BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Jun 12, 1925

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068807.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068807.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068807-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068807-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068807-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068807-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068807-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068807-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068807-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068807.ris

Full Text

Array 7
^HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
.   "-^ftft. With   whtoh   Im   onn&nllita*Ail   tho   1'n-ml-^^l.i.,^   *«.„..
4f
■'an
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 24.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBIA FRIDAY,    JUNE    12,   1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
NANAIMO MINERS VOTE FOR WORK
THIRD ROUND
OF CONNAUGHT
CUPSATURDAY
Local Eleven  Meet  Vancouver
Engineering Works—Visitors
Have Strong Team
Tomorrow (Saturday) at 5:30
p.m., the third round of the
Connaught Cup, emblematic of
the Championship of Canada in
Association Football, will take
place on the Recreation Ground,
Cumberland, when the local
United and the Vancouver Engineering Works teams meet.
The Engineers have an exceptionally strong team and the locals will have to step all the way
to register a win. The visitors
include in their line-up the famous Geo. Russell, who is reputed
on the mainland, to be the best
centre half in B.C.     Local soc-
ONLY LARGEST SHIPS
WILL BE OIL BURNERS
Only high-class passenger and mall
steamers will be oil burners in future, according to A. B. Cauty, general manager of the International
Mercantile Marine, who announced
upon arriving at New York on the
White Star liner Homeric that his
company will soon build an 18,000-
ton vessel.
The cost of operation tor oil burners is too high, said Mr. Cauty, who
added that until the price of building material went down, the ships of
the future would be about 20.000 tons,
and coal burners.
Surface Men At Hub City
Mines Are Voting Today
UNDERGROUND   WORKERS   VOTE   TO   RESUME   WORK
BY   MAJORITY   OF   110
Courtenay Wins
Sunday's Game
P   W   L     Ave.
2 2     0     1.000
3 12       .333
3     12      .333
By "Uno"
COURTENAY.—After  dropping the
first two straight C.P.C. League games
Keep  Smiling
Cumberland
Courtenay
Powell River
cer fans claim that distinction
for Sacki Conti, Cumberland
United's Captain; an interesting j
tussle between these two stal-i
warts is anticipated. The game j ana with the score five to one against
is scheduled to start at 5.30 with j them lu the fifth frame, Courtenay
A. S. Jones of Union Bay, ref- \ stt»8ea one of •■••- gamest come-backs
eree. The following will do | 'n the history of the club and event-
duty for Cumberland, Blair, Mor | "ally trimmed the Powell River boys
timer, Stewart, Monahan, Conti  before a large crowd at the Courtenay
(capt.) Brake, Bannerman, Mar- bail park last Sunday.
shall, Fowler, Plump and Hitch-      The onl..* disagreeable feature of the
ens. ding-dong struggle  was a close de
cision by Umpire Pat Fletcher when
Obrey slid Into the home plate with
the tieing run in the eighth.     From
Courtenay. B. C, June 4, 1925 | where we sat lt certainly looked as it
Cumberland  Islander. j Obrey was out, but Pat was right on
j top of the play and deemed otherwise.
CORRESPONDENCE
j It was a great struggle   with   both
Editor,
Cumberland.  B.C.
Dear Sir";—
May I, through the columns of yourI teams evenly matched and the same
paper, congratulate Cumberland on I applies to the opposing hurlers,
having such a public spirited number ! Smiling Lefty Barkhouse for the
of citizens. Behind the efficiency and i Courtenay boys, and little Willie Gol-
aotlvlty of the school snorts on .-June I agher ot the rowell River team.     It
3. was a great deal of detail and un
assuming co-operation and as one
who has assisted in promoting similar affairs, I cannot sufficiently express my admiration of the whole-
hcarted assistance and support which
was given by thc huge committees,
many of whom hud no direct interest
in the school but were working solely
for the good of the school population
"f Upper Vancouver Island.
No doubt some very minor matters
could have been Improved, but In spite
' of the fact that this Is the first year
that these sports have been held, the
district which holds the meet next
year will have more than enough to
do to equal Cumberland's efficiency in
management without hoping for any
improvements.
Congratulations!
G. William Stubbs.
Is a peculiar coincidence the big part
both these men played In the game.
Barkhouse fanned seven men and
combined with seven assists was responsible for the disposing of fourteen men on the opposing team. Gal-
agher fanned eight batters and hnd
five assists, which meant that he was
directly responsible for retiring thirteen men of the Courtenay team.
The little Indian pitched great ball
until the beginning of the sixth canto, but from that time on the Courtenay team had his number and coupled  with  poor  support  in  the  held,
C.P.C. LEAGUE MAY RUN
POST - SEASON SERIES
A meeting of the C.P.C. Baseball
League was held in the Riverside
Hotel, Courtenay, last Sunday, those
present being E. C. Lee, representing
Powell River; R, B. Dixon, representing Courtenay and J. Dallos and A. S.
Denholme, representing Cumberland.
An extension of the playing schedule
was suggested by Mr. Lee but as thc
league winners have to be decided by
August 1st, nnd the last game is now
scheduled for July 19th, It was found
Impossible to extend the schedule, although n "post-season" series may be ( DUBS BRING IN
(Continued on Page Seven)
COURTENAY TENNIS
CLUB LOSE TO ALBERNI
The members of the Courtenay Tennis Club who visited Port Alberni last
week end were Mesdames Brock, Collin, Eadle, and Pottinger, the Misses
Hlghet. Sillence and Sutton and
Messrs C. F. Brock, M. Blunt, R.
Bowie, B. Hughes, T. A. Briggs. II. E.
Wallls. R. Thompson, R. Sutherland,
and McLaughlin. Although the
Courtenay players did not give a very
good account of themselves while at
the west coast town, a very enjoyable
day's outing was experienced, and
tbey hope to do better when the Port
Alberni tennis players visit Courtenay
on Sunday.
After numerous mass meetings and conferences with the operators, the underground workers of the Western Fuel Corporation, Nanaimo, yesterday voted to resume work at the company's
terms—a bonus reduction of 60 cents per day. The majority in
favor of returning to work was 110.
A secret ballot was taken on Monday and resulted as follows:
357 voted to return to work; 359 voted against returning. This
decision was announced at a mass meeting held yesterday, and
as the difference between the two was so slight it was decided to
take an open vote on the spot. 257 voted to accept the company's
terms, 147 voted against, giving the majority of 110, as stated
above. This concerns underground workers only, but it is expected that the surface men will pursue the same course at their
meeting today.
A special committee of underground workers met the company officials, informing them of the result of tho vote, and the
latter gave assurance that the men will be taken back without any
discrimination.
HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS
MADE PRESENTATION
At 3:30 o'clock on Thursday afternoon last tlie pupils of tlle Cumberland High School assembled to present their fellow-student, Miss Prlscilla Cloutler, with an engraved silver cup In apprecutlon of her splendid feats during tlie Upper-Island
school sports on June 3rd. After a
short talk from Mr. Shenstone, Miss
Partridge, on behalf of the pupils,
presented the cup. Prlscilla suitably replied, thanking thc teachers
and pupils, after which the meeting
disbanded with three hearty cheers
and a tiger.
Council Meets In
Record Short Time
THANK YOU
For the past four years as the baseball season has wheeled into
its own, our local merchants have been approached for something in
the way of a donation to the baseball team. It is our contention
there is no other city in the Province where the merchants are more
loyal to their local sporting organizations than those in business in
Cumberland. This year again, despite adverse trade conditions, they
have responded wholeheartedly to our appeal. Both the executive
committee and the pla..ers of this club wish to express their thanks
for tlie following generous contributions from our merchants. It is
our hope that the actions of tbe club both on and off the Held of play
will prove worthy of the support received- Cumberland Baseball Club
Donations—Victor Marlnelli $10.00; Louis Frelone $5.00; Campbell
Bros. $5.00; F. Dallas $5.00; Geo. Clinton $5 00; Wm. Merrifield $5.00;
V. Bonora $5.00; Marocchi Bros. S2.50; Malt; Brown $2.50; Pastime
Club $2.50; Dr. Bruce Gordon $2.50; Royal Candy Co., $2.00; Win.
Henderson $2.00; T. Nakagam'i $2.<>0; T. Nakanishi $2.00; Geo. Cavin
$2.00; Union Tailor $2.00; Shorty s Poolroom $2.00; C. Spooner $2.00;
W. P. Symons $2.00; F. D. Pickard $2.00; J. Cameron $2.00; R. Yates
$2.00; Mann's Bakery $1.00; Joe Aspesi $1.00; S Davis $1.00; Cumberland Tailor $1.00; Wilcox Bros., $1.00; L. R. Stevens $1.00; Mrs.
Francesclnl 50c. Donations In Value—R. C. Lang $5.00; C. H. Tarbell and Son $5.00; John Sutherland $2.50; A. McKinnon $2.50; Reid
& Osborne $2.50.
School Report For Month Of May
carried out.
Tho constitution of the league was
formally adopted, and Mr. Denholme!
was appointed  ollicial league scorer.'
An added feature to the games which
Powell Hiver plays in Cumberland on
July 19th, nnd In Courtenay on July
THREE RUNS AGAINST
GREENHORNS TWO
The Cumberland Greenhorn baseball team journeyed to Courtenay on
Wednesday  lust  to  try    their    luck
5th, wlll be the Powell River Elks j against the  renowned  Dub  team  of
that city but were unfortunate ln losing the game by the narrow margin
of one run, the final score being 3-2
in favor of the Dubs. Bight errors
chalked against the Greenhorns were
responsible for the defeat.
D. Watson and D. Lockhart did the
Band which thc team has arranged
tn bring wilh them on these two occasions.
cliff;
RETURNS
TO COURTENAY
Roy Cliffe. champion light-heavy of I burling for the Cumberland boys and
B.C.. Is hack In Courtenay; convales
clng at bis home after having
tonisls removed.
between them struck  out a total of i
his! ten opposing batters In the seven in-!
nlngs played.    Watson had poor sup-
Roy is looking for a light In Court-   port In the second  Inning, and lncl-
enay on Dominion Day and bus sent [dentally Courtenay crossed the plate!
a tempting offer to Lou Bollinger, the
Chicago llght-henyweiglit. In the
meantime, Cliffe must keep in condition and Is looking oft* a local man
with whom to spar.
three times in this frame. Hamuli.n pitched for the Dubs, striking out
I'ine batters.
(Continued on Page Seven)
Shield for attendance won by Div.
9.—Miss Carey.
Division 1
Enrollment 37; Percentage of attendance 95.4; Lates 0.
Perfect attendance — Robert Osborne. Marlon Brown, Mary Conn, Eleanor Davis, Wm. Devoy, Kathleen
Emily, Mary Gozzana, Margaret Hannay, Gordon Horwood, Margaret
Hugbes, David Hutton, Tatsuml Iwasa, Fred Leversedge, Lilian Leversedge, Annie Mann, Alastalr Mac Kln-
non, Norma Parnham, Emma Picketti, Gordon Walker, Tsuneto Asao,
Agnes Bruce, Nobuo Hayashl. Frank
Read.
Honor Roll—A. McKinnon, A. Mann
G. Walker. J. Strachan, T. Iwasa, W.
Devoy.
H. E. Murray, Teiteher.
Division 2
Number on roll 31; Pecentage of
attendance 96.8; Lates 1.
Perfect attendance—Annie Beveridge. Mary Clark, Edna Davis. Joseph Dueca, Norman Frelone, Barbara Grant, Stephen Jackson. Klshlo
Kaga, Shigeo Kawaguchl. Lcng Low,
Mary Sweeney. Richard Marpole,
Fusae Suglmorl, Josephine Welsh,
Isabel Brown. Tom Combs, Robert
Colling. Tadoa Dol, Mary Jackson,
Lena Merelli, Sakayo Suglmorl, Annie Walker.
Honor Roll. Grade VIII Jr.—Edna
Conrad, Andrew Brown.
