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The Cumberland Islander Aug 7, 1920

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Array -Provincial- Library
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
II
With which Is consolidated the Combe rland News.
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 32.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1920.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
CUMBERIAND WANTS
PROMISED WAR TROPHY
Considerable satisfaction was expressed at the council meeting
on Monday evening as to the satisfactory condition of Dunsmuir
Avenue, which had been completed and thrown open for traffic.
The entire lack of dust on these dry hot days is very pleasing.
The council finances were found to be in a very good condition, the
overdraft at the bank having been wiped out and $5404.23 being
in the bank to the council's credit. "
His Worship Mayor McDonald occupied the mayoral chair, Aid.
Brown, Bannerman, Parnham, Wier, Thomson and Pickard, and
City Clerk Mordy being on deck.
Cumberland Wants its War Trophy.
Attention was drawn to the fact that several cities had received
their war memorial trophies from Ottawa and it was moved by
Aid. Parnham and seconded by Aid. Bannerman that the City
Clerk communicate with Mr. H. S. Clements, member for the
Dominion House, and also with the War Trophies Commission,
regarding the same and request fulfilment of promises.
Bills amounting to $789.S5 were before the meeting, which after
discussion were refe*rred to tlie Finance Committee for approval
-and if found correct to be paid.
Two of the lots advertised for sale have been disposed of, one
going to Mr. Potter and the other to Mr. Webster.
a,
Reports of Committees.
The Finance Committee reported that tlie balance of the bank
loan had been paid off, and the balance in the bank amounted to
$0104.23.
The Board of Works reported'the w»ru on Dunsmuir Avenue
as being completed and the street open for traffic, and that it was
in a very good condition. The committee also reported that the
far end of Allen Avenue needed some ashes on it, and that the
manhole below Fourth Street needed fixing.
The Water Committee drew attention to the nfcessity of cleaning out all manholes and catch-basins before the rainy season
commenced. Also that the water pressure at No. 5 Japanese town
was too low, without larger pipes being installed, to enable an
hydrant lo be of any use there.
*   Aid. Parnham asked permission to bi>ing in an amendment to
the Pound Bylaw, which request was granted.'
Mr. E. W. Bickle made a personal request to the council that the
surplus of the Peace Celebration Fund amounting to $196.75 be
handed over to the G. W. V. A. to be put toward their building
fund. It was pointed out that a motion of November 10 last
disposed of that surplus otherwise.
Nanaimo News
The Canadian Western Fuel Company, Ltd., are remodelling Ihe new
ear sheds opposite Wlnfleld Crescent,
on which worlt wns suspended last
fall. '
Contractor Wilson, with a gang ot
men, has started worlt on the erection
of the new E. & N. Depot.
Tlie Nanaimo Crlbbage Club hold
their lirst annual picnic Sunday last
at Indian Head, and a most enjoyable
day was spent In sports, etc. On the
way back home in the launch the
patty found throe people who bod been
left ou due of the Islands and saved
them from spending the night in the
open.
StcJmiAN-HOBGSpN.
A wedding of unusual interest was
quietly solemnized at the Methodist
parsonage Tuesday when the Rev. Mr.
Vance united in marriage Mr. AI(|Tnu-
der N. McMllIln, only son ot .Mr. and
Mrs. A. .1. McMillan, East Wellington,
nnd Miss Minine Hodgson, youngest
daughter of ex-Mayor and Mrs, Thos.
Hodgson, of Nanaimo. They were, attended by Mr. and Mrs. J. Z. Miller,
the latter being a sister of the groom.
A touch of significance attached (o
the nuptials through the principal::
being both natives of Nanaimo, where
thoy arc both favorably known by a
-large circle of friends. Until recently
Miss Hodgson was a most popular
nurse ul the Nanaimo General Hospital, where she had been for tlie past
two and a halt years, while Mr. McMillan was a most trusted employee of
the Nanaimo branch of the Merchant::
Bank, ot* Canada for tour years. A
year ago be accepted a position at the
main office of this Institution at Vancouver.
The newly married left for thc Mainland on their way to Cortland where
. their honeymoon will be spent, and
upon tiieir return will take up apartments in the Terminal City.
Things Diogenes Never Turned
His Lantern On:
The Real Estate Polder.
' The Opposition Newspaper.
The Oil Stock Prospectus.
The Book of Travels.
The Political Platform.      v
The Railroad Time Table.
The Road Map.
The Candidate's Refusal.
MEMORIAL HALL
NEARING COMPLETION
Building Fund Augmented by a
Cheque for $100 From the
Vancouver Breweries.
Excellent progress Is being made
with the construction of the Memorial
Hall for the Great War Veterans, nnd
it is expected to have It completed in
another week or so.
The Building Fund had a boost this
week when the Vancouver Breweries
sent lu a cheque for $100.
ABOUT 12,000 EACH
MONTH FROM BRITAIN
OTTAWA.—British Immigration to
Canada so far this season is about
double what is coming in'from the
United States. Of an average influx
of about 18,000 a month, 12,000 are
coming from the United Kingdom and
6,000 from tlie United States .
The newcomers from the Old Coun-
trj aro mostly English. Out of total
arrivals ot 12,000 in the last month,
more than 8,000 were English. 3,000
Scottish, fewer than 1.000 Irish and
150 Welsh.
The new immigration restrictions
requiring careful selection are rejecting about 1,8110 a month, while about
thirty or forty are deported for criminality or other disqualifying conditions.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
OF MAY CELEBRATION
We, the undersigned, have examined
the books, vouchers, etc., of the 24th
May Celebration Committee, and found
them O. K. The following Is a summarized statement of the accounts:
Revenue from—
No. 4 Mine Employees   $ 305.22
No. 5 Mine Employees       303.00
No. 7 Mine Employees       126.00
Union Bay Employees        76.00
Miscellaneous Employees....     103.94
Local Subscriptions        99.50
Courtenay Subscriptions ...      80.00
All Other Sources       442.37
Total Revenue   $1,596.03
Total Disbursements   $1234.90
Balance in Bank     - 61.07
Accidental Death
Verdict of Jury
Joseph Lynch Lost His Life By
Tree Falling in Opposite
Direction Intended.
Further details ot the manner ln
which Joseph Lynch met his death
were given at the Inquest hold by Dr,-'
Butters, coroner. Vincent Harris,
who wns with Lynch at the time of the
accident, was the chief witness. The
witness said that Joe Thompson, who
was the chief feller, hud directed the
Binning Bros, to fell tho tree ln a certain direction. They undercut the tree
and started with the back cut and
Thompson warned Lynch and HarrlB
because the tree had a side lean and a
lot of ground rot. If the tree had
fallen In the way It was expected it
would have gone (Ifty feet from where
Harris and Lynch were working. It
was a thirty Inch butt, with twelve
Inches In the centre of the rot. Harris
and Lynch were working and apparently did not hear the warning of
"timber." for when they looked up
Harris saw the tree was coming
straight for them.
It was thirty degrees off tho line It
was expected to fall. Harris ran to
one side, but Lynch got behind the
butt of the tree they were working on.
As the tree fell It knocked tho top off
another tree and It struck Lynch on
the top of the head.
Samuel Kennedy was the foreman of
the jury, and a verdict was returned
of accidental death as tho result of a
fallen snag at Gwilt's sawmill.
DR. BAKER IS MADE
PICTURE DIRECTOR
AT $300 A MONTH
Fugitive Still
Eludes Police
Many Rumors of Desperado Being Seen Bt Police Are Unable to Locate Him.
VICTORIA.—"Director of patriotic
aud educational picture service," ls the
title which has been conferred upon
Dr. A. R. Baker, chairman of the Game
Conservation Board, by order-ln-
council passed by the provincial
cabinet, which provides for him a
salary of $300 per month.
The picture service is that authorized under legislation passed at the
recent session of the Legislature, providing for the organization of a department for producing moving pictures of scenes and events in British
Columbia, these to be shown, not alone
in the moving-picture theatres of
British Columbia, but also to be exchanged with other provinces, and to
be shown abroad.
Dr. Baker, as head of the Game
Conservation Board, has not been receiving any regular salary, hut his
travelling and out-of-pocket expenses
have been paid from the publlc
treasury. He Is allowed $10 per diem
for such. In addition, he Is* now to
receive $3600 per year as director of
the moving picture service.
REFRESHMENT BOOTH
AT COLLIERY PICNIC
Woman's Auxiliary .of G. W. V
A. Appeals to the Public for
Cakes and Pies.
At the picnic ot the employees of
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsniulri,
Limited, to be held at Royston on
Saturday next, thc Woman's Auxiliary
of the CI. W. V. A. will conduct a light
refreshment booth, at which coffee,
tea, cake, sandwiches, pies, etc., will
be served, as wns done last year.
Thc auxiliary Is appealing to the
general public for contributions of
cakes and pies for this purpose. Tilts*
who care to do so aro requested to
send them to the City Hull on Friday
afternoon or evening next. If unable
to deliver, notify the secretary, Mrs.
Conrod, I'honc 89, and it will be'called
for. It is expected that all returned
men will donate.
As it Is necessary to know the
amount of refreshments on hand before purchasing from outside sources,
parties willing to donate are requested to kindly phone Mrs. Conrod of
their Intention.
Many have Intimated their intention
of donating refreshments and they
wlll kindly accept this Intimation.
FIVE-A-SIDE TEAM
GOES TO VANCOUVER
CHAS. O'BRIEN,
J. D. DAVIS,
Finance Committee.
Cumberland, B. C, July 31, 11120,
Five members of the Cumberland
United Football Club went over to
Vancouver yesterday with the Intention or winning flrBt place in the nve-
a-slde football contest, promoted by
the Caledonian Sports, being held at
Hastings Park today. Messrs. Wll
klnson, Stubbart, Conti, Bannerman
and Hunden comprise thc team.
The police chase after James Barry,
fugitive assailant of Mr. A. S. Stod-
lart, jeweler ot Victoria, has been
unsuccessful so ftir, though many are
th rumors of his presence at different
points on Ilic upper Island.
A Chinese cook at one of the local
roBldonccs was Btopped tho other night
and asked where lie worked. On being told, the man asked the Chinese to
put some food In a pall and put It
outside, as ho was starving. Naturally this aroused all kinds of ideas us
to the possibility of thc man being the
much-sought fugitive.
"Three-or four days ago a resident of
Cumberland who was coming up the
Island Highway in his auto was accosted hy a man answering the description of Barry. He attempted to
stop the car. in fact he made an attempt to get aboard, but the owner
put his foot on the accelerator and
the car shot ahead.
There is little doubt that tlie man
who almost killed the jeweler at Victoria and Jack Barry, the rancher at
Errington, uiear Parksvllle, are one
and the same person. Barry is described by those who know liim at
Parksvllle us about live feet "six. bul
very muscular and quite good looking.
He, claims to be an Englishman, but
It Is stated by those who know him
that he is a South Africa Boer. Whilst
at Errington he stayed at the Alexander ranch.
Considering tlie wild nature of the
country in which lie is supposed to be
located, the police will have their work
cut out to run him down. If he does
show himself at the ranches scattered
along the highway, he will probably be
at once recognized, as a good description has been furnished, and his presence would be quickly communicated
to the police.
SPLENDID BASEBALL
GAME LAST SUNDAY
Nanoose Giants Went Down to
Defeat in a Hard Game By
Score of 3 Goals to 1.
Cumberland defeated the Nanoose
Giants at baseball on Sunday lust to
the tune of three runs to one, after a
good gume. Hunder pitched good
ball for the first four innings, then
Brynjolfson went on the mound. The
latter Is a very likely player from
the mainland, and has strengthened
the team a good deal.
The team were:
Cumberland—E. Hunden, Marocchi,
Watson, D. Hunden, Robertson, Murdoch, Brynjolfson and Miller.
Nanoose—Mehan, Clegg, Flannlgan,
Salon. Edmonson, McLellan, Pendleton, Stewart and Wood.
COURTENAY WHITEWASHED POWELL RIVER
The Courtenay Baseball team again
lemonstrated their supremacy on the
diamond when they defeated tho
rowell River team on tlie latter's own
ground Sunday last by eight .runs to
nil. The Powell River team had been
strengthened In the hope that they
would have at least a chance. The
score Is perhaps not a correct indication of thc piny as the Powell River
boys served up a good article at ball,
playing errorless ball and hatting
freely. Boyd never played u hotter
game In his life. Besides striking out
fourteen men he took a turn at hitting
and made a two-base hit.
HUNDRED BOATS IN
RUM-RUNNING TRADE
TORONTO—One hundred boats or
various varieties are engaged in the
rum-running traffic across the Detroit
River between Canadian and United
Slates territory at Windsor, Out., and
Detroit, Mich. At IcaBt 1000 cases of
Canadian liquor are taken across tin-
river to the United States every night,
according to Isidore Polozker, special
United States district attorney at Detroit, ns expressed tn an Interview
Willi the Toronto Star correspoiidenl
who Ih at the border writing up the
situation there.
