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The Cumberland Islander Aug 20, 1926

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
i*
.Provincial Llbrar-
With which is conuollilated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 34.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA        FRIDAY. AUGUST  20—1926.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
PRIME MINISTER RECEIVED
GREAT RECEPTION AT
ROYSTON MONDAY
MR. MEIGHEN DECLARES AT ROYSTON INEQUALITIES OF
PACT WITH  COMMONWEALTH  SHOULD  BE  ADJUSTED
Twelve Hundred Comox-Alberni People Hear Eloquent Address
on Vital Issues
Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, speaking at Royston last Monday
night on the Australian treaty, said the Conservatives would not
wipe out the treaty. The party would reform it, however, to
make it more acceptable to the Canadian producer. The result
of the treaty was that butter rolled in from Australia. "Has
it reduced the price?" was asked. "Certainly," said Mr. Meighen.
"The price is up this year because world prices are up."
The farmers were entitled to the benefits of that increase in
price. The farmers, like any other manufacturers, were entitled
to the advantages that came from it. A protective tariff was
essential to this country, he said.
Mr. Meighen was received with tu- tories were closed or not. The people
multuous applause as he rose to
speak, and was presented winth two
beautiful bouquets by two young
girls. In acknowledging his reception, Mr. Meighen jestingly said that
Dr. Tolmie's appearance at thc meeting showed the Government had some
weight.
Having read some of Mr. Nelll's
speeches, Mr. Meighen said that he
thought It waB time someone should
outline that candidate's position.
Every man had a right to stand for
a party. He preferred a roan to stand
by the principles of the party he supported and not appear as an Independent.
Dealing with the question of trap! put it on the imported car.
licences,  Mr.  Meighen  said  that  he     The   Canadian   manufacturer   had
was not as familiar with the fishing  been obliged to pay a duty on the
Industry as those who lived by the [parts used, and the Government re-
sea.   He had had the matter brought milted the revenue duty on parts. In
A. W. NEILL WILE HOLD
MEETING TONIGHT IN
ILO-ILO THEATRE
A. W. Neill, Independent candidate
for Comox-Alberni, will hold a meeting in the Ilo-llo .Theatre tonight,
Friday, at 8:00 p.m. sharp. Mayor
Alex. Maxwell will act as chairman
and a cordial Invitation is extended
to all Interested to be present and
hear the sitting member for Comox-
Alberni give an account of his stewardship while at Ottawa.
who were concerned were the mon
who worked in the Canadian factories.
There was consternation when the
move was made. Mr. Robb said they
are going to stay by their guns. The
Government said it was not going to
quit Its citadel. We knew they would,
but were interested to see how they
would do lt. And accordingly they
made their escape by the back window.
The luxury tax put on cars raised
the revenues to the country. It did
not affect the manufacturer as the
user of the car paid it. The Liberals
turned the luxury tax into a duty by
taking it off the Canadian car, and
to  his  attention   at  Prince  Rupert.
Hearing the views of the fisher folk
this way the manufacturer had just
the same protection aB before.   The
there against traps, he had come to j cars were cheaper because the luxury
the conclusion that it was in the best j tax was taken off, and lost to the
Interests to suspend the trap licences,  treasury.   Those making larger cars
He had wired Ottawa in the matter
and was satisfied that this would be
done.   He thought the subject, could
had greater protection than ever
Tax on Clothing
'After all," said Mr. Meighen, "was
Logging Camp
Foreman Killed
In Strange Way
COURTENAY, Aug. 18.-A fatal
logging accident occured on Wednesday morning when Thos. Mcllfatrlck,
foreman of the logging operations of
P. L. Anderton at Merville, met his
death. In the absence of the regular
teamster, Mcllfatrlck took the team
himself and was hooked on to two
logs taking them down the hill to
the sea. There are a few Chinamen
employed at this camp and when the
team and the logs arrived at the landing stage without the driver, one of
the chinamen went up the skid-road
and found the badly mutilated body of
the foreman, which had evidently been
dragged some distance down the hill
with the logs. Mcllfatrlck came to
this district about three years ago
from Alberta. He was a good steady
worker and well liked. He was a
thoroughly experienced man with
horses. His wife and three children
make their home at Bevan where he
was formerly working for the Gwllt
outfit. It may be necessary to hold
a coroner's inquest.
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Islander, during the past week.
received the following wire from Mr,
J. E. Armishaw:
"I am contesting as Farmer-Labor.
Please make announcement. J. E.
Armishaw."
A news item appeared in one of
the Victoria papers that Mr. Armishaw was contesting Comox-Alberni
as a Labor candidate and the telegram
just received is confirmation that he
Is definitely in thc field.
Decisive Wins
Scored By Locals
On Tennis Court
WINNIPEG SPORT WRITER
SAYS   CUMBERLAND
THE BETTER TEAM
Interesting Write-up of Football Finals by Tommy Cavaghan
in Winnipeg Tribune B
BRITISH MINISTER GUEST
AT BEAUFORT HOUSE
have been dealt with to better ad- the automob„e the nr9t thlng t0 be
vantage to all concerned. He was in
favor of duly weighing the whole
matter from all standpoints and arriving at a permanent policy that
would be satisfactory.
Old An* Pensions
On the matter of old age pensions,
relieved of taxation? The clothing
on your backs was made to retain
the sales tax. The sales tax on clothing was sixty-six and two-thirds per
cent higher than when the King
Government came into power."
The  great  mass  of the people of
Mr. Meighen said that consideration the country never paid income taxes
of the situation by all concerned had | and never should. The King Gov-
recommended a conference of all the '■ eminent asserted it had done a great
provinces. This conference was neverj thing in reducing the Income tax.
called, and Mr. King undertook to The King Government had a three
Introduce a bill on the subject. The j per cent sales tax in force when it
provinces, with the exception of one J came Into power. It was raised by
or two, did not endorse It. The Con- that Government to six per cent,
servatlves did not oppose the bill, Later It was reduced to Ave per cent
knowing their motives would he nils- and still stood sixty-six and two-
Interpreted. They did call attention thirds per cent higher than when it
to the need of a conference. When ; came Into power,
the matter got to the Senate it was | Customs Scandal
designated as sham legislation and! .0„ (he Cu8tom9 acanda, Mf
wa. defeated. Had the bill gone Me*ghen ,ald Mr.-fflng's Government
through it would have been fake leg- 8(ood conv|cted of ma,fea8ance ln
.station; it would not give them any-1 offlce a8 black a9 any government ever
thing. The word "sham" is written I was p,aced under Mr steyen8 de_
in perforated letters across the great-1 g rve(i Ule greate8t credlt fop h|g „.
er part of the legislation passed by ; po9UreB ,n th|a „ne
the King Government. \    The Customa Department collected
The ConBervatives would get the ; Blxtv.two per cent of the ta][e8 col.
concurrence of the provinces and j |ected by ,he 0o¥ernment| but in ad.
would pass old age legislation. "When  dmon t„ tWg |t defended (he country
The Earl of Clarendon, British
Under Secretary of State for the Dominions, and chairman of the committee which has charge of Overseas
Settlement, on behalf of the British
Government, arrived on the Island on
Tuesday in the course of his Canadian
tour. He is visiting his cousin, Lieut.-
Col. Charles W. Villiers, general manager ot the Canadian Collieries (I).|,
Limited, at Beaufort House, Cumberland.
The Earl, who Is accompanied by
his eldest son, Lord Hyde, and Lady
Joan Villiers, has been making a
thorough visitation of families who
came out under the scheme, and
which he has found are doing well ln
a new country.
SALE OF WORK SEPT. 4TH.
The Lady Foresters are holding a
Sale of Work, Home Cooking and
Afternoon tea on Saturday, Sept. 4,
from 3 to 6 in the Fraternal Hall,
Dunsmuir Avenue.
wlll you do it?" was asked. "Just as
soon as you give us a mandate to do
so," was the answer, greeted with
loud applause.
