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The Cumberland Islander Nov 12, 1921

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Array Ffevjfefel
NOV
-'5
sM
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which la consolidated the Cumberland Mews.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 46
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLOMBIA 'SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PJHCE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Alderman Francescini Shot
While Hunting on Sunday
News Was Great Shock to Community—He Was a Very Highly
Respected and Popular Citizen—Coroner's Jury Returned
Verdict That He Was Accidentally Shot in Mistake for Deer
By Norman Whitehouse.
When the news reached Cumberland
on Sunday that Alderman Louis Francescini had met sudden death in the
woods by being shot In mistake for a
deer, It caused a feeling of profound
sorrow throughout tho city. Only a
few hours previous he was among us
alive and well, and It seemed almost
unbelievable that he should be seen
no more alive. For Louis Francesclnl
was liked by all, and was well known
on account of his, many connections.
He was a fireboss in No. 4 Mine of tlie
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
a member of the City Council and
chairman of the Board ot Health; a
member of Cumberland's Mine Rescue
team which gave such a remarkable
exhibition on Labor Day; also of the
No. 4 Mine Underground team, which
has won such notable honors during
the past year. Only last Friday night
he attended the St. John's First Aid
Association annual dance and presentation of prizes, when we was awarded a medallion for third year proficiency.
He was a member of Cumberland
Masonic Lodge, a Past Worthy President of the Fraternal Order of Engles,
and a member of the Italian fraternal
order, Societa Felice Cavallotta.
The deceased leaves to mourn his
loss his widow and seven-year-old son,
a brother, A. Francescini of Cumberland, and many relatives by marriage.
The Fatal Trip.
Early on Sunday morning a party of
hunters, including Messrs. James and
John Halliday, Wm. Beveridge and
Louis Francescini, left town In a motor
car on a hunting trip up the Comox
valley. They reached the swamp in
the vicinity of Camp One of the Comox
Logging & Railway Co., when on
starting hunting they spread out, all
going In the same general direction,
although they soon lost sight of each
other. Francesclnl had only been in
tbe swamp a few minutes wheu a
young man named Norman White-
house, an employee of the logging
company, also entered the swamp
hunting for deer. The latter said he
heard a noise wliieh sounded to him
like that made by a deer, and on looking into a thicket, about 16 yards distant, saw a brown object, about 2Vs
feet high, partly concealed by the
branches. On looking n second time
he saw the object move, and fired.
The bullet entered Francesclnl's chest,
killing him instantly. From the position of the wounds, the deceased must
have been bending down low at the
time, possibly going under the tree
branches.
Whltehouse in his evidence at the
coroner's Inquest said he heard a cry,
and feared the worst. Investigation
only proved hla fears to be correct and
he hastened to the railway and reported to the train crew. Men at once
proceeded .to the spot and found that
Francescini was dead. He was identified by Mr. C. F. Smith of Camp Three.
Whltehouse, In company with his
uncle, Mr. R. J. Good, went to Courtenay and reported the matter to the
Provincial Police, who placed White-
house in custody.
Coroner Dr. Butters and Constable
Russell proceeded to the locality and
later brought the body to Courtenay.
The flrBt intention was to hold the
body there until the Inquest on Tuesday, but at the request of Mayor D. R.
MacDonald that the body be allowed
to   be  brought   to   Cumberland,  the
VERDICT OF THE JURY
"Wc (lie jury empanelled to inquire Into the dentil ut Louis
Francesclnl Hud thut lie was iiccl-
dentally shut by being mistaken
for a deer wilh a M3 Sanige rllle
by .Viriuuii Whltehouse, November (I, (1121, near (amp One, Vancouver island."
coroner caused a jury to be empaneled, after which they viewed tlie body
and adjourned the bearing until Tuesday. The coroner then released tiie
oody and it was brought to Cumberland ou Sunday evening.
The Inquest.
The inquest was resumed at "tlie
olllce of the Provincial Police, Courtenay ou Tuesday morning, before
Coroner Dr. Thos. Butters. The jury
consisted of Messrs. Geo. Pldcock
(foreman), F. Quinn, L. D. Piket, Roy
Winters, E. O. Emde and Geo. Spencer.
Wm. Beveridge was the lirst witness
called, and gave a detailed account of
the trip, and also produced a plan oi
tlic swamp an* locality where tlie accident occurred. Witness said that
after travelling some distance in tlie
swamp lie heard a shot, and thought
that Francescini had shot a deer.
Later he met some men who informed
him tbat a man had been shot, and
the description gven liim was a great
shock, for he knew it was his pal.
The shooting must have occurred
within ten minutes after entering the
swamp.
Witness said the swamp was bushy
In places bul the trees were leafless,
and a man could see about 20 yards
ahead. He said Francesclnl had a
brown slicker on, rubber boots and a
black hat. The morning was misty,
but the light was good In the open.
Francescinis' body was found in a
group of small trees. Witness said he
had been hunting steadily for 8 years
and had seen men with brown coats
who at no time resembled a deer.
Mr. James Halliday and Mr. John
Halliday corroborated the evidence of
their companion.
Mr. C. F. Smith, locomotive engineer
of Camp Three, gave evidence as to
finding the body and seeking for signs
of life. He Identllied the body ns tliat
of Alderman Louis Frencesclni.
Wlilichousc's Evidence.
Norman Whitehouse was sworn in
and gave detailed evidence of his actions on the morning of the occurrence. On reaching the swamp he saw
a deer on edge of the swamp, 30 or 40
yards away. Saw part of bead and
breast; it turned too quickly for him
to get a shot. It looked like a buck
but could see no horns; saw white
patch on neck and presumed it was a
huck as a doe does not have white
patch on neck. It ran Into swamp and
he went down a trail. Later on he
stopped and listened. There was a
thicket of lir and pine irees ahead of
blm, and on other side of this was a
knoll with a few hemlocks ou it. He
heard something as if a deer was lying down aud got up.