Honor Roll, Grade VII Sr.—Stephen
Jackson, Norman Frelone.
Honor Roll, Grade VII Jr.—Mary
Sweeney, Robert Colling.
T. A. Gallivan, Teacher
Division .1
Number on roll 37; Percentage nf
attendance 97.4; Lates 1.
Perfect attendance—Hugh Braes,
Jean Brown, Beatrice Cavallero, Harriet Horbury, Sadako Iwasa, Kathleen
O'Brien, Hltoshi Suglmori, Mlnnru
Tahara, Violet Williams, Barbara
Westfield, Bert McLellan, Dorothy
Gordon, Beta Devoy, Joo Williams,
Matsuljo Abe, Vlncen Auchterlonle,
Alven Freloni. Yhshlo Kawaguchl.
Ping Low. Willie Mcintosh. Jean McWhlrter. Kitty Prior, Victor Tomassi,
Hatsumi Mujahara. Edna Read.
Honor Roll, Grade VII.—Rena Bonora,   Beatrice  Cavallero,   Violet   Wil
liams and Harriet Horbury equal.
Honor Roll, Grade VI Sr—Edna
Read, Jean McWhlrter. Kitty Prior.
I. McFadyen, Teacher.
Division I
Number on roll 37; Percentage of
attendance 97.09; Lates 0.
Perfect attendance—Annie Brown.
Magnus Brown, Josie Burghiner,
Itudi Bonora, John Combs, Klmeyo j
Kaga, Mildred Lockner, Margaret.
MacDonald, Bessie Nicholas, Tasku
Oyama, Tommy Robertson, Edward
Stockand, Rosina Thompson. Nellie
Walker, Harry Westfield, Aida Mil-!
suyie. Tom Mossey. George Strachan,
Tommy  Tobacco,  Irene  Davis, Alden
Francesini, Norlo ileroe, CazuUo Iwasa, Hatsue Matsukura, Ilisako .Yak-!
ana,  Muriel   Partridge,  Nina  Shields, j
Honor    Roll,  Grade   VI   Sr.—Aida |
Mltsuyie,     Mangus     Brown,     Harry
Westfield.
Honor Roll, Grade VI Jr.—Cazuko
Iwasa, Nina Shields, Cyril Davis.
('. MacKinnon, Teacher.
Division ,*>
Number on roll lis; Percentage of
attendance 94.5; Lates 1.
Perfect attendance -Winona Baird
Mary Beveridge, Olga Bonara, Edith
Cavallero, Donald Graham, Doris
Hannay, Takeru Kawaguchl, Second
i Merlettl, Jemima Mltohel, Toklo Nakano, Thomas Robertson, Helen Saunders. William Sweeney. Nellie Jackson, Alfred Jones, Jennie Lawrence.
Mary MucMilhiu, Bessie McLennan.
Bennle Nicholas, Hlroshl Okuda. Ma-
morn Tahara, Archie Welsh. Harry
Buchanan, Lorua Osborne.
Honor Roll, Grade VI Jr.—Albert j
Cooper, Edith Cavallero. May Bever-
idge and Helen Saunders equal.
Honor Roll, Grade V Sr.—Bessie Mc
Lennan, Jennie Lawrence, Lorna Osborne.
Edith Hood. Teacher.
Division n
Number on roll, 37; Percentage of
attendance 93.5;  Perfect 1(1; Lates 2.
Perfect attendance -Robert Blown.
John Burghiner. Marlon Combs, Ter-
uko Dol, John Hofflielnz, Low Hong,
Hugh McNeil, Robert Marshall. Mas-
alu Sora, Malta Tomassi. Joe Whyley,
Klyoko  Abe.    Wilhert   Auchterlonle,
The regular meeting of the City
Council was through in record time
on Monday evening, there being very
little business to be dealt with. Every
scat around the couucil board was occupied.
George E. Apps, secretary 61 the
June 3rd Scliool Sports, wrote thanking tbe council for its donation of
fifty dollars.
Reports of Committees
Tlie various committees had very
little to report. Aid. Potter had been
in Vancouver on business aud in consequence his department, the Board
of Works, had been doing very little
during tlie past week. Aid. Ledlngham reported the chemical truck had
had a few minor repairs but was now
in good shape again. The fire department, he said, was called out on
Sunday morning to a fire in West
Cumberland; both trucks answered
the call but the chemical sufficed to
put out the fire.
Bills und Accounts
Bills and accounts to the total am-
out of $103.38 were presented to the
finance committee for payment. They
were: B.C. Telephone Co. $8.25; Canadian Collieries (feed, etc.), $28.73;
Cumberland Motor Works (gas, etc.)
$8.40; George Leighton (shoeing) $8;
June 3rd sports committee (donation)
$50.00.
Transfer .Sanctioned
It was stated tliat Mr. Chandler
wished to transfer the soldier's house
in which he resides on Derwent Ave..
to Mr. Watkin Williams, all that was
needed to complete the transaction
being the council's sanction. This
wus given when lt became known that
.Mr. Williams will assume ull obligations.
POLICE TO BE
ASKED  TO
ASSIST CLUB
Recreation (1 round Trespassers
Will be Prosecuted to Full
Extent of I.aw
The committee of the Cumberland United Football Club
have been stirred to action at
last, owing to the depredations
of certain individuals in and
around the local sports grounds.
The stand, fences and gates
are to be placed in good condition again and locks provided
for all doors. Notices, warning all and sundry will be conspicuously displayed and we are
given to understand that the
Provincial Police have been asked to co-operate. All persons
found trespassing, damaging
fences, stands, etc, on the local
grounds from this date, will be
prosecuted to the fullest extent
of the law.
DANCE SATURDAY
For a good time on Saturday night
attend the Dance in the G.W.V.A.
Hnll. Excellent, music, excellent
dance floor.     Gents 50c. Ladles 10c.
A BULL STORY
MOTHER AND DAUGHTER
BANQUET WEDNESDAY
(Continued on Page Three)
On Wednesday evening an enjoyable Mother und Daughter banquet
was held at Grace Methodist Church
under the auspices of the "W.H.O."
"Foursquare" and "Willing Workers''
C.G.I.T. groups. Thc church was artistically decorated with yellow broom
snowballs and blue hyderange. thc
tallies were centred with rose und
daisies. Afier singing "Be present
at our table Lord," one hundred
mothers and daughters sat down to
a sumptuous repast.
.Miss Edith O'Brien, president of the
foursquare group, acted as (oast-mis-
tress and In a few well chosen words
extended to all a very hearty welcome
Tho toast list was as follows:
"Tlie King." proposed by Miss E.
O'Brien and responded to by the National Anthem.
"Our Country," proposed by Miss
Jean Smith and responded to by the
Maple Leaf.
"Our Mothers," proposed by Miss
Edna Gear and responded to by Mrs.
Stevens.
"Our Sister Groups." proposed by
Miss Edna Davis and responded to hy
.Miss Helen  Parnham.
Solo—"Mother Machree." Rev. J. R.
Butler.
"Our Sunday School," proposed by
Mrs. Hanks and responded to by Alex
Henderson,   Supt.
"C.G.I.T. Organist." proposed by
Mrs. Geo. Richardson and responded
lo by Miss Mae Brown.
"Girls of other Lands," proposed by
Tostilko Iwasa and responded to by
.Miss Constance Ward.
They told Raymond Griffith that a
bull can not kick backwards, that he
can kick witli a forward or a sideways motion only.
That's all applesauce, according to
Griffith, who gained accurate knowledge on the subject recently, when
a large, red-haired and black-souled
he-cow planted its right hind hoof
on Ray's trousers right where they
lo«e their creases quickest.
The experiment took place during
the filming of Paramount***! "The
I Night Club." a rollicking story adapted from William de Mllle's stage play
"Aft-.r Five." Griffith, having been
treated rudely and roughly by the
bull, is shown in lie act of using his
right foot to register his disapproval
on the animal's posterior.
But "Bombo," the name by which
the bull Is affectionately known by
Raymond Griffith, sensed the impending chastisement and, as the sporting
writers say, lie "heat Griffith to the
punch.
Feutucd witli Griffith in the cast of
"The Night Club," at the Ilo-llo Theatre tonight (Fridayi and Saturday,
are Vera Reynolds. Wallace Beery
and Louise I-'azenda. The story ls
one of a young woman-hater, who
falls heir to a million but has to
marry a certain girl to collect.
Come and laugh yourself silly.
DULL WEATHER MAY
CAUSE LOSS TO LOCAL
BERRY GROWERS
COURTENAY, June 10. -The continued dull njid wel weather may
cause the berry men some loss lt an
Improvement in tiie .* ttnospberlo condition does not take place Immedi
Btely,
Strawberries nn- .;isi beginning to
arrive iu volume, btjl the season Is by
no means at Its highest so far. The
frull Is meeting with a ready local
sale up lo the present time; hut there
Is sure to he :: surplus over and ubove
the local demand as the season advances. The growers have secured
the services of Mr. II. s. Maker who
Willi a delivery truck Is making deliveries throughout the district. The
surplus berries will lie shipped to
Mission as either crate or Jammers, it
has just been decided and the growers
hope to get nine cents per pound for
thc fruit thus disposed or. Tllc
strawberry crop Is undoubtedly short
In other parts of the province this
season hut the local growers may
fail to reap much benefit from the
condition owing to kick of preparedness and organisation for lhe disposal of their crops.
(Continued on Page Eight)
Mr. and Mrs. William Ker MacNaughton. of Prince Albert. Sask., are
the guests of Dr. and Mrs Geo K.
MacNaughton, Windermere Ave. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY.   JUNE   12,   1925
SECURES CERTIFICATE
COURTENAY, June 10.—Further
successes have been won by pupils
of the Courtenay Commercial School.
Miss Agnes Williams has secured a
certificate from the Remington Typewriter Co., for typing twenty-five
words per minute. Miss Gladys Roy
was awarded a card case and certificate from the same company for
speed and accuracy.
GRAND EXALTED
RULER OF CANADA
VISITS LODGE
COURTENAY, — Courtenay Lodge
No. 60, B.P.O. Elks wore honored with
a visit from the Grand Exalted Ruler
of Canada Col. Royal Burrltt, D.S.O.,
of Winnipeg during the week. After
attending the lodge meeting and taking part iu the Initiation ceremony.
the Grand Exalted Ruler accompanied
the members of the Order to the Elk's
Home where a musical program was
rendered and refreshments served. In
an  eloquent and  interesting  address
Col.  Burrltt  referred  to the growth,
j the   teachings   and   Influence   of   the':
I Order and showed how the Order, un-
] like    other   fraternal    societies    had'
spread   from   tile   west   to   the   east.
Out   of   a   toial   of   ninety-four   Elk I
lodges in Canada, t wenty-flve were In
j British Columbia.      .Mr. V. V. Vinson,
Of  North   Vancouver,   district   deputy
U.K.It.,  accompanied Col.  Burrltt on
his visit here.
OVERLAND COACHES
BOOST PRODUCTION
IN APRIL TO 27.083
By smashing all previous manufacturing records. Will.s-Overland's
combined Toledo and Toronto ship
ping records for April reached the
high peak of 27,003.
T. A. Russell, President ot Canadian
Willys-Overland, commenting on this
record   production   said:   "While  Hi
entire  line of Overland    fours    and
sixes, together with Hie Willys-Knight
OVERLAND
The Engineering Masterpiece
of the Year ^ - ^ ^The most
talked of Car on Four Wheels
NOT since the days when automobiles were
curiosities has the public showed such Intereit
In a car as they are showing in this beautiful
•nd powerful new Overland with sis cylinders.
Everybody Instantly admires this great c ir's refreshing
newness. Its sensational power performance is the
plain topic in automobile circles. People s.iy It Is away
ahead of all other cars of its class in power . . uwny
•head in lightning pick-up and getaway . . away
•head In beauty . . in luxury and comfort . . away
ahead in economy. And It Is away ahead in all these
things because It is so far ahead in progressive enftineer-
Ing. Its low price la all out of proportion to its great
advantages. Don't fall to see the new Overland SU.