Tlie correspondent declares, as Hi"
result of his Investigations on the
scene tbat despite recent energetic
efforts of the Canadian and United
States authorities to slop the traffic,
more liquor (s being shipped acrocH
'he river from Amlienthurg Minn over
before.
COLLIERIES' PICNIC TO
BE EVENT OF SEASON
As the time draws near for tiie third annual picnic of tlie employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, interest
grows apace. Athletes and teams are practising for the events,
and even the little kiddies may be seen doing little stunts getting
into shape for the big day. Arrangements are well ahead of time,
the various committees putting in considerable time and efforts to
this end. A number of men have been working on the ground this
week getting it in shape and erecting the necessary building."..
Residents of Cumberland, Bevan and Union Bay Invited.
With regard to the invitation to the public to attend this event,
it haa become necessary, owing to the limited size of the ground,
to modify that to read the people of Cumberland. Bevan iftid Union
Bay who are ifbt employees.
The standard platform decided upon for the.tugs-of-war is in
groups of two cleats, 14 inch centres, four feet apart, with four
cleats, 12-inch centres, for the anchor men. All teams entering*
must conform to this standard.
Ingenious Device Shows "Result of Tug-of-War Contest.
In connection with these events, an ingenious device, invented
by Mr. John Quinn, manager of No. 1 mine, indicating the position
of the centre of the rope, will be used. It is attached to the rope,
the pull of which, operating through levers, moves a hand on a'
semi-circular dial showing the position of the centre of the rope
to those at distance.
As will be observed iu tho programme, there is no second prize
in any event in which there are not more than two entries. The
general committee, however, with a view to encouraging the
training and practice of First Aid, have made an exception in this
event, *-so that should there be only two teams competing, the
losing team takes second prize.
The age limit for the Junior Baseball Contest has been fixed at
20 years.
Contestants Are Requested to Be on Time.
All contestants in the various events are particularly requested
to be sharp on time at the starting line—it's taken for granted
that each one intends to get to the finishing line on quick time.
As there are over 50 events on the programme contestants will see
the necessity of getting the events off quickly. All entrants are
therefore advised to be ready during the event preceding the one
they propose entering, so as to immediately step into lines at the
call of the starter.
The general committee handling the picnic wants everybody
'attending lo "dig in" and have a jolly good time—let this be the
best event of its kind ever held on the Island.
EMPLOYEES'  PICNIC COMMITTEE
A meeting of the above committee will be held on Sunday,
August 8th, at 10 a.m. Every member is earnestly requested to put in an appearance as the work for the picnic is to
be allotted to the sub-committees, so that confusion will not
exist. All committeemen are urged to get a hustle on and
be present.
MOTOR DRIVER TO LOSE
LICENCE FOR LACK OF
CARE IN DRIVING CAR
NANIMO.—On account or not having taken KUfliclent precaution in approaching the railway crossing, Edward Allen, who was the driver of the
Ctrl' which carried Angus McRae on
June IH) to his tragic end, should he
debarred for twelve months from driving a car containing passengers. This
was the verdict of the Jury which met
under Coroner Hiekling to inquire into the cause of the accident.
BIG COAL CARGO
NANA I MO.--On account of not huv-
coal is the shipment that will he carried nut lo Kio Janeiro hy S, 8. Robin
GoodfOllow, of tlie Kohin Line, Sau
Francisco, which arrived In noil .Sun
day in command ol ('apt. Papralg. Tlie
Kohin Good fellow, one of the largest
vessels that Iihh culled here for Bomu
time, was built hy the .Skinner & lOildy
Company of Seattle.
SH
IPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION DA}
July 2ft—Wireless, Maagen, Thlep-
val, coastwise.
' July .10-Coasler, Olive M„ coastwise: Hulk General Full-child, Ocean
Fall' ; .Storm Kltir-
and Scow, constv
July .'II—Westli
fill.  ClItllDX.
Faultless, Canadian
ie.
in, coastwise; Joy-
PeertesB,  Achates,
Bby, coastwise;  lu-
Aug. 1 -Active.
Progressiva, Mori
Uus, Portland,
Aug. '■' li. ('. P., MaBset, coastwise;
Melanope, Vancouver.
Aug. 4- Sadie and Scow, Victoria;
liaiiiy, coastwise; Martnton, Ocean
Falls.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Aug. 8, 'lentli Sunday After Trinity.
CUMBEKLANP.
Holy Communion, s.;to a.m.
Kvensong, 7 p.m.
Purlng the absence of Archdeacon
Colllsson,  the   Hev.   VV. Leversedge
will lake the services at St.  Peter's,
Comox. and i.iun. on the 8th and 22nd
of Mils month,    The Hev. Mr. Minimi
wlll Conduct the services at Hnystoit
ou ttiosp Sundays.
IM.1UN CATHOLIC CHI IK II.
llav. Father it. Beaton, Comox.
j I a in. Aiims al Cumberland,
I'ltliSIIVTKItllM 8BRV1CE8
James Hood, Pastor.
.Morning Service, II a.in.
During tin.- remaining Sundays uf
August, the evening service will lie
discontinued in tin* Presbyterian
Church, On" good service Will lie
conductod each Sunday morning at II
o'clock, to which a cordial invitation
Is extended to all.
ORACH METHODIST CHURCH
Hev. Goo  Kinney
Morning Service, 11 a.in
Sunday School, 10 a in
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Boss—"I thought it would be the laBt
tiling Murphy would do to carry a
lighted candle Into a powder magazine."
Casey; "it was, sor."
INTERMEDIATES I ROM
NANAIMO WIN OCT
The Cumberland Juniors pui  up a
Igood gainc against the Nanaimo tnlor-
Imedlates, but came out eventually on
the short end of a 7-0 score.
o
/ Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 1, 1920.
RANGES
Exceptionally    Low   Prices   on
High-Grade Canada Ranges
Owing to a long delay in the shipment of an order
of Stoves and Ranges booked some considerable time
ago, and \vhjgh have now arrived, the prices at which
we are selling these Ranges cannot be equalled in
British Columbia, as we secured them at the prices
ruling many months ago.
"BRITANNIA" RANGE
We have on show a beautiful "Britannia" Range,
made by the Buck Stove Co., of Canada, whose goods
are well known all over the continent. This range has
a tiled buck, 6-hole steel top, large oven, warming
closet, thermometer register on oven, and is fully
nickel plated—altogther a splendid high-class range
which would grace any kitchen and give many years
of service. We have priced this at the exceptionally
low figure of
$115
This same stove is selling today in Vancouver at $140.
Terms can be arranged.
OTHER STOVES AT $65.00 AND $75.00
These prices cannot be equalled.
I'. O. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
Make Your
Drinks at Home
LIME JUICE
COOLING FOR THE BLOOD
GRAPE JUICE
REFRESHING FOR THE STOMACH
(See William Jennings Bryan)
LOGANBERRY JUICE
SWEET FOR THE KIDDIES
Frost's Drug Store
The Rexall Store
Cumberland, B.C.
"Old City" Brand
Strawberry Jam
In 2 lb and 4 lb Glass Jars
ABSOLUTELY I'URE AND DELICIOUS JAM
'i he large, whole Strawberries look very tempting in
the glass sealers.
NEW SEASON'S PACK
SOLE AGENTS:
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
First Aid Training
Highly Important
(Contributed)
IN HAIM'OMIMNY
A Scotsman, travelling to London
fortified with six bottles of whiskey,
was brought up at the police court the
next (horning charged with being intoxicated.
"I am afraid," said the magistrate,
"you were in very bad company."
"Ve'ro right, sor," replied Sandy. "I
came up from Aberdeen with six men,
and every one of them was teetotal."
It is much easier to break into some
affair than it is to break out again.
'SOUTHERN" FRUITS
FLOURISH NOW IN
LILLOOET DISTRICT
LILLOOET.—Peanuts are the order
of the day on the Campbell ranch,
where Mrs. Campbell is cultivating a
healthy patch of the delicate legumes.
These and other such exotics such as
watermelons and cantaloupes, flourish
under the warm sun of Lillooet, and
when the country is further developed
promise to yield big returns.
Amid the squalor and filth of (he
lines behind the battlefields of Southern Russia during the Crimean War a
woman saw a need, and conceived a
plan to remedy the terrible sufferings
due to war, pestilence and unsanitary
conditions. Thus was created a more
humane method of nursing and First
Aid to the injured. The woman was
Florence Nightingale, a cultured English girl, and what she accomplished
in reducing mortality, in improving
those terrible conditions, is now hie-
tory. Thorugh ber constant efforts
the idea soon took hold and before
long training schools in hospitals
came into vogue. First Aid and -Ambulance Associations were formed all
over the Empire, until fatalities from
wounds, fractures and disease were
reduced to a minimum.
But apart from this, First Aid has
wrought infinitely more. The statement may seem startling, but nevertheless true, that First Aid has been
one of the greatest factors in the making and sustaining of the British Empire. Curiously, coincident with the
growth of First Aid, came the broadening of the British colonial policy.
Previous to its existence exploitation
of countries and peoples by intolerant
and repressive measures, with little or
no regard paid to their health or well
being, was the general policy with
regard to possessions.
Gradually, however, the beneficent
forces of nursing and First Aid came
into action, giving common ground to
Briton and native where, from one
point 'at least, they could see eye to
eye. With tlie confidence begat of
such service came understanding,
vi: Ion to statesmen, enactment of
legislation for the people consistent
with their intellectual development
and their moral and physical well
being.
The effects of First Aid training are
to an even greater degree noted in the
Individual. Emerson states, "It is
only iu our simple, easy, spontaneous
action are we great." This means
simply the co-ordinating of the faculties of mind and heart—intelligent
sympathy: the combination of the two
making the third which functions
spontaneously and unerringly,
Tlie Mairie ul' First Aid Training.
It strengthens character by aiding
concentration and quickening decision. The magnificent work of tbe
girls in France lias compelled fiction
to turn to truth for its heroines. Out
of the thousands of non-combatant
soldiers of the medical corps it is not
recorded where one has been found
guilty of cowardice or neglect of duty
—a circumstance unique in thc annals
of human endeavor.
The man or woman who has taken
a First Aid course has created within
himself or herself a power that only
requires the opportunity to demonstrate. Its mission is everlasting, for
it is founded on the rock of high purpose—service to one's fellow men.
First Aid Work hi Cuinborland.
Tlie people of Cumberland are particularly fortunate in having the
management of the Canadian Collieries ho keenly interested iu the extension of First Aid work. They have
just renovated the large hall over
Eraser's Confectionery Store aud made
it suitable for a First Aid class and
practice room. Dr. MacNaughton and
Dr. Hicks are at all times willing to
give what they can of their time toward teaching this important subject.
The teachers and school being now
available, the co-operation of the
public is desired in order to supply
the scholars for this noble work.
The young men have their annual
class, the membership of which could
be increased considerably. It is also
very important that the young women
take up the subject, as accidents respect neither time nor circumstance,
and the value of being prepared has
been proved so often.
lirst Aid Contest,
At the picnic of the Canadian Collieries employees on Saturday next,
a First Aid contest has been provided
on tbe programme, the event starting
at 11.40 a.m. The first prize is valued
at ?25.00 and the second at $15.00.
Each team is requested to bring its
own equipment.
REPORTS FISHING
POOR ON THE NAAS
"The worst year in the history of the
Naas" reports Mr. J. T. C. Williams,
inspector of northern fisheries. The
report which covers the period of fishing up to July 30 states that the run
of sockeye there has practically
stopped now, and Dominion fishery
officials are of the opinion that American trap nets are largely responsible
for the depletion of this valuable
fishery.
The flight of a train is like the thmh of an enormous pulse
in ihe arteries of the nation. To slow the beat is to
ilmv the life of the country.
THE train  in this picture is one of the
eleven hundred freight trains in daily
service in Canada.
It consists of one heavy-duty freight engine
and 45 standard box cars.
It can carry 2,000 tons of wheat.
In 1913 its engine could have been built
for $34,700—to-day $81,000; its box cars for
$1,138.85 each—to-day $3,797.50.
In other words the rolling stock alone in»
the movement of 2,000 tons of  wheat has
increased   in   cost   from   $85,948.25   to
$251,887.50 or 193.1%!
The labor bill of the railways has risen in
the same period from $115,000,000 to
$231,000,000—101%!*
The cost of rails for a mile of track has
gone up from $9,497 to $19,680—107% !
No cost has been unaffected by the general
rise.
Operating expenses continue to rise more
rapidly than Gross earnings. Net earnings
are sinking at an alarming rate.
These are the  facts  that- lie  behind the
application for increased freight rates for
the railways.
'Estimated
rWi is Ou second of a serisi of adtsrtiismsuls publithsd tinier tht authority of
The Railway Association of Canada
loimerla-    Iha    CANADIAN     KA1LWAY    WAR    HOARD
Explanation of Chart:
Top Hits shows thtriss of Gross
reosnus.
Uiddls tins shows the mors rapid
rise ofOpsrating Expenses.
■ Bottom tins shows tlu downward
plunge of A'-l earnings as a
result of thtriss in ths nldils
tint—Operating Expsnsss.
