little home. He
later, of course, received higher
wages and his expenses mounted in proportion.
Never again was he able to accomplish as much
on his income as he did in those old days when
his pay was $9.00 per week. All of which causes
us to stop and wonder just where this vicious
circle of raises in wages is leading us. Five
thousand paperhangers, decorators, and painters
recently struck for $14 a day, the week to consist
of five eight-hour days.
What we would like to know is this: If a
paperhanger or painter is worth $14 a day, a
college professor is surely worth $50 a day, and
a doctor $60 a day. An ordinary school teacher
who trains children properly ought to be worth
as much as the man who paints a garage and a
street cleaner, on this basis, should have $9 a day.
If the paperhanger gets $14 a day this year,
he will want $16 a day next year. What will this
thing lead to? The plumber finds it costs him
more to live, so he charges more for his plumbing.
This makes it more expensive for the butcher to
live, so the butcher charges the plumber more for
his meat.
This is what economists call the "vicious
circle." The only point we wish to raise is shall
bricklayers, paperhangers, plasterers and other
craftsmen lead the procession.   And if so, why?
There is something about a bath, a shave and
clean linen that makes a man respect himself and
puts new courage in his heart.   Pick up a dirty
bit of life's driftwood; wash, shave
DRESS UP   and dress him; give him a shine
and a cane, and he will hold his chin
up and look the world in the eye. Since clothes
make the man, so far as his own feelings are concerned, it is the duty of every man who has his
way to make in the world to array himself ip such
attfre as may be required to give him self-respect.
For many thousands of years fine raiment has
meant authority and conscious superiority, and
rags have meant degradation and servility.
RED CROSS CAMPAIGN
FOR MILLION DOLLARS
The Canadian Red Cross, on Empire
Day will enter on a nation-wide campaign to raise tl.000.000 with which
to carry on its comprehensive peace
time programme in the Interests of
the returned soldier and the health of
the citizen generally, a programme of
national welfare on which It has already spent a sum of over $7,000,000
since the war.
Chief Commissioner J. L. Blggar of
Red Cross Headquarters, states that
plans for the campaign are well forward in all provinces so that it is now
only a matter of days until the first
posters appear in many parts of the
Dominion nnd the first guns are tired.
While the general plans of campaign have been worked out at headquarters, the detailed arrangement in
the nine provinces have been in the
hands of the various Presidents and
Directors who will carry them onward
to   the   close   of   the   campaign   on
Dominion Day In thc way best suited
to their districts.
It Is understood that the Society
will make its appeal directly on Its
record of accomplishments ln its services for the disabled soldier, its 39
Outpost Hospitals, the Seaport Nurseries in Halifax, Saint John and Quebec, the Junior Red Cross now numbering in Canada 140,000 children
engaged In the pursuit of health for
themselves and handicapped children;
the Disaster Relief activities of recent
times, and the Home Nursing Training
which lias been extended to over 12,-
000 women and girls In the last three
years.
Where's the Built
A countryman was visiting the town
nnd happened to see a lot of young
fellows outside a rifle range. So he
went up to Ilic attendant and procured
a rifle.
"What be I do with this?" he asked.
"Oh." said the attendant, "If you
hit the bull's eye you can have your
money back."
The countryman grinned and stood
for several minutes fingering the rlfl*).
The attendant watched him for some
time, and then said:
"What are you waiting for?"
"Waiting?" said the yokel.    "I be
waiting for the bull.   Wheer ls It?"
Answer That One)
Father: "When Abe Lincoln was
your age he was making his own
living."
Son: "Yes, and when he was your
age he was president."
The "OEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & JHalrdmser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 60c
Children'! hair cut aay style 36e
Comox Pure
Jersey Ice Cream
—because there is none better
AT YOUR FAVORITE FOUNTAIN
Support a home industry-get the best
Comox Creamery
Association
Courtenay.
fcaaea t*t
AT IT AGAIN!
COURTENAY LODGE. NO. 61, B.P.O. ELKS
present their Second Musical Comedy Success
The Red Widow
GAIETY THEATRE, COURTENAY
May .'{1st and June 1st
ILO-ILO THEATRE. CUMBERLAND
Thursday, June 2nd
Hf\ CAST ANI) CHORUS flfk
OF 70
Pretty Girls, Snappy Songs. Nifty Dances
Beautiful Costumes, Special Scenery
■asajssaMs-i ■— *.aiWA!d*a»uaa)s]HEai^nM»n)asainAai:
THREE HOURS OF MIRTH
AND MELODY
Book your scats early at Lang's Drug Store
75«> and $1/*>     —PRICES—      75o and $1.00
TENDERS KOH (UAL
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the Purchasing Agent, Department of
Public. Works, Ottawa will bo received
at his office until IS o'clock noun
(daylight saving), Wednesday, June H,
1927, for the supply of coal for the
Dominion Buildings and Experimental
Farms and Stations, throughout thc
Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan.
Alborta and British Columbia, and at
Kenora, Ontario.
Forms of tender with specifications
and conditions attached can bc obtained from O. W. Dawson, Chlof
Purchasing Agent, Department of
Publlc Works, Ottawa; J. E. Cyr,
Supt. of Dominion Buildings. Winnipeg, Man.; H. E. Matthews, District
Resident Architect, Winnipeg, Man.
O. J. Stephenson, District Resident
Architect, Regina, Sask.; J. M. Stevenson, District Resident Architect,
Calgary, Alta.: and J. O. Brown, District Resident Architect, Victoria, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the above mentioned
forms.
The right to demand from the successful tenderer a deposit, not exceeding 10 per cent of the amount of
the tender, to secure the proper fulfilment of the contract, Is reserved.
By order,
S. E. O'Brien,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, May 11, 1927.
20-21
CONDUCTED
TOURIST THIRD CABIN
EXCURSION
to
Glasgow -*
Liverpool
"8.8. ANDANIA"'
from Montreal July 8
OCEAN   FARE  SINGLE, $95
RETURN. $170 (PLUS TAXI
Passengers will leave Vancouver
July 2nd and will be personally
conducted by Mr. Frank Lefeaux
of our Vancouver office.
DECK SPORTS
CONCERTS
DANCING
<aaa»iaaB>.<«B»<>«BB.
Apply to Local Agents or to the
Cunard & Anchor-Donaldson
Lines
[622 Hastings St. W.       Vancouver
CANADIAN NATIONAL
EUROPEAN TOURS
P.P. Harrison, iM. L. A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay            Phone 258
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel ln Evenings.