Don't fail to ride in .      Easy terms if you desire them.
Standard Sedan 11,400; De Luxe Sedan J7.ft.i5.
F.O.B. Factory, Toronto.   Taxes Extra.
SPARKS CO. (COURTENAY), LTD.
PHONE 99
O'^i imulin ft
lathe
World's
Lowest Priced
Four Cylinder
5 Passenger
Sedan
four and six-cylinder models is experiencing an unprecedented sales
volume, the tremendous demand for
the now Overland Coaches is to a
great extent responsible for these
high figures."
'The Overland Six Coach has been
carefully designed and manufactured
to give the highest possible degree of
long und satisfactory service. The
performance of this beautiful car
wilh its fast, powerful get-a-way surprising acceleration on hills, and unlimited reserve power in deep muddy
roads, has earned the complete en-
dorsation of thousands of veteran
six-cylinder drivers.
The introduction of the Overland
four-cylinder Coach which is the
"world's" lowest priced car of this
type met with an almost instantaneous response from the many thousands of buyers in this low price field
who were not desirous of getting into
tlie higher prices. These people realize they can now enjoy the many advantages of a substantially constructed and attractive Coach at a very
low price.
The Overland four-cylinder Coach
has a full 5-passenger body in which
are incorporated the very latest improvements. The body is mounted on
the standard Overland four-cylinder
chassis, already well known for its
many big-car features, some of which
are: A smooth, positive-acting disc
dutch three speed sliding gear transmission—Triplex patented springs—
removable    axle    shafts—and    many
other   outstanding  mechanical    features.
Sparks (Courtenay) Ltd., are the
local distributors. Phone 99 for demonstration, or any information dealing with the Overland and Willys-
Knight cars.
European News
For Tourists
Job
Printing
—of the
Better Kind
Just Unloading
A car load of the best Number 1 kiln dried finished
lumber including: Floorings, V-Joint and long lengths
of 4" gutter.
Call and inspect our stock at our new premises on
the River Front next to the Government Wharf.
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd
COPIED FROM HANSARD
After rending tliis scathing attrck
from Mr. A. W. Nell, the Hon. member
for Comox-Alberni, (Wherever that
Is) we feel constrained to go out of
business. This bird has Burely never
seen Tbe Reporter. Here Is what
hi* lias to say about The Mall and Empire and the Orange Sentinel.
"I would ask the liberty of thi
House to diverge for a moment to perhaps a more personal matter. Some
mouths ago 1 saw an editorial ln a
paper called the Mall and Empire—I
should not say I saw It, because my
attention was called to it. Personally I only subscribe for the better
class of newspapers."
Mr. Garland (Bow River): Where
Is that paper published?
Mr. Nell: I have only obscure knowledge of this particular paper, but I
think It ls published in the city of
Toronto. I wonder Is that the same
city that publishes the Orange Sentinel. It is eh? Well, Mr. Speaker, that accounts for a whole lot,
doesn't it? It is a surprising thing
to me to find that a city that sends
men here as able as the Toronto representatives, particularly the hon.
member for Centre Toronto (Mr. Brls
tol) and the hon. member for West
Toronto (Mr. Hocken), should be
foupd lending its support to newspapers of this character. When the
occasion offers I think I shall make
lt my business to visit the city of Toronto, and observe *at first hand the
habits and customs of this quaint and
Interesting people, with their strange
weird newspapers. This particular
editorial Is a peculiar one. It Is incorrect as to its facts, very muddy as
to its logic, and faulty as to it grammar which one would not have ex-
pe«ted." Some day this Gink will
probably blow this way and we shall
be able to tell our readers just where
Comic-Albert is. — The Reporter,
Saskatoon, Sask.
SCHOOL   CHILDREN   TAUGHT   TO
BE POLITE TO TOURISTS
VIENNA—The Mayor of Vienna,
Austria, bus signed a decree instructing tbe school teachers to attract tbe
attention of their scholars to the importance of tourists to Austria, enjoining them to show the greatest politeness to foreigners. In the same
Interest meusures are being prepared
to stop all Increases in hotel rates,
and the tax on foreigners Is being reduced.
HOTEL   1»  TIMES   HIGHER   THAN
TIIE WOOMVOTII BUILDING
GENEVA.—The distinction of being
the highest hotel In Europe belongs to
tbe Kulm Hotel, at the terminus of tho
Zermatt-Gomegrat Railway in Switzerland, where travelers ln summer
enjoy themselves at an altitude thirteen times as high as the Woolworth
Building of New York. It Is equipped with electricity and every modern comfort. From Its windows fifty
nine glaciers can be seen and more
than fifty well-known peaks decorate
the sunrise and sunsets.
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS' MAP
PARIS. — Tourists visiting Paris
may now see, amid the treasures of
tbe nibliothequc National, the map
which Columbus presented in 1491 to
the Catholic Kings of Europe on the
eve of bis voyage to discover America. The map may be seen ln what
were once tbe private rooms of the
great Cardinal Mazarin, familiar to
all readers of Dumas, and is one'of
the oldest maps extant.
aud chateaux back on the hills not far
from Cannes, between HyereB and the
Italian frontier on the Riviera. Quaint
old homes with many years of history
attached to them, many of which
have long been derelict, are now ln
the hands of Americans, who, with
taste and discernment, have restored
the exteriors in keeping with the arch
itecture of the country and fitted up
the almost hopeless interiors with
every modern convenience. Ono American lady from Rhode Island has
restored ber chateau in the old Pro-
venclal style and while planning the
Installation of n witter supply from
the hills, bas also provided a similar
supply for the little rocky village beside her.
GERMANS REMOVE MONEY
RESTRICTIONS
HAMBURG.—All restrictions operative during the inflation period regarding the amount that could be
taken In or out of Germany have been
abolished. Visitors may now enter
without making the usual customs
declaration of the amount of money
ln their possession.
AMERICANS BUYING UP OLD
VILLAS
CANNES.—A number   of   Americans
have recently purchased the old villas
LONDON BOOSTING ITS PARKS
LONDON.—London now claims to
have more parks, publlc gardens and
open spaces than any other city in
the world. One visitor recently who
had thought of the English capital as
a dingy town of smoke, back yards
aiid streets, found he could travel 3
miles through four of the royal parks,
only crossing a street twice. Within
seven miles of the hca-1 of London
begins the wild tradition-haunted forests of Epping, where kings and
queens for a thousand years have
roamed and bunted, and where today
it is possible to wander for a week
amid majestic ancient oaks and
beeches.
the
Gaiety Theatre
MILL STREET, COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 17 P. O. Box 62
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND ICE CREAM PARLOR
The White Store The White Bakeij
COURTENAY, B.C.
THE GREAT THING
THESE DAYS IS TO
GET A GOOD DRIXK
ANI) THAT YOU
CAN GET  AT OUR
FOUNTAIN
COURTENAY
MON. & TUES.
15—JUNE—16
Sir Percy Bcauchamp says*.
"One time tbe Chambaw of
Commerce from Pwovidence,
Rhode Island, came ovah heah
from time to time one ot thetn
would remawk in a loud voice
SO THIS
LONDON!
And then tbey would laugh uproariously nml so will vou when
you aer George M. Cohan's
Biggest Comedy  Scream
Presented by
Verna Felton
and the
Allen  Players
with the original cast
The play  that  ran  eight   solid
weeks In Vancouver with record
houses.
Prices—reserved    seats    $1.00; General  Admission  75c;  Children 50c;    Seats on sale at the box offlce, Gaiety Theatre daily
from 10 to 2.30 and 7 to 10.30 In the evening.
At the Gaiety Theatre for
Two Nights Only ■
FRIDAY,   JUNE   12,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
EE       (ft
New SMP
Enameled Sink
Bett value ever offered. MadeofArmco
Iron, coated with pure-it SHP White
Enamel. Centre drain; with or without
Upholei.   Price includes all fittings.
Also the SMP Enameled
Drain Board
Price $6;50
Whlttenimeled Armco Iron, atl-ons, rtiiiil
very h.ndyl «lau unique vulue. Fit inujly
loaink. AiMlplUMbinnrcuaaliun. Priie
include, oil Bttinga. Sold by plUmtKn
hardware atorta, or write direct to
•Sheit Mft»L Products eo"K \
MOMTKiAL   TORONTO    WINNIPEG,.,,,,.
fOMONTON     VANCOUVER   CALOARV 184U
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown landa may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
und by aliens on declaring intension
to become Britisli subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Kull information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Scries,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria. B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
\<a only  land   suitable   for   agricultural
\t purposes, and  which   is  not  timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Laud Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, ln which the land applied foils situated, and are nude on primed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can lie
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class 'arable) land Is ?5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment rf
stum page.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has heen surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based >n
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for rango
management. Free, or partially free.
permits are available for settlors
campers and travellers, up to ten
head. •
School Report
(Continued From Page One)
Chrlsaie Robertson, Jackie Wong,
Shlgera Kiyona.
Honor Roll, Orade V.* Sr.—Masalu
Sora, Sidney Hunt. Progress—Audrey Gear.
Honor  Roll,  Grade  IV  Sr.—Thora
MINERAL ACT
(FORM F.)
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE
real Fractional, Robin, Red Bird, Cau-
try, Black Bird, Blue Jay, Lark, Wren
•>now Bird, Birch No. 2, Hemlock No.
2, Cedar No. 2, Spruce No. 2, Tamarack No. 2, Swan No. 2, Raven No. 2,
iMne No. 2. Fir No. 2, Maple No. 2,
Oak Fractional, Locust, Long Fractional, Loon, Hawk Fractional, Mink
Martin, Eagle No. 11, Eagle No. 12 and
lingle No. 13 Mineral Claims, situate
in the Quatsino Mining Division of
Rupert District.
Where located:—Near Old Sport
Mine, Elk Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank C
tireen. acting as agent '<"• Coast Copper Company, Limited, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 75.895C, intend, sixty
lays from the date hereof, to apply to
the Mining Recorder for Certificates
if Improvements, for the purpose of
ibtalning Crown Grants of the above
claims.
. And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
lieforo the issuance of Buch Certificates of Improvements.
Dated this 28th day of October, A.D.,
1924.
F. C. GREEN,
221 Pemberton Bldg..
13-24 Victoria, B.C.
Keeler,   Willie   MacNaughton.      Progress--Shlgera Kiyona.
V. Aspesy. Teacher.
Division 7
Number on roll 34; Percentage of
attendance 92.8.
Perfect attendance—Enis Boaora.
William Graham, Harvey Hurd, Jack
Marpole, David Marshall, Barbara
Martin. Bryson Parnham, George
Saito, Cheyako Suglmorl, Muriel
Thomson, Segulra Yagauchi, Willie
Brown, Preston Bruce, May Graham.
Okera Herosi, Harold Hughes, David
Hunden, Masahl Kaga, Willie Logan,
Akea Matsumaza, Jackie Morrison,
Alex Somerville.  Margaret  Westfield.
Honor Roll—Harvey Hurd, George
Saito, Agnes MacKinnon.
Honor Roll—Harold Hughes, David
Hunden, Preston Bruce.
U. M. Bickle, Teacher.
Division 8
Number on roll 41; Percentage of
attendance Mi.6; Lates C.
Perfect    attendance    —    Gertrude
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite lle-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
m
"The Most of the Beit for the Least"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOM.
SHINGLES.
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WD DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Dunwu-n JN,,M c,,1"! 1,4X Courl»nB*'
FHOWI!,a I Office; 16» Cumberland
Dairs, Jean Dunsire. Jackie Hassell,
Susutnti   Kawaguchl,    Johnny   Mah,
Tsugino Matsuklna, Audrey  Phillips,
Lettle Surngler, Rhoda Walton, Peter
Bono. Bessie Brown, Willie Cloutler.