14      Nt      II       ttt,        III
- 2
Ja
Jz       Z
—./.(—
hsi"     f-   i
•±1     —1     J.
\t     t
u_   \tl^
-—Jfi|     f
\/
,
*       1-    ,*-.,
II     "^n.7    X
N                   .     Tt,                     v
j
Al'
Sale of City Lots
SEALED TENDERS are Invited for
Hie purchase of:
Lot 2, Moil- 15, Mil) 522A
Lot \ Block K, Mill* 5*!A
Lot 7, Block 4, Muy oil
In the corporate limits of the City of
Cumberland, as authorized in the Cily
ol Cumberland Land Sale Bylaws Nj.
1, 1919, and No. 2, 1920, to each of
which of the aforesaid lots the City of
Cumberland    holds    an    Indefeasible
Title.
Tenders must bo sealed   aud   forwarded to the City Clerk.
T. MORDY,
July 9th, 1920. City Clerk.
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
Try one of Henderson's
Special Banana
Splits
We make our own Ice Cream
and claim it to be the best on the
Island. We get the cream fresh
from the farm every day.
I
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beef   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water £uuilJC,£f Pure
CaSCade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD
NANAIMO, B.C. August 7, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Three
P
JUST ISSUED
Wrigley's B.C.
fop 1920
YEAR BOOK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Official data covering agriculture, lands, timber, mining, fishing and public works.
GAZETTER AND ALPHABETICAL  DIRECTORY
Describing 2149 cities, towns, villages and settlements within the Province, giving location, distances
and directions from larger points, how reached, with a synopsis of local resources, populations, etc., followed by an alphabetical directory of all business and professional men, employees, farmers, stock
raisers, fruit growers, etc.
CLASSIFIED BUSINESS SECTION ' ,
The business interests of the Province, including manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers, listing all
products from the raw material to the finished article, are classified under 569 headings, alphabetically
arranged according to towns. '
TRADE NAMES, BRANDS AND TRADE MARKS
A list of popular trade names, brands and trade mark
British Columbia, alphabetically arranged.
PATRONIZE B.C. INDUSTRIES
goods,  either  manufactured  or represented  in
/
Almost anything which anyone desires can be purchased in British Columbia. Every dollar spent in B.
C. assists the Province. You can assist B. C. by trading with B. C. merchants. If you are unable to purchase what you desire in your local town or community, then consult Wrigley's Classified Business
Directory, a copy of which can be secured at all first-class drug stores, confectionery stores, hotels, auto-'
mobile garages, in fact, most of the live business concerns have a copy of Wrigley's 1920 British Columbia
Directory. \
Subscription $10.00 prepaid to any address
Wrigley's Directories Limited
198 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 2876
lis FROM A NEW YORK ROOF
Luxury Tax Removed |
from Electric Heating |
Appliances |
You will be interested to know that the efforts of |g
manufacturers of Electric Heating Appliances and of §|
others interested, have been successful in securing the j|
removal of the 10 per cent. Luxury Tax on nickle- j|
plated Electric Heating Appliances. If
We quote herewith a recent letter from R. W. Bread- jj|
nor, Commissioner of Taxation, to a manufacturer of g
appliances: g
"In reply to your letter of the 15th inst., I may state S
that the luxury tax applies to articles plated with gold g
or silver adapted for household or office use.   Nickle- Jj
plated electric heating appliances are exempt." g
Some of the more importaht arguments used were: g=
1st—In almost all communities of the Dominion of g
Canada it is actually more economical to iron, toast, gf
cook, etc., with electric appliances than by any other
method.
The proposed legislation, therefore; would be taxing
an economy rather than a luxury.
2nd—Appliances made from steel and iron require
a covering of something to protect them from the
action of rust.
Nickle is the best and most economical for this
purpose.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains ot this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it ls a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland .Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co», Ltd. p. O. 314
New York women dry their hair on
the roof; they hang their clothes on
the roof; they let their children play
on the roof; they go out on the roof
on summer evenings to cool off. New
York has no front yards, no back
yards, no porches. New York has only
roofs and fire escapes, says "The
Christian Science Monitor."
Clothes hang on the roofs; clothes
hang on lines strung between the
backs of buildings, two lines to each
dwelling, two dwellings to each floor,
five floors to each building, 20 buildings to each block on one street, an
equal number on the next street standing back to back. Across the slit between the buildings, the clotheslines
—crossed and criss-crossed, when not
entirely weighted down with clothes
lend haziness to the Are escapes at
the far end. Slit, lines, clothes, and
fire escapes are visible only to roofs.
Eight hundred families live In that
block and hang their clothes across
that slit, and carry on their small
activities within Its concrete arms.
Down below there a lady Is renewing her hat with Jettum. Two windows beyond, another ls Ironing. A
building or so away, a bit of white
shows, Hoops out, a sleeve waves
wildly, grotesquely; an interval, and a
waist Jerks out to the centre of the
silt and hangs there, grimly, resentfully, upside down, puffed absurdly by
the wind.
Two children play on a carpet on
the Are escape two floors below and a
couple of buildings over. Two other
children on the tire escape a floor
above watch them enviously. They
look up and answer, and they all laugh
and chatter back and forth.
Directly below Is a garden of vegetables, fenced ln by concrete, growing
in a thin layer of earth scattered over
concrete. Another garden shows a
spot of green on the fire escape two
doors up.
Just below, a white puppy trots
back and forth before a ledge of concrete, with the ever insatiable curiosity over what lies on top. At one
end he places bis paws against It, and
wags his tail hopefully. Then he trots
patiently to the other end and looks
up, waiting. Back he goes to the first
end, running; things sometimes change
quickly and he must be on hand. He
waits expectantly.    Slowly he edges
RELIGIONS  OF THE   WORLD.
According to reliable statistics and
carefully-made estimates, the adherents of the leading branches of the
Christian religion number: Roman
Catholics, 273,860,000; Greek or Orthodox Catholics, 120,000; Protestants, 171,650,000, making a total of
564,510,000 Christians. The leading
non-Christian bodies number: Con-
fuclanlsts and Taolsts, 300,830,000;
Mohammedans, 221,825,000; Hindus.
210,540,000; Animlsts. 157.270,000
Budhists, 138.031,000; Shintolsts,
25,000,000; Jews, 12,500,000; unclassified, 15,280,000. The total non-Christians number 1,081,981,000, and these
with the Christians makes a world's
population of 1,646,491,000.
William and Henry, chauffeurs,
were discussing the ill luck of a fellow
chauffeur, Clarence, who had the day
before been fined for taking out his
employer's car without permission.
'But how did the boss know Clarence had taken the car out?" aRked
Henry.
"Why," exclaimed William, "Clarence ran over him."
WHOLE COURT GOES
TO TRY ESKIMOS
Judge and Officials From Montreal Must Travel 2,000
Miles By Sled.
"I understand you have told your
wife to throw the oulja board into the
wood-box."
"Yes. I'm not going to have any
such superstitious nonsense deciding
questions around my house. When I
come to a point where I can't make
up my mind what to do. I simply flip
a coin."
WINNIPEG.—To demonstrate to the
natives of the Par North, in a spectacular manner so they shall never for-
?et, that British laws must be obeyed
■ven In the remotest parts of the Empire, two Eskimo murderers aro to be
■rlcd tor their lives at Chesterfield Inlet, one of the furthest north posts of
ihe Royal Canadian Mounted Police on
Hudson Bay.
The court--consisting of Inspector
D. L. Thomas of the Mounted Police,
who will preside as magistrate; two
constables and the necessary paraphernalia Is being taken from Montreal in the government steamer Mus-
eople. Two months will be required
to make tlie voyage to Chesterfield,
and two or three months to make the
nccessH ry preliminary examinations
and hold the trials. By that time winter will be upon the Barren lands, so
the court will either have to travel
about 2,000 mlleB by dog sled to return to civilization or will have to
spend the long winter at the Inlet, to
await tlie coming of the Muscopie on
Its spring voyage.
One of the murderers. Ouangwak, Is
the native who was captured by Sergt.
W. O. Douglas, of the Mounted Police,
and walked 2,000 miles to The Pas,
Manitoba, the nearest outpost of civilization, to account for the slaying of
two fellow tribesmen.
The Eskimo, was brought to Winnipeg after two months' imprisonment
In the jail at Dauphin. Manitoba, aud
was shown the time of his life while
here waiting to be taken east. He has
the distinction of being the only Eskimo who ever visited Winnipeg and th*
only one of his race who ever took a
"joy ride" in an automobile. Although
he marvelled at the experience, Ouangwak did not enjoy It; he suffered too
much from the heat. The temperature
was around 85, which Is about 50 degrees above comfort for him. In spite
of the fact that he was sweltering, he
could not be persuaded to discard his
heavy fur-trimmed native costume for
white men's clothes.
After two days in Winnipeg, the Eskimo, under the escort of Sergt. Douglas, left for Montreal, where they met
the "court" and set sail on the Muscopie.
Upon arriving at Chesterfield, Inspector Sergt. DouglaB, with the constables, will start Inland in search of
another Eskimo, who Is said to have
murdered a man In a quarrel over
meat. Thcnews of this crime reached
.Mounted Police headquarters here
Just before Sergt. Douglas left. When
the second murderer ls captured he
will be arraigned along with Ouangwak, for preliminary trial.
Natives for 1,000 miles around wlll
be rounded up to witness the working
of British courts of law. Every detail
of ceremony common to British courts
of law will be carried out, with as
much ostentation as possible, In order
to Impress the Eskimos and Indians
with the solemnity of the proceeding.
If they are committed for murder
land there is no question of Ouang-
wak's guilt because he has confessed
his crime), the murder trial will follow the preliminary ln a few days.
What punishment will be meted out
to the prisoners in case they are convicted, the police will not say. .Sergt.
Douglas expressed the opinion, however, that they would not be hanged;
that It was more likely they would be
imprisoned in the police barracks at
the Inlet for a few years.
It was the familiar story ot Illicit
love for a woman that brought about
tbe arrest of Ouangwak. He shot and
killed the woman's husband and the
husband's brother at Lake Yathyed.
1,0(10 miles north of Winnipeg. Sergt.
Douglas "mushed It" 700 miles to ar-
resl blm uml then walked 1.300 miles
witli his prisoner to the end of the
steel on the Hudson's Hay railway to
bring Mm lo The Pas.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERKIFIELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland, B. C.
Canada Fond Board License No. 10-4986
by selecting the shells that
hunters fromcoastto coast
have proved dependable
under all conditions.
Rega)
Shotgun Shells
are a double assurance ol
success for the man who
prefers ballfstite powder.
We Hito carry s full line rf
Canuck and *SoT«rtlftn Shotgun Shells and Dominion
Metallic Cartridges — each
backed by th« big " D " tra-' ■-
muk
f. H. TARBELL
•Cumberland, B.O.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night,
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Material
and
Workmanship
Guaranteed
Rubber Heels
Fixed While C Walt
Phillips' Military Heels and Soles.
S. DAVIS  ■  Dunsmuir Avenue
An attorney was examining a witness, and chanced to ask him ahoui
the character of tbe dend men who
figured iu the case, to which thc witness replied:
"He was a man without blame, beloved and respected by all, pure In all
his thoughts, aud —"
"How did you learn that?" demanded the Judge.
"I read It on his tombstone," wa
the disconcerting reply.
"Jack siiys 1- am all   the world to
him."
".My dear, he's said that to every
girl he's been engaged to -then he's
looked around for new worlds to coll
*|iier."
MAKING 8IHE
"What Is your opinion of tho liquor
question?"
"Well, sir, I'm seeking votes in thi:
community, and before I answer that
question I should like to know where
you stand."
TOO LATE.
Hubby—By the way, Mary, I've been
thinking over that little argument we
had, and I'm beginning to agree with
you.
Wlfey—But you're too late. I've
changed my mind.
up, puts his paws against the ledge.
and Jumps a little.   He hurries hack
to the other end and jumps there. One
his way back to the other end, looks' wonders how long his hope will last.
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION  BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT  DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and  Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Voung Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPFXIALS —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delirious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
Llcenso No. 9-3902 Four
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 7,-1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN  Edlt0r
SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1920.
SPOKT A BOND OF NATIONAL FRIENDSHIP
There is one feature of 'international Bport which is often
overlooked or minimized, says the Toronto Saturday Night,
and that is-the importance of sport as a bond of friendship
between nations. Tbe athlete can frequently be quite as
influential an ambassador as the diplomat Is, He can do
Incalculable good by strengthening that, international amity
which Is the best guarantee of the world's peace; just as
he can work irremediable harm by arousing national and
racial animosities, And it all depends, not on whether he
wins or loses, but solely on the spirit in which he plays
tbe garne.
The recent races for the America's Cup have boon an
Instance of the excellent effect of good sportsmanship tn
promoting international good will. Tlie genial Irishman
who challenged for tlie cup has always been famous (or
the fmperturable gooil humor with which he accepts either1
Ills failures or his victories. Naturally he is always out to
win. li he does, he is nol unduly elated. If he loses, he
takes it as a good sport should. And he was met in the
same friendly aud sportsmanlike way. It was a case of
"may the best sailor and tbe best boat win."