Telephone  U6R or  24
A maximum of travel through particularly Interesting countries at a
minimum of expense Is provided ln
the Canadian National Educational
Tours this summer through Scotland,
England, France, Belgium, Switzerland aud Italy.
Two tours have been arranged and
sailing will be made from Montreal,
July tl, on thc S.S. "Andania," direct
to Glasgow. Very careful attentiou
has been given to itineraries Involved.
Tour No. 1 is a 37-day trip on sea
and land, visiting important cities ln
Scotland, England, France, Belgium,
Switzerland. All expenses, (372.50,
Montreal to Great Britain and the
Continent and return to Montreal.
Tour No. 2 is a 51-day trip on sea
and land, visiting in Scotland, England, France, Belgium, Switzerland
and Italy. All expenses, (501.00,
Montreal to Great Britain and the
Continent and return to Montreal.
There will he low excursion fares
to the seaboard from points in the
Prairie Provinces.
These tours will be personally conducted from Western Canada, and
while overseas will be under the
direct care and supervision of thoroughly responsible and reliable
organization, fully qualified ln every
particular to successfully look after
the interests of our patrons.
The sight-seeing program is very
complete and generous. Automobiles
and motor coaches are freely used.
All sight-seeing is well planned to
save unnecessary fatigue and to see
the worth-while places within thc
time at our disposal. Competent lecturers will reveal to our patrons thc
outstanding features, literary, historic,
artistic or scenic ot the Old World
centres visited.
Edward W. Bickle, local agent tor
the Canadian National Railways, will
be glad to discuss these tours and
arrange all details. 14-21
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat Quality
BEEF, VEAL, HUTTON AND
PORK
JOHN INGLIS
Tht Practical WhIU Tailor
COURTENAY, B. G.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Offlce Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
.;.laaa1>«BB.1.«Ba1iaaa. ,h
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good service,  reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel!
iimi — m ——■■—a
Fresh and Cured Fiah
1    HOTELS AND CAMPS    f
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO I
Our Motto:
"QUALITY  AND  SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   •   •   Prof riator
U TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Licensed Taxi Driver
UNION   HOTEL     I
Cumberland, B. C. ^eW
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone It Plea* 11 •      *-	
<l
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1927.
THE CUMBCRLANP ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
■'■«■*.«■».■►* » •    |
Ilo-llo Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
;*$£*
G Qaramount Qlcture	
MARRIAGE
Marriage
Marriage
Virginia Valli and Allan Durant, a
sterling young German actor, head a
great cast whicli appears In "Marriage.' a mighty drama of matrimonial mysteries, whicli comes to the
Gaiety theatre next Monday and Tuesday, May 23-24, and to the Ilo-llo on
Wednesday and Thursday, May 25-20.
This lllm Is "Fox Films version of
H. G. Wells' widely discussed novel,
"Marriage." R. William Neill. director of the production, deserves much
credit for his skillful handling of the
theme.
The story concerns the marriage of
an idealistic young man to a young
lady of materialistic tendencies. The
clash of their temperaments, In spite
of the fact that they are madly In love
with one another, forms the basis of
a compelling theme.
aanaaa   aaa   aaai^
Next Friday and Saturday
f)H what a
V boy   ahe
makes in this
colorful, f.ait-
moving, roman-
tic comedy I
Dashing spirits
—gorgeous fun
—you'll hail His
Royal Shyness as
the greatest of
screen comediennes!
with
ANTONIO MORENO
Srtnuric h 4pm CUi.lm. Jatnston
Inns l»» nm* h G<*ori« Mm* I
HtCnScnton I
Directed by
SIDNEY FRAWKLIN
nnlh CREIGHTON HALE
rtW ROY ffAICY
a Me&qffi^ ffVi/n-^^ct picture
Big Holiday Special, May 23 & 24
We're in the Navy
Now
also Tom Mix in "No Man's Gold"
Wednesday, Thursday, May 25,26
WELLS' "MARRIAGE"
FILM COMES HERE
Attractions for the
Coming Week
j
AN ANNOUNCEMENT!
Concerning the exhibition of a new,
most unusual screen production to be
Bhown at the Ilo-llo this Friday antl
Saturday. It is called "Variety."
Words printed on paper, flashed ou
the screen, or even spoken, cannot
begin to describe lt. Never before in
the long history of drama has there
been an achievement like this one-
never before sucli characters as you
will see in this production—characters that actually live before your
very eyes—characters whose Innermost emotions are bared—whose souls
are open before your gaze—you wlll
look Into the depths in their hearts—
you will experience their loves—their
hates—their desires.
Never before has the spoken drama
or the motion picture produced this
strange effect—a mysterious haunting
appeal that will occupy your thoughts
for days and days, even weeks after
you see It—and you will see lt—
everybody wlll see It.
"THE IDOL" BITES
DUST IN TOM MIX'
"NO MAN'S GOLD"
"The Idol" bites the dust in "No
.Man's Gold," Fox Films latest release
starring Tom Mix in a screen version
of J. Allan Dunn's widely read novel
of the desert, which comes to the llo-
Ilo next Monday and Tuesday, May 23
and 24, and to the Gaiety theatre on
Friday and Saturday, May 27 and 28.
Forrest Taylor, who had the leading
role ln the thriller "The Idol," has the
"heavy" role ln "No Man's Gold." In
making the selection Mix laughed and
said:
"I've always longed to make 'The
Idol' bite thc dust. Vou play the role
of Wat Lyman In 'No Man's Gold.'
Vou have found a fabulously rich
mine and Frank Healy, a gambler,
trails you and shoots you down. You
fall off your horse and bite the dust.
Frank Campeau, the gambler of '3
Bad Men' plays Healy, and Campeau
Is a sure shot, so you need have no
fear about biting the dust. Well attend to that."
All right with me," laughed Taylor. "I've devoured a lot of dust ln
films and I'm an expert now."
MARION DAVIES
IN A NEW ROLE
Marlon Davles, heroine of many-
romantic roles, is playing one unlike
any in her entire career, in her new
Cosmopolitan production, "Beverly of
Graustark," which comes to the Ilo-
llo next Friday and Saturday, May
27-28.
Miss Davles has played romantic
heroines In historical dramas of the
past; has been the center of court
Intrigues in mediaeval times, has
played roles laid In the Infancy of
New York, but this time she is playing the romantic center in a European court intrigue—but of the modern day.