Mltsuo Hayashl, Walter Hunt, Vuichi
Klshlmcli, Sliari Kiyonaga, Marguerite Larrigan, Robert Logan, Richard
Marshall, Shegimi Maruya, Yoeko Obara.  .Muriel  Shortt,    Willie Tobacco,
Arthur   Wong.   Josie   Wong,   Wong
Ying, Ettic Buchanan, James Osborne.
Honor   Roll—.Madge   Bryan,   Lettle
Sumgler,    Rhoda    Walton,    Audrey
Piilllips, Muriel Shortt, Mltsuo Obara
G. McFadyen, Teacher
Division »
Number on roll 'ill; Percentage of
attendance 97.9; Lates 4.
Perfect attendance—Ronald Brown,
Charlie Gomm, Gwen Abrams, Doreen Bickerton, Alice Brown, Mary
Coleman, Audrey DeCouer, Alice Jack
sou, Dudley Keeler, Teruko Kiyonaga.
Betty .Malpass, Margaret Marpole,
Slitzlo Matsunaga. Ella McWhlrter.
Billy Merrifield, Gladys Millar, Harry
Mordy, Alex Mossey, Klyoslil Okuda.
Jean Quinn, Wardena Thompson, Jim
my Tremlett. Ada Tso. Margaret Williams, Cheung Wong, Tommy Wong,
Tsuyuko Yagulchl.
Honor Roll—Harry Mordy, .Margaret Marpole, Ada Tso. Jean Quinn, Alice Brown. Progress—Billy Merrl-
lield, Ella McWhlrter. Jimmy Tremlett.
C. Carey, Teacher.
Division 111
Number on roll 34; Percentage of
attendance 93.98; Lates 1.
Perfect attendance—Robert Mossey.
Joe Aida. Mary Baird. Arnold Bonora.
Harry Choe, Jimmie Choe, David Da
vis. Gee Doon, Loo Foo, Irene Gomm,
Mltsuro Hirosi, Lem Ho, Charlotte
HolTlieinz, Tsuglo Iwasa. Irene Jackson, Hlroshl KawagauchI, Moyshi
Kimoto, Kejhl Kiyonaga, Tsugimatsu
Matsunaga, Cheung Ming, Haron Nakano, Ina Robertson, Url Snlto. Marie
Buchanan.
Honor Roll—Stanley Lawrence and j
Gee J)oon equal, Ina Robertson, Jean [
Miller, Mary Baird, Harry Choe, Tai- i
bert Davis.
H. I. Harrison. Teacher.
Division 11
Percentage    of    attendance    96.4;
Lates 2.
Perfect   attendance — David   Bell.
Winnie Bird, Margaret Braes. Gladys
j Colling, Thelma Freloni, Sakae Fuji-
moto, Jack Graham, Margaret Home.
] Rosie   Marocchi,  Fred   Martin.   Hugh
■ .Miller, Hugh McWhlrter, Aikeru Saito
Dorothy Sweeney, Lily Tobacco, Tom
Tso, Daryl Thompson, Hldeko Tsur-
olia, Billy Westfield, Honest Wong.
Kiycika Kiyonaga.
■ Honor Roll—Margaret Beveridge,
I Roddy Selfe, Rosie Marocchi. Chrissle
I Edwards, Edith Hughes, Margaret
! Braes.
P. Hunden, Teacher.
Division 12
Number on roll 36;   Percentage of
j attendance 90.66; Lates 7.
Perfect  attendance—Annie   Brown.
I Douglas Davis, Kazuo Iwasa, Yashi-
toshl Kawata. Mltsuo Kishimoto,
Seichl Kishimoto, Masayuki Kumalle.
Jung Mee. Hanaye Nakauchl. George
Nicholas. Sumeye Okuda, Sliunko
Saito, Margaret Short, Jean Sommer
vllle,   Billy   Walker,   Michlko   Yoma
! moto.   Douglas   Coleman.     Margaret)
j Waugh.
Honor Roll-Nellie* Ramsell, Margaret Shortt, Betty O'Brien, Arthur
Ramsell, Jean Sommerville, Dorothy
Hunt.
C. Richardson, Teacher.
Division lit
Number on roll 22; Percentage of
attendance 95.; Lates 3.
Perfect attendance—Tsneyoshi Kim
ura. Tosiki Oliaru. Nabiko Davis. Ki-
kuye Fuglmoto, Mlnoru Fugimoto,
Genevieve Larrigan, Fumiko Matsu-
bachl. Willie Waugh, Mitsko Yaguchi,
Charles Reid.
Honor Roll—Violet Scavarda, Lille
Waterfleld, Gilbert Davis. Wanua Williams, William Waugh, Herbert
Woods,
This Day, Friday and Saturday
MOOimtUtOMmnltSttL
n.w...   i-..,,niaa|llil   lwi ir J _t I
RAYMOND
GRIFFITH t^W^       1
JfiUC T&
At the Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland
B. C. GOVERNMENT
PLANS $5,000,000
BOND ISSUE SOON
Ollicials of thc Provincial Department of Finance are completing an
investigation which Ib expected to
lead to the early issuance of Government securities totalling approximately $5,0110,000. Thc issue iu designed
purely to refund maturing short-term
Pacific Great Eastern Hallway debentures, which the Government
bought In at a very advantageous
rate some years ago and which since
have increased in value substantially.
These debentures have matured now
and new railway debentures or ordinary Government bonds must be issued to cover them, Announcement
of the Finance Department's decision
on the matter will be made within the
next few days.
COAL COMPANY MAY
ENTER IRON BUSINESS
It is announced from Toronto that
the Crow's .Vest Pass Coal Company,
with Iho object of utilizing Its coke,
may make on effort to get into the
iron and steel business.
A dividend of three per cent has
been declared on the stock of the
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Limited,
payable to shareholders of record May
11'. Latest advices from the collieries are to lhe effect Ihat the company
has been steadily working into a more
favorable position. A daily output
of 8,000 tons of coal has been maintained recently since the settlement of
the labor difficulties, aud shipments
have been practically uninterrupted
since the resumption of operations.
Not Just For
Emergencies
While long-distance telephoning serves admirably
in cases of emergency, the same service is also used
for everyday business and social purposes in place of
the writing of letters.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE l&O
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
LETHBRIDGE MEN ARE
TO MINE MORE COAL
CALGARY, June 11,—In place of
working one day a week and even
lfadS, the Gait Collieries at Lethbridge
it is expected, will operate fairly
steadily from now on and the output
naturally will lie increased as the
Fall and Winter advances, according
to Lewis Stocked, In charge of the
mines branch of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, who has returned from Lethbridge.
This is the first domestic- mine in
Alberta where the men have followed
the example of the miners in the
steam coalfields of the Crow's Nest
Pass and elsewhere in negotiating a
direct agreement with their employers
The action was taken by the men
themselves, who agreed to a cut of
from "'/fc to Iii per cent, ou cotnract
rates, and practically the Fernie scale
so far as day wages are concerned,
which ranges from §*1 lo $li a day.
Those closely connected with the
coal mining industry of Alberta are
now watching with much interest
what the result of the Lethbridge
men's decision will have on the domestic mines In lhe Drumheller valley.
In connection with the new agreement ai Lethbridge, put into operation, it Is stated about BOO men will
he employed at onco, Later the number will be Increased to about 650
men.
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
Tie Judge ■— Water Is Both. Stainless And Tasteless -Bu M,B,
BETTER HAVE SONlESOUP.SlR.
ITS OHLY 5*r EXTRA WITH
IT NEVER STAINS AFter^
6 o'clock PAGE FOUE
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   JUNE   12,   1925
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,    JUNE    12,   1925
PUFFING SMOKE AT OLD FOGIES
Once again we are called upon to note the
strange reversal of form, to borrow a phrase
from the sporting editor, in the attitude of woman toward her own minor morals and those of
the opposite sex.
It is within the memory of men who still
have all their teeth and whose hair is firm-rooted
and original-hued, that girls used to dictate to the
young men who sought them in the matter of
drinking and smoking. It was often a condition
precedent to the purchase of the ring that the
favored swain should empty his pocket of cigars
and promise never to renew the supply.
No matter how tenderly she set her face
against his in matters romantic and in parlors
dark, she set sternly against tobacco in any form.
The young man, if he possessed sufficient flexibility of conduct, meekly agreed and then, when
the knot was tied and the honeymoon past and
the customary feminine discovery that man was
not at all angelic, had prepared the way he relapsed, too often to a pipe.
Here is a case, however, in Budapest which is
the exact reverse of traditional courting rules. A
girl named Matilda Haska—we stop to inquire
who will haska again?—has broken off her engagement because her fiance, who is a non-smoker, wishes her to give up the habit. She declares
she can live without a husband but not without
cigarettes.
This is an exaggerated case, the outgrowth
of continental laxity with regard to feminine
habits, but if the broken engagement doesn't find
a parallel here at home the cigarette pulling does.
In days gone by many a boarding school miss or
college girl has smoked a cigarette in a harmless
bravado, and then forgotten all about it.
Now it is different. Some girls, good girls,
smoke openly at the house of their friends. Matrons pass cigarettes around at dinner parties.
It is not pleasant to contemplate but what
are we going to do about it? Women make social rules. They can break them, too, or change
them with the changing times.
For the rest, all women and fair-minded men
know that the daily life of the domestic woman
hcips the joint treasury along, quite as truly as
ihe work of the husband, at bench, in factory, behind the plow or counter, or in the managerial
seat of the mighty. In fact, one doesn't have to
be a sentimentalist to conclude, after a survey of
her duties and cares and worries, the number and
persistence of them, that the man who goes out to
work has the less fretted time.
When you add to the mere physical labor of
the housewife her wise economy in her own domain and the practical wisdom she often brings
to the affairs of the husband who is sensible enough to take her into his business confidence, then
an even better appreciation of her share in the
financial success of the family is apparent.
THE WIFE A PARTNER
We are firmly convinced that the best managed and happiest home is the one in which the
wife is given a weekly allowance sufficient to permit her to pay the household expenses and to reward her thrift with an opportunity to save on
her own account. Both husband and wife should
contribute to the household treasury and there is
something radically wrong with the accepted
plan of domestic economics. It is humiliating
to the wife to be made practically a dependent
upon her husband and the shame of it doesn't
lie with the women who suffer, but with the men
who inflict. It is the bad husband's fake logic
that the wife's services are not entitled to monetary recognition which makes this social and
economic blot.
HOME, SWEET HOME
To give up the old homo, to let the family
traditions die, to abandon the simple domestic
i ustomB, for whatever return, is to make a fool's
bargain.
In the window of a secondhand store, the
other day, we saw an old-fashioned mantel clock
■ hat was still keeping good time, yet someone
had thrown it aside to probably install a glass
time-piece with gold trimming. There was some-
lhi'*!*: sad about the faithful old clock as it seemed to hold its hands before its face in mute appeal
Somewhere In the days gone by, it had ticked
away the hours in a happy home. Tenderly it
had been wound each night before the family
ought their beds. Still sturdy and faithful in
its duty it had been cast aside for the garish trink
ets of this age and day. We wanted to buy the
old clock and once more install it on the mantel
over the hearthstone of a real home.
The tendency of young people, when they
marry today, is to listen to the voice of fashion.
Their parents may have given them the example
of a modest life; but the new generation shows
its rights to existence and liberty, by repudiating
things that seem to them old-fashioned. So
these young folks make efforts to set themselves
: up lavishly amid the latest creations, and rid them
selves of father's property at dirt-cheap prices.
Instead of clinging to the things that say: Remember ! they garnish their newly-built bunga-
j lows with quite new furnishings that as yet have
no meaning.
The old family clock that ticks faithfully
through the silent watches of the night has no
charm for them. It might recall the life of the
old home before these days of turmoil and rush.
; So they cast it out and put a dainty, noiseless little timepiece on the mantle. The little clock will
not bid them remember the peace of the old home.
Instead, if perchance they take the time to glance
|at it, the smiling dial will only say: Do not forget
your appointment, at the club, theatre, the races,
or your hour is at hand at the beauty shop.