Two other important events in recent sporting history
which have redounded to the credit and good feeling of
both the great English-speaking nations, were the victory
of young Tolley ovcr Gardner, the American, in the British
amateur golf championships, and the success of tildcn, of
Philadelphia, in gaining tbe world's tennis championship
from Paterson, the Australian, at Wimbledon. Gardner
was finally beaten in a sensational battle in which he
seemed more than once on the point of gaining the victory.
Through it all, when the tide was setting in his direction,
just as when it was turning against him, he remained the
same modest and plucky fellow, a great golfer and a
thorough gentleman. Even the staid old "London Times"
pointed out that if he had won the title, there would have
been nothing but congratulations antlgood will for him,
as no visiting athlete had ever before made so many friends
in England. And the same excellent feeling has marked
the reception in England of Tilden's victory. It was the
first time that the tennis title had ever passed out of the
British Empire, and it was a distinct blow to British pride.
But nothing was permitted to detract from the warmth of
applause which greeted the outcome of the final match.
Tilden had won by sheer tennis brilliancy and cool skill.
He had proven himself one of the world's greatest player:;
and a good sportsman as well, aud that is all the English
public needed-to know. It Is a sreat thing for sport and
also for international friendship when tlip result of these
contests can be accepted in such a spirit.
ADVICE TO CANDIDATES
F. P. V. in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
We've always told these here birds that get the Itch for
office into their systems not to own any newspapers.. And
now two of 'em at once have gone and done It. And just
like we said they would, they've both got.caught at it, too.
As far as we're concerned we'd just as soon keep a
trained phonograph on the hall table listening to everything we say to the family before breakfast and ready to
spill it all out at out mother-in-law's funeral. We've
always made it a regular policy not to own'any newspapers,
and from the present outlook it's entirely likely we'll be
able to keep right on being consistent.
When you've got a paper that belong to you, you've got
to print things in it whether you have a typewriter of your
own or not. And you've got. to hire a fellow to think 'em
up for you—an editor, or a circulation man or something
like that with a little snap to him. Then, like as not, dod
rat him, he goes and thinks up all the wrong things he
knows.
Not wrong from the way he looks at it, you understand,
aud maybe they listened easy enough to you, too, the first
time he pulled a galley proof. Leastwise they sounded 0,
K. at the time. Hut four or live years afterwards, when
you've got a national viewpoint, including a good deal
more savvy, and the members of your great and glorious
party have demanded in no uncertain tones that you bo
their standard-bearer from the rock-ribbed, etc., etc., to the
sun-kissed, etc., etc., some dirty, lying, unscrupulous, wife-
beating, peanut selling sonu-of-u-bum goes and digs 'em up
on you.
Doggone It! Naturally, disinterred after so long a re3t,
they've got a distinct odor—a right down old-fashioned
smell. Then everybody seems lo think h,e's appointed to
bring 'em around and lay 'em ot» your doorstep as though
you were interested iu their family history and homesick
for 'em.
As a matter of fact, you never cared for the darned
things an way. But the mor^you explain that they're dead
—completely aud entirely dead and utterly irrelevant, immaterial and inconsequential—the more people get to pok
$SrS-S*SS*S*S-S*S-VV-S-S-S-S-S-Sre
NEW   GOODS
ing 'em up and talking about 'em. By and by they get so
wrought up they print 'em in a hook as though they was
priebless jewels of thought. And the next thing 'you
know—
Oh Lord, oh Lord—if we ever decide to run for office,
# m
paralyze our members if you must and scatter our brains
hither aud yon, to make head cheese of, but if you love us
the least little mite, oh .Lord, just keep us from owning any
newspapers!
CONSERVED  ALASKA
Mr. Payne, ihe Secretary of the Interior for the United
States, puts his finger on the sure spot of Alaska: "There
are too many things 'reserved.' One almost thinks of
'vorhoten' in Germany, Conservation in the States is most
desirable, but what Alaska needs is more men and women
and less governmental regulations."
.Never was a truer word spoken of that region of unbounded resources and potentialities.. From the best of
motives Alaska has been overconserved and constricted.
Hor development has been fettered lest somebody should
gel rich in tbe process. Not thus did the great States of
the West*«gro\v up. They almost paid a bounty on energy.
A free field and free play; and let the pioneer become a
"plutocrat" If he could. They prospered because they invited an active and ambitious population. Amska has been
for years the most beruled, belawed, beregulated of countries. Wealth immense, population scanty, development
arrsted or straggling. Such is the result of fanatical "con-
scrvafion. Wasn't it Drysdale in "Tom Brown at Oxford"
who explained, when caught, tn a vinous moment, burying
tbe college plate, that he was "providing for posterity"?—
New York Times.
DRESS GOODS IN ALL-WOOL SERGES, in cream, old rose, navy 'blue, dark green,
saxe and brown, in 54-inch width, at $4,50 per yard.
WOOL AND COTTON TARTAN PLAIDS, small and large checks, in black and white,
from $2.25 to $4.50 pet^yard.
TRICOTINES,  GABARDINES,  PANAMAS AND COATINGS, in all popular shades.
MARCELLA BEDSPREADS from $6.00 to $14.75.
COTTON EIDERDOWN in 30-inch width, in pink, sky, sand and cardinal, at 90c per
yard.
TOWELS—TOWELLINGS—TABLE DAMASKS
FLANNELETTES—CANTON   FLANNELS, bleached and unbleached.
'TEDDY BEAR CRIB BLANKETS, in pink and sky, at $2.25 each.
SINCERITY IN LOfrER ANIMALS
■ The ccnsplcuounueEO of the will in the lower order of
inimals explain', Ihe delight we take in dogs, apes, cat:
etc.;  it  is the entirely haive way in which they express
themselves that gives us (so much pleasure.
The sight of any free animal going about its business un
disturbed, peeking its food, or looking after its young, or
mixing in I lie company of Its kind, all the time being exactly what it ought to be aud can be—what a strange
pleasure it gives us! Even if it is only a bird, 1 can watcli
It for a long lime with delight; or a water rat, or a hedge
hog; or, better still, a weasel, a deer or a stag. The main
reason we take so much pleasure in looking at animals is
that we like to see our own nature iu such a simplified
form. There is only one mendacious being in the world,
and that is man. Every other is true and sincere, and
makes no attempt to coneal what it is, expressing Its feel
ings just as they are. SCHOPENHAUER
GROCERY   DEPARTMENT
Specials for the Week
CLIMAX JAMS—4-lb. tins .$1.10
CORN—Quaker Brand, per tin  20c
ROLLED AND BONED HAM—4 to 6-lb.
,  pieces, per lb. j**?.. 50c
PACIFIC MILK—Large tins .... 7 for 95c
PACIFIC MILK—Small tins, dozen.... 90c
TEA—Bulk Broken Orange Pekoe, lb. 55c
SUGAR—Granulated, per lb  24c
FLOUR—Fjve" Roses, per sack  $3.75
TELEPHONE
CUMBERLAND
THE LESSON OF LANGUISHING TROLLEYS
Exactly what changes are coming in methods of transportation is, at the moment, difficult to determine. That a
great readjustment is in progress seems beyond question.
All sorts of people are noticing the evidences of it, particularly that which Is at present most striking among
.. them, namely, thhe partial snulling out of trolley lines.
Apparently the main reason for this gradual,extinguishment may be given in very few words. The automobile
lias overtaken and outstripped the trolley car. It seems
only a few years ago since street railway people were look
ing forward to a heavy carrying business not only for
passengers but for freight, and not merely in the cities
bul in their environs, nnd even, eventually, in the sparsely
settled country districts. It is significant that the carrying
of freight ami express matter was at thit time expected to
lie the basis for a wondrous development. But this was
reckoning without the automobile, Just as the street cars,
with their freight-carrying development, had been found
more flexible in their Kervit-e than the steam railroad train,
so, in time, automobiles came to show themselves more
iloxibl than fbe street cars. The trolley express car, true
to expectation, outstripped the steam railroad freight
trains by picking up and delivering got.ds in town centres
and along the highways instead of requiring them to be
handled entirely through freight yards and fixed stations.
Hut the automobile has now proved Itself superior* to the
trolley by picking up aud delivering passengers and goods,
ns It wero at the very doorways of shops and dwellings.
Only durable highways arc now needed to enable the
automobile trucks to carry virtually as great quantifies of
freight and express matter as the steam and trolley lines
have ever undertaken to handle, and the trucks make no
bones of doing business on a door-to-door basis between
business buildings in great cities that nre hundreds of
miles apart.-Christian Science Monitor.
.THE MAN WHO DIDN'T INSURE
The. Preferred Accident Insurance Company points out
the value of accident insurance in a small leaflet, which
reads:
Years ago we tried to sell a man some Accident Insurane,
BUT DIDN'T.
He said he didn't expect to be hurt and would take a chance.
HE DID!
.About a year rigo he said he was away ahead of the game.
HE WAS.
This is, he hadn't paid premiums "for nothing" for ten
years or so, aud figured he was $5Uu to the good. But
he didn't Jmve it IN THE BANK.
Then the old law of averages got busy. An automobile
hit him, HARD, TOO!
They put him In a nice clean hospital room at $35 per,
and got a good-looking nurse at $35 per, and a highly
trained surgeon. AND EVERYTHING.
After a few days of blissful unconsciousness, he began to
wonder where "it" would all come from. We. couldn't
help him * THEN.
In about six weeks they turned him over, all fixed up, to
his creditors.   . HE'S STILL WITH THEM.
Almost every branch of research is indebted to the birds
of the air, the fish of the sea, the beasts of the forest, aud
the insects on the wing. The machine that swiftly shoots
across the sky, tbe boat that moves upon and under the
water, and the car that follows the mountain trail all pay
homage, so to speak, to something in nature related to
their origin. And to tbe long list of useful devices
developed from a humble beginning has to be added the
"buzzer," which may he heard, though seldom seen, In
every blllce with modern equipment. The buzzer pro
duces a sound resembling that of the bee. It takes the
place of the bell, or the noisy shout "Boy!" and is quite
distinct above other noises in the room. To such an ex
tent is the buzzer being applied that it is no longer con
find to the office or the workshop, but hns entered the
dignified chambers of parliaments. Tbe South African
House of Assembly has adopted the huz/.or for the purpose
of curtailing speeches on the budget. The buzzer merits
a still wider application, for budget speeches are not tbe
only kind which tbo public would like to have curtailed.
Al a recent meeting of members of the British Houses
of Parliament to discuss the revolutionary field iu its
Infest phase, the Sinn Fein movement of Ireland was declared by Influential speakers to be linked up, more or less
directly, wilh Russian Bolshevism. There certainly seems
to be a Bolshevist simplicity and directness in the notice
reported to have been sent by the Sinn Fein executive to
jurors rcently summoned to attend the Cork Assize Court.
"The executive reminds you," reads this document, "that
no sClf-respecting Irishman will participate In the proceedings. You. therefore, are ordred not to Attend the
court." Truly an independent Ireland, governed by this
gentle executive, would prove an interesting and instructive example of new and up-to-date methods of "democratic" government.
IN PONTIUS PILATE'S PLACE. rThe seat once occupied by Pontius Pilate is now held hy a graduate of famed
Cambridge University, Colonel Richard Storrs, son of the
Dean, of Rochester, England, has entered upon his duties
as British governor of Jerusalem.
It's worse than useless to advertise for lost faith.
No adva'nee in the price of shoes will prevent kicking.
Some men don't want to talk about justice after they
get it.
Home-made advice is just as unsatisfactory as any other
brand.
Business men who cling to the ancient methods are apt
to be, left at the post.
Abbreviated costumes ou the beach may he responsible
or those loud tremors in Los Angeles.
WEEKS   MOTOR  COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C:
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book.
The experience of Veteran moorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all* the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the'Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the- Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay /
t
August 7, 1920.
5=fe^-^'
PIANO
SPECIAL
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
Here is a .Piano at a remarkably- low price but of a
particularly high standard. The Regent has a beautiful tone and is well finished throughout.
The Price
is only
$385 '
KEE FROM
TAX
With increased cost of production and taxes, we are not
sure how long we will be able to sell this instrument
at this price, so intending customers will do well to
decide while there are a few in stock.
CONVENIENT TERMS  WILL BE  ARRANGED
,.'*V\^VVV»-***»^**aa'V»S*%*VV»*%'*V*a*VVS**>a"vV'*a^*\/\**^/\
In addition to thc above Ve have a few Pianos at'
Tax Free prices:
The GERHARD HE1NTXMAN, which needs no introduction, as many hundreds have been sold in this
- district.
The MENDELSSOHN, in mahogany and fumed oak
finish, at a snap price. .
The CEC1LIAN, full toned instrument, at $575.   Convenient terms arranged.
The HAINES BROS. Piano, at $575.      ,
We have a full stock of all other lines aid will be
pleased to demonstrate when you call.