Royalty goes through its devious
political bargainings and its Dur-
bnnked romances—just as in tho days
of "When Knglhthood Was In Flower"
—but It Is all strictly up-to-date—so
much so that a good deal ot modem
history is, perhaps inconsclously.
echoed ln Ihe story, which Is a spectacular adaptation of George Barr
.McC'utchcon's famous novel.
Miss Davles plays the heroine, an
American girl, cousin to the crown
prince of a European kingdom, who,
to aid her royal ulatlve, engages lu
a daring masquerade, in which, in his
uniform, she Impersonates him to foil
the*plot of a pretender to the throne.
Jllss Davles' male masquerade Is one
of the wonders of the screen, so perfect ls the illusion. In her uniform,
the star Is almost a, double for tlie
Prince of Wales.
"THE FIRE FIGHTERS"
TITLE OF NEW SERIAL
The first episode of the IIo-IIo's new
serial, "The Fire Fighters," will be
shown on Monday and Tuesday, May
23 and 24th, and succeeding episodes
will be shown every Monduy and
Tuesday for nine weeks thereafter.
Following is a synopsis of chapter 1.
Fred Powers, a widower and also
a member of the Danville Fire Department, wins enough money on the
victory of the Danville Brigade in tho
annual fire lighters' tournament to
build a home for his future wife, Mary
Kent. Grant Stewart, who seeks to
gain control of Fred's homestead,
upon which is located valuable water
power potentialities, has tried to turn
the race to the rival town, that Fred's
resulting poverty would force a sale.
Falling in this, Stewart's henchmen
get Powers into a crooked gambling
game in whclh he loses all his winnings and then gives Stewart a deed
to the homestead as security for a
loan which he also loses.
Fred's son Jimmie Is sent by Mary
Kent to tbe Kentucky Club for his
father. Fearing that the boy's entrance will stop the play, the henchmen send the lad upstairs. Powers
loses his all, but discovers Fenton's
crooked play and accuses him. Fen-
ton draws a gun but Powers shoots.
Fenton falls. Powers runs out. They
try to stop him. In doing so a lamp
Is overturned and the Kentucky Club
goes up In flames. Risking arrest.
Powers returns to rescue his son who
Is calling from the upper window for
help,
Gaiety Theatre
MONDAY AND TUESDAY, MAY 23-24
i !
III!
1 •
M
'•VNIMMMOOJKOVU
WELL*
A mighty
drama of
matrimonial
mysteries
! I
i i
i i
» < i
iii
l i
i i
i i
i i
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, MAY 25-26
••
Ilo-llo, May 23, 24
Gaiety, May 27, 28
WREi
ZHAVYNQH
h
WALLIE AND RAY STUMBLE
INTO CRADLE OF THE DEEP
YOU'RE IN THE NAVY NOW!
Those were the words yelled into
the ears of Wallace Beery and Raymond Hatton as they started working
on Paramount's "We're In the Navy
Now" which arrives at the llo-Ilo next
Monday and Tuesday, May 23-24, and
at the Gaiety Theatre next Friday and
Saturday, May 27-28.
Beery and Hatton are seen as a
couple of green gobs who enter the
Navy much against their will. In
fact, they wcre entirely oblivious of
the fact that they had become sailors
until they tried to leave tho naval
training camp.   Then—they were In
formed via the verse above that "they
were In the Navy now!"
Not taking lt at all seriously, the
boys had asked where food was being distributed. A long line outside
one of the buildings was pointed out.
They joined it but instead of geting
nourishment—got haircuts, vaccinations,   and   awful   fitting   uniforms.
Still in pursuit of lunch, they then
joined another line only to discover
that the start of It was located on an
army transport which was ahout to
leave for France!
That's enough fun for an ordinary
comedy but wc are Informed thnt
there's nothing the least bit ordinary
about  "We're  In    the    Nevy    Now."
What you have just rend Is merely
a record of the events In Iho lirst new
laugh-getting gags of the type which
made "Behind the Front" such a hit.
Edward Sutherland's latest production wns adapted hy John McDermotl
from .Monty Hrlee's original story.
Chester Conklin and Tom Kennedy
are featured. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1927.
ROUND trip FARES
On   Sale  May  22   to   September   30.
limit October 31
TO EASTERN POINTS
In Canada and the United states
Summer Tourist Tickets
TO EDMONTON AND CAlGARY.
Also
The Triangle Tour
VICTORIA 1'IUM'K KITKHT
On Sale May 15 tn Sept. 30.
■■SEE Canada in CANADA'S diamond JUBILEE YEAR   ibi,i.\iir
For  full  particulars  apply
Cumberland E. Vi. BICKLE Telephone 85
Or write C. F. Earle, District Passenger Agent, Victoria.
FIRESTONE
DEALERS
Demonstrate This Extra  Valut
The Firestone Dealer in your locality will gladly explain te
you the extra value of Gum-Dipping. He is prepared to
demonstrate how the cords of the carcass are saturated in •
rubber solution, insulating every fibre of every cord with
rubber, which minimizes friction. Naturally, tires built
of Gum-Dipped cords have extra carcass strength and
stamina insuring longer wear.
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
HAMILTON, CANADA
,utsa\\^sssTnt*s1       MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
grgtette
FIRESTONE BUILDS THE ONLY GUM-DIPPED TIRB»
YOUR DISTRICT AGENT:
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
Automobile Specialists
Phone 8 Cumberland, BC.
r-^Ti'L f
SOMETIMES THE
INFORMALITY OF THE
SPOKEN WORD IS
MORE EFFECilVE
THAN A LETTER.
"LONG DISTANCE, PLEASE"
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite lhe Drug Store.
WOULD INTRODUCE NEW
GAME BIRDS TO ISLAND
VICTORIA.—Steps will be taken by
the Victoria and District Game and
Fish Association to interest the
authorities in the introduction ot
capercaillze, something like a young
turkey, to the woods ot Vancouver
Island. This decision was reached at
a well-attended meeting of the association held last Friday.
J. H. Gillespie brought the matter
before the meeting. He said the forests around Victoria would be suitable to this class of game bird, which
is so valuable In Scotland. Some of
these birds had been brought here
once before but the arrangements for
their liberation were not perfect.
ALBERNI ROAD WILL
BE MADE SAFER
VICTORIA, May 17.—The narrow
piece or road leading directly into
Uberni, which gives trouble to many
motorists, will be widened and pointr
relocated to reduce the grade, Hon
W. H. Sutherland, Minister of Public
Works, assured a delegation of the
Automobile Club of British Columbia,
which waited upon him yesterday.