Australian Trent)*
from smuggling. Men left the country rather than appear as witnesses
at that investigation. Wholesale perjury was resorted to to defeat the
ends of the Investigation.   He would
On the matter of the Australian ' not say tlie Government was rcspon-
treaty, Mr. Meighen said concessions j slide for all.
were given by Australia In the mat- > Mr. Neill, he heard, was now saying
ter of autos, salmon nnd paper. The he Always wanted a judge to Invesll-
fault found with lhe Australian treaty i gntc this matter. It he did, Mr.
was that it left the duty the same Meighen said that he had not found
with other countries in the matter of, his request In Hansard,
dairy produce und wiped out the diuy j Mr. Stevens moved an amendment
against Australian farm products.      i of censure in the House. The Govern-
The first trenty proposed was far \ ment did not get Mr. Neill to move an
better. Under it the duty against: nmendment, but they got Mr. Woods-
other foreign countries wns raised ■ worth to do it. Mr. Kennedy had said
while Australia was given an iidvnn- . he wanted thc Stevens amendment,
tage. But Mr. King had to make his j Had Mr. King's request been acted
peace with the Progressives, which ''■ upon, Parliament would have been
said there must be a reduction in the i dissolved precisely as it was dissolved
tariff. Mr. King had the trenty re- j a few days later on his (Mr.
formed in keeping with that. I Melghcn's)    recommendation.      The
On the matter of automobiles, Mr. | Governor-General had refused to take
Meighen said that the duty placed j the recommendation of Mr. King and
upon autos by thc Laurier Govern-; avoid the vote of censure. If the Gov-
ment was reduced by the King Gov- \ ernor-General did that, It must be
ernment. The only protection wanted plnclng Parliament under tho control
ln Canada is that which would allow i of the Government rather than the
Canadian industry to develop. \ Government being In control of Par-
Automobile In In try j "anient.
The automobiles that were made In i ,,r* «*■"
Canada were made by the same com-' Hon. Dr. Tolmie was given a splen-
penles In the United Stales. The IiiihI- did reception. The gathering, he Bald,
ness In the United Slates was far would do credit to any place In Can-
greater than in Caiiuda. Thc share-' ada. It showed the way In which the
holders In these companies do not j people of Canada were receiving the
care about whether the Canndlan fac-' Prime Minister throughout the whole
country. It had been a great task to
arrange the meetings for such a popular man as Mr. Meighen.
Never had there been a time when
good government was needed as now.
There must be a cutting out of political trickery and the giving of good,
efficient, stable government Instead.
Dr. Tolmie referred to the election
trickrey practised In Montreal at n
by-election, where plugging was practised at the poll on a large scale.
The Pence River election scandal,
when Mr. -Collins, the Conservative,
was cheated out of his seat. Canada
had been losing revenue at the rate
, of $411,000,0110 a year by Customs
: trickery.
,    As chief organizer for the party, he
assured them that the Conservatives
j were going to bo returned.   Liberals
< were   announcing their Intention of
! voting  for good  government.     They
j had in Mr. Meighen one of the ablest
| leaders In the Britisli Empire.
Large Attendance
Two   thousand   people   In   Comox-
i Alberni district attended.   The chalr-
| man, Mr. O'Brien, explained that the
meeting    was' made possible by thc
generosity of Hon. Dr. Tolmie, who,
with the wonderful whole hcartedness
characteristic of his every action, had
given his evening at Victoria to tlie
electors of Comox-Alberni. They appreciated very fully this spirit which
had been  shown  by Dr. Tolmie.
Mr. MacDonald, thc candidate,
spoke very briefly, promising that. If
, elected, he would do the very best for
the district. This district, he said, be-
i lleved In protection. Canada was a
* great country and needed only a
measure of protection to become the
greatest count**)* In lhe world.
In an Inter-club tennis tournament
last Sunday afternoon, representatives
of the Cumberland Tennlc Club turned the tables on the Courtenay team
and more than made up for their
recent defeat in the first match which
was played In Courtenaj some weeks
ago. The score Sunday was 112
games for Cumberland against 70 for
the visitors, and of the eleven sets
played the local players only lost
three. In spite of a slight shower
which lasted for about fifteen minutes, It was an ideal day for tennis,
and those who saw the games were
well repaid by the tine playing.
Each set was decided on the best
out of twenty-one games system.
Complete results follow, with Cumberland players named first in each
Instance:
Ven's Doubles »
H. Stewart and T. Graham defeated
M. Blunt nnd F. Brock, 11-7.
M. Graham and P. Graham lost to
G. Corfleld and P, MacLaiighlin, 9-11.
T. Graham and P. Graham defeated
MacLaiighlin and Morris, 11-9.
Stewart and T. Graham lost to Corfleld and MacLaughlln, 8-11.
M. Graham and P. Graham defeated
Blunt and Brock, 11-2.
Ladies'  Doubles
Miss Bickle and Miss Strachan defeated Mrs. Harvie and Mrs. Brock,
11-5.
Miss Bickle and Miss Strachan defeated Miss Gray and Miss Beasley.
11-2.
.Mixed Doubles
MJss Bickle and M. Graham defeated
Miss Beasley and Brock. 11-4.
Miss Strachan and II. Stewart lost
to Miss Gray and Blunt, 7-11.
Miss Bickle and T. Graham defeated
Mrs. Harvie and Corfteld,  11-4.
Miss Strachan and P. Graham defeated Mrs. Brock nnd Morris, 11-4.
Arrangements for the export of
largo quantities of British Columbia
seed potatoes to California are being
made this year by a potato grower of
that state. The British Columbia potatoes are desired In California for
seed purposes because they introduce
new strength into the southern strain.
Experiments were made with Canadian-grown seed last year in California and growers were well satisfied
with the results. Some of the best
seed potatoes ill Britisli Columbia
come from the Nechaco, Iiulklcy and
Skeena river valleys, hut the output
at present Is comparatively small, although Increasing rapidly.
Mr. Thomas Bannerman, of Allan
Avenue, Cumberland, is all excited
this week. He has an apple tree In
his garden, which he claims has
blossomed three times this year.
There is evidently no reason why a
person should go to lhe southern
Okanagan Valley to become a fruit
rancher when fruit trees around hero
will blossom three times anil give at
least two crops per year. We wonder
If tlic tree wlll repeat next year.
Tiie following account of the final
game i nthe Dominion Football series
was received last night by "Wally"
Brake from Mr. Sam Davidson, and
was handed in to the Islander for
publication. It will doubtless be read
with Interest by the many soccer fans
throughout the district.
"The Connaught series final last
night at Carruthers avenue when
United Weston and Canadian Collieries met for the fourth time was a
story of ebb and flow, of periodical
turns of supremacy, of the rise and
fall of hopes until the end of it all.
The tale was just the same—a goal
decides, and United Weston was the
team to register the lone tally.
"This final has been the best ever
served up to followers of the game in
Canada, not only because every game
has been so close, but because one
felt that for a greater portion of all
the matches that something was liable
(o happen at any time; and it is usually found that an error—easily excused on such a day—proves lo be tlie
turning point of the struggle. But
not so on this occasion. Weston
who had to fight against a superior
football team, carried the battle to
their opponents. Twice in the closing
mlnules the framework came to the
assistance ot the Cumberland team,
and. just when everyone was settling
down to an extra halt hour of the
splendid dish being served up. the
Issue was settled, and It was Johnny
Lang who shot the hall Into the vacant net during a hot raid on lhe miners' capital. The scoring of the goal
arrived two minutes from time, and
the visitors had no opportunity of redeeming the lost ground. But If
territorial play, and not goals, counted. Cumberland should have won.
"Without taking any credit away
from Weston for their victory, and
in fairness to Cumberland, it must he
stated Ihat from a football point of
view the visitors had the smoothest
moving machine, but what they lacked was the fighting spirit of the local
brigade.
Comes as Surprise
"The goal came at a moment when
Weston were reviving after having experienced a rather bad time. In this
respect therefore it was a little surprising. But It was neither a lucky
victory nor a fluky goul; it was just
one of the Ihrilllng Incidents In an
up-and-down game, and this final will
stand out In the records; it wlll be
ever remembered on account of lhe
fluciuatlons.
"It was a glorhius victory for Weston, but a mighty hard game for Cumberland to lose. If ever a team
deserved a draw on the run of thc
play. II was the miners. But the go-
get-'em spirit of I'nlted Weston carried the day. and the first to congratulate  them  were their opponents.
"Footbnllcrs more talented than lhe
-visitor*! have appeared at Carruthers
Park iu recent years, hut never such
a popular team as Canadian Collieries
stepped Into the arena, and this was n,niTF..\*AY.    \.„     1-     \   in,-
borne out by the actions of the dyed- tha, ,,.,„ been buro|ng Vl,rv s|owly fur
NOTICE
All persons having claims against
the Cumberland United Fool hall Club
arc requested to have same iu hands
of the Secretary, Mr. II. Strachan, on
nr before Monday, Augusl  23rd.
Wednesday's quoit match resulted
III another overwhelming win for the
Koyston team over Gartley's Beach,
lloyston took nine of the ten games
played and came away with 2113 points
to their opponents' 154. Seo next
week's Islander for full account and
detailed scores.
not look any, too rosy for Weston, but
the left flank man handled the hall,
nnd a line scoring chance was lost.
"At the other end Tait gave away
a comer to escape a dangerous rush
by Miller, and a few minutes later
the custodian saved from Slidders.