San Little Brown Thing.
He squatted down to look through
the thicket nnd saw   a little   brown
thing.   He moved to sec if it was a
deer   and   heard   something   which
(Continued ou Page Five)
Big Funeral Was Evidence
Of Popularity of Slain Miner
Largest Cortege Ever in Cumberland—Many Beautiful
Floral Tributes
I*
I
K.
Iff;*,-
fl-
Tho funeral of the late Alderman
Loula Francesclnl took place" on Wednesday afternoon, when many hundreds of people were present to pay
their respects to a popular citizen.
The mines of the Canadian Collieries
were cloeed dowh for the day. The
deceased was a fireboss In No. 4 Mine
and bIx of hla fellow firebosses acted
as pallbearers, being Messrs. N. Bevis,
W. Williams, R. Reid, J. Bennle, J.
Dando and Sid Horwood.
Mayor D. R. MacDonald and the City
Aldermen attended in a body. The
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
was represented by Mr. Thos. Graham,
General Superintendent, Mr. Charles
Graham, District Superintendent, Mr.
A. Auchlnvole ot Union Bay, and many
other officials.
Deceased was a member of the Cumberland Masonic Lodge, who had
charge of the funeral. This order
headed the procession, followed by a
car laden with many beautiful floral
tributes; the hearse bearing the mortal
remains of the deceased gentleman,
three cars containing the mourning
relatives; following this came members of the Froternal Order of Eagles
and Societa Felice Cavallotta. Upwards of a hundred automobiles were
ln the procession, which proceeded to
the Roman Catholic cemetery, where
the Impressive Masonic burial service
was read by W. M. Thos. Eccleston.
This concluded, the burial services of
the Fraternal Order of Eagles and
Soclta- Felice Cavallotta was read by
the oflicers.    .
Included In the floral offerings were
the following:
Globes«-OflicIals and Firebosses of
No. 4 Mine, aud Mine Rescue Team
and No. 4 Underground First Aid
Team.
Heart—Cumberland Electric Lighting and Water Companies.
Wreaths—The family, Mr. and Mrs.
NeilBon (Nanaimo),. Fraternal Order
of Eagles, Societa di Cavallotta. Mr.
and Mrs. F. Scavarda, Mr. and Mrs. L.
Allara, Mr. and Mis. J. Green, Mr.
and Mrs. A. W. Watson, sir. and Mrs.
J. Taylor, Sir. and Mrs. Berloldl, Mr.
and Mrs. Jas. Walker, No. 4 Surface
Team and St. John's Ambulance Association, Pythian Sisters, Women's
Benefit Association of Maccabees, F.
and E. Pickard, Mumford's Grocery,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Dueca, Mr. and Mrs.
W. Henderson, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. J. D.
Somerville and family, Mr. and Mrs.
V. Marinelll, Mr. and Mrs. Evans.
Square and Compasses—Cumberland
Lodge No. 26, A. F. and A. M.
Crosses—City Council, St. John's
Ambulance Association (Cumberland
Centre), Mine Rescue and Ffi-st Aid
Association, Mr. and Mrs. J. Halliday,
Mr .and Mrs. Wm. Beveridge. Mr. and
Mrs. Jno. Baird, Mr. and Airs. George
Shearer, Mr. and Mrs. F. Smith.
Sprays—Mr. and Mrs. H. Farmer,
Mr. and Mrs. W. Hudson, Mr. nnd Mrs.
A. Ronald, Mr. and Mrs. Enrici, Mrs.
Benson (Nanaimo), Mr. and Mrs. A.
Bogo, Mr. and Mrs. E. Jackson. Mrs.
Babba, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Williams,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Smith, Mrs. H. Wallace (Vancouver), Mr. nnd Mrs. Mc-
Adams, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Brown Jr.,
Mr. and Mrs. Marchetti, Mr. and Mrs.
T. Eccleston, Mr. and Mrs. A. Derbyshire, Mr. and Mrs. L. Frelone, Mr.
and Mrs. H. Reese and family. Mr.
and Mrs. J. Favetta (Nanaimo).
Second Division
Game on Sunday
Nanaimo Davenports Will Play
Cumberland City on Local
Grounds at 2.45
The Cumberland City football team
have the Nanaimo Davenports as their
oppuitcnts on the Recreation Grounds
uu Sunday, in an Upper Island Second
Division League game. A considerable amount ut interest ls being taken
oy local fans in tills game; the visitors
.ne a good team, und were unfortunate
in being defeated lust Sunday by the
crack teuin 'from Ladysmith by the
small score of 1-0.
Tbe CU'"'"-rlaud team will make
strong efforts lo annex another two
points and tiie management of the
club have selected the strongest possible teum tu oppose the Nanaimo
ooys.
The Cumberland City club has secured the services ot Tucker James,
nc being transferred from the Cuni-
uerlund United. His bustling tactics
and shuutiug qualities should greatly
strengthen the front rank.
It Is rumored tllat the Cumberland
team will he without the services oi
Foster in goal owing to Jacky receiving an accident to his hand iu the mine
the other day. However, the management have signed ou H. Jackson as a
substitute.
The game is to start at 2.45, with J.
L. Brown iu charge of the whistle.
Cumberland City team—II. Jackson,
Guugh, A. McWhlrter, Brown, Cour-
tenay, E. Jackson, Slaughter, Gibson,
McWhlrter, James, Scott; reserves,
Kerr, Westwood.