He also Informed the delegation
that the Government is proceeding
with the oiling ot the Island Highway
to Englishman's River, and if the
money appropriated tor thia oiling
lasts, work will be continued as far
as ParkBville.
1st prize, value $8.00:
4 Girls).   Open to the
1st prize, value $8.00;
List of Events at Cumberland's
Monster 24th May Celebration
10:30—1.   Boys' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:30—2.   Girls' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:35—3.   Boys' Race. 7 to 8 years, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:35—4.   Girls' Race, 7 to 8 years, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:40—5.   Boys' Race, 9 to 10 years; 75 yds; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:4ft—6.   Girls' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yds; 1st prize, value $1;
10:45—7.   Boys' Race, 11 to 12 years; 75 yds; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:46—8.   Girls' Race, 11 to 12 years; 75 yds; 1st prize, value $1;
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
10:50—9.   Boys' Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, value
$2; 2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
10:50—10. Girls' Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, value
$2; 2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
10:55—11. Boys' Race, 14 to 16 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, value
$3; 2nd prize, value $2; 3rd prize, value $1.
10:5f>—12. Girls' Race, 14 to 16 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, value
$3; 2nd prize, value $2; 3rd prize, value $1.
11:00—13. Boys' Race, 16 to 18 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, valu*.
$3; 2nd prize, value $2; 3rd prize, value $1.
2nd prize, value 50c; 3rd prize, value 25c.
11:00—14. Girls' Race, 16 to 18 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, value
$3; *2nd prize, value $2; 3rd prize, value $1.
11:05—15. Girls' Egg and Spoon Race, 14 to 15 years; 1st prize
value $2; 2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
11:06—16. Boys* Sack Race, 12 to 14 years; 1st prize, value $2:
2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
11:15—17. Girls' Shoe Scramble, 12 to 14 years; 1st prize, value
$2; 2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
11:20—18. Boys' Relay Race, (Team of 4 Boys).   Open to the
Public Schools of the district.
2nd prize, value $4.00.
11:80—19. Girls' Relay Race, (Team of
Public Schools of the district.
2nd prize, value $4.00..
11:40—20. Boys' Three-Legged Race, 12 to 15 years; 1st prize
value 3; 2nd prize, value $2; 3rd prize, value $1.
11:50—21. Girls' Three-Legged Race, 12 to 15 years; 1st prize,
value 3; 2nd prize, value $2; 3rd prize, value $1.
12 o'clock to 1 o'clock—LUNCH
1:00—22.   Girls' Skipping Race, 9 to 12 years; It pr:z3, va'
$1.50; 2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
1:05—23.   Tug of War, (Best of three pulls; team of 6 boy;;)
Open to Public Schools, of the district, 1 ut mmnbe
of a team must all be pupils of same school.   1st prize,
value $12.00; 2nd prize, value $6.00.
1:25—24.   Boys' Pillow Fight, 13 to 16 years; 1st prize, value $2.
2nd prize, value $1; 3rd prize, value 50c.
1:35—25.   Running High Jump, Open to Boys up to 18 years
1st prize, value $7.50; 2nd prize, value $5.
1:45—26.   Running Broad Jump, Open to Boys up to 18 year*
1st prize, value $7; 2nd prize, value $5.
1:55—27.   100 Yards Dash, Open to Boys of all Schools.   1st
prize, value $5; 2nd prize, value $2.50.
2:00—28.   Ladies' Nail-Driving Contest, open.   1st prize, value
$3; 2nd prize, value $2.
2:10—29.   Physical Drill Contest, open to any Public School classroom.   Team of 10, with pupil instructor (11 in all).
1st prize, value $11; 2nd prize, value $8.25.
2:30—30.   Boys' Slow Bicycle Race, 100 yards, open to Boys up
to 18 years.   1st prize, value $3; 2nd prize, value $2.
2:40—31.   Old Men's Race, 50 yards, open to men 50 years or
over.   1st prize, value $5; 2nd prize, value $2.50.
2:50—32.   Chinese Race, 100 yards, School pupils barred.   1st
prize, value $7.50; 2nd prize, value $4.00.
3:00—33.   Japanese Race, 100 yards, School pupils barred.   1st
prize, value $7.50; 2nd prize, $4.00.
3:10—34.   Men's 100 yard Dash, open.   First prize, value $10;
second prize, value $5.00. „,„„„
3:15—35.   Men's High Jump, open.   First prize, value $10.00;
second prize, value $5.00,
3:25—36.   Men's 220 yards, open.
second prize, value $5.00.
3:35—37.   Men's 1-mile Race, open.
second prize, value $5.00.
3-45_38.   Five-a-side Football competition, open; entries to be
not less than four teams.   1st prize, value $25.00;
2nd prize, value $12.50.
5:30—39.   Baseball Game, Cumberland versus Bevan, for a prize
$50.00 value. *    „
40.   Football final to be played after the Baseball game.
First prize, value $10.00;
First prize, value $10.00;
PARADE PRIZE LIST     m
BEST DECORATED FLOAT   2S5'92
BEST ADVERTISING FLOAT  xfixX
BEST DECORATED AUTOMOBILE  "Ig'Sx
BEST COMIC GROUP      {\l'\\7.
BEST DECORATED BICYCLE      f»-00
BEST CHARACTER REPRESENTATION $5.00
BEST ADVERTISING CHARACTER §§.00
BEST COMIC INDIVIDUAL      $5.00
PARADE PRIZES FOR DISTRICT SCHOOLS (OPEN)
Clam with faghest percentage in the parade  J?lw!2
Best Decorated Group of 16, Grade 5 down SlXnli
Best Decorated Group of 16, Grade 6 up  $1U.UU
PROVINCIAL POLICE MUST
PAY FULL RAILWAY FARE
OTTAWA.—By a ruling of the
Board of Railway Commissioners the
ippllcation of British Columbia for
■educed  rates  on  railways  for  Pro-
TrtyRie-9 Pudding
Made this Way.-
1 cup boiled rice
' i cup Borden's Eagle Brand
Condensed Milk
I teaspoonful vanilla
I egg
]■$ cup water
1,8 teaspoonful nutmeg
Mix Eagle Brand and **yate<*
together thoroughly.    Beat;
egg and blend with the mill:
andvanilla. Addthistnlxturo
to thc rice (boiled) and mix
well. Pour into buttered pan
ond sprinkle top wlth'thjnut-
meg.   Place pan in a dish of
water (as for a custard) nnd
bake in a slaw oven until a
golden brown. E2727
EAGLf*f]RAOTJ
CriNlSW§KOMII.N
vinclal police constables and officers
has been dismissed. The application
sought to have the railways directed
to carry Provincial policemen for two
and a half cents a mile while travelling in His Majesty s service, in
accordance with the Federal Government order-tn-councll of March, 1926.