The home, now that father's clock has been
cast out, becomes a sort of half-way house, where
one comes to rest a little and change one's clothes
between two prolonged absences; it isn't a good
. place to stay. As it has no soul, it does not speak
to yours. Time to eat and sleep, and then off
again! Who was the fellow that wrote "Home,
Sweet Home," anyway? He must have been as
dull as a hermit.
But there will come a time when you will
long for the peaceful rhythmical ticking of father's old clock, as you lay awake thinking what a
'mess you have made of your life.
UNION   HOTEL
CUHIBLANat, B. C.
Comfort   ani   Hemeltke   servlee.
II   rooms,  (iMtrlwlaV   healed.
aUMlltit enlslae—
Far reservatloas fkeae 11.
ft. IATBI, Manager.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM. MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunstuuir Avenue. Cumberland
Ink
So
Jasper National Park
And Return—$85,85 From Vancouver
Edmonton and Calgary
And Return—$ 15.00
(War Tax Additional)
$13.00 Extra for Routing via Prince Rupert to Cover
Meals and Berth on Steamer
Also to
Eastern Canada
CENTRAL AND EASTERN STATES
Particulars on Application
i  . Edward W. Bickle, Cumberland, B.C.
'MM
0 I
HQBHUnH
ail a mi
There's nothing puzzling
about the quality of the
foodstuffs here — or the
prices. They help solve
the problem of high living
cost.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cur, ."illi nnd  iHmMiiuIr.
New Car Service
CAU FOB HIKE DAT OB NIGHT
it—TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
For Job Printing Try The Islander
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
Here and There
'lhe liopiu-u'ily of the Nova Scotia
apple is rapidly growing in Europe.
1,103,980 barrels and 8,693 boxes
were shipped in 1924-26 to ports in
England, Scotland and Germany.
Shipments also went to Newfoundland, West. Indies, Central Canada
and the United States,
Production of sugar beets in Canada during 1923 amounted to 169,200
tons, valued at $1,922,668, and grown
on 17,941 acres, according to the Bureau of Statistics. 6,000 acres have
been planted to beets this year in
Southern Alberta, due to the establishment of a sugar beet factory.
Milton Sills, the well-known movie
actor, with a company of 32 other
acreen artists, passed through Montreal recently to take scenes in "The
Come Back" in which he is featured.
The party went to Beauchesne, in
Northern Quebec. Travelling by another train was a mother skunk and
five kitten skunks which -will also
figure in the picture.
The 286 passengers on the Canadian Pacific S.S. Empress of France
completed their 30,000-mile tour of
the world on Saturday, May 23, when
the vessel docked at New York. At
their last stop at Havana, President
Machado of Cuba invited the passengers to attend his official inauguration and to witness the unveiling of a statue to the preceding
President.
Another aristocratic rancher recently passed through Montreal on a
return visit to the ancestral estates
in Transylvania, Hungary. This was
Baron Josef Csavossy who, with his
brother Andre, took over a 1,600-
acre ranch last March near Cochrane, Alberta, on the Bow River. Incidentally the Baron was a passenger
on the Trans-Canada on its first return trip of the season trom Vancouver,
The Indian Day Celebration at
Banff, it is announced, will take
place as usual this year on the third
Thursday and Friday in July. Preparations are already under way for
this event, which enjoys an enviable
population as an Indian show. The
Stoney Indians arrive in large numbers from their reservation to take
part in the ceremonies, which are
the 23rd annual celebration of the
function.
Edward G. Taylor, one of the best
known game fishermen on the continent is authority for the statement
that New Brunswick is losing none
of its lure as a fisherman's paradise.
Just back from a trip to the Cains
River, N.B., Mr. Taylor said salmon
were steadily increasing in numbers
and size in the province. He added
that he had caught on this trip a salmon 42 inches long and weighing
24 lbs. In the autumn such a fish
would likely weigh up to fifty
pounds.
The following story is told of Sir
William Van Home, first president
of the Canadian Pacific Railway and
a Major Rogers, .who was in charge
of. the supplies for men working
along the track. Van Home said:
"Look here. Major, I hear your men
won't stay with you, they say you
starve them." "T'aint so, Van."
"Well, I'm told you feed 'em on soup
made out of water flavored with old
ham canvas covers." "T'aint so, Van,
I didn't never have no hams."—
From "Canada's Great Highway," by
J. H. E. Secretan.
The Western railways of tha
United States comprising 67 roads
serving Chicago and the West, have
petitioned the Inter-State Commerce
Commission for permission to advance rates. They state that for the
years 1921 to 1924 inclusive, the
average rate of return on capital
was 3.55 per cent., wliieh they claim
is so small as to render it impossible
for them to secure working capital
for extensions and improvement of
service by the sale of stock or issue
of bonds at reasonable lerms. They
ask for rates that would give them
a net return of 6*i pev cent., which
it is generally admitted is what railways should have.
/ Will Call
at your house ln time to take yeu tt
the train er boat.
Car  For Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE 25 OR 22-ASK FOR
Geo.  Mason
COMOX VALLEY  COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following is a list of cows in the above association that gave 50 lbs. or
more of butter-fat for May, 1925.
Days                                                                     Lb. Lb.
F'esh     Name ot Cow Breed Milk   Fat         Owner
67   Emma    Gdr. Jersey 1434 71.7 W. A. Urquhart
43   Daisy   Gdr. Jersey 1152 69.1 H. Piercy
60   Elsie   Gdu. JerBcy 14G4 67.3 R. U. Hurford
40 Oxford North   P.B. Jersey 1326 66.3 Miss M. J. Hardy
190   Bell   Gdr. Jersey 1104 66.2 W. A. Urquhart
82   Winnie   Gdr. Jersey 1608 64.6 R.  U.  Hurford
183   Josephine  T... ...,  Gdr. Jersey 1200 62.4 W. A. Urquhart
190   Lilly   Gdr. Jersey 1176 61.1 W. A. Urquhart
120   Daisy  Gdr. Jersey 1080 60.4 Butler Bros.
32 Vena   Gdr. Jersey 1179 58.8 R. U. Hurford
41 Pearl   Gdr. Jersey 1128 58.6 A. Randall
104   Blossom    Gdr. Jersey 1200 57.6 Pritchard Bros.
30   Pansy   Gdr. Jersey 1086 57.5 Bayly Bros.
33 Beauty   Gdr. Jersey 1134 56.7 J.  Isblster
100   Heather  Gdr. Jersey 1128 56.4 Mra.   Bell-Irving
36   Joan   Gdr. Jersey 1173 66.3 W. A. Urquhart
48   Patsy   Gdr. Jersey 1276 56.1 D. Kilpatrick
204   Lucy   Gdr. Jersey 1275 66.1 A. Randall
30   Champion   Gdr. Jersey 1242 55.8 J. Isblster
46   Fannie   Gdr. Jersey 1212 55.7 F.  Chambers
60   Flirtation    P.B. Jersey 1110 55.5 R. U. Hurford
35    Maisie   Gdr. Jersey 1350 65.3 J.  Isblster
163   Northern Star   P.B. Jersey 1251 55.0 R. U. Hurford
160   Patsy of Pansy   P.B. Jersey 918 66.0 C. Hughes
42 Beauty       Gdr. Jersey 1098 54.9 Pritchard Bros.
155    Pansy   Gdr. Jersey 1098 64.9 C. Hughes
216   Lilly of Haven   P.B. Jersey 1245 64.7 R.  U.  Hurford
210   Spots   Gdr. Jersey 1134 54.4 W. A. Urquhart
30   Snowdrop of Sandwick   P.B. Jersey 1044 54.2 G.  Hornby
137   Luclnda   Gdr,, Jersey 945 53.8 A. Randall
174 Happy Valley Sultana 3rd P.B. Jersey 996 63.7   J. McKenzie
90   Pansy   Gdr. Jersey 1056 53.8 Miss M. J. Hard/
71    Bella     Gdr. Jersey 1056 62.8 C. Hughes
180   Rosie   Gdr. Jersey 996 53.7 J. McKenzie
70   Ella   Gdr. Jersey 984 52.1 A. Randall.
67   Daisy   Gdr. Jersey 945 51.0 F. Chambers
197   Heather   Gdr. Jersey 954 51.5 A. Randall
67   Peggy   Gdr. Jersey 1143 51.4 R. U. Hurford
43 Topsy   Gdr. Jersey 882 51.1 D. Kilpatrick
168   Biddy   Gdr. Jersey 1020 51.0 R. U. Hurtord
65   Daisy 2nd   Gdr. Jersey 1155 60.8 W. A. Urquhart
109   Fannie   Gdr. Jersey 1149 50.5 A. Randall
140   Queenle   Gdr. Jersey 1089 60.5 J. Isblster
137   Daisy   Gdr. Jersey 840 60.4 A. Randall
249   Fern of Sandwick   P.B. Jersey 1005 50.2 G. Hornby
WM. ROSE, Supervisor.
Specials
For Week End
Ladies' White Canvas Slippers, with Rubber Heels,
Reg. $3.50.     Special   $2.45
Brown Trimmed Oxfords, with Rubber Heels, regular
$3.95 for $2.95
White Oxfords, with Rubber Heels and Soles, regular
$2.85.     Special  $1.95
Coil Spring Simmons Make Felt Mattresses, full size
Price $12.00,   $12.50,   $14.50,   $18.00,   $25.00 Each
Steel Beds in Cream, White Enamel and Wood finishes
ranging in price from $12.00 to   $23.00
Amherst Pit Shoes,    Special at $5.25
Work Socks at .'. 25c, 40c, 50c, and 80c. per pair.
Men's Canvas Shoes, with Leather Soles at $3.60
Men's Leather Shoes, a good Shoe for hard wearing
Reg. $4.25.    Special $3.35
A. McKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
■III
■■HI
,.W*r,
iSti-ffi&f
BEFORE WARM DAYS COME, PHONE WILCOCK
BROS. FOR ICE. =
Always at your service—huge cakes of cooling Wilcock II
Bros. Ice—your guarantee of maintaining a healthy §|
household during the summer season. |§
HI     Leave your order today so that you will have your
g ice when you want it.
I Wilcock Bros. I
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
and FRIDAY.   JUNE   12,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
4
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
Cumberland
This Friday and Saturday
12 JUNE 13
ADULTS 50<>
CHILDREN 25.?
HE WHO LAUGHS AT GRIFFITH LAUGHS BEST!
The Happiest, Snappiest
Picture Ever Made
IF YOU ARE SCARED TO LAUGH, STAY HOME, AS MORE FUNNY SCENES ARE PORTRAYED IN THIS PICTURE THAN ANY EVER SHOWN HERE.
Comedy and News Reels
Come and Laugh Yourself Silly     HHH
MONDAY and TUESDAY
15 JUNE 16
ADULTS 35<?
CHILDREN 15t?
Florence Vidor
IN
"Girl of Gold"
A DRAMA OF WEALTH AND BLIGHTED ROMANCE WITH
MALCOLM McGREGOR, ALAN ROSCOE AND CHARLES FRENCH
WEDNESDAY- THURSDAY
ADULTS 35«*
17 JUNE 18
CHILDREN 15(*
Another Run on Your Bank of Laughs!
From the stage hit by
William Le Baron.
Adapted     by     Beulah
Marie Dix.
JACK HOLT
Wanda Hnwloy ami Julia Faye in the supporting cast. Directed
by Wallai • Worsley.
n
Nobody's Money
A SOCIETY DANCE IN A GOLD MINE.   YOU'VE NEVER SEEN THAT BEFORE, BUT     Something new for Jack Holt—a delightful light comedy.     All about a handsome man of
mystery who breezed into town and upset the grafters and the  ladies'  hearts  and  won   the
YOU'LL SEE IT WHEN YOU COME TO THE ILO-ILO reigning beauty for his own.    A success on the stage; a hilarious hit as a picture
Next Friday and Saturday
June 19 and 20
ADULTS 50«?