/ 'All players and reserves meet at the
Waverley Hotel dressing room at 2
o'clock.
Armistice Day
Observances
The boys who died on Flanders
Fields were not forgotten on Armistice Day. Two large crosses made
with artilicial poppies and one large
wreath were placed on the arch at
ihe Memorial Hall on Friday morning.
As tlie years go by, when the guns of
the arch enemy were silenced on that
memorable day in November we realize more thu never what those brave
heroes sacrilleed that we might live
in peace and harmony, nnd it is only
right aud proper that as each anniversary comes rouud we bestow a
thought to those who lie lu Flanders'
Field*.
During the day appropriate exercises were carried out at the schools
dealing with Canada's part in the
Great War.
Over 350 popples were sold at the
Public School. The entrance to each
building wns decorated with a wreath
to the memory of the glorious dead.
At 11 o'clock in the morning, ln
keeping with the proclamation of the
Governor-General of Canada, a two-
minute silence was observed in both
the High and Public Schools.
All the poppies allotted to Cumber-
laud were sold out ou Thursday. Efforts were made some time ago to get
another supply but none were available.
"Dinty"
At Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and
Saturday Nights.
The attraction at the Ilo-llo Theatre
Friday nnd Saturday will be "Dinty,'
in which young Wesley Barry makes
his how to tbe picture-loving public in
his lirst actual starring vehicle, directed hy Marshall Neilan, who also wrote
the story himself.
Advance reports state thai the
freckle-faced youngster of "Daddy
Long Legs," "Don't Ever Marry" and
"Go Get It" has Hi this lutest film
made the finest performance of bis
brief but brilliant career.
At any rate, Mr. Neilan has surrounded Wesley Barry witli an ex
cellent cast of players, including sucli
favorites as Colleen Moore, J. Barney
Slierry, Marjorie Daw, Pat O'Malley.
Noah Beery, Tom Gallery, Kate Price,
Tom Wilson aud Newton Hall.
The balance of the cast includes
Waller Chung, a Chinaman, and
Aaron Mitchell, a pickaninny, who
plays the part of Barry's chums in
•Dlnty."
"Dinty" Is the tale of a lighting San
Francisco newsboy, "Dlnty" O'Sulli-
van. It deals with his rise to* the
head of the Newsboys' Trust, and the
prominent part he plays iu running
down a hand of Malay highbinders
who have stolen the assistant-attorney's llaucee. Pathos, humor, romance
and adventure are the four elements
that Marshall Neilan has woven Into
the plot.
Marlon Fairfax, the clever sub-tiller
Dt "Go and Get It" and other screen
successes, prepared the scenario for
"Dinty" from Mr. Nellan's story. Many
of the scenes were photographed In
Sau Francisco's Chinatown and waterfront, and some remarkable effect.--
>;re said to have been obtained.
A two-reel comedy will he shown
«illi tills feature.
Double Feature Programme Monday.
On Monday William Hart will be
'Piesented in "The Whistle" and
Buster Kenton In a special two-retl
i comedy. * „j
First Aid Whist
Drive and Dance
Prizes Presented to Successful
Candidates—Appeals Made
For More Teams
The St. John's First Aid Association
of Cumberland held their annual whist
drive and dance and presentation of
prizes on Friday night last, In the Ilo-
llo Hall, which was very largely at-
lended. The gathering was a hue success in every way, everyone enjoying
heinselves.
The first part of the evening was
devoted to a whist drive, when over
thirty tables were occupied by players. Valuable prizes were given, the
winners being: Ladies, 1st, Mrs. J.
Walker* 2nd, Miss Perclvalj cunsola-
tlon, Mrs. W. Hudson. Gents—1st,
Alex. Walker; 2nd, Dave Kennoy;
;onsolation, Wm. Brown.
Following tlie whist, dancing was
ndulged iu for some time, after which
:here was an interval for presentation
of prizes to the successful candidates,
and also piesentalous to Dr. G. K.
MacNaughton, Dr. E. R. Hicks and Mr.
Frank Bond.
Mr. Bond, president of the association, briefly addressed the gathering,
inking the public for their attendance. He said they were very proud
jf their First Aid men, who had done
jo well in the past, and he felt sure
hey would bring home tlie Dominion
championship. He then culled ou Mr.
Charles Graham to present the prizes.
Appeals for More Men to Take tip
First Aid Work.
Mr. Graham said it gave him a great
(Continued on Pago Five)
$500 Donated To
Britannia Fund
Smoking   Concert   at   Athletic
Hall Last Saturday Was a
Great Success.
The smoking concert held at the
Athletic Hall last Saturday night by
tbe members of the Cumberland Literary aud Athletic Assocation was a big
juccess in every way, the large number ot Canadian Colliery employees
attending having a very enjoyable
time.
Instrumental music was supplied by
Mr, W. A. Owen aud Mr. W. Klnuln-
mont, songs aud recitations by Messrs.
Jubb, Naylor, Boffy, Buchanan, Kenny,
O'Donnell, Robb and a number of
others.
The feature of the evening was a
gymnastic display by Mr. H. Jackson,
illustrating a one-man wrestling
match, dancing on hands, balancing
and juggling. Mr. Jackson is an
athlete of the lirst class and his performance was a great surprise to all.
He has promised a better display for
iext month.
Tote W0U to Brltuuuhi Relief Fund.
During the evening tlie members of
the club voted to subscribe the sum
of $500 to the Britannia Relief Fund
"A NICHT WP BURNS"
Mr. Carrick of Vancouver Will
Deliver an Address—Songs
and Poems on Programme
A "Burns' Night" will be held in the
Memorial Hall on Saturday under
the auspices of the Cumberland Burns
Club. Mr. P. McA. Carrick of Viineou
ver will deliver an address and n few
selected poems. The address will he
highly Interesting and well worth listening to, and all interested hi the
poet and his works should make a
point of being present.