Chief Commissioner McKeown
maintained that as a special rate was
created by the order-in-council it is
outside the Board's jurisdiction..
British Columbia has claimed the
railways have refused to recognize
the regulation made by the order-in-
council. The railways, In turn, have
insisted the order is void, and could
not be issued under the Railway Act.
Railway counsel argued that while
the railways were required to carry
members of His Majesty's forces under certain terms, this was done in
the right of the Dominion of Canada,
and not in the right of a Province.
BABY'S OWN
S0AP><
The Best Dairy Pafly
\&hc ever tf ami.
Wc built this SMP Dairy Pail for",
the man who is "tired of buying
new pails all thc time." They are
made of good heavy tin, highly
polished; strong bottoms; heavy
wire handles; and put together the
way a pail should be. You'll get full
value from every cent you invest
in SM.P Dairy Palis and other Dairy
Tin Ware. Made by
ibj Sheet Metal Productj Co. uuited '
montreal        toronto        winnipeg
VANCOUVCT CALCAHY
EHIS
iMPJ
LOAiarrniiJ
Jala aa   aa,   ^""'" wLMaT —,~_^ r *^^\UL*T
SM P DAIRY PAILS j
and Dairy Tin. Ware,M
>S
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 156
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
7: receive prompt attention.
STAK LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DU1ISD FLOORINGS,
AN13   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORI*
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night cnlls:  134X Courtenay
I Ofllce: 159 Cumberland. FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
A
News of Courtenay and District
PROPOSED SITE OF NEW
HIGH SCHOOL CLAIMED
TO BE UNSUITABLE
COURTENAY, May 18.—In connection with the new High School building, the provincial school architect,
Mr. Gibson, and school surveyor, Mr.
Middletou, from Victoria, were in
town on Monday. In company with
school trustee John Sutton, they had
Inspected the proposed Bite on Warren
Avenue. Mayor McKenzie reported at
Monday's com* ell meeting that these
gentlemen had stated that they would
not recommend the site to the Dept.
of Education, claiming that It was too
low, that It did not contain the necessary two acres and that the light
would not be suitable. It was clearly
shown, however, that the Ways and
Means committee, together with Mr.
Geo. Pldcock, chairman ot the scliool
board, had made a very careful inspection of the site, whicli is dry and
well drained. The addition of three
lots would make the requisite two
acres. The criticism as to the position for light was shown to be groundless as tbe building, according to Aid.
Macdonald, Is to be square witb the
same window space on ull sides. It
was pointed out thnt lt Is thc city's
place to provide the site. The report
of the Ways and Means committee
was therefore accepted and sustained.
The condition of Union Street in
front ot the Masonic temple came In
for discussion. Reduction of the
grade at this point had previously
been considered. This would mean
the tearing up of a small portion of
the hardsurfaclng done last year.
Aid. Douglas had been advised not to
touch the roads on account of the
proximity of the carrying out of the
1927. road surfacing programme. This
.entailed a long discussion concerning
street profiles. The mutter will be
taken up by Aid. Douglas with the
district assistant engineer.
Aid. Fielder submitted a Bliort report as chairman of the Water works,
which he reported as being in good
condition after the repairing of a
break on the Comox extension. Water
connections had now been made at
the golf course at Comox. Applications for water service had been received from Messrs. C. F. Green and
W. Farmler on the Cumberland road.
The city health officer, Dr. McKee,
submitted a report as to general conditions. This showed several drains
on private property to be in an unsanitary condition. Aid. Douglas
thought that the council should take
drastic action and notify the offenders
to rectify the nuisance. The cily
solicitor will first be consulted, however.
For the purpose of requesting the
city authorities to waive certain building requirements, Mr. Hugh Stewart
waited ou the council. He contemplated the erection of a building on
the corner of Union and Judson
streets, opposite Messrs. Tarbells, and
wanted permission to eliminate thc
fire wall until such time as Ihe ad-
Joining lot would be occupied. After
discussing the matter for an hour, Mr.
Stewart came to the conclusion that
the by-law would not permit of this
concession.
"Bible class" was proposed by Miss
Catchpole and replied to by Mr. A.
Morson. Mrs. J. J. McKenzie and
Miss Barbara Duncan took care of
the toast to the single folk. Instrumental solos were given by Mr. Les
Moody, and an amusing sketch was
staged by Fred Stephens, Sidney Williams and George Edwards.
| CAMPBELL RIVER NEWS |
Miss K. Townsend, of Duncan, is at
present on the nursing staff of the
Lourdes Hospital.
Mr. H. A. Rands, of the Canadian
Crown Willamette ls at present visiting with relatives at Oregon City.
Mr. W. D. McDonald, of Vancouver,
made a short visit here during the
week.
Dr. J. C. Morrison, of Vancouver,
has at present !i!b dental office at the
Willows Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Thulin are receiving congratulations on the birth
of a daughter, born Saturday, May 14.
Mr. George Francis and son returned to their home at Lake Cowichan.
The Ladies Auxiliary wish to announce the following proceeds received at the dance given May 17th
at thc Lilelana Pavilion. They also
wish to thank the public for their
kind support.
Receipts from admissions $199.40
Store  receipts    38.45
Total  receipts   $237.8S
Total  expenses     117.35
Supper Tendered
Married Folks By
Single Friends
COURTENAY, May 18.—The supper
and social evening tendered the married folks by the single people of the'
St. George's United Young People's
Guild In the church basement on Monday night was enjoyed by all present.
After an excellent repast community
singing was Indulged In and various
games played. Thero was a short
toast list which Included a toast to
the married people. This was given
by Mr. Charles Rive, who, for tho
benefit of the single ones, recalled the
famous advice of "Mr. Punch*' to those
about to marry, which was "Don't!"
This toast was responded to by Mr.
J. M. Rodger. A toast to thc Guild
was given by Mr. Copp Sr.. and was
responded to by Trevor Davis.   Tho
Balance on hand  $120.50
Mr. and MrB* J. Anderson, of Lund,
paid a short visit here early in the
week.