"It was Cumberland's turn to press
and the movement ended when Mou-
aghan shot wide of the upright. King
gave away a corner which was partly
cleared. Fowler skimming the crossbar with a hard drive. Derby did
well lo tip Iho ball over the bar from
Hitchens from close In, while a few
minutes later Tail saved from lhe
head of Lang.
"The first 45 minutes was fought at
a fast clip, but neither side could get
through and the interval arrived with
the score sheet blank.
Second Half
"Weston, playing towards home,
opoheil the second half with a line
combined movement, Hutchinson
shooting closely past the upright.
Cumberland again carried on their
fast raids into the Weston territory.
Derby played a great game between
the posts. He had twice as much to
do as Tait In the visitors' goal, and
he came through with llying colors,
even If at one period the ball did
strike him and rebounded clear.
"Cumberland's goal had a close call
when .Miller whipped one over from
the left. Anderson missed lhe ball,
but It was travelling too fast from
Scotty Lang to make the best of It
and Just skimmed the bar.
Davis and King's heads came together when they tried to reach a
high ball, and the Weston player took
the count, but continued after receiving attention. Fowler got iu a hard
drive from the left. Again Derby
saved and at tlle miners' end Watson
headed wide of the mark with Tait
beaten.
"McNeil handled outside of the penalty area. Monaghan took the kick,
and placed thc ball to the toe of Fowler, who drove In a terrific shot, Derby saving under tho bar.
Last Ten Minutes
Willi only ten minutes remaining
to bc played, Weston were seen at
their best. Weston headed against
the face of the crossbar, with Tait
nowhere near. Scotty Lang hit the
upright with the custodian again
beaten. Hutchinson drove In a hard
shot which was blocked by Mortimer
in lucky fashion. The Cumberland
goal was having a charmed life. The
gome was all Weston al lhls period,
and when Johnny Lang scored the
deciding goal after a general raid on
the Cumberland capital, in which the
halves of the local team combined,
It wns a glorious ending In a glorious
battle, but Cumberland at all limes
were as good as their masters."
TREE BURNS FOR
OVER ONE YEAR
In-the-wpol    supporters    of    Weston.
ovcr a year was discovered two days
■ I inn   a   M'iu   was  iiiscovei en   two oays
who carried lhe losers lo ll„* dressing „„ ,,y mployegn of lhe I'otnox Log-
room after the tussle. No greater\ant Company „, Bevan offlo|al|1 0,
compliment could have been paid Mtoe.iogrfng company say thai the tree
any sel of athletes, and ihe general wa, ,gI;|uffl „ year flg0 whMJ ^ 0wm
expression of feeling was. 'we hope, ,„„„,„ m|„ „„ ,„„,„„, .,.„,, ,rt,e
you .-nine again nexl  season.' w„s n|„oly ,.,„,  ,||g|l ,„„, „|)()U|  f(lur
"Cumberland played ihe same team ,„„, ln ,„„„„.,„,. .„ lh„ hi,B„ .,.„„ „M
us lasl Monday, bul Weston again i „„,, ,,,„.„„, .„ „ „„„, h(|U, ,„„,, ,,
preferred   Miller to   Borland   on   lhe   ,„,,, „,„„ |h(, ,„„ ,„„, ||a(, gf^.
left flank. Matthews was still miss- ua„y ,„„.„„, ,,„„.„ t|le 08atr9 0, th0
Ing from the local line-up »'1'1"1' ln.„ l„ „ pitch seam lo wl.hln twonly
makes ihelr vicory all the more ered- feol of ,||0 gr(mn(, „,„, W,1H* s|1|,
liable.   And Miller justified his selec ] bUrI)|ng w,1(,n „„ l|im.„      ()w|]|g (o
l!o"* I lack nf draft, combustion  had    been
"The play was Just the same as In ! uk|ng    „,„,.,.    vm. 8,mvh.   bu(  U||,
the    previous    matches.     First    oneh^   „.„,„,   „„   ,l)n„,,0,cly   ,,„,,,,,,,
team and then the other had the edge.  laav|ng „ ,„„„ ()f ,„„ w01„. „„„ slx!v
It was jus. a battle swaying from one   feft  ,„  ,,    th   ■„„,,  „  „,„  ^  (m
...i.l      ,,.      tl...      A,h„. ('.ml.       ... i .-.  ... I       I..     '
end  to the other.     Goals  missed   by
lhe antics  of some  squirrels   which
WHIST DRIVE BY
REBEKAHS SEPT. 13
Keep open the date of Monday, September 13th. Whist drive and social
that evening, under the auspices of
Harmony Rebekah Lodge. In thc Fraternal Hull. Dunsmuir Avenue.
;un-   mules   in   sunn-   si)uiiieis    which
narrow margins, unsteadiness In front drew |h(, ,M„nlUm ,„ (mc ()f ,hi, „„,„
of lhe goal, but  that  will always be'      „|0 lrcp   „   ,„  „,.„,,„,,,,,  ||mt   ,„,,
so while players arc Human, and the  flr(, wou,(| haye „,„„„ |(J way t() ,||e
electric atmosphere of n final causes        .
the coolest  player to quiver.	
Hard Checking CONSERVATIVE WHIST
"The  visitors al   the outset played ,)R,VE  AN() SQC]AL
hard.   They  had   done   Ihelr  scoring
Inside the first llflcen mlnules at He-;
glna. and hail Ihcy not twice caiighl
the   Weston  defence   napping?     Bul !
FRIDAY, AUGUST 27
The  Conservative  Association   will
was ! hold a Whist Drive and Social In the
checking hard during the opening I G.W.V.A. Hall on Friday. August 27,
mlnules. and when llilchlns had a j al S:IHI o'clock sharp. Everybody
clear  Held ahead of him. things did j welcome    Admission; 26 cents. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 20—1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
EDWARD W.
AT CUMBERLAND,
BICKLE
B. C.
FRIDAY. AUGUST 20—1926.
THE MARTYR On August 7th, Dr. Maxime
AND THE CAD Menard died in Paris, a martyr to the science of radiology
as a treatment of cancer. In the end, after 15
years of exposure to the rays that he had used
to treat the cancers of others, Dr. Menard himself died of the disease. Dr. Menard lost all his
fingers, one after the other, and at last his right
eye. The disease spread to every part of his
body, but in spite of the agony he suffered he
carried on his studies. ln spite of his handicaps
he insisted on being wheeled into a hospital room
to supervise the treatment of patients when his
assistant was absent.
The daily press carried a small announcement
of the death of Dr. Menard while devoting long
columns to the rehash of the search for evidence j get out of the
in the slaying of a New Jersey preacher and his where we are going, but we're on our way,
paramour,   which   occurred   four   years   ago.
Nevertheless, the preacher was a cad, while Dr. I
Menard was a martyr, "for gieater love hath no THROW OFF       Some people just don't seem to
for your Christmas turkey you probably won't
get one. The clock's are moved ahead. The
fur sales are being put on in August. Hurry
up! Step on the gas! Move lively! We saw
the picture of a girl who was a mother at 13 the
other day. Children of eight and ten have their
dancing parties and dress like adults. Push 'em
along. Get them through school and into college as quickly as you can. But, after all, what
is the hurry?
Now, to go back to the automobile. Did you
ever watch a string of cars held up at a railroad
crossing? Hear the impatient honk of the klaxon, the calls of the drivers. Can't wait a minute. The other day a girl driving a Cadillac
filled with children chased us two blocks before
we decided to slow up a bit and let her pass.
Fifty feet after she had gone by she.pulled up at
a refreshment stand and stopped. We all do it.
We can't wait a second at a railway crossing so
we get hit and spend six weeks in a hospital or
they lay us away with hands folded upon our
breast. People don't have lingering illnesses
any more; they just drop dead on the street.
Hurry, hurry, hurry! No time to enjoy life. No
time to be sociable. If we go out for an evening
it is hurry and deal for we must play nine games
before midnight. Honk! Honk! Speed up or
way.     Nobody  seems  to  know
man than he lay down his life for his friend.'
YOUR CHAINS
ON OUR WAY The automobile may be responsible for it. We have come to
blame the automobile for a lot of things. This
time we are talking about the eternal hurry that
has crept into present day life. Somehow nobody ever seems to be ready for anything now.
You gulp your coffee in the morning and rush to
the office. In the midst of the struggle the noon
hour arrives and you grab your hat and fly out
to lunch. They are waiting for you when you
get back to work, and glower at you because you
are a few minutes late. You rush to the bank
to find the doors slammed in your face. You
hasten to a store to find the last clerk leaving
with a curt "We close at noon on Wednesdays."
Everywhere people are rushed to death in the effort to close for the half holiday. You get your
September magazines about the fifth of August.