CONVENIENT TERMS ARRANGED.
sl^Si'£l*S'sl'le*musi*sl^i*t'*s*s*'A**d*s*li**e^i*e**.'Se**t*^^
GEO. A. FLETCHER
MUSIC COMPANY
"EVERYTHING IN MUSIC"
CUMBERLAND, B.C,
Al! Phonographs in Stock
Special  Summer
Terms for One
Week  only
$60 cash
$15 pei* month
Give Telephone
Numbers Clearly
When calling Central, be sure to consult the directory
first, and when giving the number do so slowly, speaking the digits clearly. It shows consideration and
assists the operator in her effort to give service.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Five
("»
THE NAKED TRUTH
The British Independent Labor Party
dispatched twelve questions to the
Third Internationale at Moscow and
have received replies which must have
sent chills down the spines of a great
many in the party ranks. The Internationale bluntly pointed out that the
triumph of the proletariat involved
bloody revolution, that the workers of
Great Britain should prepare for civil
war, and declared that the day.was
coming when communism, sweeping
through Europe nnd Impressing Its
power upon eastern nations, would
meet the capitalism of Europe nnd
America in conflict.
The genlle, pastoral picture of the
communist paradise, wilh such beautl-
I'u features as bloody revolution, civil
war, assassination, rnplne, loot and
general all-round rulllluiilsiii evidently
does not attract James Ramsay Macdonald, one of the leaders of the Independent Labor Party, who, commenting on the replies from Moscow,
writes: "The Independent Labor
Parly nnd the Third Internationale are
oil aud water and won't mix."
One oT the troubles of the Third Internationale, however, is the fact that
Its amiable principles are being totally
disregarded by Lenine and Trotzky.
Russia has fallen Into such a shape
under their ministrations that they
have scuttled their communism to the
point of sending emissaries to "capitalistic" Britain, France, the United
States and Canada to arrange for trade
uterchanges, while they are reorganizing Russia's Industrial machinery ou
an anti-communistic -basis.
Indeed, their principal agents in
many departments are Czarlsts. Some
day. we may assume, the Third Internationale will discover that Lenine
and Trotzky liavo slipped away from
their light and leading, and will hoist
them on n bomb. The French terrorists guillotined Robespierre and St.
Jusf as soon as they were suspected of
modifying their terrorist idens under
Ihe pressure of responsibility of ofiice.
Herald.
FOREIGN MINDS AS
SEEN IN WANT ADS.
Samples of some advertisements in
foreign language newspapers printed
in tlie East:*
Wanted—competent druggist to
undertake sale of a new patent
remedy. Will prove highly lucrative
to tbe undertaker."
From a German sheet comes this
characteristic piece of psychology:
"Notice—If Johann Weitz supposed to
be in the West will communicate with
us he will hear something to his advantage.   His wife is dead."
A Hutheninu paper carried this:
"Wanted—a small grosery store by
two llends going into business together." This, of course, was In English, in the only paper of a small town
which occasionally ran an English
column.
"Pressed hay for sail" frequently
challenged the eye Iu this same paper,
and once when a prosperous Ruthcn-
ian farmer had played host to a stray
horse he put two ads. In, one In his
own language, and the other in ours,
which read: "A stranger horse has
come on my farm. He has bote fore-
foots wlte. He is coler black. Who
owns him come get him and pay me
\ puts of keep him."
A German paper recently had several Interesting items In Its want-ad.
column. The first was: "Ladies who
have old feathers can be re-dyed and
made as good as new." Another called
for: "A tall strong woman able to lift.
To take care of a young man a little
out of his mind." And a big display
al, announced that "Mr. Warthmann
would make coats, muffs, caps, etc.,
lor ladles out of their own skins."
It takes the German to conduct a
cold-blooded, business-like matrimonii! bureau, however. This is where he
may be sulil to shine.  Listen to this:
"Wanted—by a young, wealthy,
handsome and agreeable young farmer, a wife with similar qualities.
Must have thoroughly rested hersell
und be not ufrald of farm work. Send
photo and state whether maid
widow, also exact age, weight and
height."
Another Teuton with a large Idea of
himself advertised for "a wife who
can sew and do all kinds of light
lingered work, as well as cook and
take care of a worthy young man with
n brilliant mind."
Sometimes a lady takes a whack at
it herself. This was a recent sample:
"Well-educated German lady, very
musical and a line cook desires to
correspond with a German business or
professional man. Object matrimony.
Will marry at once If agreeable."
LIVE WIRE BARGAINS FOR
SATURDAY ONLY
We have still a large stock of the following and offer vou EXTRA SPECIAL
BARGAINS FOR SATURDAY ONLY. These prices are all away below cost, consequently
we cannot offer such bargains for a long period.
Georgette and
Crepe de Chine Blouses
$13.95
$11.95
$11.00
$10.95
   tPt)ol/»J
Satin Camisoles
Regular price $19.50.
Sale price .'	
Regular price $17.00.
Sale price	
Regular price $16.75.
Sale price	
Regular price $15.00.
Sale price	
Regular price $10.75.
Sale price	
DAINTY CREPE UE CHINE AND
SATIN CAMISOLES
Regular price $U.95.
Sale price 	
Regluar price $1.95.
,Sale price	
$1.95
$1.35
Middies
Ladies' Hose
75 PRS. SILK HOSE, in assorted t\r
colors.  Regular $2.00.   Sale .... t/U-L
50 PRS. BROWN SILK HOSE, (j* j   Q r
Regular $2.75.   Sale price.... tpleOtl
50 PRS. BROWN LISLE HOSE.     PA.
Regular 95c'pair.   Sale price... lll/v
COTTON CREPE— jji   FA
Regular $8.76.   Sale price :.. «p4t.O"
WHITE DUCK— d»Q ht
.   Regular $7.50.   Sale price ... «DO. I O
WHITE DUCK— d»<n nr
Regular $5.50.   Sale price
Trimmed Hats
$3.95
Panama Hats
Suitable for camping and picnics. QJT^
Regular $12.00.   Sale price  VuL
Regular $6.50 to *$10.95.
Sale price	
RIDEOUT'S
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
License No. 8-25489
New Directory
Is Just Out
Wrigley's Year Book for 1920
Contains Mass of Information—Whole Province, Including Rural Districts, Covered.
The third Issue of Wrigley's British
Columbia Directory is now being delivered. The 1D20 issue comprises
1,262 pages, thc first 70 pages containing an early history ol the province,
the personnel of the British Columbia
Government, together with a list of
all officials of the various departments
of the government, both at Victoria
and throughout the province, with
short articles giving the Jurisdiction
of the various departments, and indicating the great resources of the province; the names of all Dominion Government officials throughout the province are also.given In this section,
and the book contains scenes and
views throughout the province, and
also maps covering all automobile
routes In the province.
Population  of  (itniborliind  nnd   District <-lven About 3,000.
Under the heading ot Cumberland
and prefacing a list of nearly 9011
names in alphabetical order. Wrigley's B. C. Directory says:
Cumberland, the home of the famous Comox steam coal. The largest
centre of population on Vancouver Island, north of Nanaimo, Is the chief
centre of production for the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., the largest coal operators on Vancouver Island, the Cumberland mines having an
output of 55,000 tons per month. The
city-Is situated In Comox Provincial
Electoral District, In the foothills ol
thc Beaufort Mountains on Comox
Lake, and connects with Union Buv
which is 12 miles south-east, thi
shipping point for Canadian Colllerlei
(Dunsmuir), Limited, nnd also with
the 13. & N. Railway at Royston, foui
miles east, hy C. C. (D.l. Ltd., Ry.
Comox Lake Is one of the beaut)
spots of the Island and affords excellent Ashing and boating, nnd Is the
supply reservoir for the C. C, (D.) Ltd.
hydro-electric plant. Tiie scenery or
this lake is superb, and all tourist,
should arrange to spend a half da>
viewing tho varied scenery of thii
beautiful lake.
Bountiful Coiiiux Luke.
The city Is reached by an excellenl
automobile road connecting with tht
Island Highway from Courtenay, six
niilcs.dlslant, and from Royston, foin
miles distant; has electric light, watei
supply, local and long distance telephone and telegraph connections, ou?
tools and post ofliop. public sehoo'-
(ten teachers), high school itwr
teachers), provincial  government as
sessors and collectors qfllce for Comox
district, County Court ofiice, four
churches and two banks. The general stores compare with those ot the
largest centres, and carry complete
stocks of groceries, dry goods und
general merchandise, three auto repair
shops, carrying necessary supplies;
two hake shops, Islander Publishing
Co., and ample hotel accommodation,
large commodious theatre and dance
hall.
Large areas of good agricultural
laud are being opened up by government rouds within easy reach of Cumberland, the produce from which will
lind a ready market lu the city.
The population of Cumberland and
immediate vicinity is about 3,000. and
the monthly payroll Is approximately
$200,000 per month, Tlie general hospital is equipped with latest approved
X-ray and has stall* of matron and
four nurses, two experienced doctors.
The chief Industry is mining, also
farming and lumbering— Royston Lumber Co.
Splendid camping and bathing beach
at Royston, and all kinds of game and
fishing in season. Cumberland is a
growing town, the company having
erected about fifty houses fo» their
employees recently. Splendid lire
protection, the city having the hesl
equipped nnd smallest volunteer fire j over the
brigade on the Island.
gcther with tlie name of the manufacturer, distributor or agent.
Size of Chief Towns.
The directory census  Is  based  on
estimates and  the  following  populations may be accepted as fairly accurate:
2.UD Cities, Settlements, Ktc.
The gazetter portion of tlie book
deals wilh 2,14!) separate anil distinct*
cities, towns, villages and settlements
In the province of British Columbia.
This ls an increase of l»7 places
over the 1D1!) issue ■
Locates ObBCUrti  Places,
There are H2ii post olllces In the province, leaving 1,838 placos which have
no post office, nnd In nil of these
cases the directory gives the name ol
the nearest post office, or tells how
mail should be addressed to reach the
residents, Only about oue-thlrd of the
places In the province can be located
[rom any other guide.
While there arr 8,149 communities
in the province, tfini-aa are only Sti
places with a population of ovcr 200,
-70 towns having n hotel and 100 towns
in which hanks are located.
Complete directories aire given of nil
other places In tiie province, Including
not only business linns and all. employees, but lbc names of all fanners.
fruit-growers, mini rn, loggers and
fishermen.
A classified business directory, giving the iiniiie:, of all business firms, nil
manufacturers, wholesalers and distributors in Die province Is contained
In the directory, classified under 5i;:i
headings.
Al the buck of tlie book Is a trade
Names. Brands and Trade Mark section, under which Is listed Ihe names
of   various   well-known    goods    to* I Dated June 22nd
Anyox    „.    2,000
Britannia Beach"    2,000
Cumberland     3,000
Chllllwack ,     i,(j(ji)
Cranbrook    3,000
Penile      4,500
Grand Porks     2,500
Kamloops     6,000
Kelowna  1    3,000
Ladysmith       3,000
Nanaimo   10,000
Nelson  ;    g,0oo
New Westminster  "  18,000
North Vancouver   10,000
Ocean Falls     2,000
Penticton      3,500
Prince George*    2,200
Revelstoke    3,500
Rossland    9,000
Trail    ( ,.   4,500
Vernon      4,300
Wrigley's Directories have taken u
definite place among the large institutions of the West. Besides the British Columbia Directory, they Include
the Canadian Hotel Hetl Book, which
gives Information regarding hotels nil
•ciuntry, ami ihe Canadian
Transport nnd Storage Directory,
which Is the official directory of the
Warehouse  ami  Storage  Association,
FORESHORE. LEASE
Nelson District, Vancouver Islam),
TAKE NOTICE thai Ihe Canadian
collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, ot
Victoria, 11 Ci Colliery Owners, Intend
to apply fur pel-mission to I""s*» tin-
following lands:
Commencing al a post planted al
high water in,:rk throe foal CI ft.)
Blast from Ihe South Bast corner post
-if Lot II, Nelson District, thence Hast
ilxteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to Ihe
approximate low water mark, theuco
Southerly along Hie approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
tho South-East corner of (he North
Fractional half of lbc Sonth-Wosl
quarter of Section 3i\ thence Wist to
aforesaid corner of snld fractional
part of Section 32, being the original
high waler niiirk, thence Northerly
following original high water mark,
being ihe Easterly boundary of Section 82 and I). I, 88 in said NelBOn
District to point of commencement,
containing in all nlnely-six ifllif acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Oraham, Agent.
1920.
08-1 THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
August 7, 1920.
Good Health
on Sound
Depends
Sleep
We can make you comfortable
OSTERMOOR MATTRESSES, $36.00 each.
GOOD    SERVICEABLE    COTTON    FELT
MAT
TRESSES at $20.00, $22.00 and $24.00 each.
WOVEN WIRE, LINK FABRIC and COIL SPRINGS,
from $6.00 to $16.50 each.
STEEL BEDS, in white and Verni Martin finishes;
good designs; a choice assortment at prices ranging
up to $50.00.