1
CHILDREN 25-T
r*^* "r*c*rS!T'^
"ZEEBRUGGE"
THE STORY OF THE MOST DARING EXPLOIT IN HISTORY
U-BOATS AT WORK
IN THE EARLY PART OF THIS PICTURE, A STARTLING SEQUENCE SHOWS A NUMBER OF BRITISH SHIPS BEING SUNK BY U-BOATS. THESE SCENES WERE TAKEN BY GERMANS, AND INTENDED FOR ANTI-BRITISH PROPAGANDA. THE U-BOAT WHICH SET OUT TO CARRY THIS
FILM TO AMERICA WAS CAPTURED BY THE BRITISH.
The results of the enterprise at Zeebrugge were undoubtedly worth the cost of life and limb. Twelve German Submarines and twenty-three torpedo crafts were blocked in at Bruges for a considerable period. This
result alone was of the greatest importance. The damage to the enemy's morale, as wc discovered later,
was no less importance.
PROOUCeD BY THE BRITISH ADMIRALTY PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   JUNE   12,   1925
PREVE
ST FIRES-IT PAYS
■J :rf.f'*tiiXJT.ftTtJ*Xi^ -»i r«a—.-iatucf-TO
Silk Hosiery
Rich and Lustrous
\V7HAT women of good taste
*» desire in hosiery is
perfectly incorporated in
Penmans Pure Thread Silk
Hose.
The texture is beautiful and
lustrous.
Only finest mercerized Hale is
used for the double soles and tops.
Elastic rib tops give aDSomte
comfort and garter tops keep Penmans Silk Hosiery in place—
always. Exquisitely shaped—preserving the trim, neat appearance
of dainty ankles.
Made in all fashionable
shades and sold in popular
weightsfrom sheer to huavy
60
{femes* B
^    HOSIERY^"
The Tourist's Eternal Triangle
g
, months was 2S3.719 tons, compared
with 190,041 tons in 1924.   These lat-
j tor figures Indicate that the increased
production iu the Crows Nest is responsible for the wiping out of the
, deficiency in tho first quarter of the
present year.
I
ALBERNI PACIFIC
LUMBER CO. SOLD
VICTORIA, Juno 11.—For a consilient! Ion In tho neighborhood of
$8,000,000, American interests have
taken over control of the Alberni
Pacific Lumber Company, it was disclosed hero. Principal among the
new shareholders arc F, R. Pendleton
president of the Straits Lumber Company at Nanoose, B.C., and M. A.
Grainger, Tlie now operating company will lie known as the Albernl-
Pacific Lumber Company Limited
1926.
The company's mill at Port Alberni, D C„ is one of the best equipped on Vancouver Inland, with a capacity of 150,000 feet per day. Assets,
further, include a logging camp and
equipment, and considerable trackage around Alberni.
Among the five old shareholders
tlie sale of whose holdings made the
deal possible, Is H. A. Dent, hitherto
managing director.
Improved New
Model Eureka
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00 $65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 80-inch extension tubing, 7-inch aluminum nozzle with detachable
upholstery brush, and radiator tool.
$10.00 $10.00
FOR SALE BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Someone has just published • book about Canada.
It is only a little book—about eighty pages—
but it contahs an astonishing amount of information. It will tell you how many cities there are in
Canada: how many people there are in those cities;
how many bushels of wheat were grown in 1924 and
how much money the government makes out of the
business of governing. It will also tell you, incidentally, that Victoria, B.C. is one of the most beautiful
cities of the world and that Vancouver has the second
finest harbor there is anywhere.
That is the right sort of book to publish. There
Is nothing vague, nor indefinite nor yet inaccurate
about the information it gives. It errs, if at all, in
being a trifle too modest. Victoria, Is indeed one of
the most beautiful cities in the world, but that is not
til one can say about it,   It is the capital of British
Columbia and as such is the centre of the province'!
recreational, industrial, and social activities and
that's saying a whole lot. Then there's Vancouver.
Look at its bathing beach. No wonder the citizens
have built the second finest harbor in the world
when they have a great and beautiful slab of th*
Pacific Ocean to fling themselves and each other
into to revive their weary bodies and minds whenever the business of operating their famous harbor
becomes burdensome.
These two cities are linked with each other and
with Seattle, to the south, by what Is known as the
Triangle Route of steamships of which the Princes*
Kathleen, of the Canadian Pacific Coastal service
is a member. The 'Kathleen' recently made her
inaugural trip on this route and is now permanently
in the service.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
I'ORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
t    HOTELS AND CAMPS
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO
COAL   OUTUPT
OF B. C. IS UP
VICTORIA, June 11.—With the resumption of operations in the Crows
| Nest Pass district, following tlie recent agreement between the operators
aud the coal miners, whereby the
long-standing dispute was settled and
operations   renewed,  coal   production
| ill the province during the first four
months of 1925 shows an increase.
In the first three months thu prov-
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
! W. P. Symons
Proprietor
NIGHT 6-
MORNING b-t
KEEP YOUR EYES
CHAN   CLEAR AND  HEALTHY
■Ma r.n ansa IT. MM Map,- savMmw. drawn.
Inclal production was about 50.001)
tons less than for the same period ill
1921, according to figures issued by
Hon. William Sloan, minister of mines
bul with Ihe speeding up In the Crows
N'est district during April tills adverse condition was practically wiped
out and for the first four months of
the year, ending April 30 last, the
total production aggregated 795,740
long tons, compared with 797,127 tons
in the same four months of 1924.
Production on Vancouver Island
however, is still considerably behind
| tliat of 1924. The total for tlie four
j months was 459.490 long tons, compared with 526,042 tons in 1924.
I On the other hand, the Crows Nest
! district    production    in    the    tour
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/a-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
S
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
ISLAND RACING
DATES ALTERED
1 Horse racing this year on Vancou-
i ver Island will open on the Colwood
| track on Monday. August 10, and the
I first race meet there will continue
| for three days, Hon. Thomas G. Co-
I ventry, M.P.P. for Saanich, and man-
! aging director of the Victoria Park
I Racing Association told The Colonist
a few days ago.
Hon. Mr. Coventry stated that the
I ten days' racing nt Colwood, the
I amount allowed by statute on a one-
I mile track during the season, will be
: divided into two meets this year, as
a result of a change of arrangements
which have been effected regarding
the schedule of racing on Vancouver
Island this year.
Racing at Colwood this season will
he as follows: First meet, Monday.
Tuesday and Wednesday, August 10,
11 and 12; sccoud meet, seven days,
commencing on Wednesday, September 2, and concluding ou Wednesday.
September 0.
The ponies will race nt Willows
Park for seven days, commencing on
Saturday, August 22.
Hon. Mr. Coventry stated that  the
new  dates that   be  announced  were
| official.     As a result of the change.
, local horse racing fans will see rac-
j ing on  the Colwood track  ln  early
i August, instead of having to wait un-
! til the following month, and will also see races on the Island a few days
before they would havo had the original schedule dates beeu ndhcred to.
Monday, September 7. which is Labor
Day, will witness horse races at Colwood.
The mile track at Colwood will be
in splendid shape for the horse racing there this season, and it is expected that big crowds of racing enthusiasts will be on hand when the
ponies perform on the popular Colwood track.
s. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
li
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
MANN'S BAKERY
APPETIZING FRUIT PIES
Our Famed Scotch Oat Cakes Need no Recommending
and our
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls Are Sure to Please
WEDDING, CHRISTENING & BIRTHDAY CAKES
MADE TO ORDER
at
MANN'S — CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 18 Phone IS
Your Grocer
IsATtot&ffr
Milkman
FREE RECIPE BOOK
Write the Borden Co., Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
BABYS
OWN
SOAP
SUCH  A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your laundry to us.  Our lonr experience  safeguards your interests and guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove it.
Free  Patches   —   Clean Work   —   Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry
PHONE 34 Quick Delivery P.O. Box 391
I FItlDAY.   JUNE   12,   1935
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
41
Gaiety Theatre
COURTENAY
„fla  ^^-x^
FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY
OF THIS WEEK
ADULTS 50.? CHILDREN 25£
Daddy's Gone
A=Hunting
THE   PLAY   THAT   SET
BROADWAY TALKING!
—IT IS NOW A GREAT FILM
The gay, colorful life of Paris' artist quarter called to
him. He chased the rainbow of his desires and found
only emptiness at the end. And then, knowing that
true love was back at home with wife and baby, he
sought forgiveness. A strong, human drama directed
by the man who made "Humoresque." A screen play
that will win your heart!
With   ALICE   JOYCE
PERCY  MARMONT
HOT STUFF COMEDY — VACATION COCKTAILS
NEWS AND TOPICS
■r^r-CigH
3g
Monday - Tuesday
THE ALLEN PLAYERS
«
IN
SO THIS IS
LONDON!
WEDS, THURS.
17 JUNE 18
ADULTS 35.*}
CHILDREN 151
The  Devil's
Cargo
With
PAULINE STARKE WALLACE BEERY
WILLIAM COLLIER Jr., CLAIRE ADAMS
The romance of one innocent girl and one good man
caught in a shipload of human derelicts.
Waves of excitement, storms of emotions, whirl-winds
of entertainment—"The Devil's Cargo" has all the
elements that make the perfect picture.
FAST EXPRESS and FELIX THE CAT
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
19 JUNE 20-
Zane Grey's
CODE OF THE
WEST
COURTENAY WINS
SUNDAY'S GAME
(Continued From Page One)
they waded right through the visitors
Barkhouse, on the other hand, cracked a little in the fourth nnd fifth innings, but outside of those two ba~d
spells allowed but two other safe hits
in the entire game. John Cummins,
who can justly claim to be one of the
classiest ball players on Vancouver*
Island, did much to help Lefty grab
the bacon. He spelled action, either
at the bat or on the paths, and
brought a run across the pan in the
seventh rrame that few other ball
players would sneak over.
Haslam, a cool headed young paper
maker, provided the batting thrills
when lie nicked Barkhouse for a
single, double and home run. The
latter wu.i In reality good for only
two bases but the pound man had evidently been chasing the cows out of
center garden lately so that the grass
was long enough out there lo play
hide-and-seek  iu.
Box Score
Powell niver All 11 H PO A E
Deacon, 2b     4   0   12   2   2
Shoenerman, cf ....   4   0   0   0   10
Heft, rf  ' 5   II   0   1   0   0
J. Galagher, c     D   1   0 ID   3   1
A. Galagher, 3b ....   2   0   0   12   0
Gemmel, lb     3   2   1 10   0   1
Haslam, ss     4   13   113
VV. Galagher. p     3   12   0   5   0
S. Hanson, If     ....   4   0   0   0   0   0
Sore by Innings
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 S 9
Powell   River      0 0 0 3 2 5 0 0 0—5
Courtenay 0 0 0 0 12 11 1—G
Summary—Earned    runs:     Powell
River 3, Courtenay 3; Two-base hits:
Deacon.   Haslam.  Larsen,  II.  nnd  J.
Cummins; Home runs: Haslam; Sacrifice hits: R. Robinson;  Stolen bas-j
es: .1. Cummins (4), Downey, Heft, J.
and    W.    Galagher;  Double    plays: ,
Barkhouse to .1.  Cummins;   Left on
bases:    Powell River 7. Courtenay S;
Struck out:  by Barkhouse 7, by Gal- j
agher S; Base on balls: off Barkhouse
4, oil Galagher 2; Hit by pitcher: A. \
Galagher by Barkhouse.
Totals 34 5   7*26 14   7
*25  one  out   when winning    run
scored.
Courtenay AB R H PO A E
J. Cummins, ss ....   4 3   3   10   1
R. Robinson, rf ....   4 0   0   0   0   0
H. Cummins. 2b ....   3 0   14   2   2
J.  Downey,  c      4 0   18   3   0
Dixon, lb     4 0   2 11   0   2
Ed. Obrey, 3b     4 2   0   110
A. Robinson, If     4 0   0   10   0
Barkhouse,   p       4 10   17   0
Larsen, cf
Totals
3   0   10   0   0
36   6   8 27 14
C  U N A R  D
■7 ANCHOR
ANCHOR DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM MONTREAL
To I'lymoufh - Cherbourg - London
Antonia  June  19. July  18. Aug.  22;
Ausonia June 27, Aug. 1. 29; Ascanla
July 11. Aug. 15, Sept. 12.