Yesterday we saw a sign, "Orders taken for Xmas
trees now," and if you haven't placed the order' er ideals.
know how to be gay. They
simply cannot avoid gloom and
pessimism. To them there is always charm in
melancholy and they seem to think it is folly to
try to be happy. They chain themselves to past
sororws that should long ago have been buried
and forgotten. Some men can enjoy life only
while whipping themselves into a fine frenzy of
despair They depict nothing but evil days
ahead. The automobile, buying on the installment plan and the waste of time are ruining the
coming generation. They picture the dissolution of Europe and the utter collapse of the already cankered civilization of the Old World.
They have been doing this now for ten long years.
They picture the present situation in Europe
as a complete failure, death by starvation of the
profesional classes and the survival of a reduced
population composed of peasants. They see!
nothing but race suicide. '
Still, in spite of all this, the scarred old world |
does move, always toward better things and high- '
Advices from Smithers, Central
British Columbia, state that the recent
miaeral find near Topley, mentioned
in the Islander recently, is of more
Importance than at first thought. It
is declared to be greater than the
Premier mine and richer than tlie
silver mines of Northern Ontario. The
surface dimensions are now given as
300 square feet and a known depth
of fifty feet. The discoverers have
driven a tunnel Into the dike for a
distance of fifty feet, and have several
other open cuts across the face, which
hns satisfied them with respect to both
the depth and width of the immense
deposit. Cross-cutting from the 50-
foot tunnel ls now in progress.
According to reports, assays of the
ore have given values in gold and in
silver ranging trom $30 on the surface to $300 in the tunnel. Ore platforms have been erected and ore fa
being piled for shipment.
The Perfect Figure
of Venus
Beautifying the "Garden Railway"
can not belong to every woman,
but   one's   natural   beauty   and I
grace can be greatly enhanced, and
any  small  defects  corrected   by j
wearing
Corsets
If you have a figure which
difficult to corset, come to us
and let us find a model which
will fill your particular need.
C/C a la Grace corsets excel in
durable wearing qualities and for
comfort.
Upper—Kenom Station Garden. Lower left—
Loohing down on artistic Port McNicoll Station
Garden. Lower right—"Countess ef Dufferin", first
C.P.R. engine to enter IVtnwipeo tn her summer
finery.
living up  to Its title as the "Garden  Railway",
thousands of trees, shrubs and perenials were
shipped out over thc whole Canadian Pacific Railway
system early in May this year. These included
willows, poplars, lilac, spirea, honeysuckle, syringe,
wciglia, earragana, hydrangea, and many others.
The perenials include roses of thc climber and rambling variety and of all shades of color, tiger lilies,
Iceland poppies, aquilegia, dianthus, Sweet William,
pyrethrum, delphineum.
Every year the floral committee of the C.P.R.
has the stupendous task of supplying the seeds, trees,
shrubs and plants to thousands of stations from
Saint John to Victoria. Bulbs are supplied and
planted in the fall, rearing their Jaunty heads with
the melting of the snows in the spring.
The seeds are propagated under glass by experienced gardeners with a view to being transplanted
when raised. In addition the committee sends out
many thousands of seed packets to station agents
and also for use in section foremen's gardens, bunk-
houses and around shops. Enormous quantities of
bedding stock are also provided and among these are
geraniums, cannas, asters, pansles, salvias, petunias,
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AN!)
PORK
*TTTHE
EAGLE*.
Supported by
VILMAH^^KYand LOUISE DR.ESSER.
Screen stay fcy HANS KRALY
a CLARENCE DROWN production
The World's Lover
Becomes The Eagle, a rapacious bandit, whose
daring deeds are heralded far and wide, but whose
heart is finally turned to romance, and who again
comes to rule supreme in
a great heart role.
marigolds, atirrhlnum, phlox, kochlas, zinnias, verbenas and alyssum.
Railway gardening was introduced in Canada by
the Canadian Pacific Railway about thirty-five years
ago. The majority of the gardens are laid out and
looked after by employees of the system. Locomotive
firemen, signal towermen, watchmen, bunkhouse attendants and others take a great interest In the
gardens with the help of horticulturists. Every employee is alive to the importance and the pleasure of
making the railway stations blossom. Each one of
them is filled with a healthy sense of emulation and
the desire to make his own garden the beauty spot of
the railway. The men treat the whole plan as a
hobby. All make the supreme yearly effort to win
the general manager's cup, a worthy trophy emblematic of the best floral display along C.P.R. tracks.
But the prizes are not limited to this Every general supsrlntendent offers a prize for his own district,
each supsrlntendent gives one for his division and
every roadmaster offers one for his sub-division.
During the Great War about 2,000 gardens were
converted into vegetable-raising grounds and produced large quantities of food supplies for the men
overseas.
Fresh and Cured Fish
I    HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
< | SPECIALLY CATERED TO I
* , *
Our Motto:
I
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE'*
WANTED—We   want   car*.   If   you ; VIOLIN—Mrs. Carey, L.C.V., late pup-
have a car and need c-isli, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1052 Port St, Victoria, U.C.     t.f.n,
11 of Dr. Brodsky. will resume
classes In Piano nnd Violin In Sept.
Apply P. O. Drawer 430, Cumberland, or at  Islander Olllce.
FRUIT FOR CANNING OH DESSERT
—Bartlett and other Pears, Italian j
nnd French Prunes, delivered when , FOR SALE—8-roomed House, pantry,
required.   Small eating Pears, $1.00
per box;   1-2 boxes supplied,   Ros-j
slter, Comox, Phone 213Q.       32-34]
bath  and  toilet.   Mra.  M. Watson.
10" Maryport Ave., Cumberland.
33-34
IN MEMORIAM
In loving memory of James G.
Lockhart, who passed away in tlle
Shaughnessy Military Hospital, Aug.
l'lth, 1922.   Aged 21 years.
"The love we bear for liim who
sleeps, will  never fade away."
FOR  SALE—Pour  Itoom  Cottage  in
good   condition.   Cheap   for   cash. I
Accept   $17r..00.     Apply   Box   112,
Cumberland, n. 0, 33-351
IW. Pa Symons   -   -   Proprietor
|      TENDERS WANTED      |
* ; *
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
SEALED TENDERS will be accepted for on addition nnd alteration to
the Cumberland General Hospital up
j till noon, Tuesday, August 24th, for
which plans and spcclllcatlona can be
procured at my residence. All tenders
must lie accompanied by a bond of
10*"/» of tlic amount of the tender,
guaranteeing completion of the work.
IS. D. PICKARD, Secretary,
Cumberland Hospital  Board.
33-34
Next Friday and Saturday
i gB3=**a***ffi*g=***«^ FRIDAY, AUGUST 20—1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
\<P
SATURDAY SPECIALS
IES ASSORTED
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
35
Poised Like Bird Against Mountains
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzle with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale.By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a >/^-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
*Miss Lydis Fulcher, champion of the Calgary Swimming Club, has shown Lake Louise, its yellow,
orange and white poppies, its distant, silent mountains and gay tourist throngs, how the swan dive
should be done. She is a true mermaid of the Canadian West, schooled in the aquatic art in the Canadian government's great pool, the Cave and Basin,
at Banff, where she has many times swum since
her youngest days.
Miss Fulcher became a champion last year at the
Banff Winter Cai nival when swimmers dived into
thi Cave and Basin, filled with hot sulphur water
from Sulpher Mountain, while the temperature outside through the open roof of the Basin wns sbl r
below the zero mark.   This fancy  diver   has  also
demonstrated her ability as a speed swimmer Ths
above photograph Shows Miss Fulcher poised in midair in the most graceful of dives, with an excellent
view of Mount Victoria Ih thc distance—some -six
and one-halt* miles away. With thc diver is shown
also the glacier as well as thc foreground in sharp
detail despite the fact that the exposure was timed
tu tho infinitesimal fraction of a second,
The new pool, situated at Lake Louise, is one of
the most popular in thc Canadian Pacific Rockies,
It is about 90 feei in length and eight feet in depth
at the deepest point. There are springboards at
various heights to suit thc expert or amateur diver,
ond lhe water is warm enough to attract those not
*'"'■'*■ '■' t" ventura into the cooler depths of Lake
'   u.s-.* r.sclf,
THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 180
Take a sign of the Zodiac, add a
garment, subtract an emergency exit,
add a geographical division, add 365
days, add a serpent, subtract a human
feature, subtract a tool resembling a
file, and the resulting letters will
spell ARIZONA.
Puzzle No. 181
Hobbs and young Snobbs contracted
to plant a held of corn for $5. Hobbs,
who could plant a row of corn in 20
24 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets boat at Union  Bay.