PILLOWS to suit your choice.
BLANKETS, in white, grey and red.
FLANNELETTE  SHEETS,  COTTON SHEETS  and
PILLOW COVERS.
BED SPREADS.
A. McKinnon
Complete House Furnishers
Cumberland, B.C.
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet, Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize in  REPUBLIC TRUCKS  and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
SHARK FISHING A LIVE
SPORT IN THE PACIFIC
Native Swims to Bottom of Lagoon and Slips Rope Over Tail
of 11-Foot Monster.
PANTHER HUNT
Large  Panther  Shot  Close  to
Duncan—Dogs Blamed for
Recent Sheep-Killing.
There is a species of shark known
as the hammerhead, which, ln spite
of its head, Is fierce and wideawake,
says the Philadelphia Public Ledger.
In certain waters of the South Pacific
lives a shark resembling the "black
nurse" shark of the Florida and gulf
waters, which also has a remarkable
head, because apparently It is totally
lacking in brains.
One party of fishermen were drifting slowly across a shallow lagoon,
watching the branched coral shrubs
on the bottom, when the native pad-
dler pointed out a huge brown lish
sleeping below on the sand.
"It's a shark." he said, "and If you
will keep very still I'll catch It."
As at that particular time there was
nothing in the boat but a coral hook
a small rope and the paddles, the
question as to how the catching would
be accomplished was something of a
mystery to the visitors. But the nn
tives soon made it clear.
Paddling the boat to one side, he
allowed it to drift while he took thc
small rope, tied it to another piece
that he fished out of tlie locker, and,
having made a slip-noose in one end,
fastened the other to the bow.
Then bidding his passengers to keep
the boat as steady as they could, he
slipped overboard and proceeded to
the attack, single-handed, unarmed except for the sllp-noose.
To say that the watchers were astonished hardly expresses it. Not
knowing that the shark was brainless
and harmless, they thought the deed
heroic, If not simply suicide.
They held their breath, expecting
every moment to see a swirl in the
water, a fin, and the native caught in
a pair of fearful jaws.
But the native was swimming easily.
He had nearly come over the sleeping
shark when, without a ripple, the man
dived, and they could see him carefully approaching the big lish from
behind, moving slowly along near the
bottom.
Reaching the fish, he took the slip-
noose and edged it beneath the long
lobe of the tail; then, seeing that the
great sleeping creature did not move,
he lifted the noose boldly and with a
quick jerk slipped it entirely over and
tightened It about the tall.
This woke the monster, and he
leaped, churned the water and enveloping the native In a cloud of mud,
out of which he popped like a cork.
He grasped the gunwale and drew
himself in just as the light craft was
snatched ahead, and away they went
ln a wild race over the reef.
For a few minutes it was wild indeed. One man held his knife ready to
cut the rope should the steed reach
deep water and dive. But here they
were In shallow water, the shark in
plain sight, whirling in circles among
the coral heads or flashing straight
away through the open spaces, making the foam curl and the boat fly hissing over the surface.
On he went, turning, rounding
doubling, darting ahead, always toward the sea outside the lagoon.
There was no pluck, no fight ln him
He had tired himself out in his fight,
and he allowed himself to be hauled
to the surface like a water-soaked log
The hammerhead proved to be 11
feet long. And his entire 11 feet were
utilized by the natives.
DUNCAN.—"Give a dog a bad name"
aiid so forth ls well known to all, but
it fell to Mr. I. W. Sherman, Duncan,
to discover the culprit in the recent
sheep-killing.
On Friday last Mr. A. Easton was
motorcycling on the road behind Mr.
W. P. Jaynes', Quamichan, when a
large panther appeared in view. It
gave the cyclist a due portion of the
road but Mr. Eastman thought it bet
ter thut the district should have more
of the room than the company of such
traffic and, whipping out his army revolver, fired.
The result, however, was not fatal,
but the marksman made the hair fly-
to some purpose for the animal tied
immediately into the brush.
. On reaching home Mr, Eastman
phoned for Mr. Sherman who, with his
dog, proceeded to the spot. There
was no difficulty in picking up the
scent and the trail led to a canyon
about a mile from the road- and towards Tzolialem mountain.
There the dog treed his enemy and
with little delay Mr. Sherman wrote
"finish" to Ills career.
The panther was of a good size and
had evidently been a sheep killer.
The bounty on the panther is $25,
but when Mr, Sherman went to the
government ofiice to claim it he was
only allowed $15, the reason given
being that the animal was killed on
municipal territory and that the latter body should bear their share of
the bounty. ;The council will deal
with the matter at its next meeting.
CANINE  CURIOSITY
People are often unreasonable In
dealing with the curiosity of animals
—sometimes by persons themselves
highly curious. I once saw a man
strike a dog for turning oyer a vase
of Ilowers in his investigation of a
mirror. He had seen "that other dog,"
and he didn't know the vase would
break. The man Bald his pet was "too
blamed curious"; but when, a few
nights inter, the dog nosed out a
prowler on the porch, canine curiosity was a line thing!
Similarly, a sportsman wants a
"nosy" dog; the beagle must have a
desire to stir up all likely neBts for
rabbits, the pointer must be of "Inquiring mind," even the sedate old
setter must not he destitute of this
"look-lnto-lt" quality If he Is to be a
success aa a retriever. But when one
of these faithful fellows accompanies
Ills master fishing and turns over the
bait-pall in trying to find out why the
minnows splash around, or rocks the
boat because he seeB something he
doeBn't understand beneath the floating moss—then curiosity Is a baneful
defect instead of a necessary virtue!
Dogs are very curlouB concerning
each other, and many are the expressions of wonder at this; people say It
Is the least justifiable of all forms of
curiosity. How Illogical! Ib there
any subject on which the average person is more curious than that of other
persons—how they live on what they
don't make, why they live together
when they quarrel all the time; what
became of the absent daughter, etc. It
is entirely natural that any living
thing should be vitally interested ln
cratures ot its own kind.
It Is unfair to a dog—or to any other
animal—to provoke his curiosity,—a
natural and desirable trait, remember
and then punish him for trying to
satisfy It. An old gentleman of my
acquaintance likes to play the violin
and hear his dog howl. The Instrument is valuable and receives the best
ot care; but one day my friend left It
lying on the bed. When he returned
ten minutes later, there was the dog
on the bed Investigating. He had nol
broken the strings, but was "nosing"
for all he was worth, and hail
scratched the wood some with his feet.
But in this case, I am glad to say, the
dog was not whipped. The man remarked that it was only natural, and
let It go at that.
It is interesting to watch the difference In dogs' behavior when a new object is Introduced to him. Nearly all
bird dogs evince curiosity in airplanes.
They are accustomed to looking up
and are Interested in the sky, Its birds,
etc. A hound, working mostly with
head down, can hardly be induced to
notice tbe airship.—L. E. Eubanks.
LEAVING THE EARTH
M. Duchesne, the French naval artillery engineer, publishes a calculation of the muzzle velocity that would
have to be given to a projectile to
make it leave the earth for ever. If
there were no atmosphere th projectile would have to strart at 36,747 feet
a second. But the air offers resistance, not so great, however, as might
be supposed. Taking the projectile
hurled by the "Big Bertha" on Paris
as a basis, M. Duchesne says it would
have to be thrown with an initial
velocity, of 48,230 feet a second to
send it so far that it would never fall
again. A slightly different calculation Is made by Miss Isabel M. Lewis,
of the United States Naval Observatory. She says that when the velocity
with which an-object is thrown from
the earth "reaches five miles per
second (26,000 feet) It leaves the earth
entirely and becomes a satellite of the
earth, moving In a circular orbit with
a period of one hour twenty-He
minutes. If the velocity is increased
beyond five miles per second the object continues to revolve around the
earth In an eliptlcal orbit whose width
increases with the velocity until a
velocity of seven miles a second is recorded, when the object flies off on a
parabolic curve, escaping the attraction of the earth and becoming a
satellite of the sun."
SHEEP THRIVE ON
AUSTRALIAN RUNS
An Idea of the immensity of the
great Australian sheep runs is given
hy Mr. George Jeffries, chairman of
the Agricultural Board of South Australia, who Is visiting Canada. The
average paddock, he says, is 20 square
miles, while some ot the runs are as
high as half a million acres In extent.
There are no natural enemies to
sheep in Australia," he points out.
The animals are turned loose ln paddocks. From ten to twenty acres per
sheep are allowed. Each shearing time
thc animals are herded together and
then allowed lo run nl large until next
shearing time. The chief trouble to
the herder is to conserve the rainfall
ao as to obtain water enough for his
flocks.
With the ordinary price of a fat
wether at $5, Mr. Jeffries says food ls
cheaper In Australia than In any other
part of the civilized world, and Australia's recovery from tlie war will be
rapid.
THE LAW IN AUSTRALIA
What the public requires is something very different from what it gets
from the profession. It does not want
profound students of legal chaos,
"sound lawyers," exquisite and expensive splitters of legal straws, brilliant advocates and purveyors of bygone legal lore. It does not desire the
perpetuation of the evils of the present system, Its costillness and its inefficiency. That judges themselves
make so much law, and have so much
Influence in thwarting any businesslike innovations in the legal machinery, renders it important that in the
interests of economy and reform legal
appointments should be judged solely
from the public point of view, and that
the views of the bar and of solicitors
should only be taken "with a grain of
salt." A practical acquantance with
modem business methods and a keen
eye for the humbugs, frauds, cheats
and aggressors, are better qualifications than a lifetime spent in a study
of law, with Its thousands of volumes
of archaeology. A knowledge of books
may be good, but a knowledge of human nature Is better. Therefore, let
us stop writing our nonsense about
"profound constitutional lawyers,"
"sound lawyers" and "brilliant advocates" being the most requisite for
the bench in the year 1920 and the
place Australia.—Sydney  Bulletin.
Is Your Car Equipped With
The New
REGULATION
HEADLIGHTS ?
* Have you read the new Provincial Motor Act regarding headlights? The Act' requires that all cars be
equipped with a non-glare light.
WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF REGULATION LENS
IN STOCK
Cumberland Motor Works
J. H. CAMERON, Proprietor. Cumberland, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of affluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
The number of marriages in Great
Britain every year Is about 333,500.
It Is a big gamble buying dogs Just
arrived from the Orient, as most, such
as Chows, Japanese or Pekinese, have
weak constitutions and the climate
here Is very different. But one out
of every live ever survives for any
length of time after arrival.
Wm
^gtt\    SINCE i IS70     ^bXmtjMII'i
Shiloh
Don't Experiment!
SEND YOUR FILMS TO
BARTON
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
Cumberland and Courtenay
- for -"
Developing, Printing and
Enlarging.
AT  ALL   THE   LEADING   HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 • Cumberland, B.C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Hay, Grain and
Mill Feed
Also Baby Chick Feed and All
Kinds of Poultry Supplies.
FOR!
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
633 Hastings St., W., Comer of
Granville*     VANCOUVER, U.C.
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries.'DrylGoods, [Boots and
Shoes, Crockery ware and   '
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING CHONG, Ci'* "erland
I HONG CHONG & CO., Bevud
UNION HOTEL
OI'l'OSll'K RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C. 1/1
August 7, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
/         ■	
W        Music and Photoplays       y
ORIGIN, LANGUAGE AND
HABITS OF THE GIPSY
The exact origin of the gipsies as a
distinct people is lost 111 the mists of
tlle centuries. Some students attribute their origin to early Egypt, and
In substantiation point to tiie tribal
name given to them in various Iau-
*Sguu[;es (even the English, gipsy, sug
gesting Egyptian). The gipsy name
for these wanderers over tlie faee of
the earth is Horn, whence Romany, us
their language is known.
This vagabond nice first appeared
in Eastern Europe early In ihe 14th
century, anil In England about 200
years later. Today they are lo be
found in every country of Europe and
ln parts of Asia and Afriea, as well as
In America.
Physically, tlie gipsy is generally
lithe and active, with tawny skin, long
black hair (often worn In ringlets),
large and brilliant black eyes, and
(eeth of extraordinary whiteness. Thci
prevailing opinion among ethnologists |
is that the gipsy is descended from
some obscure Hindu tribe.
There is no system of religion among
the gipsies, though traces of paganism
ln various forms are said to exist in
thelrjanguage and customs. In their
nomadic occupations they llgure as
tinkers, basket makers, fortune tellers
and dealers In horses, and they appear to have a racial talent as musicians. They have won for themselves
an unenviable reputation for thievish
propensities; in farming sections people are wont to keep a sharp eye on
their chickens and their livestock generally whenever gipsies pitch their
tents iu Ihe neighborhood. The race
has been credited, too. with expert-
ness lu the kidnapping of children.
Among Americans, at least, Ihe life
or the gipsy has always been Invested
witli a peculiar charm and fascination—due, no doubt, to Its absolute
freedom of movement, its utter uncon-
ventlonality ami Its unbroken bond
witli tho great out-of-doors. Popular
aeniiiiicut long has chosen the gipsy
mniden as a subject of arden admiration—though not. the male of the
species. In Longfellow's "Spanish
Student' 'appears Ihe couplet:
"God send the gipsy lassie here,
And not tlie gipsy man."