If tills programme Is well received
here, there will be addresses given
periodically during tlie winter nioiilhs
by various well-informed speakers
ind as the success ot the season's
work depends on Saturday's meeting
It Is hoped there will be a good turnout of those interested iii tlic sulijci-t.
Songs of Burns' will complete the
programme and nn enjoyable evening
is assured. Ladles wlll be very welcome.   Admission is free.
Shooting Brought To
Notice of Attorney-General
City Council Asks His Department to Make More Stringent Investigations—Adjourned Meeting on Wednesday Dealt With
Routine Business—Vacant Seat on Council to Remain Until
Next Election.
The adjourned meeting of the City Council was held Wednesday
veiling, Mayor MacDonald in the chair, and Aid. Parnham, Crown,
Pickard, Bannerman, Thomson and City Clerk Mordy in attendance. In discussing the sad occurrence of the death of Alderman
Francescini by being shot in mistake for a supposed deer by a
,*oimg hunter, the council unanimously passed a resolution calling
the attention of the Attorney-General's Department to the sad
jccun-ence and asking that more stringent investigations be made
into such cases. The feeling was general that the coroner's jury
at least might have added a rider censuring the hunter for his
-■arelessness in shooting at an object the true nature of which he
was not sure. The following motion was moved by Aid. brown,
econded by Aid. Thomson and curried unanimously:
"We, the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Cumberland,
resolve that the attention of the Attorney-General's Department be drawn to the matter in connection with the death of
our late colleague, Alderman Louis Francescini, who wa? tn
and killed in the bush near Merville on Sunday, Novembei o,
1921, in mistake for a deer.
"And whereas, owing to the frequency of such occurrences
in this district, we ask that the department make mora
stringent investigation into such cases with a view to lessening such occurrences."
In opening the meeting Mayor MacDonald explained tbe cause of tbe
adjourned meeting. He did not think
t would lie necessary to have an elec-
ion to till the vacancy caused by tlle
iudden deatli of 'Aid. Francescini. He
;aid his chair would be kept at the
able In honor of liim until the next
jlection.
A communication was received from
he Board of Directors of the Cumber-
and General Hospital thanking the
•ouncll for the money voted for the
:ew sterilizer.
A communication from the Women's
Auxiliary of the General Hospital was
read exprestng regret that the auxlul-
ary could not take up tlie proposed
'■ollectlon for the Children's Aid
"locioty of Vancouver. Tho secretary
jf the auxiliary said several members
•vould belli if the council toot the
natter up.
Hills and Accounts.
.»
The  following  bills  and  accounts
were read and referred to the finance
commltte for approval   before   being
paid:
Damonte & Machettl, gravel $ 10.50
lievan Lumber and Shingle Co.,
lumber for soldiers' houses.. 174.42
a. C. Wilson     10.00
Telephone service       7.10
Canadian Collieries, coal     24.90
Hargreaves & Smith, suppplles
for new iiouses    54.80
Sand and lime      2.50
P. P. Harrison, services     20.00
Two-Minute Silence ou Armistice Day-
Aid. Brown drew Ihe attention of
the council to the order-ln-couucll
Wblch has been passed at Ottawa proclaiming Friday, November 11, to be
observed ns Armistice Day, and that tt
two-niiniite silence would be observed
.it II ii.iu.
Major MacDonald   said   lie   would
Aid. Parnham suggested that the
llrehell he tolled 11 times as a notification to Ihe general publlc.
Fourth Street In Disgraceful State.
Aid. Thomson reported that the portion of Fourth Street coming under
provincial jurisdiction was in a disgraceful condition and very dangerous to traffic. It is full of big holes
caused by the earth falling through
the corduroy road beneath. A resolution was passed instructing the city
clerk to write to Euglneer Richardson
and ask that the road be repaired.
Unsanitary Yard.
Mayor MacDonald reported that the
backyard of tho King George Hotel
was in a bad state owing to loads of
manure being dumped there. A mo-
lion was passed that the owner be
requested to clean up the yard within
one week.
Increased Telephone Charges.
Aid. Parnham suggested that Iho
council take up the matter of Increased
telephone charges. He moved a resolution that the city clerk write to the
Board of Railway Commisioners and
ask if tbe charges are legal.
Tarvia Subscriptions Should Be Paid
At Once.
It was reported that only one payment had been made for tbe tarvia
work on Dunsmuir Avenue. Theso
payments should be made nt once.
Five-Ton Roller For Onls.
The mayor said lie had asked Engineer Richardson for the Ionu of tho
big roller but was unable to get it owing to It being in use. However, Cap-
Ulchnrdson had told the mayor that
the cltly could huve the old (lvc-ton
roller if they wanted it.    This is an
cause notices to be placed tn town to horse-drawn rolled nnd would be very
the effect, nsklng business houses and j useful to file city. The only cost
others to observe the 2-minute silence ' would be the hauling to Cumberland,
out of respect to the soldiers who fell about $5. Tbe mutter was left in the
m the war. hands of the mayor.
DRY SQUAD CAUSED
MUCH EXCITEMENT
'.{aided Several Places in Town,
Securing Good Hauls of Evidence—Cases Remanded.
The  "Dry  Squad"   from   Victorin
raid  a  flying  visit  to  the    district
] I'l.'iirsday night nnd caused   n   little
urry of excitement during ihelr brief
lay.   There were eight or ten in tlie
party. Including the provincial police
I irom N'anaimo and other points. They
I were well equipped, being thoughtful
1'iiough Hi bring a lawyer along with
11hem, Mr. Lelghinu of Nanaimo acting
in that capacity,   They nlso brought a
.court stenographer, evidently expecting to get results on their expedition.