. minute, could plant two rows while
young Snobbs covered one; but young
\ Snobbs could plant three rows while
Hobbs covered two. The puzzle ls to
show   how   they   both   worked   eight
i hours and earned the same amount of
I money.
I'uzzle No. 182
"How fas Is It to Calcutta?" asked
a wayfarer of an intelligent Hindoo
who was sunning himself at the door
of his tent.
The elephant knows but two gaits,"
replied the native, "so If my brother
walks his beast at the rate of six
miles an hour, he will be an hour late
for the boat, while if he trots him al
the rate of twelve miles an hour there
will be an hour to spare for devotions
and refreshments."
How far was the pilgrim from Calcutta?
to Eat
Comox Creamery Pure
Jersey Ice Cream
SOLD AT YOUR FAVORITE FOUNTAIN
 <s> «. »	
REMEMBER OUR OTHER PRODUCTS—
COMOX BRAND POTATOES, COMOX WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, COMOX GRADED
EGGS, COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
s
Puzzle No. 183
In each of the Mowing sentences n
word is to be placed in the llrsl space,
then Its letters re-arranged into another word for the second space, so
that the sentence will then read correctly:
Rich nnd poor had gone to the fair
and yet the doors of thc   and
cottages were not 	
The man who had been playing lhe
abandoned his efforts  with a
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good  service,  reasonable  charges
King George Hotel
The .stupid      was  obliged  to
  the entire work.
But it was  and not her sister
who deserved the 	
Puzzle No. 184
Monsieur Dc Pole Gras, the noted
Chauffeur, mentions that while motoring from Passy to Par tout, a distance
of 135 miles, in two hours, and from
Partoul to Nulpart, a distance of HM
miles, In two more hours, the power
steadily diminished during the entire
journey so that tlie hourly runs decreased a like number of mites each
hour. What was the distance recorded by the speedometer at the end of
each hour?
 o	
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to tlie foregoing, will appear
in this column next week.
Answer! to Inst Wcf»hN Puzzles
I    No.  L75   Tiie word  PORTERAGE,
\    No.   176—WORSHIP   minus   SHIP
| plus MAIL minus AIL equals WORM.
j    No. 177—The foreman received $1.10
j for the first day and then 90 days nl
$1.11, making !>1 days for $101,   The
! handy man worked litl days for $101,
The helper put in 1 day at 0U cents
and then 110 days at fll cents, making
111 days for $101.   In all, 303 days s
work,   for   which   the  employer  paid
$303.
NO. 178 -The word HARK.
Np.  17H- Trout, rout, out.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite llo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any stile BOc
Children's hnlr cut any style ia-:
Thc horticultural branch of the
British Columbia Department of Agriculture estimates that the apple crop
of tho province this season will be at
least 3,185,500 boxes, compared wilh
2~,653,449 boxes last year. There Is
also a large Increase In the production of peaches, apricots, cherries,
crab apples, pears, plums aud prunes.
The berry crops were also very heavy.
I (Siiiqbeplar^d j
IBj Commercls    JLJ/a|''>|       Maus     E"}
Hjllsadqutruri y\ vll*vl   RtuonsbU II]
ACCOMMODATION THK  IIKST |
Itoiillls  Strain   Denied g
IV. MHtitimxD, prop.      I
e'MISiWWUiilrSaSiWISSWiil^fi^iWS^iJS
ifOiMi; '■!>•' Aw*1'!? ?j s.t n< vy K W v$ *W5.^w*;i:'if !*j:; ^.ij-imyr-^-^-^^aOTt-
AH Lines Tested
Every Morning
All long-distance telephone lines In the B. C. Telephone Company's system are tested every morning
to be sure they are ready for the day's business. This
is another service safeguard.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
ii HEfiflSSfil jfirSC IliI iffi iu Tin in. iu J":":. iii iV.fi \\l lift lift it ri Tiii lift in a ii iffi if ii Ti fi iff. W ■• in iu
H
ere an
dTh
ere
A total of 800,000 I rout fry from
the Banff hatchery have been placid
in Sylvan Lake and 000,000 in But.
falo Lake, during the past week. A
further consignment is to be placed
in the tributary waters of the Red
Deer River.
Export of pilohard oil to Europe
will commence in bulk in September.
Producers have contracted to ship
000 tons on each ship of the Royal
Mail Steam Packet Co., for several
months. The market is in Rotterdam. The company will have about
two ships per month. Pilchard oil
is used in preparing foods and medicines.
Another step forward in the effort
to restore to Montreal its leading
position in the live stock industry
was taken recently when members
of the Eastern Cattle Market Exchange met to reorganize their
operations on the basis of new
changes made calculated to improve
Montreal's standing in the industry.
Duke Dmitri, of Liuchtenberg,
Count de Beauharnois. lineal descendant of Charles, Marquis da
Beauharnois, who governed Canada
in the name of the French King
Louis XV. between 1720 and 1747,
is visiting for the first time the
country in which his ancestor made
history. He is taking part in the
Grand Pow-Pow of the Canadian
Trail Riders which is being held in
Ptarmigan Valley, near Lake Louis,
in the Canadian Rockies.
The English football team have
finished their seven weeks' tour of
the Dominion and they- were greatly
impressed with thc generous hospitality tendered to them by the
people in tho cities they visited.
Joe Smith, captain of the team, said:
"Canadian football will, in a few
years, in all probability be on a par
with the brand of soccer played by
the major leagues in Great Britain."
According to him the object of tho
tour ha.s been fully accomplished.
Coming from all parts of Great
Britain and Ireland twenty-five
thoroughbreds were unloaded from
the Canadian Pacific liner Metn-
gama when it arrived in Montreal
lately. They are for Mulan's breeding and training ranch near Winnipeg, and comprise <ine stallion, lit
mares and eight geldings. Nellie's
Pet, 8-year-old, by Oyg'nus (Sire of
winner of Scottish Derby lait year)
out of La Lis; and Dcntan, two-
year-old, who conies of thc samu
breeding as Coronach, winner nf
this year's English Derby, were
among the horses arriving.
Captain Kilroy Harris, lecturer
and radio talker in the United States
on Australia and New Zealand, recently passed through Montreal on
his way to the weet where he will
take part in the Trail [fides in the
Canadian Rockies. He Is already
possessor of a silver medal for having completed 100 miles of trail
rides and hopes this year to earn tho
gold medal that testifies to the completion of 500 miles riding trails in
that district. Capt. Harris is gathering material from Canadian
sources for-his lectures and radio
talks.
Reports from the Banff Springs
Hotel nnd from agents along the
line of the Canadian Pacific Railway from Banff to the Pacific Coast
received nt C.P.R. headquarters,
state that the forest fires in the
Kootenay Park region at their nearest point are eighty miles distant
from the hotel, and that they are
nowhere near any of the tracks of
the railway. Quests at the hotel
and travellers on the railroad have
been in no way incommoded by the
fires and these are now stated to be
well within sight of control. Banff
Springs lintel is at the presenl time
enjoying the busiest season in ill
history,
NOTICE
WATER MOST NOT HE I'SED for
'prlnkllng or Irrigation purposes ex-
:ept [rom the hour of 7 a.m. to 8 a.m.
it.il from 7 p.m. to !i p.in.
CUMBERLAND & UNION
WATERWORKS,  CO.,  LTD.
II.   W,   CLINTON.
.Managing Director.
UNION   HOTEL
rU.HHER.UNb, B. C.
DxottUnt oulalna—
For rftEtrvattoni I'hont U.
Comfort   and   Homtllk*   ««rrle«.
M   rootni,   electrical.*   h-Mttl.
ft. TATRN. Manager. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 20—1926.   .
V^m&'x^mwi&m&i&imMmMiia
THERE IS NO AMBlGUiTY-NO MYSTERY
AS TO THE AGE AND METHOD
OF MATURING OF
BOTH ARE PLAINLY STATED ON EACH BOTTLE
READ THE GOVERNMENT STAMP—READ THE LABEL
i^wsiWBsWtmmiVim
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone
150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
u
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOUS.
SHINGLES,
KILN DltlED  FLOORINGS,
\
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH  REASQNABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
] Night call
PHONES
184X Courtenay
lfiii Cumberland.
Championship Fight
"Thc Radio Detective"
CHAPTER   XXVI
"TRACKING HY WIRELESS"
Rae Larue and Jack Curtis, when
they had left Vlra and Glenn, did not
return to the Club. Even their calloused souls were not impervious to
tlic idea that the game waa up.
There was only one thing for them
to do and that was to make a safe
getaway before Craig and the rest of
us returned or they would be landed
in cells next to Caulillower Pete.