The picturesque lite of the gipsies
—thc charm with wliieh popular sentiment invests their free-and-easy existence—Is vividly reflected in "The
Sneak," a Wm. Fox photoplay showing
at the Ilo-flo this evening. In this
Gladys Brockwoll, the noted screen
star, enacts the role of a gipsy prin
ter emotional acting and novel touches himself    Th™ a-. „i„   .
!* comedy relief, stamp "The Turning  P„c    hat r,        aIm°8tK<'aUght *
Point" as nrnh.li* «,*      °. M.™.*   .    °y' *ut Ge0<*e escaP<-<* «V ««e win-
Point" as probably the most interesting story .Miss Macdonald has yet appeared in.
*   *   *
SHIP AHOY—
On a venae I off tbe CaI.foru.au coast
Charles Hutchison and his company
wero working. The sea was rough i
'and choppy, and shortly after leaving
the dock, a husky cowboy, whose complexion had'suddeuly assumed a Nile
green tingo, made his way to the boat
rail. Hutch slapped him on the back,
remarking:
"Brace up, old man. Don't let this
bother you. Think ot a man who rides
the way you do, being seasick."
\\ ell, partner," replied the cowboy, "1 didn't mind tlie r'arin' and 1
don't mind the pKchlfi'. but when she
.struck them furrows and sailed over
that plowed ground, say boy—"
*   *   *
"A DAMSEL IN DISTRESS"
A  Delightful Comedy in Five
Acts—Starring June Caprice
and Creighton Hale.
'She's thc most distressful damsel
That ever yet was seen;
You'll hold your sides with laughter
When you see her on the screen."
dow. That night Reggie and Alice
elope and the next morning Aunt
Caroline gels an awful shock—but to
tell you more of the amusing episodes
lu this delightful comedy would spoil
your pleasure In viewing it next
Thursday evening. „
.   .   *
NEXT!
Working late on the lot and having
a rusli dinner engagement In the city.
Harold Lloyd took a chance and
dropped in on a new, barber for a
shave. The barber was one ot those
"old school" chaps who believe in
talk. He talked of the weather, pictures, the races, scandal, baseball,
boxing—everything. And once or
twice he nipped Harold for a "cut" ou
the chin and one on the cheek.
"I'll be more careful the next time
I shave you," he promised.
"You'll be more than that," said
Lloyd softly. "If over you shave me
again you'll be wearing a muzzle."
THEY DIDN'T
A general street car -strike In Los
Angeles recently caused many downtown cars to be sent out in charge of
"green" crews. Harry Pollard was a
passenger on one of these and lie
noticed that the young motorman was
In anything but a happy frame of
mind.
"Let me off at Pico Street." said the
comedian.
"Been waiting to get off myself for
two blocks," said the quaking motor-
man.   "Can't stop the blamed car."
"Holy mackerel!" chirped Pollard.
"What are we going to do?"
"I gol a fine idea!" suid the luotor-
nian.   "When  we get to  Pico Street,
you yell and we'll both jump."
.   *   *
KATHERINE MACDONALD
In Chambers' Great Story
"THE TURNING  POINT"
Famous Star More Gorgeous
and Enchanting Than Every
in a Role of Regal Beauty
Fighting Love and Povery.
In the face of high prices and the
bankruptcy of her dead father's business, Diana Teniianl, New York society girl, outfits herself and sister In
the latest style of ready-to-wear, un-
heedful of the fuel that she Is almost
penniless.
This Is the situation which Katherine MacDonald, starring In "The
Turning Point," her latest picture released through First National Exhibitors' Circuit, will enace before the
patrons of the ilo-llo Theatre on Monday next.
Story By Famous Novelist.
"The Turning Point" Is an adaptation from Robert W. Chambers' novel
of the same title, and Miss Macdonald,
declared to be the most beautiful
woman on the screen, gives a splendid
interpretation to the role of Diana of
Tennant, haunted by an untrue rumor
of the past, In love with a society idler,
and endeavoring to ward off the distasteful attentions of a wealthy man
who would willingly bring an unjust
disgrace upon her.
Katherine Macdonald was last seen
here ill "The Beauty Market," and her
reception was enthusiastic. In her
lalest feature, the   splendid   ehancCu
Do you remember that serial story
In Ihe Saturday Evening Post several
months ago that doubled you up with
laughter over the predicament of a
certain fair damsel who found that,
no matter whether her family and
friends were pulling with or against
her. (hey were only making her situation more distressful'*1 The title of
the story was "A Damsel in Distress"
and I'elham Greuville U'odehouse
■wrote It.
Albert Capellanl saw splendid possibilities in the story for a photoplay
and was fortunate enough to outbid
all competitors tor tho motion picture
rights to it. Then he took his delightful co-star te;im, June Caprice
and Crelghton Hale, aud surrounded
them witli an excellent company.
The result of this combination of
story, author, producer, stars and director is tlie best light comedy picture
Of the year and one of the llnest ever
produced. In making (bis statement
we believe that we are telling the
simple truth.
"A Damsel in Distress" is a clean
wholesome, delightfully human, romantic comedy! Anyone of any ago.
disposition or taste will lind a solid
hour of joyous entertainment in this
feature, which will be shown at the
llo-Ilo Theatre on Thursday evening
of next v/bek.
The Story in Flirt.
Maud Marsh has incurred the displeasure of her aunt, Mrs. Caroline
Byng. by falling in love with a young
man she met while camping. Aunt
Caroline lias never seen Geoffrey, but
doesn't like him. Auntie wishes to
marry Maud to her stepson, Reggie,
but he is In love with Alice Parraday.
Maud Is Imprisoned in her father's
palatial home at Marshclilf-on-the-
Hudson. Her fat brother, Percy, Is
deputized by Aunt Caroline to watch
Maud. One day while Auntie is in
Philadelphia, Reggie lakes Maud into.
New Vork In his car. She is about to
'phone Geoffrey when she discovers
the. loss of her purse. She also discovers Percy spying upon ber and
seeks lefuge In a taxi in which ls
George Bevan, a young playwright.
At Grand Central Depot, Maud
leuves Bevan without disclosing her
Identity. Percy incure the displeasure
of a policeman and is arrested. The
morning newspapers, carrying a story
about Percy's arrest, shed some light
to Bevan on the girl's Identity. He
rents a summer house next to the
Marsh estate aiid sends two notes to
Maud asking when lie may see her.
One note reaches Maud. The otiier
reaches her aunt, who naturally concludes Hint their new neighbor is the
man Maud loves. Father promises
auntie to "speak to the young man,"
but the young man makes such an
Impression on lather that he promises
George that if Maud loves him he'll
not stand in tho way. Reggie .also
calls and congratulates George and
promises to help. George is quite delighted to be told by two people that
Maud is so madly iu love with him.
and thinks everything is coming his
way splendidly, especially when an
opportunity occurs for hiin to play
butler at Marsholiff on an auspicious
night.
Percy is suspicious of the "butler"
—he looks too much like the man he
saw in the taxi with Maud. Finalb
George meets Maud in thc den—
promptly kisses her—and is slappee*
smartly. Maud explains to blm thai
she loves another and that everyone
has mistaken George for that other.
George can hardly appreciate the joke,
for he is now deeply in lovo with Maud
'FATTY'S" CAR READY BIT CAN
NOT GET GASOLINE.
Unless there is some relief soon from
Ihe gasoline shortage 111 California,
walking promises to become the favorite outdoor sport of erstwhile auto-
ists. Two or three gallons a day ls
about the best that any auto-owner
can hope to secure from a service
station there now, says a telegraph
report, and he can't get that until his
tank register shows that he Is out of
fuel.
One of the principal sufferers happens to be "Fatty" Arbuckle of the
movie world. Arbuckle recently had
'made to order a huge automobile at
unprecedented cost and now he's got
a blue-enameled, nickel-plated wonder-
bus that looks like a half section of a
palace car—with no place to go.
"1 went down to get some gas the
other day," Fatty explained, "and the
filling station bird told me he could
give me only three gallons. Heavens,
says I, that wouldn't even flood the
carburetor. So I had to put the thing
back under a roof."
TIIE BANJO AT THE I'OLE.
Ono can scarcely Imagine a greater
contrast than  playing a banjo in a
crowded meeting in the heart of London, and giving a performance In the
Icy atmosphere of the Arctic regions.
At the hundredth lecture given by Sir
Ernest Shacklcton, when he told the
thrilling story of his last polar expedition, he introduced some of his old
colleagues, and insisted on the production of the old banjo which played
so great a part ln   keeping  up  the
spirits of the men who were marooned
on Elephant Island for a dreary four
and a half months.   At an informal
gathering after tbe lecture, some of
the old songs were sung and specimens given of the Impromptu ditties
tbat helped to pass away the time and
amuse the men, the tale of whose fortitude and patience Ib being listened to
by thousands of people from the cushioned seats of the Philharmonic Hall
In  London.    Sir   Ernest  Shackleton
tells his adventure in simple homely
language, with a sense of humor that
is a relief to the thrilling story.   The
penguins, In the pictures, all unconscious of their London audience, behave   in   their   usual   amusing  way,
familiar to stay-at-home people, who
love to roam the world by the help of
more adventurous spirits.
*   *   .
"LABJES MIST LIVE"
Alice Duer Miller who writes Action
for the Saturday Evening Post and the
Ladles' Home Journal Is the author of
'Ladles Must Live" a George Loane
fucker production to be presented by
Mayflower,
As a resit of his work In "Athalle,"
Conrad Nagle. who played opposite
Sylvia Breumer In tlie uii-star of this
Mayflower production, has been signed
for five years by Famous-Players-
Lasky.
a    ♦    a
SOI'NIM'HOOF ROOM FOR BABIES
IN THEATRES
The Park moving picture Ihertre,
now being constructed at Austin,
Minn., contains the last word in picture theatre construction. 11 is nothing less than a sound-proof, glass-
enclosed room for mothers who have
crying babies. In this room, which Is
in full view of the stage, mothers may
congregate, each with her Infant, and
though tlie youngsters all cry in Infantile chorus, the mothers may calm
ly enjoy the show, knowing that no
one Is disturbed and that the orches-
ra is not hampered ln its efforts.
HONEYMOON READING.
"Ferdie jilted Maud and married an-
I other girl, but Maud had her revenge."
"How?"
"She sent the bride a book to read
on their honeymoon — Stevenson's
'Travels With a Donkey.'"
Seven
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, August 7th
GLADYS BROCKWELL
 IN	
"THE SNEAK"
DO   YOU   KNOW
the real man without a country ? He's tlie gipsy—the mysterious, fortune-
telling wanderer over the face of the earth. For centuries the gipsy has
been a romantic, picturesque figure in history, as in fiction. Spend an hour
or two with thc gipsy caravan. Get a close-up view of these Nomads, their
queer customs, their firce passions of love and revenge. See GLADYS
BROCKWELL as Rhona, the gipsy princess, in the great William Fox
photoplay. Here's a true picture of Romany romance. It will thrill you
and delight you.
Eighth Episode of Jack Dempsey in
"Daredevil Jack"
COMEDY-MUTT AND JEFF IN
"LEFT AT THE PQST"
Monday, August 9th
Katherine MacDonald
IN
"THE TURNING POINT"
Screen,Adaptation of Great Novelisls's Most Gripping Tale Gives Miss
MacDonald Role Similar to Own Life History—With Ail Dramatic Power
Which Has Made Chambers Famous—"The Turning Point" is Throbbing
Story of Struggle Made by a Financially Ruined Society Beauty to Gain
a Living for Herself and Her Sister, and Against Moral Ruin Threatened;
by Old Roue Who Desires Her for Her Unusual Charm and Attractions^
I
Tuesday, August 10th
King W. Vidoris presents
"THE FAMILY HONOR"
WITH AN ALL-STAR CAST
Thursday, August 12th
June Caprice md
Creighton Hale
IN
A DAMSEL IN DISTRESS
ADAPTED FROM THE STORY IN THE SATURDAY EVENING POST
A Lovely Damsel—A Man-eating Aunt!
A Henpecked Widower-Daddy—A Summer Camp Sweetheart!
A Mischievous Page Boy—An Ultra-dignified Butler
A Bright-minded Step-cousin—A Fat-headed, Fat-bodied Brother!
And an Impetuous Young Playwright Who Knows Not Defeat!
Those Are thc Principals in this Joyous Outburst of Merriment.
"She's thc most distressful damsel that ever yet was seen;
You'll hold your sides with laughter when you see her on the screen!"
Also Eighth Episode of
"THE BLACK SECRET"
I Page Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Augusts, 1920.
SUMMER SALE
■OF-
Dry Goods and Gents Furnishings
At the Big Store commencing Saturday, August 14th for
3 Days only San:eXonday
TERMS: CASH
During this Sale there will be a great array of bargains
marked at away down prices
W/c DEDUCTED OFF ALL ARTICLES EXCEPT
THOSE MARKED DOWN FOR A
QUICK CLEARANCE
PHONE  134
I
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Come Early and Avoid Disappointment
GAME REGULATIONS
FOR COMING SEASON
An ordor-in-council has .men passed
at Victoria fixing the gamo regulations
for the coining season.