The dance In the Community Hall
last Saturday was Indeed a great success, people coming from all the surrounding districts. The amount
cleared was about $100.
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Anderson, of
Vancouver, passed through here the
latter part of last week, after visiting
at Quathiaski Cove.
The many friends of Mr. Alfred
Joyce, of Valdez Island, wlll be sorry
to learn that he is in poor health and
left Friday for the General Hospital
at Vancouver.
Mr. S. Ritchie left Sunday for Everett, where he wlll visit relatives.
Mr. Jack Lamb, of Menzies Bay,
met with a painful accident last
Thursday and has had the misfortune
to lose three fingers.
The Brownie Committee are giving
a Tea in the Community Hall on
Thursday. May 19th. Mrs. Hodgson,
of Port Alberni, wlll be present.
Mr. Jas. Whlthead, of Vancouver,
called and gave a picture show on
Wednesday evening in the Lilelana
Pavilion. '
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. English are at
present visiting the City.
Mr. H. Rogers, of Upper Campbell
Lake, was a visitor here during the
week.
FIRE CHIEF'S ACTION
DEBATED BY COUNCIL
(Continued from Page One)
rates. He said that In some of the
larger cities, the fire apparatus was
not allowed outside the city limits.
It might so happen that, while assisting at a fire some miles from the city,
there might be an urgent need for
their services in the city.
Aid. Macdonald agreed with Aid.
Pearse and said that although there
was no doubt that assistance would be
rendered at fires outside the city, the
Hre fighters should go as Individuals
and that tlie council had no authority
to send either the men or the equipment. The matter will be further
dealt with by the Fire Department
and the City Council at a meeting in
the near future.
Aid. Douglas said it was the Inteu-
tlon to purchase a new high power
car for the Department. The car
would be stripped down and painted
red aud gold to conform with the
other equipment. There were now 2
practices weekly, No. 1 company on
asaHHSwawsaHMHsaraai^^
AUTO LIMERICKS
There was an old man from Dundee
Whose life had been spent on the sea
So this clever old cuss
Made a boat of his bus
It's clever, you're bound to agree.
YOU'LL AGREE HERE'S
VALUE!
If you know automobiles
you'll find a reconditioned
car here that you can be
proud of the year around.
A car that looks and acts
like new for little money,
with a reliable guarantee
of satisfaction.
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
USED AND THOROUGHLY REBUILT CARS
P. O Box 190 Telephone 61
Tuesdays and No. i company on
Thursdays. It was intended to cooperate with the Cumberland Fire
Department in a display on the first
of July. The department would also
co-operate in the matter of flushing
city drains.
Aid. Macdonald's report for the
electric light committee covered a
recommendation of Mr. Southam, who
had recently been here, in connection
with a scheme of street lighting, when
he had submitted figures and plans.
The scheme would include five suspended lights at an approximate cost
of $40 each, and standard lights at
the junctions of Union and Isabel and
Union and Judson streets.
Electric Light Extension
Discussing the Lower Road pro •
posed extension, Aid. Macdonald said
that in order to take advantage of
the new agreement with the Canadian
Colliereis for the supply of electrical
energy at a reduced rate, It was necessary to Increase consumption. It was
therefore advisable to obtain more
consumers. He recommended that
temporary help be supplied at the city
hall to enable the city clerk to get
out and sell this electric power. The
sooner the city could take advantage
of a greater consumption which,
under the new agreement, would cost
no more, the better it would pay the
city. The recommendations were left
with the committee with power to act.
"A long discussion followed as to the
advisability of sending the city clerk
to Toronto or some other Eastern
point for the purchase of transformers for the new electrical sub-station.
An effort will be made by correspondence to locate suitable transformers
before any additional expense ls Incurred.
GIRLS ARRIVE FOR
FARM LANDS OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Medley of Settlers Arrive  At
Winnipeg, Including Lassie
For Comox, B. C.
WINNIPEG, May 17.—Scottish lassies in high boots, young Irish girls
whose brogue was as rich as the color
In their cheeks, Welsh families and
groups of rural English, Danes and
] Swedes, as well as Mennonite women
with kerchiefed heads, and Czeck
laborers, were Included In what was
perhaps the most cosmopolitan train-
load of new Canadians over the Canadian Pacific lines this season. The
special, carrying close on to 500
passengers from the Ss. Montnairn,
reached Winnipeg at 6:30 this morning.
Parents In Comox
Very proud of tlie manner In which
Bhe used her left leg, five-year-old
Gladys Thompson hopped from the
train. Gladys crossed on the Ss.
Montnairn last February with her
parents, who are now living at Comox,
B. C, but before disembarking the
little girl slipped and broke her leg.
since which time she has been in the
hospital at St. John. Immigration
authorities sent her In care of Conductor Binning to Winnipeg and the
Canadian Pacific officials will see tliat
she reaches her parents in safety.
Destinations
Thirty girls are going to farms In
Alberta and British Columbia. Of the
total number of passengers, 499 adults and seven children will move on
to British Columbia.
COURTENAY
Mr. Elijah King left on Wednesday
to attend the Presbytery of the United
Church in Vancouver.
Mr. Fred A. Burgess, of Vancouver,
was a recent business visitor in town.
Mr. H. C. Erlckson of the Guaranty
Savings and Loan Society, is In the
district on business.
Mr. Harold Tull is being congratulated on having obtained second class
honors In first year Arts at the B. C.
University. He ranked fifteenth out
of a class of five hundred.
The Misses A. and M. Moncrleff,
formerly of Courtenay, were both
successful in passing ln the exams of
the flrst year at the University.
Mrs. M. Williamson and Miss Laura
Williamson are spending a few days
In Vancouver.
Mr. A. Stokes of Victoria, and local
representative of the Swift Co., Ltd.,
is about to locate In N'anaimo. Mr.
Stokes is well known In football
circles throughout the province, having been on the referee's list for several years.' He now holds the secretaryship of the Lower Island Football Association and what is regarded
as a distinct loss to the lower end of
the Island, will be this district's gain.
Ills Own Idea
A big burly negro was arraigned
before tli** judge on a charge of
assault, he having cut-up the face of
another negro.
Said the Judge, "Why colored man,
the devil must have been behind you
when tyou slashed that poor man's
face so badly."
He replied, "I guess you're right,
but I tell you it was my own Idea
when I bit off his ears."