They had taken the chance to speed
far out on the end of the Island and
there they had signaled the Scooter
to put in and pick them .up where they
abandoned their cur. Once aboard
thc Scooter they had figured they
would be safe.
The fact was, however, that Rae
and Jack Curtis wcre anything but
safe with the mysterious skipper of
the Scooter. He swdre when lie
foun/1 that It was they who had signaled.   He might have been far out
ROY CLIFFE
COURTENAY
Charlie Belanger
WINNIPEG
like little Dick Gerard—potentially
worth a million for ransom.
The chief suddenly changed his
mind as he sighted a little cruiser
that had turned as if afraid to stick
its high nose further out into the Atlantic Ocean. He signaled it. This
was the Sea Vamp which had been
cruising around aimlessly for pleasure.
Even though they were in a great
hurry to get along on the high seas,
to make the jump to safety In tho
Scooter up to the north, the couijse
was changed. The Sea Vamp also
hove to, as the larger boct aproached
rapidly.
"Why. Helen, that's that same boat
we saw putting into the Binnacle yesterday, it's the Scooter they broadcasted about. I wonder what they
want of us? Can they know wc sent
news of them?" He was just a bit
frightened.
"Imposible!" his wife exelnimed.
"How   could   they  know?"   She   was
The  muffled  skipper  laughed  up-
: roariously.   Rae was rather relieved
when she saw that the Sea Vamp carried only this man and his wife.   She
We were off.
Higher, ever higher we mounted until we sailed far above the Sound.
Even  Mount Misery at the entrance
had felt an increasing fear of that to the harbor was far below us
villainous crew on the Scooter and |    with a glass behind the windshield
had  grave doubts  ot the  ability  of i Craig   was   gazing   ahead   eastward
Jack as a protector. I along the Sound as Easton headed out
The Scooter headed again out into  toward  where the ocean, joined the
the sea. Rae and the woman on the
Sea Vamp stood for a moment, appraising each other. "How did you
come to be on that boat?" demanded
the woman.
Rae felt that the less truth told the
waters
fled.
which  the  Scooter had
(To be continued)
,v ,..»v .— . ,    Tlie Univenal Engine Co. Is plan
better.   "They bunked us into taking j nlng the establishment of a $1
a sail.   When they began acting fresh    ...... ..      -.._,_
into the sea if it had not been for this ! 'or brazening II out. and. as it hap-
delay.     His  sole  purpose  in  life  at \ Pened. she was right,
that, moment was to make a safe get-1    The   two   boats   approached   even
-way.   He feared Craig Kennedy. He   closer.
had no further use for Rae and Jack
and did not hesitate to tell them so.
It was a hitter pill for those smart
young criminals to realize that they
were merely little cogs in a machine,
and they were slated for the scrap
heap.
"I'm going to set you ashore!" lie
blustered. "I'm going to turn you
over to the police. What good are
you? You're nothing but worn-out
tools—squeezed-out lemons!"
Rae   and    Jack    were    frightened
There was no reason why ifiey should I    ™e man on the Soa Vamp was re
be given any consideration   hy   this-Heved,   He-had feared it-might,be -
"Going down tho Sound—west?"
shouted  the  skipper of  the  Scooter.
"Yes."
"We got a couple of deadheads on
board. Will you take them ^o tho
first place you are going to touch at?"
"Sure!" The man did not like the
looks of the rest of the crew. He
hastily figured it would be the best
policy to stand in with these thugs
and avoid argument.
"Who are they?"
'A guy and his girl
conscienceless chief.   They were not
car
Write for our
free booklet
on Baby's cave
nnd feeding.
EAGLE BRAND
Condensed Milk
The Borden Co., Limited
VANCOUVER^
couple of the villainous crew
"Put 'em aboard!"
Thus it  was  that   Rae   and   Jack
j were   unceremoniously   dumped   over
j on thc deck of the Sea Vamp.
;    "Where shall we take them?" ask-
I ed the man on the Sea Vamp.
"Take  'em  to—anywhere!    I   don't
care.   Hand  'em  over to the  polite.
| if you-want to!"
14-26
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
,000,000
- -** » -—  I plant either at New Westminster or
we made such a fight they were glad j Val,couvel. B. c. Representatives of
to get rid of us. They knew our i the aotnpimy hnvo bc(J„ |,18pecting
friends who would make trouble for i p0S8iW(! slt(m on the Pl.a9er Rlver
them."
"You young folks!" The woman
shook her head. "It's no wonder
there's so much crime. You just let
yourselves ln for trouble."
"Well, we didn't mean any harm
going with them," Jack Curtis said
with assumed penitence. "We were
just foolish."
"I'll Bay so. Well, I'll have you
back on land to your friends in short
time now."
j With the riddance of Rae and Jack,
the skipper ot the Scooter became
even more vclious. Dick had been
watching for another chance, while
the others were busy, to broadcast
another alarm, that might bring hulp
to himself. Accordingly he seized the
second opportunity to sneak into the
radio cabin.
He had hardly set up to broadcast
his  second  alarm when  he heard  a
voice at the cabin door.
!    "Hey, kid, whatcher doln'?"
i    "Nothing.   Just, looking around."
!    "Lookin'  around,  eh?     Lookin'  at
the radio!   Broadcastin' to get us In
, wrong, I says!    I'm tellln' the Chief!"
|    The sailor grabbed Dick by the collar and hustled him up on deck.
'I found him, sir, at the radio. Says
; es just lookin' around!"
"Just looking around?" echoed the
Chief. Well, we can't afford to have
you around our radio. Rope him and
keep him in the to'castle where he
can be watched." The sailor Jerked
' Dick backward. "Not so rough, Lar-
i sen. Keep him safe. But don't forget. That boy's worth more than
money to us. If they'll foTget to
prosecute, we'll hand  the boy  back
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACTMNDMENTS
I'HE-EMl'liONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may bo pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens ou declaring intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land,' copies of
wliieh can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre vest of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to tbe Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the laud applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of wblch can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied tor
Ave years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information Bee
the Bulletin "How tu Preempt
Laud."
PURCHASE
i    Applications are received for pur-
' ~" a    '■ • a       i chase    of    vacant    and    unreserved
But we must get some place where. c,.own   ,au(lb   not  being  t-raUer,anQi
they can't reach us." | for agricultural purposes;  minimum
On board the Scooter they were be-1 price of first-class (arable) land la 15
„i„„i„„ m ho mnro i,,,,i.i ,„ nini, I Per acre, anil second-class (graiing)
ginning to be more brutal to Dick.    . ^  ^ •„ per m    Furlhe*  ,„,„'.
Ill the hangar of the Radio Shack matton regarding purchase or lease
now the steady drone of the engine, of Crown lands in given In Bullet*.!
.....     in     t„,,,i    QAI.|»„     "Pnri'hflriP   and
■■■■■llllIiB
E. L. SAUNDERS 1
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER. ||
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear B
longer after repairing than when new. g
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and s|
Service at— =3
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS g
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store. E
and the staccato hum of the propeller
of the air-boat was deafening.
Easton had climbed into the boat
along with Craig, Ken and myself.
"Oh," pleaded Ken, "take Laddie!"
The dog was hauled Into the boat.
On down the skldway she moved
majestically, off the skids, on the water. Across the smooth harbor of
Rockledge we taxied, ever faster.
Then the radio-hydroaeroplane rose
from the water, took the air like a
giant bird of a new species.
Ten Rounds to decision for
Dominion Title
STADIUM
Courtenay
Saturday, Sept. 4
0:00 P.M.
WATCH "ISLANDER" POR FULL PROGRAMME
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
l||P. P. Harrison, M.LA.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Offlce
Courtenay           Phone 268
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings.
Telephone  115R  or  21
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of. Crown Lands,"
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including. payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsuiveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, mny be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected iu the first year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
nessaeaaEse
rav***t*i*riwr«=aaa*)ae3t3PB«eseta
u
MANN'S BAKERY
for
QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
—SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY—
Lemon and Custard Tarts, Cream Lemon Slices,
Delicious Appetizing Dainties.
also
Doughnuts, Scones, Meat Pies, etc.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
LET US BID ON YOUR PRINTING REQUIREMENTS
THE IDEAL
Underlying our business is to merit the reputation of being thoroughly capable, reliable and
reasonable.
QUALITY
Is always worth more than its cost. In «very
industry firms noted for their excellence are
the recognized leaders.
The Islander
Job Printing Department
Phone 35 Dunsmuir Ave.