Grouse may tie tuken on Vancouver
[Bland with the exception ol' the .Muni-
ctpality of Oak Ray, from October 16
to Nov. 2!). The duck neauon in the
north and ea:jt opens on September 4,
while in the west the open date is one
week later. 'I lie deer season iu different districts opens on September 4 to,
IS. i'hcusants on the Mainland, with
the exception of Point Grey, north of
Marine Drive, mny be Hhot from October id to November 22.
The regulations give particulars as
to bag limits, sale of game, trapping,
etc., and in the mountain districts full
information is given as to the open
season on moose, caribou and other
animals, ['articulations of the regulations are as follows:
-Uitiiie Animals.
MOOSE—Bulla only, over 1 year old
—In   Atliu,   Fort   George,  Omineca
and Cariboo electoral districts, Sept.
I to Dec. 15.
OAitlBOU—Bulls only, over 1 year old
—Throughout  the   province, except
on Queen Charlotte Islands, and except south and east of the main line
of the Canadian Northern Railway,
Sept. 1 to Dec. 15.
MOUNTAIN SHEEP—Hams only, over
1 year old—North of the main Hue
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
Sept. 1 lo Nov. Iii.
In  Columbia,  Fertile  and  C ran brook
electoral districts, Oct, 1 to Nov. 15,
ln Llllooel electoral district, south of
Hancevllle, Clinton road and woal <• i"
Fraser Rivi r, Sept, l to Nuv. IB.
MOUNTAIN GOAT   Ovcr l year old
Throughout the province, Sept. i to
Doc. u>.
REAR   On  Vancouver  (aland, Nov.   I
to June 30,
Throughout the remainder of the province, Sept. 1 to June 30,
DEER   All kinds over 1 year old -In
Allin   and   Prince   Rupert   electoral
districls (except on Queen Charlotte
Islands) and east of the summit of
llii? Cascade   range   (except   white-
tall deer In North and South Oka.in-*
gan and Greenwood   electoral   districts), Sept. 4 to Nov. lit.
Throughout the remainder of the province, Sept. IS to Dec. 15.
NOTE—Bag  limits   one  mooso,  two
caribou,   two   sheep   of   any   one
species or three altogether, north of
the  Grand   Trunk   Pacilic:   Railway,
and one sheep only within the boundaries of the Columbia, Fernie, Cran-
brook, Llllooct and Cariboo electoral
districts; two goat, three deer, one
doe only; three grizzly bear.
• Gallic Birds.
DISTRICT NO. 1, northern, includes
Atlin electoral district and all of the
province east of tho summit of the
Cascade Mountains north of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
DISTRICT NO. 2, eastern, includes all
of tlie province east of the summit
of »he Cascade Mountains south of
tho Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
DISTRICT NO. 3, western, includes all
of the province west of the summit
of the Cascade Mountains south of
the Atlin electoral district,, and includes Vancouver Island und Islands. m
DUCKS, SNIPE AND PLOVER (except
wood and elder ducks)—Northern
district, Sept. 4 to Dec. 18.
Eastern district, Sept. 4 to Dec. IS.
Western District, north of 51st parallel, Sept. 11 to Dec. 25.
Western district, south of 51st parallel, Oct. IS to Jan. 30.
GEESE AND BRANT—Northern district, Sept. 4 to Dec. IS.
Eastern district, Sept. 4 lo Dec. IS.
Western district, north of 51st parallel,
Sept. 11 to Dec. 25.
Western district, south of 51st parallel, Nov. 13 to Feb. 27.
GROUSE—Northern district (all kinds,
including ptarmigan), Sept. 4 to
Nov. 15.
Eastern district, In Omineca aud Fort
George districts, Sept. 4 to Nov. 15.
Eastern district, remainder of district,
Sept. 4 to ept. 20.
Western district (blue), in Island electoral district, except in North
Saanich, Sept. IS to Sept. 27.
Western district (bluel, remainder of
district, Including North Saanich,
Sept. IS to Oct. 25.
Western district (willow) on Queen
Charlotte Islands, Sept. is t<> Nov.
15.
PHEASANTS—Eastern dist. (cocks)
in Soutli Okanagan electoral district,
Oct. 20 to Oct. 25.
Eastern district (cocks) in Similka-
meen electoral district, Oct 20 to 30.
Western district (cocks) on Vancouver
Island except In Oak Ray municipality), Oct. 10 to Nov. 2'.».
Western district (cocks) on Sidney,
Moresby, Pender and Mayne Inlands, Oct. Hi to Nov. 23.
Denman and Hornby Islands, Oct. 1(1
to Dec. 21.
Western district (hens), Salt Spring
Island, Denman Island, Dec. 1 to
Dec. 31.
Western district (cocks) on the main-
bind (except In Point Grey municipality north of Marine Drive), Oct. 16
to Nov. 22.
QUAIL—Eastern district) in South
Okanagan and Simllkamcen electoral districts, Oct, 20 to 30.
Western districts, In Cowlehun, Esquimau, Saanich and Islands elec-
torn!  district   (except   Salt   Spring
Island), Oct. 16 to Dec. 15.
On   Salt   Spring  Island, Oct.  16 to
Dec. 31.
EUROPEAN PARTRIDGE— Western
district, in Delta electoral district,
Nov. 15 to Nov. 22.
In North Saanich district, Nov. 23 to
Nov. 29.
.VOTE—Bag limits -Ducks, 20 in one
day, 150 for the season; geese and
brant, 10 -each in one day, 50 each
for season; grouse, (i (of one species)
. or 12 (of all species) in one day, fit)
for season; pheasants (western district), 6 in one day. 25 for season j
European   partridges,   6   in  one  day,
■25 for season;  quail   (western district), 20 in one day, 150 for season;
(eastern district), 10 In one day. '50
for season.
Game may be kept for two weeks
after any open season has expired.
Fur--Hearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals may be trapped
as follows:
ALL FUR-REARING ANIMALS EXCEPT REAVER, Dec. 1 to March 31.
Sale of Game. t
NO GAME MAY BE SOLD- Excopl
moose and caribou in Atlin, Fort
George, Omineca and Cariboo electoral districts, Oct. 1 to Dec. 15.
Bear on Vancouver Island, Nov. 1 to
June 30; bear in remainder of province, Sept. 1 to June 30.
.Note Particularly It Is -Unlawful
To trap beaver anywhere throughout
the province.
To trap bear soutli of the main Hue
of the Canadian Northern Railway.
To carry firearms or (rap;-, with.ml a
licence.
To use any oilier person's licence.
To use pit-lamps or lights of any doi *•
crlptlon at any time for the'purpoao
of hunting.
To carry loaded firearms or discharge
same  from   an   automobile  or  nny
other vehicle.
To hunt game birds from any sail or
powerboat.
To carry a pumpgun without a permanent plug.
To hunt  on  game reserves or other
prescribed areas.
To kill golden or silver pheasants.
This  is simply a synopsis for tbe
convenience of the public only.
Mary had a little lamb.
And then she had some game.
And everything that. Ajnry had
It got there just tbe same.
In a contemporary a well-known
novelist is described ns "taking tlie
cover off his typewriter."
Which ^iuat shows that It is as well
that we have discovered different
words to describe the machine and
the girl.
We Want to Know
1. Who was the lady wearing
white shoes that fell In the Lake
Saturday? And what happened to the
shoes? ' '
2. Where can we get a good recipe
for shortbread?
3. Who was the girl that had a
"nightmare" when she heard about
the "wild man?"
4. Did the young lady sleeping in
a tent get a. scare when a calf poked
it's head in?
5. *Who was the girl that, on her
lover's persuasion, did not go to the
dance last Satuiday, but went home
to bed instead?
0.   Why  the  picnic  committee  did
not  include  a  Baby Contest   in   tl
programme? We could suggest a good
judge of babies—female ones, over 17,
7. Which is the Quickest way to get
to Royston Saturday?
S. Why the Mayor is so fond of ice
cream?
0. Why a certain young blood looks
BO lonely this week?
10. What time la Curfew fo
"chicken:'.'."*
11. Whether two prominent mer
cluHits who arrived in town with (he
auto lights burning at S a.m. had been
out all night?
12. How far it is from Royston
walking—these nice warm mornings
Ask Frank.
13. If tiie picnic committee was
successful in securing insurance on
the thumbs of ladies entering the nail
driving competition?
14. Why a certain gink gets mad
when the lady is mentioned?
15. If the gang of udvenlurers who
luft town last night iu high .spirits to
go to Vancouver by launch arrived
al English Bay safely and "dry"?
Poor Fewlox had the misfortune to
lose bis hair very early in life; but
that was no reason why the other t'el
lows should be continually nagging
him about his bald head.
One July afternoon he was sitting
quietly in the smoking room, ab
sorbed*. in a well-known Cumberland
weekly paper (price five cents of all
news agents) when one of his friends
si rolled up behind him and began
stroking his bald head.
"What a jolly old bald head!" remarked the humorist. "Ain't it nice
and smooth? Why, it's'as smooth us
my wife's neck!"
Fewlox started, and put his hand to
his head.
By gad!" he exclaimed.   "So it 13!"
Weary a mortal's life;
Sad is his lot.
Either he has a wffe,
Or he has not.
"Please hurry," aald the wife impatiently to her husband. "Have you
never buttoned a dress behind before?"
"No," replied her husband also impatiently, "you never had a dress that
buttoned before behind."
AUTO
PMNTING
General Woodwork, Auto Doilies,
Trucks and Wheels built u order
Ktpuirs l'rouiiitlj* Attended to.
Jas. C. Allan
tor. I'rldenux ft Fltzn Ullnm Sts.
NANAIMO, B. C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 5-1172
TEACHER WANTED
E'perlenoed teacher wanted to
teach First Division, Minto Puhlic
School. Duties to commence September 1st, 1920.
Applications will he received up to
July 31st. Salary, $1,140 per annum.
Town either way .1 miles (rom school.
Apply
DAVID MORGAN,
Secretary.
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A FULL STOCK OF
FRUIT JARS
AS FOLLOWS:
ECONOMY—In Pints, Quarts and Half-Gallons.
KERR'S SELF-SEALING—In Pints and Quarts.
MASON WIDE MOUTH—In Pints and Quarts.
MASON GEM—In Pints and Quarts.
PERFECT SEAL—In Pints and Quarts.
Also Rubber Rings, Caps and Lids
TO FIT ALL JARS.   .
LEAVE YOUR ORDER  FOR
PRESERVING   PEACHES
It only costs you 4 cents per quart for sugar to preserve
the fruit.
NEW POTATOES
TURNIPS
CUCUMBERS
RHUBARB
ONIONS
GREEN ONIONS
LEMONS
ORANGES
BANANAS
CANTALOUPES
WATERMELONS
PLUMS
PEACHES
APRICOTS
NEW APPLES
GRAPE-FRUIT
CHERRIES, Eating
and Preserving
FRESH TOMATOES
RED CURRANTS
Simon Leiser & Co.
Phone 38. Limited
LOST
FISHING ROD IN ROUND LEATHER
case, on Comox Lnke. $5.00 reward
on returning to R. Rideout at the
Lake or at Canadian Collieries Ofllce.
SILVER   HAT   PIN,   THISTLE   DE-
sign, on Courtenay Road, near tlie
slaughterhouse,  Thursday  evening.
Suitable  reward.    Notify  Box  278.
1-29
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—3-ROOMED HOUSE.
Cush or terms. Apply to B. Pearse,
Cltv
MOTORCYCLE — IN EXCELLENT
running order. Apply P. O. Box
105, Cumberland. 3-30
SEVEN HOUSES FOR SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
FOR SALE—FOUR ACRES OF LAND
with three-room dwelling, ham
garage and other buildings; one and
a halt miles from Cumberland
Price reasonable. Apply A. R. Wesley, Cumberland, B. C.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from $5S0 to $1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 31.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheup? It so, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
WANTED
WANTED. CUMBERLAND DISTRICT,
a permanent representative (either
sex), for the "British Columbia
Monthly," now entering, tenth year
as the Social, Educational. Literary
and Religious Magazine *of the Canadian West, independent of party,
Beet or faction. Substantial commissions; renewal premiums. Address.
mentioning experience and references. Manager, B. C. M., 1100 Bute
Street, Vuncetiver, B. C.
FOUR TO SIX-ROOM HOUSE IN
Cumberland—will buy. lease or rent
suitable place; Immediate. Address,
B.H.G., c-o Islander.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
Are You Happy?
There are things that make us happy,
There are things that make us blue,
There are things that satisfy our hunger,
As no other things can do.
There aro things that gratify our longings
From a sandwich to a good hanibone,
But the thing that is most like heaven
Is that good "McKenzie" Ice Cream Cone!
GET IT AT--
KELLY'S
OPPOSITE THE BIG STORE
CUMBERLAND

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