RILEY'S TRANSFER
COAL    —
GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
—     WOOD
David Hunden, Junr.
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
255*=     PROMPT ATTENTION     ^
We have a reputation for Quality.   Purchase your
Bread and Cakes from
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
FOR HEALTH TRY OUR
PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT HEALTH BREAD,
HEALTH ROLLS AND
HEALTH MUFFINS
WEST COAST PLANTS ~
ARE PREPARING FOR
RUN OF PILCHARDS
UNION BAY SURPRISE
PARTY MUCH ENJOYED
VICTORIA, May 17.—Preparations
are being made to handle the greatest
output of pilchard oil and meal from
West Coast plants since the new industry was established, according to
word received from firms Interested
in handling the products from operators of the plants.
Pilchard operators are lining up
gangs of men for the West Const,
some of whom have already left to
help workman getting ready for the
pilchard run. Nineteen plants will be
operated this season.	
| UNION BAY, May 10—A surprise
party was tlle occasion of a very
entertaining evening at the Nelson
j Hotel on Friday. The genial and
i popular proprietor, Mr. J. Fraser, as-
j sisted by the staff, welcomed the.
[guests and the evening was spent In
jcards and dancing. Among' those
i present were: Mr. and Mrs. A. Auchlnvole. Mr. ann" Mrs. E. T. Searle. Mr.
and Mrs. M. H. Thomas', Mr. and Mrs.
Seymour Abrams, Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
Harwood, Mr. and Mrs. P. Reid, Mr.
| and Mrs. A. Kay. Mrs. Little, and
| among the visitors from Courtenay
'were Mr. and Mrs. E. MacDonald and
Mr. and Mrs. G. Van Hemert.
w
sssestsssassesssesesMesesesee
CUMBERLAND'S J $1,000
MONSTER 1927IIN PRIZES
3Cjjasasajas3S5PSa»sas-s=»ai-
CELEBRATION
Victoria Day, 24th of May
Big Parade leaves School at 9:30 a.m., proceeding through City and
thence up Dunsmuir Avenue to Recreation Ground.
Anyone may compete in Parade. Wonderful Prize*!
Adult Sports
* *    •
Children's
Sports
• • *
Five-a-Side
Football
PARADE PRIZE LIST—GENERAL W VvOrOna 11011
Best Decorated Float  $25.00 m        .   ■. . /rA
Best Advertising Float   25.00 § QT   MaV   UUCen
Hest Decorated Automobile 15.00 m J     ^c
Best Decorated Automobile
Best Comic Group   7.50
Best Decorated Uicycle   5.00
Best Character Representation 5.00
Best Advertising Character 5.00
Best Comic Individual   5.00
Parade Prizes for District Schools (open)
Class with  highest  percentage in
the parade  * 5.00
Best Decorated Group of 16, Grade
Five down   10.00
Best Decorated Group of 16, Grade
Six up   10.00
May Pole
Dancing and
Folk Songs
Baseball
Cumberland City Band will be in attendance
At the Recreation Grounds
CUMBERLAND
ALL DAY, MAY 24th.
«Be3S3Heasg3essss£s»E3ss5
SPECIAL TRAIN
Special train leaves
Union Bay for Cumberland and Way Points at
8:30 a.m.
SPECIAL TRAIN       B
Special train leaves
Cumberland   for   Union
Bay after the Sports at
6:00 p.m.
•irtaMa»«a^*«^si;tivaiitji PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1927.
; NO €
EVER*? :
Regretted
■buying
^lucuau
It pays to buy
good shirts
Shirts that are cut from
finest quality materials,
carefully tailored, of
attractive pattern and in
colors that won't fade.
Forsyth quality is guaranteed.
When you buy a Forsyth
Shirt the Forsyth Insurance Policy assures you
of complete shirt satisfaction.
No one ever regretted
buying quality.
SUTHERLAND'S
Used Cars
CHEVROLET COUPE, 1925 Model, as good as new in
every respect and a real bargain at   $680.00
FORD 1926 Roadster, in first class condition throughout, very reasonably priced at    $480.00
STAR COUPE, 1923 Model, has been completely reconditioned, selling at a sacrifice   $435.00
McLAUGHLIN K15, Touring Car, performs perfectly
and has good tires, repainted, top and curtains good;
offered to you at   $465.00
FORD Tourings and Light Deliveries at prices from
$50.00 up.
ALL CARS OVER $300.00 GUARANTEED
EASY TERMS
PIDCOCK & McKENZIE
Agents
HUDSON-ESSEX & DODGE BROS. MOTOR CARS
Personal Mention
Invitations have been issued for the
golden wedding anniversary of -Air.
and Mrs. •William Shearer, which will
take place at the G.W.V.A. hall on
Monday, May 23rd. The celebration
will take the form of banquet and
dance.
The Byng Boys will be at your
service on the evening of May 24th at
a peppy dance In the Uo-IIo hall.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAHENDHENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series.
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C.. or to any Government Agent.
Records wlll be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Rangj
and 8,000 feet per acre east of thai
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, In which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland.
.for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) ltfid Is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing.)
iand $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase airtl
Lease of Crown Lands,"
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres.
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES    ^_
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites.
condttlonai upon a dwe'l'ng being
erected In the flrst year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners, Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
Phone 2r> Courtenay Phone 25
;*-i-^^^si_^^^=^^^sviaiaasaa3a(3i5aa>aBs
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY
The Cash Store
•        *       .••>■—_-
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A NEW .STOCK OF
MEN'S OVERALLS, SHIRTS. AND WORK GLOVES
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Shearer and
family, of Cadomin, Alta., arlrved this
week to attend the golden wedding of
Mr. and Mrs. W. Shearer. Mr. Chris.
Pattlnson, M.L.A., of Edmonton, son-
in-law of Mr. and Mrs. W. Shearer,
accompanied  them.
* *   *
Mr. George Hunden, who has been
a patient at St. Joseph's Hospital,
Comox, suffering from an injury to
an eye, ls sufficiently recovered to be
at home.
* *   *
Miss Kate Robertson left Monday
last for Powell River.
* *   *
ltev. and Mrs. J. R. Hewitt and Mrs.
Geo. Richardson, motored to Nanaimo
last Tuesday en route to Vancouver
to nttend  United Church  Presbytery.
...
Mrs. Victor Frelone and Mrs. L.