OUR EQUIPMENT IS MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT
llmtgtiaBat^^ FRIDAY, AUGUST 20-1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIV1
ti
Ilo-llo Theatre
News of Courtenay and District
Monday/August 23
■sSt*
A
Mcuo
tfpkIWi
m
CHB was undisputed leader of die
13 boldest Apaches of the Paris underworld.    She  stalked  bet  greatest
prey—a scion of wealth and  tide—
using the lures of love—
and then she discovered the* she
really loved this  man she had
plotted to betray.
ITHE MOST AMAZING FILM Of
UNDERWORLD ROIVUNCB
EVER MADE1
tttmui h CHRISTY CABANNB.   Mljn*t
MCTtfUB
Tuesday, August 24
Wild, Wild Susan
Wednesday, Thursday, Aug.r25-26*|
She Loved Her Husband's
Best
Friend!
THE wedding-ring could
nol stop her search for
happiness. Hoe is the
drama of thousands of
men and women who each
ytttvt sacrifice convention
em the altar of their love.
Out nt the uafUaJ dwtiny of
two brav* haMftt who gjwbifd
FRANK BORZAGPS
(has has written a Md-air-
ring drams.
A pttwerftst pity that ftact-
nastnt Brandt-ay for two years
sum nutate into a gripping
picturel
ELEANOR
BOARDMAN
and Malcolm McGregor
Fnm ti* ssntt lllm h>
W. SOMBKSOT MAUGHAM
> t> ll at B, I
h Mm
\fcvK$oldiMjn*\fef&
PICTURE
■"•*« •%"^^*wi*»^m<^m
NEW ESSEX COACH
NOW ON DISPLAY AT
PIDCOCK & McKENZIE'S
A new all-steel body of radically
improved design is the feature of the
Essex coach, announced and placed
on display today by Pldcock and McKenzie, Hudson-Essex dealers for the
district. The real story of this new
car Is said to be the story of a $10,
000,000 plant which the Hudson Motor
Car Co. erected especially for the
building of these bodies.
"The Hudson organization, a year
ago, completed the design of this new
body and laid out a program for a
building to construct It," said Mr.
Geo. Pidcock. "In this general expansion program, $10,000,000 has been
invested in the body plant, and $5,
000,000 additional in other manufacturing departments to bring them up
to the capacity which lt ie expected
this new car wlll call for. On the
very day determined on a year ago,
the plant was complete and a schedule
of 150 new all-steel bodies was put
through, as against a task of 100
bodies which had been originally laid
out.
"While the new bodies are radically
different In construction from anything known up to the present, they
retain generally the characteristic
Essex lines; however, the rear quarters have been somewhat curved and
the whole body is two inches lower.
The finish is a lustrous black enamel
baked on in the 600 foot ovens at high
temperatures which assure*a.long life
and a glossy appearance for the life
of the car. A bit of color ls added
by a nickled radiator, and by a double
striping around the belt line.
"Possibly the most striking feature
of the new body is its unusual rigidity of construction. By the use of
steel sills, all lines of weakness between the chassis and the body has
been eliminated; in fact, the body and
chassis are really one. The steel sill
Itself is 60 per cent stronger than the
wooden member it displaced.
"Tested over the roughest stretches
of road to be found around Detroit,
the body has been found to be absolutely free from squeaks and rattles,
The car was repeatedly run up on
curbs of various heights, the doors
' tried and found to open and close
| freely. A 200-pound man was placed
I on each door as a final test of the sta-
! bllity of the body, and the car was
I driven over several hundred yards of
rough road. The doors did not sag in
the least, fitting Just as perfectly after
this rigid test as before. This remarkable rigidity In the body Is gained by the scientific sectioning of the
pressed steel from which the body is
made. All of the pressed steel parts
are formed with not only ease of
assembly in view, but also from the
standpoint of rigidity.
"The door is an interesting and
typical example of the construction
of this body. Its rigidity Is gained
by box sections formed by presses.
After the assembly of the door parts
ls complete, the entire door is placed
ln a 130-lon hydraulic press for a final
operation that leaves no doubt about
the correctness of the door shape. A
piano type of hinge, an entirely new
Idea in automobile practice, supports
the door. Besides the remarkable
gain In strength and accuracy, this
type hinge brings about a marked
Improvement In appearance.
"The whole Interior of the car is
exceptionally neat and trim, the dash
well arranged and pleasing. The door
handle and lock are combined in one
unit. The steering wheel is solid
walnut mounted on a cast aluminum
spider. The windshield wiper switch
is on the dash and forms part of an
attractive Instrument board arrangement.
"These bodies are mounted on tho
standard Essex chassis, with no
mechanical changes whatever. Standard equipment includes shutters and
motometer, stop-light, electric windshield wiper, rear vision mirror and
tire carrier. The price announced is
$900 f.o.b. Windsor, duty only paid."
(Adv't.)
water was actually going over the
roof from one of the city hydrants.
Tbe hotel's own fire service was on
the job just as quickly, however, and
the fire never had anything more than
a start. It was very fortunate, however, that the outbreak was detected
so promptly as otherwise there mlg'.it
have been an entirely different story
to be told.
ABUNDANT WATER
ASSURED COURTENAY
BUSY NIGHT FOR
FIRE DEPARTMENT
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
131R        —PHONES— 29H
COURTENAY, B. C.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
COURTENAY, Aug. 18.—Two fires
which occured between eight o'clock
Monday evening and four o'clock on
Tuesday morning, kept the Courtenay
fire department very busy all night.
The first blaze was the roof of Mr.
Ous Power's house on Courtenay
avenue. Considerable damage was
done to the premises before the lire
was extinguished. The other fire, at
4:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning, waa
at the E. & N. round bouse, when the
cab of one of the engines therein was
practically destroyed. Two fires In
one night appears to have been too
much for the electric fire siren which
refused to function nnd a church bell
was rung. There was n big blaze,
which seems to have been caused by
combustion of the oil soaked flooring
of the cab, and It is surprising that
more damage was not done to the
rail road premises. The volunteer
fire department responded promptly
on both occasions.
COURTENAY, Aug. 17.—There Is
an abundance ot water for the domestic supply of the city available In the
mountains between the east and west
cousts of the Island. The party pf
city officials, consisting of mayor J.
W. McKenzie, aldermen Wm. Doug-
Ins, Theed Pearse, city clerk C. S.
Wood and others, which returned
from a trip into the mountains ou
Tuesday evening is assured that by
the expenditure of a few hundred dollars the water of a very considerable
watershed could be conserved for city
uses. This would be done by the
construction of a comparatively small
amount of darning at Goose Lake.
Among the mountains and plateaus of
the Island range ln the hinterland of
the Comox Valley are many beautiful
lakes surrounded by a vast country
of wonderful variety. None of these
lovely lakes appear lo contain any
fish, however, and it is the Intention
of the members of the expedition to
recommend the stocking of these
waters with different varieties of fish.
Deer are to be seen in abundance in
the immense park like spaces and In
the great natural meadows, the latter being at present covered with a
heavy crop ot* the finest redtop and
other grasses. The party made its
way Into the heart of the mountains
but owing lo thick weather and much
rain was unable to enjoy the scenic
beauties of the country to their fullest.
It Is announced from New Westminster. B. C, that the Westminster
] Paper Mills Ltd., hnve purchased the
j manufacturing rights for a new pro-
i cess of making paper napkins and
I towels, which promises to revolution-
: Izc this particular industry. Six
j machines for making those articles
! have been purchased and preparations
are now being made to hoiiso them.
i The patent rights of the new process,
[which Is an invention of T. H. Hor-
I witt, of New York, covers all British
I countries oilier than Great Britain.
jj This Week end at Gaiety Theatre |
L» ■ Pnrnts jf
SALLY  1
OP THE §j
SAWDUST 1
0&M
with.
CtSROL DEMPSTER
om-fWGFIELDS
(United tii FORREST HALSEY* fim a
Jtny iy DOROTHY DONNELLY
SMALL FIRE AT
RIVERSIDE HOTEL
COURTENAY .Aug. 17—On Friday
afternoon the Courtenay Fire Department mode a quick response In answer to an alarm caused by an outbreak on the roof of the Riverside
Hotel. In about a minute and a half
after the first sound of the fire whistle
sSSSaHMHMJ'-ft-BH'Mra^^
The New Model
- FORDS -
ARE DOING BETTER MILEAGE PER GALLON
Than You Would Believe
WE HAVE SEVERAL REPORTS OF 40 MILES
PER GALLON
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
Phones 46 and 182
Courtenay, B. C.
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
EAT McBRYDE'S PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT
BREAD AND LIVE IN THE PATHWAY OF
HEALTH
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates Tor Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
■a——
39 PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 20—1926.
SILK DRESSES
On display a news hipment of Silk Dresses, Crepe-de-
chene Dresses in the leading colors. These were
travellers' samples and are very much below the usual
prices. See our special Dress at $10.00; others at
$10.95 and   $12.50
Our stock of Fall Hats is coming forward regularly,
and comprisese many of the latest novelties. Visit
our Millinery Department, see our Special Hat at $3.95.