I They raided several   places   in town,
securing   evidence    In    halfjil-dozen
places In the way of beer or Whiskey,
or both, aud the owners were either
charged with selling or having lu possession   unlawfully,    They   were  nil
lieileased under heavy ball, some iiiii-
, nl.ng In $2000.   Evidence was secured
in two hotels, a poolroom, harbor shop,
ludiaccoulst   slore.    The   cases  were
called Friday morning before Magls-
| Irate Baird and adjourned until Tlims
I day next, j
Council Adjourns Out Of
Respect for Late Alderman
The regular meeting of tho City Council was hold on Tuesday
evening, arid out of respect to thu memory of the late Alderman
Louis Francescini, no business was transacted. His Worship the
Mayor spoke very feelingly of the great loss the city had sustained
in his untimely death. The meeting adjourned after passing the
following.resolution of condolence to Mrs. Francescini and relatives:
"On behalf of the City of Cumberland, the Mayor and Aldermen
desire to express their profound regret at the untimely death of
Alderman Louis Francescini, and to extend their deepest sympathy
and condolences to his bereaved widow, son and surviving
relatives.."
MASQUERADE BALL AT
BEVAN NEXT SATURDAY
On Saturday. November 10, a nus-
MUeinde ball will he held at the Bevan
liull under auspices of the Bevan
Burns' Club. $loo value In prizes has
lieen allotted to the various classes,
which should bo an inducement for
large entries. Doors open at 7.30 aud
the grand march begins al 10.80, Good
iniisle and refreshments are protnised
und ii general good time. Judges will
be picked fi'olu the spectators.
Tho prize list Is as follows:
Best dresed lady, $r> cash nod $5 ln
value.
Best dressed gent, $5 cash and $5 lu
value.
II-  '     itional lady, $5 value.
Best national Kent. $5 vulue.
I    Best sustained lady, $6 value.
Best sustained gent, box of cigars.
Best comic lady, $2.50 valuo.
Best comic gent, $2.50 value.
Best comic group, $S cash.
Best clown, $3 cash.
Besl hobo, box of cigars.
Best flower girl, $8.50 cash,
Best group representing Allies, $0
value.
Best advertising charaoter, $3 value.
Best Topsy, brooch value $2.50.
Best hard-times character, $3 value.
Best Rod Cross nurse, $1 value.
Beit representative or lievan Burns
Club, $10 cash.
Special  prizes  will  also  08 given.
Only those in costume allowed on
lloor.
Admission is 5n cents for masked
indies and spectators, nnd one dollar
for masked gents. Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 12, Mi.
Mothers and
Grandmothers
WE HAVE JUST THE THING FOR THOSE
TIRED AND TENDER FEET
Slater's Dr. Hammond's Cushion Shole, in the best of
black kid  $10.00
Aunt Mary's Outsize Shoes and Oxfords, in good
black kid, cushion insoles and rubber heels. Priced
from   $0.25 to $8.50
The Albany Shoe, in a new last; these shoes will fit a
very wide loot and look very dressy   $7.75
Fathers and
Grandfathers
WHO HAVE TENDER FEET, CALL IN
AND LET US SHOW YOU OUR
Slater's Dr. Hammond Cushion Shoe $12.00
Murray's Army Last Shoe—We can fit the widest foot
in town with this shoe  $10.50
The older people need not think that they cannot
buy shoes in Cumberland to fit them—we have them!
It has been proven time and time again that "Chums"
for the Children are the cheapest in the long run.
We have in stock now a full line of Slater's Strider—-
without doubt the best good shoe for Men and Women
Cavin's ShoeStore
FOOTWEAR ONLY
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. B. C
"1 don't believe in advertising."
"Well, then, old man, you may know
your own business, but no one else
wlll."
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets aro installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to sec that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
FISH—AND OTHER THINGS
Reing Reflections of a Stroll to
Our Neighboring Village.
By THE WAYFARER.
Having both the time and inclination, the other day I decided to take
walk down to Courtenay, for the
health of my body and mind. However,
I had not proceeded far along tbe
King's Highway leading thereto when
a friend happened along with his auto
and invited the writer to take a ride.
* *   *
The walk—or ride—down the valley
has many charms for he who has eyes
to see. In the distance towards the
Mainland, tlie view is enchanting—o'er
valley, sea and mountain. Along the
highway the foliage lends much charm
to the surroundings. Just now the
beautiful dogwood tree Is a mass ot
colored leaves, from delicate yellow
tints to deep red, and stand out very
bright among the stately fir and cedar
evergreen trees. When ln clusters, as
frequently occurs, the dogwood trees
have a very striking appearance.
* *   *
Looking to the West one gets a
splendid view of the glacier, over
Comox Lake, which just now stands
out vividly In all its glory. The rugged
grandeur of the mountains and cliffs
are Indeed Inspiring to the philosophi
cally minded.
• »   •
There is something charming ahout
the little town of Courtenay—the folkB
seem removed from the hustle and
bustle of the world and take things
more rationally than most towns do.
• •   •
The waters of Courtenay river, now
at high mark owing to the heavy
rains ot late, were rushing seawards,
A short distance up the river, where
it winds around, the air was pierced
with the screeches and screams of
hundreds of seagulls, while the raucous caw-caw of the crow added, variety to the noise.   Investigation showed
that the gulls were having a
gorging themselves on the salmon
which have given their lives in fulfilling the immutable law ot nature, depositing the millions of salmon eggs
on the shoals of the river In order
that the propagation of their species
should continue.