Francescini left Monday morning for
Vancouver to attend the grand rally
of lhe W. B. A., which was held ln
the, Hotel Vancouver. Mrs. Frelone
representing the Cumberland Review
No. 17. On their return from the
terminal city they attended a meeting
of St. Cecilia Review. Nanaimo.
* *   *
Mr. B. Sheppard, who has been on
the staff of the City Meat Market for
the past twelve mouths, left Monday
last for Vancouver where he will
reside In future.
* *   • —
Mr. J. Brown- and small son, of
Victoria, are visiting Mr. and Mrs.
T. H. Mumford.
* *   *
Mr. W. B. Crombie, Insurance adjuster of Victoria, was a visitor to
Cumberland during the week.
RESIDENTS LEAVE TO
SETTLE IN OLD LAND
Autographic
KODAKS
$5.00 UP	
Load your Camera with the
dependable Film in the
yellow box for the 24th
Fresh Stock of all sizes
Flags for the 24th, 5c. up
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Have you cashed your Discount Bonds
Mr. and Mrs. Rees Rogers were
guests of honor at a farewell party
held on Saturday night last at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Jones.
West Cumberland. Mr. and Mrs.
Rogers arc leaving Cumberland this
week-end for the Old Country, where
they Intend to reside in future. On
the occasion of the farewell party the
rooms at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Jones were tastefully decorated,
seasonable flowers forming the main
decorative scheme. A very pleasant
evening was spent In music and
games, dainty refreshments being
served by the hostess. During tho
evening the guests of honor were I
presented with a travelling hag by
Mra. A. G. Jones, president of the
Welsh Society of Cumberland nnd district, who. on behalf ot the Society,
wished Mr. and Mrs. Rogers the best
of luck and health on their return to
thc old land.
Amongst those present were noticed
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams, Mr. and
Mrs. B. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. R. Coe.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Jackson, Mr. and
Mrs. E. Williams. Mrs. Reece and Mr.
and Mra. A. G. Jones.
You're planning to spend Ma)* 21th
In Cumberland, so why not plan to
attend thc dance In the Ilo-llo hall
thnt evening*.   Byng Boys playing.
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Men's
Chrome Split Gloves, per pair 	
"Tuf-Horse" (Moves, per pair   	
Horse Hide (Moves, per pair	
"Bronco" better quality, per pair	
All Genuine Horse Hide, per pair	
8-oz. Blue Denim Overalls, bib, per pair...
8-oz, blue denim Overalls, Jackets to match,
Blue Pants, Red Backs, strong, per pair....
9-oz Blue Denim Overalls (bibs)	
9-oz. blue denim Overalls, Jackets to match,
Pin Check Shirt 	
Good Ev'ery-Day Shirt 	
Blue Check Drill Shirt 	
$ .45
.65
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.95
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
1.95
2.25
1.55
DON'T MISS OUR CASH PRICES ON GROCERIES
Northwest Fairy (Soda) Biscuits, per pk  19c
Special in Brooms, 50c and   95c
Our Pink Salmon is going strong at per can     9c
Royal Crown Soap, per pkg. (6 bars)  29c
Royal Grown Cleanser, per can   10c
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY
THE CASH STORE
ijjajajaj-aaewessaMWTKMtawsi
l^feS
Johnson's Wax
Electric Floor
Polisher
Beautifies all your Floors and Linoleums
quickly, without stooping, kneeling, or even
soiling your hands.
Price complete, with Johnson's Lamb Wool
Mop for spreading Wax:
$48.50
Rent it or buy it from
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
*i*-SE»^»HHKraM*e«W^
What the Red Cross is doing
for the Good of Canada
For the Veteran
Befriends 3,500 soldiers still in hospital . . . relieves
sickness and need in their families . . . cares for the
soldier settler . . . provides sheltered employment for the
disabled in three Veterans' Workshops.
For the Children
Through Junior Red Cross, has aided   5,000 crippled
children and has pledged over 137,000 school children to
practice health habits and to serve others.
For the Pioneer
Brings nursing service to those in frontier districts through
39 Outpost Hospitals and Nursing Stations.
For the New Canadian
Welcomes and gives needed attention to immigrant mothers
and children at three Seaport Nurseries.
For the Mothers and Daughters
In Home Nursing Classes, has taught principles of nursing,
diet and home hygiene to over 12,000 women and girls.
For the Disaster Victim
Is organized  to afford prompt relief to sufferers from
lire, flood and epidemic.
Nation-Wide Appeal 1
Canadian Red Cross Society
Send Contribution, to:
British Columbia Division, Canadian Red Croit Soei.ty,
626 Pender Street Weit, Vancouver, B.C.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"    .
This is a 1/2-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
5Es*esMaestse3Mafca£3esM=aas=^^
HOSPITAL CONTRACT
AWARDED TO J. D. BROWN
Repairs to the root and Interior of
A Victoria contractor. Mr. J. D.
Brown, has been awarded the contract
tor the building ot nn addition to the
Cumberland General Hospital in competition with local and Vancouver
firms. The amount of Mr. Brown's
tender was $14,840. O. Sutherland &
Co., of Vancouver, sent ln a tender
for $15,894, and Little Brothers, of
Cumberland, figured the contract at
$17,260.
The general contract, for whicli
these tenders were opened here last
week hy the board of directors, Includes wiring, plumbing and heating
In the new wing as well as some
alterations to the present structure.
The new extension was designed by
William Owen, engineer for the Cann-
dlan Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited.
It will be one story high of frame
construction on concrete foundations,
and wlll give provision for nine additional   wards.   The   alterations  to
! Itruufort House, damaged by fire on
j Tuesday lust, have been commenced.
; Damage to the property Is eatlmatod
Iat $6,000 and to furniture, etc., ln the
: upper storeys approximately $2,500.
...
J Llcut.-tfol. Charles W, Vllllere paid
j a visit to Cumberland on Thursday,
■ returning to Victoria the Bame day.
I '   *   *
j    A Musical Service will be given by
' the choir of Cumberland United
Church on Sunday evening, May 22,
nt 7 p.m. Everyone cordially Invited.
Sunday school at 10 a.m., and 11 a.m.
service will he withdrawn.
the present structure include remodelling of tbe front and the conversion
of Ihe drying room Into a laundry.
I Mr, .Brown will start work at once
' and will use local labor and materials
to the greatest extent possible.
Hay •-•Illi Finish It off by attending
the dance In the Uo-IIo hall. Byng
Hoys orchestra.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068899/manifest

Comment

Related Items