BROADCLOTH AND GINGHAM DRESSES
Last call for some real bargains in these, all values to
$6.50.   Special on Saturday   $2.95
Don't miss these! •
House Dresses, a few to clear out at $1.00 and $1.95.
Sutherland's
Cumberland Supply Store
Rickson's Old Stand
Dunsmuir Ave.
How to Dwell in Peace and Happiness—the Secret is
here—Do your Shopping at the Cumberland Supply
—Make your home your Castle—Free frolm the worry
of High Prices. Here are a few of our Saturday
Bargains
—1—1—>!->—1—>—1—1—^—1—1—1—,—>—>—»—>—)—)—»—>—>—1—1—1—1—>—1
Van Camp's Pork and Beans, small, 3 for  35c
Rye Crisp Biscuits, per pkg  45c
Magic Baking Powder, 12 oz.,     33c
Sweet Biscuits, per pound, 25c, 35c and  50c
Kellog's Corn Flakes and Post Toasties, 3 for  40c
Quaker Corn Flakes, 2 for   25c
Tillson's Health Bran, per pkg.  23c
Good 4-string Brooms   55c
Hire's Root Be*er   35c
Heinz's Malt Vinegar, 28c and  48c
Heinz Ketchup, best you can buy, 35c, 3 for .... $1.00
Toilet Papare, 6 for   25c
Wednesday Special Seedless Raisins, 2-lbs. for .... 35c
Regal Free-running Salt, 2 for   25c
Special today only. Peaches, per crate  $1,65
Outside Grown Tomatoes, per lb  10c
Hot House Tomatoes, per lb  15c
Sunkist Oranges, 3 doz. for $1.00; per doz., 40c, 50c
Water Melon, per lb    5c
Bananas, per lb  15c
Potatoes, 12-lbs. for 25c, per 100-lb. sack   $1.65
Sweet Potatoes, 2-lbs. for   25c
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY STORE
Phone 155 Cumberland
HAVE YOU
ever been caught a long wny from home without
A TIRE REPAIR OUTFIT
TIRE   PUMP?
Perhaps It's a
SPARK PLUG, BULB OR FAN BELT1
There's no need for It—we sell them all.
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
SPECIALISTS IN AUTO REPAIRS
Phone 8 Cumberland, I). C.
Personal Mention
On Thursday evening Mrs. G. W.
Clinton held a bon-fire party at Gartley's Beach In honor of Miss Madge
Bryan, who is leaving for Victoria on
Saturday. All lhe residents of Gartley's Beach gathered round the bonfire, refreshments were served and a
jolly time spent.
.   *   *
Mrs. W. P. Symons, of Pendrlth
Avenue, entertained a few friends at
her sister, Miss Mongomery, of Van-
the tea hour on Friday in honor ol*
couver.
E. O. Sheppard, vice-president of
the North West Moose Association,
will pay an ollicial visit to the Cumberland Lodge nn Monday, August 211,
at 7:30 p.m. All .Moose are requested
to attend.
...
Mr. John Mnrt returned l'roni a
vacation spent on tlie mainland, arriving In Cumberland on Saturday
last.
♦ *   ♦
Mr. and Mrs. Palmer, and'daughter,
ot Vancouver, have been the gticsls
of Dr. and Mrs. Geo. K. MaoNaughton.
Mr. Palmer is a former principal ol
the Cumberland Schools and renewed
many old acquaintances while here.
...
Miss Jessie MacLean, of Victoria,
was the guest of Miss Jean MacNaughton for the past ten days.
...
Miss Annie Loggie. of Vancouver,
is the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Geo. K.
MacNaughton at their summer camp,
Gartley's Beach.
...
Mrs. T. Hudson and sister, Miss
Nora Glenn, of Nanaimo. were the
guests last week-end ot Mr. and Mrs.
M. B. Stewart. Dunsmuir Avenue.
* *   *
Miss Jessie Grain, ot* Victoria, is nl
present holidaying at lloyston Beach.
ENGAGEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. D. Marsh, Grantham,
anounce   lhe   engagement   of   their
youngest daughter, Hazel  Marion, to
| Mr. Norman I. Parkin, second son of
I Mr. and Mrs. I. Parkin, Headquarters.
The marriage will take place at the
} Catholic Church, Comox, on September 2nd, at 7:311 p.m.   Public reception  will  be   held   at   Headquarters
' Social   Hall   immediately   after   iho
I ceremony.
COURTENAY PERSONALS
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Turner, of Edmonton, who have been spending two
weeks holiday with Mr. and Mrs. A.
D. Gregson, left en route for home on
Tuesday.
Miss Margaret F. W. Thomas, of
North Battleford. Sask., Is visiting al
the home of Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Thomas at lloyston. Before returning lo
(he prairie she will visit Victoria,
Prince Rupert and other points.
Among the residents ot Courtenay
and district who have-been visiting
Vancouver for the Exhibition are Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Kerton nnd family,
Mr. M. B. Tribe, Mr. John Inglis and
family, Mr. H. Bryant, Mr. II. E. Wallls, Mr. and Mrs. il. K. Midwinter, Mr.
J. W. Andrews. Mr. and .Mrs. J. !l.
Parkins. Mr. A. B. Graham and Mr.
Wm. Cooke.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Watson have
returned from their wedding tour and
are residing at Royston.
After undergoing a minor operation
ln Vancouver, Mr. Ilcbor Cooke has
returned home.
Magistrate W. A. Hames is back
from a two weeks' visit lo soul hern
Manitoba.
Mr. Thomas Pretsel is making good
progress with the (■(instruction of his
new home on lbc Lake Trail.
Mr. and Mi's. J. II. Mclntyre have
left by car for Vancouver and other
points.
Mayor J. W. McKenzie has returned
from a holiday trip in the north of
thc  Island.
PROVINCIAL BRIEFS     |
J 1
Convening lish into nil and meal
has   become   un   Important   Industry
Ion the weHt .coast of Vancouver
Island. This year fifteen plants are
operating,  len  more than  last year.
I Two million dollars have been invested in the business and during the
last, few months $700,000 have  been
' expended for new machinery for tho
older plants, Pilchards, which resemble herring, but arc larger and
contain more oil, are chiefly used in
! those reduction plants. By a recently Invented process the fish are fed
i Into one end ot* a large boiler-like
machine  and   are   discharged   at  the
i oilier end ns oil und dry meal, the
oil being carried oil" by a flotation
process.   A ton of lish wlll yield six-
1 ty gallons of oil.   The oil Is marketed
1 in Great Britain, and the meal Is used
for chicken and stock feed and land
fertilizer. Thc extraction and grinding process is said to lie absolutely
odorless.     The   pilchards   spawn   nt
| sea and come inshore in the summer
! iu enormous shoals and remain for
several months. Some claim that the
supply Is inexhaustible, but more con-
1 servalive observers claim that it will
bo exhausted in  live years.
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Or. Slli und  Duiisniulr.
Phone 122 Cumberland
II
SALE OF BUILDING AND WITH
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
/the undersigned nnd endorsed "Tender
for Purchase of Government Telegraph Building and site at Clayoquot,
B.C.". will be received al this olllce
until 12 o'clock noun (daylight saving), Wednesday, Si-pti-nilicr 1.1, 111*111,
for the purchase of the above mentioned Government Telegraph Hull-ling and site In accordance with plan
mill description exhibited in the-oilice
of the District Superintendent, Government Telegraph Service, Victoria.
B.C.; the purchase to include all
structures erected on this pVoperty,
The party whose tender Is accepted
must make cash payment on notification of acceptance oi tender.
Each tender to be accompanied by
an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank, equal to 10 per cent of the
amount of tlle tender, payable In the
order of the Minister of Public Works.
which will be forfeited if lhe person
tendering decline to carry out his bid.
The Department does nol bind Itself
to accept the highest or any lender.
Any further Information required
may bo obtained on application to
the undersigned.
By order,
S. 13. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, Augusl 11. l!)2fi.
Kodaks $5
UP
(—U-(_(—(—I—(—(—!,—t—I—I — t.— (_l_t_l_ I—(_.(,—(,—1—I.-.!.—<,—(_t—(
Special New Vest Pocket
Kodak-Has Many New
Features—$5.00
See Window
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
m
PREVENT
FOREST
FIRES
YOU   CAN
HELP
B.C. FOREST SERVICE
Don't Forget
ELKS   DANCE
TONIGHT   AT
ROYSTON
Saturday, August 21st
NANAIMO ORCHESTRA
Hi

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