Walking across the bridge of the
lower road one could see hundreds of
salmon—of the humpback variety-
swimming over the shallow waters of
the river bed. Here and there dead
fish could be seen, fish which had
died after spawning. These fish which
had been hatched in this same river,
four or more years ago, and when
sufficiently grown and learned ln the
"rules of the road," had departed to
the "happy fishing grounds," the location of which is unknown to mortal
man; now they return to complete
the cycle. Wonder of wonders, and a
great mystery.
* *   *
The death of these fish at first sight
appears a sad tragedy—but by far the
greater tragedy would be for the lish
never to return at all.
* *   *
In a Held nearby was another phase
of life—50 or 60 lambs feeding on the
succulent grass, evidently in process
of being fattened for slaughter—and
food for mankind.
* ♦   •
Higher up the river was peaceful
quietness, save for the sweet music of
rushing waters, and o'erhead the
swift flight of wild ducks. Truly,
Comox Valley ls a charming place.
A PLEA FOR THE "OPPY
AS A MEMORIAL FLOWER
IL0-1L0  THEATRE
| FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Nov. 11 & 12 |
s5   m
1 The Freckle-Faced Funomenon 1
——starts a Tong war in Chinatown.
 lifts the lid off a real-life romance.
-whoops away with thc swiftest set of
laugh-thrills you ever saw.
"THE GIRL COMES IN BUT YOU  STAY OUT!"
The door slammed suddenly and the girl was spirited away whence white women
never return.
Whirl in the chase with Dinty! But. you'll have to go some to keep up with him!
MARSHALL NEILAN
PRESENTS HIS STORY
"DINTY"
Six  rushing reels of mystery, drama, romance, laughter, and thrill!   Big cast of
favorites headed by WESLEY BARRY.
Extra Attraction—2-Reel Comedy
Children, 25c.
Adults, 50c. 1
MATINEE   SATURDAY   AT   2.30
Children, 15c. Adults, 35c.
| Usual Saturday Night Dance, 9.30 p.m.
j =
H Monday Only-Double Feature Programme Starring
1 Wflliam S. Hart in "THE WHISTLE"
■ and Buster Keaton in a Special Two Reel Comedy
1 USUAL PRICES
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously inclined porsons have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tamper with such
valves, and should thc offending parties bo apprehended tbey will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of tho law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
In Flanders' Fields the poppies
grow between the crosses of those
who on the shell torn fields of France
and Flanders fought and won and
died and now rest in peace among the
ruins of the land tbey helped, at the
sacrifice of their own dear lives, to
save. And amid the profusion of a
waving mass of blood red poppies the
crosses of our sleeping hoys peep
forth to, tell the world that still they
sloop forever wrapped in pence and
eternal rest. And now on tho approaching anniversary of the cessation of hostilities, the cemeteries of
our dead soldiers are thronged by a
reverend crowd eager to give practical demonstration that those who
fought and won and sleep In Flanders
Fields are not forgotten.
On the anniversary of Armistice
Day in 1919 the children of France
gave tlie nucleus of nn idea when they
gathered tlie red poppies which grow
in such numbers In Northern Franco
and Flanders and decorated the
graves of all the fallen heroes In the
graveyards near their homes. They
also wore the poppy as a memorial
flower. The lirst Idea conceived in
childish minds and executed by childish hands has rapidly gained favor In
France and all tbe Allied lands until
now Great Britain, France, Australia,
the United States and other countries
have adopted the poppy as the memorial flower for Armistice Day.
Sentiment in Canada to honor our
fallen soldier boys is even stronger
than those of other lands. Canadians
by the thousand shed their blood over
almost every foot of that land where
now a solid mass of poppy blossoms
blow.
Concentrated efforts are this year
being made to have every true Canadian man, woman and child consider
it a sacred emblem, and to wear this
bright red flower on Armistice Day.
Not only will it show that the heart
of our country is still In sympathy
with the spirit lu which our own sol
diers gave their best for Canada, but
it will help to hold and preserve the
link of affection betwen the two sister
countries—France and our Dominion.
The children of the war devastated
areas of Fiance and Flanders have
been busily engaged ln making silk
replicas of the poppy, and the idea
was conceived that these could be sold
and the proceeds devoted to making
these children more self-sustaining.
The sympathetic support of the Canadian people Is asked for, for three
reasons:
The wearing of the poppy on Armistice Day will provide a fitting way of
expressing public reverence for the
dead; from the sale of poppies it is
hoped to secure funds for the relief of
the needy In Canada; and by the purchase of the poppies the destitute
children of France will receive much
needed assistance.
So watch for the sale of the poppy
and wear one on Armistice Day and
help to keep alive thc memory of
those who brought honor to their
jountry, glory to their flag, aud peace
to the world.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Something Good
To Eat
Look! See Who's
Coming!
Only a few more weeks!
A few suggestions for early
shoppers:
Cut Glass Cream and Sugar $3.00
Cut Glass Marmalade   $2.00
Hand-Painted Bon-Bon   $M5
Cut Glass Bud Vase  $,1.50
Sugar Shell, Community Plate.... $2.00
Child's Set, knife, fork, spoon.... $5.00
Call and make your selections
early. A small deposit will
secure any article you wish.
Louis R. Stevens
Something made of good flour,
of good milk, of good, nourishing compressed yeast, of good
shortening!
A PURE FOOD PRODUCT
A product with a fine, natural
flavor, with a satisfying slice,
with a crisp crust.