To Liverpool
Auranla  June  20.  July 24;  Alaunla
Aug. 7.
To Glasgow
Athenla   June   19,   July   17;   Letitia
July 3; Saturnia July 10.
FROM XEW YORK
To Quceiistiiivn uml Liverpool
Laconia June 20; Carmania June 27
Caronla July 8; Laconia July 18.
Til Clletrboiirg uml Sniilliuiiipliiii.
Mauretnnia June 24, July 15. Aug. 12.
Aqultania July 1, 29, Aug. 11); Beren-
garla July 8. Aug. 5, 26.
To Londonderry uml .'Insgun
Cameronia June 20;  California June
27; Assyria July 4; Columbia July 11.
To I'lyiiiiwMi . Cherbourg - London.
Albania July 18; Caronla Aug. 8.
To Plymouth - Cherbourg - Hamburg
Andania June 27, Aug. 1. Sept 5.
Money  orders  and  drafts  at  lowest
rates.     Full information from Agents
or Company's Offices, 622 Hastings St.,
W. Vancouver, B.C.
ZIEGFELD CAN
GLORIFY 'EM, HUT MOVIES
FINALLY GOT 'EM
Flo Zlegfekl may be a master nt
picking beauties tor his well known
"Follies," bul in the business of keep
Ing thom It's another story. Take
Sully Long for Instance.
In "Kid Moots," Sally for two years
wns one of the bright bits of the
Zlegfeld entertainment. And to make
himself secure against the bidding of
rival Broadway girl show nnd dance
promoters, Mr. Zlegfeld had Lloyds
Insure him for fl.OOO.noo against
the loss of his beautiful star.
But Zlegfeld reckoned without the
movies. Sally heard the call of filmland and she'll lc seen in Frank
Bozznge's Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture, "Daddy's Gone a-Huntfng," coming to the Gaiety Theatre tonight and
Saturday. She plays the part of an
artist's model.
The picturization of Zoo Akln's
famous stage play brings Percy Mar-
mont und Alice Joyce together again
in the lending roles.
FAMOUS BRITISH
NAVAL FEAT VIVIDLY
REPRODUCED
The British naval raid on Zeebrugge
the glorious exploit of the British
Navy on St. George's Day, 1918 and
the success of which turned the tide
ou the western front, lias been reproduced In moving pictures In a most
wonderful way.
The whole story is thrilling from
start to finish, permeated with that
British spirit that won the war. The
story  of  Zeebrugge   was   reproduced
under the guidance of the officers of
the British Admiralty, surviving officers and marines, who actuully took
part in the heroic raid, going through
their acts again, but this time before
the camera.
Some idea of the tremendous task
undertaken to put "Zeebrugge" on the
screen may be gained when it is
known that it cost 12.500.000 to reproduce, and then the Admiralty loaned the ships, etc., so that thc British
people may get the historic value of
the raid.
The whole action at Zeebrugge Is
accurate in every detail, the soldiers
on the deck being real soldiers, and
the smoke screen being supplied by
Alan Brock, of Brock's Fireworks,
the brother of the wing commander
who lost bis life gloriously during tbe
fighting on the Mole.
The picture was first shown at the
Marble Arch Pavilion, London. England, where their Majesties the King
and Queen witnessed It, and Incidentally saw their first moving picture
The picture wlll be shown at the Ilo-
llo Theatre on Friday nnd Saturday,
June 19 und 20.
AHA! A FILM PARADOX!
suggestion,     lt is of the latest flapper
construction.
Bessie  Eyton  Ib   the  tltlan   haired
beauty  whose locks ore the envy of
every female heart on tlie studio lot.
Miss   Eyton   has   never  bobbed   her
hair.      Not because she  doesn't approve of this method of wearing it,
j but because she has never found any-
j one willing to lend his moral support
I to the relinquishment of her crowning
' glory.
Claire Du Brey's raven tresses are
of the blue black shade that every
; man admires nnd all women envy. It
: is bobbed, or rather, shingled, but so
cleverly is It waved and combed that
in the society role to which she lends
her vivid personality in "The Girl ot
Gold" there is un Impression ot a
coiffure such us only ait expert hair
dresser could procure.
The opportunity given these three
actresses to "play up" their varied
types Is rather unusual. Bathing,
riding and dancing parties provide a
scope for individuality In dress that
has a strong appeal to both the masculine anil feminine fans who will
crowd to the llo-Ilo Theatre whero
"Tlle Girl of Gold" will be playing.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
They were the bitterest of enemies
during the duy!
At night they lived together!
Sucli was the paradoxical situation
of Owen Moore and David Butler
while on location in the Tonto Basin.
Arizona, filming scenes for William
K. Howard's production of Zane
Grey's gripping novel, "Code of the
West.'
Throughout the picturization of the
story. Moore and Butler were
enemies. Rivals in love and business
they clashed on several occasions and
once they engaged in a terrific list
fight. In Ihe evening, however, the
two made up, went Into the cabin
the both occupied together and nursed each other's wounds.
"Code of thc West" Is a story of
the great open spaces of Arizona
where cowboys are cavemen and flappers are scarcer than hen's teeth.
Featured in tlle cast are Owen Moore.
Constance Bennett, Mabel Ballin.
Charles Ogle and David Butler.
"Code of the West" will be shown
at the Gaiety Theatre on Friday and
Saturday, June 19 and 20.
"GIRL OF GOLD"
HAS ALL STYLES
OF LOVELINESS
When you are In need of a
Plumbing & Heating Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Blonde, brunette or titlan-halred
beauty — whichever your penchant,
you may find it in "The Girl of Gold."
starring Florence Vidor. the picture
which will be nt the llo-Ilo Theatre.
Monday and Tuesday, June 15 and 16.
Miss Vidor is a brunette "au nntu-
rel'l but wears a blonde wig in this,
her newest role, to carry out the title
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 167
Cumberland I
Your   needs   will   receive   lmmediati
attention. !
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
XOTART PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
—J
Summer's Safest Food—
JERSEY ICE CREAM
SUMMER IS THE SEASON WHEN IT BEHOVES ONE TO EXERCISE CARE
IN THE DIET. IT'S THE DANGER SEASON FOR MOST FOODS. ICE CREAM
IS SAFE—AT ANY TIME, IN ANY QUANTITY.
JERSEY ICE CREAM IS PURE, WHOLESOME, NUTRITIOUS, TASTY AND
DELICIOUS. MADE OF NOTHING BUT THE RICHEST CREAM, PURE
FRUIT JUICES AND FLAVORING SYRUPS. A FOOD FOR THE CHILDREN,
THE ADULT, THE AGED AND THE INVALID.
AT ALL FOUNTAINS IN BRICK  OR   BULK
Comox Creamery Association
ee
DUBS BRING IN
THREE RUNS AGAINST
GREENHORNS TWO
(Continued From Page One)
There is an unwritten rule which
governs these two teams. It is: "any
player showing the smallest sign of
baseball ability will be given his Immediate release." It is interesting
to note that no one wus released.
The return game is scheduled for
Wednesday next in Cumberland and a
large turnout Is expected. Both
teanis promise to be greener and bigger dubs than ever. Dud Dixon was
l.'mps at Courtenay.
Box Score
Cnnfhcrland AB R H PO A E
Wilcock. 3b   4 0    0   0   0   2
Strachan, c    3 0   1 10   2   1
Carey cf   3 0   13   0   1
Hudson, rf   3 1110   0
Mounce.  If    3 0    0    10   0
Lockhart, 2b, p .... 3 0   0   12   1
Watson, p. 2b   3 0   2   10   0
MacKinnon, lb   3 0   0   3   0   1
Stevenson, ss    3 11112
•Totals 28 2   6 21   5   8
Courtenay AB R H PO A E
Palerson, 2b    4 113   2   0
Midwinter, ss    4 0   1110
Dalby.  If   4 10   0   0   0
Booth, rf   3 0   0   0   10
Denham, cf   3 0   T 0   0   2
Hamilton, p   3 o   o   0   1   0
McPherson, lb   3 o   l   o   l  o
Piercy, 3h     3 ii   0   0   1    0
Morrow, c   3 10   9   0   0
Totals
30   3   4 21   7   2
Score by Innings
12 3 4 5 6 7
Cumberland 0 110 0 0 0—2
Courtenay 0 3 n 0 0 0 0—3
Summary—Earned runs: Cumberland 1. Courtenay 2; Sacrifice hits:
Wllcock; Left on bases: Cumberland
5, Courtenay 0; Struck out: by Watson 3 in 2V4 Innings, by Lockhart, 7
In 4Vj Innings, by Hamilton 9; Bases
on balls: off Watson 1. I'mplre. Dad
Dixon.
WHEN EDITORS TELL THE
TRUTH
Only a short time ago lhe editor ot
a paper in Indiana grew tired of being culled a liar and announced that
he would tell the truth In tbe future
und his nexl Issue contained the following Items:
"John Benin, the iaziesi merchant
i In town, made a trip to Mecvllle on
.Monday.
"John Coyle. our groceryniun, Is
doing poor business, Ills slore Is
dirty anil ; ilsty. How can he expect io do much?
"Dave Conkey died nt his borne here
Tuesday.      The doctor gave It out lis
heart failure.     Whiskey killed blm,
"Married .Miss Silvia Rhoades and
James Collins lust Saturday ut the
Baptist parsonage, by the Rev. Gordon. The bride Is u very ordinary
girl wiio doesn't know any more about
cooking thun a Jncfcrabbit and never
helped her mother three days In her
life. Kbe is nol a beauty by any
menus und lias a gall like a duck. Thc
groom Is on up-to-date loafer. He
has been living oil the old folks nt
home all bis life antl not worth shucks
Il wlll be a bnrd life.
SPANISH (I mtois omi'l.tl.s
COURTEOUS TO TRAVELLERS
MADRID. Detailed revised regulations have just been ndoptcd by the
Spanish Cuatoms with u view of extending every possible courtesy lo
American and Canadian travelers. Articles of uny kind which are dutiable
will nol be taxed if il Is shown that
they are for personal and domestic
use. PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   JUNE   12,
1925
MOTHER AND DAUGHTER
BANQUET WEDNESDAY
(Continued From Page One)
Solo—"A Perfect Day," by Mr. Alex
Henderson.
Several selections from the C.G.I.T.
Song Sheet were heartily sung by all.
A hearty vote of thanks was proposed
by Miss Kate Robertson to all those
that helped make the affair such an
outstanding success, this was seconded by Miss Beth Hornbury. Miss ]
Edna Gear presided at the piano.
Miss Ward gave a very Interesting
account of her work among women
and girls in China where Bhe has beeu
employed  by  the Missionary Society
COURTENAY RIVER
FREELY DISCUSSED
AT B. of T. MEETING
] COURTENAY, June 9.—The main
topic of the last meeting of the Court-
enay-Comox Board of Trade was that
of Improving the Courtenay River for
transportation. The subject was introduced by a telegram from the Vancouver Transportation Co. This mes
sage claimed that the matter of removing two sandbars was the most
important, work to be done trom a
navigation point of view and lt was
pointed out that the straightening of
the river, which was allowed for in
the estimate for the work was of a
decidedly   secondary   nature.      The
j etupioytju   u.s   mc  i.iioo,u,.u.j    , i aeeiunui*/    new....*.,,    .....	
L=|of the Methodist Church for the^toBtjtendl,„S| however, were not appar
|  Summer Chic
| Is In New Hats
§j ALL AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES ON
jj SATURDAY
5 Soft felt, sheer straw and silk predominate in these
g= new close-fitting models.    Cut low at the back in the
B latest fashion, they roll either at the side, back or off
B the face.     Trimmings arc varied but always simple.