What could it be but Bread—
the perfect food.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
GOOD BREAD
is Bread at its Best—insist on it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The bread that builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir  Avenue     •     Cumberland
Jeweler
Optician
Engraver
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • • B. C.
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in thi* Memorial
Hall.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings arc hold on tho second
and fourth Wednesdays of each month,
in the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Ranger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F. Slaughter,
Treasurer.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY  STORE
Good Selection ol Pipes, Cigar and
Cigarette Holders.
Football Results Every j
Saturday Night
James Brown
Cumberland
Liddell's Orchestra
-is —
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Functions
of all kinds. Any number of
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave. ••■■-1-
*■   ...-*. ;
I*
V
November 12, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Three
•
ASTHMA.
USE
] RAZ-MAH
HO Smakiif—Ni Spraying—No Stuff
Juit Swallow a Capsule
RAZ-MAH Im Guaranteed
to restore normal breathing, stop mucus
Catherines In the bronchial tubes, give
** "Jajotf ot quiet sleep; contains no
lit-forming drug. $1.00 at your drug-
tong njghts of quiet sleep; contains no
habit-forming drug. $1.00 at your drug-
fiat'a Trial free at our agencies or write
teapletona,   142 King W.,   Toronto.
Sold by R. E. FROST.
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballer*
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
JAPANESE AGGRESSION
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
An Article in Leslie's Magazine
Gives Wide Publicity to B.
C's Oriental Problem
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  CO  TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome Hotel.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
8RRVICE, MATERIA!
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While IJ Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS, TS
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
No student of current events considers the Japanese asleep, but few
realize the skill and ingenuity they
are showing ln their transition from
Oriental to Occidental Industrial
methods. Many ot the Germans who
fought against Japanese troops at
Tsingtao have been Induced by the
Japanese to settle in that country and
Korea, where their technical skill
makes them valuable aids In the
transition and some half-dozen of
these Oermans are now farming three
thousand acres ot hitherto untitled
land In Korea, where Japanese capitalists have advanced steam ploughs
and other up-to-date machinery, and
the first crop of soya beans ami peanuts has already been harvested. All
profits above 5 per cent, are shared
equally between the farmers and the
Japanese capitalists who liuanced
them.
In this connection a writer In Leslie's Magazine, referring to the Oriental question In Britisli Columbia, says:
"Come ashore with me and wc wil]
talk to the citizens of Britisli Columbia. High and l(fw they tell us that
they have a Japanese problem on
Ihelr hands and that the problem is
serious. Let us condense all the interviews into one tliat shall be as
nearly typical of all as one may be.
For the facts tliat our compound Canadian will give us I am deeply indebted to Mr. Lukiu Johnston, of the
Vancouver Province, and to Mr. J. S.
Cowper, of the Vancouver World.
"Tlie total population of British
Columbia Is 450,000," our informant
begins; "58,420 of these are Orientals.
There are 40,877 Chinese, 2363 natives
of India and 15,180 Japanese."
"We look at each other and smile.
'I should think you would be mure
concerned about tbe Chinese than
the Japanese,' you say. 'I can't for
the life of me see why you consider
15,180 Japanese In your province a
serious problem.
" 'The Chinaman is a good domestic
servant and worker,' our informant
explains. 'Our laboring people object
to him because he lowers wages. But
we have a different case against the
Japanese. They are more aggressive
than the Chinaman. It is only a few
years ago when one could Und a Japanese store only In the small Japanese
section of any city. Now they own
and operate some of the largest and
most expensive shops in tho centres
of our various larger cities. They
enter many lines of commerce and
have practically, monopolized our
fisheries.
"Of the 4566 gill-net licences for
salmon fishing in the season 1919-1920
2272 were issued to Japanese, whereas
British subjects, Including native Indians, took out only 1766 licences.
The herring fisheries of the coast are
now almost entirely in the bauds of
the Japanese and during the war, to
assist this industry, all the Japanese
boats running between British Columbia ports and Japan were compelled
to allot a certain amount ot space to
herring. In this way tbey built up a
large business at a time when British
shipping was busy helping with tbe
war."
You nod vaguely and look puzzled.
You do not understand why there
should be so much fuss about so comparatively few Japanese. Our informant tells us then of the Okanagan
Valley, one of the most beautiful bits
of fruit country in tlie world, and of
how the Japanese have struggled to
get a foothold there. They have not
succeeded to any great extent. There
are a dozen here, fifteen or twenty
there. But our informant shakes ills,
head In expression of misgiving.
"Wherever they get a start tlie
whites move out," he says. "One
moves in today and within ten years
the whole territory's yellow."
He tells us then strange wild stories
of Japanese spies; of high olllcers
working as servants in British Columbia homes; of strong ships ostensibly
blown ashore on the Britisli Columbia coast but actually having been deliberately driven ashore by the Japanese crew. The reason for this Is a
bit vague but you are assured that It
is sinister.
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE  AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland. B. C.
Wood for Sale
Rod and Gun in Canada
/■—- <-
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C
Has a Punch To It
America has always been known as
the land of "hustle." This no doubt
accounts for the report that a newly-
married couple of New York recently
spent their honeymoon in the divorce
court—Punch.
The November issue of Rod and Gun
In Canada will delight tbe sportsmen
of the Dominion with its resplendent
cover painting showing a picture of a
ling-necked duck In natural colors.
The many Interesting stories and
articles in this issue include a splendid ducking story entitled "Twenty-
six grains of ballisttte and one and
one-eighth ounces of number six." A
thrilling account of one of Captain
Joseph Bernard's exploratory trips in
the Arctic regions also appears in tlie
Trapllne November Issue. The usual
departments appear in this issue of
Canada's national monthly for sports
men.