Bs White is used in modeling several very smart styles.
I  J. Sutherland
live years. She will return to China
in September aud take up work with
the students ot the Normal School
under the United Church of Canada.
Miss Ward exhibited some Interesting
views of ber work In West China. Tlie
singing of Auld Lang Syne brought
happily to a close the fourth Mother
..nd Daughter Banquet held by the
C.G.I.T. groups of Grace Methodist
now the United Church of Canada.
POWELL RIVER WILL
HAVE NEW BATTERY
IN SUNDAY'S GAME
The Powell River baseball team,
which plays In Cumberland this coming Sunday, will probably have an entirely different battery from that Cum
berland fans have seen in action in
previous games, as the two Indian
hoys, who have been doing the hurling and receiving, are off to hunt lish
rather than baseball fame. The management of the Cumberland team does
not know, ns yet, who the new players
will be.
Big Bill Boyd has secured his re-
nnd   will
WATER NOTICE
(Diversion and Use)
TAKE NOTICE that Henry John
Bull, whose address is Granite Bay,
B.C., will apply for a license to take
and use one cubic foot per second ot
water out of a creek tributary to
Granite Bay. The water will be diverted at a point about three hundred
feet from the mouth ot the creek and
will be used for domestic and power
purposes upon the land described as
Lot "318" Sayward district. This
notice was posted on the ground on
the 7th day of April 1925. A copy of
this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the Water Act
1914 will be tiled ln the office of the
Water Recorder at Nanaimo. Objections to the application may be filed
with the said Water Recorder or with
the Comptroller of water rights. Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.,
within 30 days after the first appearance of this notice ln the local newspaper. The date of the first publication ot the notice Is May 22nd, 1925.
HENRY JOHN BULL, Applicant.
21-26
FOR SALE—House, containing six
rooms, 1 pantry, and out-houses.
All in good condition. A snap at
$650.00. Apply Mrs. James Potter,
Allan  Ave., Cumberland. 22-24
FOR SALE—Five room house, situate on Maryport Avenue Cumberland, $600 on terms. Apply R.
Strachan, Cumberland. 23-25.
WANTED—To rent piano, by family
with no children. Phone 35 or
write to P. 0. Box 579. 22
BASEBALLERS TO MEET
j A meeting of tlie Cumberland Base-
l ball Club will be held in the Athletic
Club at 7:00 sharp on Sunday i veiling
June 14th. Thc executive und members of the club nre asked to be
present.
enlly mentioned in the estimate. Mr
Heber Cooke explained that the telegram had been referred to the Transposition committee, who had discussed the matter.
Capt. E. Lloyd, who Is very familiar
with the Courtenay River, was of the
opinion that the sandbars would event
ually disappear with the straightening ot the river channel. He had
heard that the dredging contract had
been let, but that the figure was considered less than that tor which the
estimate allowed. There would be
money left over from the amount appropriated, he thought. The Transportation Co. had been advised that
Ihe Board of Trade was taking up the
matter with Mr. J. P. Ford, the district engineer in Vicloria and that a
request had been made to have any
money that might he left from the
appropriation expended in the removal of the sandbars. It was pointed
out to Mr. Ford that several boats had
actually gone aground on these bars
and the work was there urgent.
As no building companys had come
forward with any proposal for building houses In Courtenay'on the loan
system,   ln   spile   of   the   Vancouver
the amount of money involved Is live
thousand dollars and Mayor Duncan
was In the chair and the aldermen
present wore Messrs Cooke, F. Field,
J. W. McKenzie and Theed Pearse.
After the meeting was under way,
the mayor left to preside over a meeting of the directors of the Comox
Creamery, when Alderman J. W. McKenzie took the chair at the council
chambers. The money by-laws that
wlll be submitted to the ratepayers as
a result of this special meeting are:
11500 for the extension of the water
works system to the southern limits
of the city, $2000 for the purchase
and Improvements of the tourist auto
park. $1500 tor purchase and installing ot public scales.
The discussing the proponed purchase of the tourist auto park from
Mr. Eric Duncan, Mr. Alderman Cooke
said it was intended to develop this
site as a children's playground und
Incidentally it could be used as an
auto park In season and on this account he thought It was a matter that
Interested the city. City solicitor
Mitchell  is  to propose    the    by-law
which will authorize the Issue of four
bonds of $500 each at 5VJ, per cent Interest maturing in 10 years, should
the proposed by-law carry. In proposing a by-law to provide public
scales at a cost ot not exceeding $1500
Alderman Field stipulated that the
amount is to bo raised by three 10-
I year   bonds   having  interest   at   6%
! per cent.
I In response to an invitation from
Mayor L. D. Taylor of Vancouver,
Mayor Duncan will be the guest of the
\ Vancouver City to a luncheon at the
terminal city on Saturday next, In
a  letter  to  Mr.  Duncan  Mr.  Taylor
1 said  that  It had been suggested  by
| Mayor  Harrison  of Nanaimo  that a
] meeting be called of the mayors and
reeves of Vuncouver Island and the
I lower mainland in order to revive and
perpetuate the old time spirit of this
province. The luncheon will be held
on the anniversary of tbe discovery
of the present site of Vancouver by
Captain Vuncouver. The council
unanimously agreed that Mayor Duncan was tlie one to represent Courtenay on this occasion.
the  most   formidable  battery  In  the
league.
Fans are asked not to forget Sunday's game. The time Is 2:30 sharp;
the place is the Cumberland Recreation Ground.     Collection at the gate
FOR SALE—House suitable for two
families or for boarding house. For
particulars apply 207 Derwent Ave.,
Cumberland, or write Box 502, Cumberland. 23-tf.
INTRODUCING THE
FLAPPER VAMP OF '49
Pauline Starke does the Introducing In the Paramount production of
"The Devil's Cargo" which opens at
tbe Gaiety Theatre next Wednesday
and Thursday.
It Is the first time .Miss Starke has
attempted a role of this kind. She
: has not become a real dyed-in-the-
! wool screen vampire, however, for
' she is the heroine of the picture, a
dramatic love story of the old gold
days of California.
I The flapper vamps of California In
; the pioneer days differed materially
I from the flapper vamps of the pros-
' ent time according to this story which
I Is a screen version of Charles Whit-
taker's "The River Boat."
■Wallace Beery, in a heavy role,
William Collier, Jr., and Claire Admits are featured wilh Miss Starke in
tiie lending roles of the production.
"Thu Devil's cargo is a melodramatic love thriller—and It's action
from start to finish.
base   from   Courtenay   nnd   will   be, ajBlclu,
een in a Cumberland uniform In fu- j Board '0f'"Trade"having referred the
ture.      His addition gives the team | suggestion to the General Contractors
Association, Mr. Cooke, who was originally responsible for the idea,
thought that the matter should be
followed up and that the Board of
Trade at Seattle and Portland should
be communicated with, with the Idea
of finding someone Interested In this
class of building. President Mr.
Eadle. who was in the chair, thought
that thc monthly meetings should be
dropped for at least tbe summer
months and tbat quarterly meetings
be held instead. This would enable
the Board to transact business
through its council, who would meet
monthly. No definite action was
taken however.
The annual Board of Trade picnic,
which ls usually quite a big affair, is
to be held sometime next month, the
date to be fixed later. The special
committee appointed in this connection is composed of Messrs A. M.
Stark. B. Hughes, F. McPherson. Wm.
Douglas and A. G. Slaughter.
MERCHANTS
Two English Cockney broom vendors met on a London street and
started at once to talk business.
" 'Aug it all." said one, "I don't see
'ow you can sell these 'ere bloomlri'
brooms for a shillin*. I steals the
wire, an' I steals the 'undies an' I
can't sell 'em for a shillin and make
ny money on 'em."
And the other replied: "Why, I
steals 'em ready-made,"
As one of your
daily dozen
shine lip with-
2in|
ShoePolish
keeps you
and
youi'shoes
fit
MONEY BY-LAWS ARE
DRAFTED BY COUNCIL
COURTENAY, June 8.-A special
meeting of he City Council was held
here thlB .*eek for the purpose of
drafting t   ) proposed money by-laws.
Frank Vyvyan and Olive Eltohe us Sir Percy and Lndy lleaucluimp in
the laughing success "SO THIS IS LONDON'' at the Gaiety Theatre,
Courtenay, Monday aud Tuesday.
THE CATHOLIC LADIES OF THE ALTAR SOCIETY
will hold a
I grant, velvety
powder that removes tlic sllfae
so perfectly, and
stays on so lonR-
docsn't easily
blovvot* brush off.
Lovely tints to
match evi-**vcom-
olexion.'
iiiiiil: I
Delicious
Sundaes
every day
of the
Week
at
Lang's
Drug
Store
II Pays to Deal nl  Lang's     Si*; |gj
Sale of Home Cooking
and Candy
ON SATURDAY, JUNE 27
Full Particulars Later.
Mercantile Store Co |
Phone 133 PEAD & OSBORNE,     CUMBERLAND
We
Deliver
Anywhere
I
ma*
GROCERIES
largo,
:t:.c
1-lb.
75c.
(ill!*.
Wll'.
The 30th of May     |§
II     The 20th OF MAY    |
II WAS THE CROWNING OF OUR MAY QUEEN j|
III A\m Ton AY IS THE CROWNING OF OUR 5
AND TODAY IS THE CROWNING OF OUR
ADVERTISING.
We invite our patrons to visit our plant and see where
the goods you place on your table are made.
IN A CLEAN BAKERY
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
tins for  _	
Empress  Greengage  Jam
tins	
Braid's Best Coffee, tin .
Tudor Coffee, per tin 	
Crown Brand Sardines, tin 10c,
Quaker Corn Flukes, 2 for 25c.
Del   Monte   Prull   Sulnd   large,
each   65c*
('larks stewed Ox Tail, large
tin    80c
DRY GOODS
Colored Voiles, reg. 75c. per
yard for     Wc,
Cotton Crepe, new shade 85c.
4 yards for  .•*  95c
Pongee Sllk. 2 qualities, per
yard 89c. and  JBO.
32" Gingham   29c.
Children's  Straw  Hats,  reg.
$1.46 for   wc
Art Silk Hose, 76c. for 59c.
Girls   Khaki   Bloomer   Suits,
reg. $3.50 for  »2.7o
Girls' Gingham Dresses 98c.
Ladles' Housedresses. values
$3.60 for  *I.J,S
Ladies' Cotton Vests .... iM.
Ladies' Crepe Bloomers 79c.
LADIES' SHOE  SPECIAL
Jicw Styles In Satin, Suede
and Pnlent, .teg. WMMM
PKH'E-$U5-PAllt
Clurlts    Boiled   Tongue,    large
tins   20c.
Ilolsuni Pickles, nsst  !.5r.
llruid's Special  Blend Ten, per
lb    We.
Campbell's Tomato Soup .. 15c.
Malkin's Pure Baking Pwd. 15c.
Borden's   St.  Charles   Milk,    s
tins  for   #1.90
('iiukcr  Strawberry   Jinn.   4-lb
tin    SOc.
WE DELIVER
MEN'S WEAR
Athletic Combs   95c.
Men's Suspenders. 75c. 59c.
Bajbrlggan Sblrls and Drawers, per garment ...,  75c.
Negligee Shirts,    reg.    price
$2.50 for $1.95
All Wool Bathing Suits, price
each $2.95 and  $!l.50
Straw Hats $1,00 to ... $2.50
All Wool Sox, per pair 50c.
3 pairs for $1.00
Black Cashmere Sox, 2 pairs
for      95c.
Khaki Shirt Special ... $1.59
Black Cotton Sox 25c & 85c
Khaki Pants .... $l.»5 & $2.50
MEN'S 11I1KSS BOOT
SPECIAL
llluik   nml   Sonic   Brown
REG, *IU0 FOU $1.95 PA1II

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068807/manifest

Comment

Related Items