During excavations ln Huntingdon
a skeleton was found buried near an
old Roman pavement. As some an
cient lead-piping work was also found1
in the cavity it is thought that the
skeleton was that of a Roman plumber
who perished of exhaustion while
waiting for his mate.—Punch.
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required. .
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone (Hi
Cu iu berland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Fork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have yon tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef] It is delicious.
What Matters It
if the break in the plate or metal
part looks serious? The delay
will not be costly when our
welders get to work on it. We
will have it back in your hands
within a few hours, all ready to
go ahead with.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED   *
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
TOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES.
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GHNERAL  FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITflNGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
(Mice 2(120 Bridge Slrccl, Victoria., B.C,
Pastor, Please -Elucidate
Jack Miner of Klugsville gave his
famous lecture on Wild Life in the
Methodist Church In Slmcoe on Thursday last—Simcoe Reformer,
Special Trade
Discount
of
10 PER CENT.
ON ALL MERCHANDISE
except Flour, Sugar and Feed
Redeemable on Cut Glass,
Silverware,  Tea Sets and
Fancy Goods
We will continue this Discount
Until Christinas
WE SELL FOR LESS
W. Gordon
Phone 133        Cumberland
TREMENDOUS DEPOSITS
OF IRON ORE LOCATED
Father and Son Accidentally Dis-
overed it in 1914—War Preventing Action Until Now
Confirmation of a recent report that
immense deposits of valuable iron ore
had been discovered on the shores of
Lake Athabasca, has been received
through the medium' ol* a government
report from a geological survey party
which has mude investigations iu tlie
north country. A number of men who
have had considerable experience in
Ihe north have also declared their belief tliat valuable deposits exist. Samples of iron ore have been brought
duwn to Edmonton und experts have
i'ound them to be of good quality. The
geological party visited the scene of
the discovery recently, aud tlie report
forwarded to Ottawa was quite in
keeping wilh the optimism shown
with tlie publication of tlic news of
tlie discovery.
The report is not yet made public
but Ihe contents have become known.
When coming from the north the discoverers brought with them over 200
pounds weight of samples. These are
now being analyzed by J. A. Kelso,
chief of the University of Alberta
laboratory, the results of which will
he announced later.
The discovery is that of a valley on
the north shore of Lake Albnbaska
which holds millions of tons of iron
ore which assays 64.;t6 pure. Careful
measurements having been made, it
would appear that there aro at least
154,000,000 tons of hematite available
in this valley, and it is said that even
this figure may be exceeded when
complete surveys have been made.
While the existence of iron ore in
north has been known to Canadian
geologists for many years, this particular discovery was made accidentally by E. A. Butterlicld and his son
Norman, residents of Edmonton, when
they were forced to land with their
canoe on returning from a prospecting trip further up the lake. This was
in 1914 and they kept their secret until recently on account of being unable to do anything during the war, in
wliieh both men served.
THE FARM JOURNAL SAYS
A bachelor's button is the one he
lost.
Silence is golden, which explains
why there is so little of It.
Some folks are so poor that they
can not so much as raise an umbrella.
The two most loathed bugs In existence are the bedbug and tbe humbug.
It requires some courage these days
to name one's daughter Mary Ann.
Words are sometimes misleading.
For instance, we never speculate with
-spectacles.
The man who wantonly abuses an
animal will undoubtedly get what ls
coming to him somewhere.
Jones had a bill from his doctor for
"visits and medicine." He remitted a
cheque for partial payment, snylnf:
"I enclose your check for medicine; I
will return your visits."
Peter Tumbledown says the easiest
way to dig potatoes is to wait till the
ground freezes up, then blast them out
with dynamite. There is no sorting,
us the explosion blows the small ones
out of sight, and no dirt adheres to
the big ones. Most of Peter's potatoes
are still in the ground, however, as he
can't find any neighbor who is willing
to lend him dynamite to try out thc
scheme.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.
sd
■m'
SAVE BEFORE YOU SPEND
Let your Bank Account be yonr
first concern.
It will more than repay you in
later years.
A Savings Department
at every branch of
#THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
m
JAPAN WANTS BRITISH
COLUMBIA   LUMBER
Will Spend Millions in Province
Which Should Help Stimulate
The Lumber Industry.
VANCOUVER.—Japan is ready tu
and is willing to buy enough lumber
spend millions iu British Columbia,
to keep every mill and camp busy for
many months. The Japanese consul,
Mr. Saito, bas beeu busy on details
with Hon. H. H. Stevens, minister of
trade and commerce. The principal
lumber luterests of Tokio have sent
Mr. Enji Fukukown to Vancouver. He
bas opened headquarters nnd has dispatched representatives to gather up
lumber to make many big shipments.
The Japanese government Is taking a
hand In the movement. Tbls ls regarded as a most important thing
ior the lumber industry here. It will
give work to idle camp und mill men,
and will diffuse millions of dollars
throughout the province.
TO A WEED
Like a soldier, still* and straight,
I see you standing, by my gate,
With your broad-brimmed yellow lint.
-Vnd It seems to me you act
Vs If you wished to have a tight
With all my lovely Ilowers bright,
Daring them to raise their heads
From their little garden beds.
\nd your comrades, I declare,
Actually have marched In tliero
On my lawn and I mourn
The loss of pretty grass;
Surely! It should come to pass
That all of you must die.
Yet methinks thnt I
Shall havo these bard thoughts softened
Hy my Baby Girl, who sees in you
No ugly weed whose death is due,
For to her, you're a gorgeous blossom
—NELLIE KINO
n
Victoria's  Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.  Made from malt and hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.  Try It and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
1 Wheat Is around 90c a 60-pound
bushel. Flour costs $2.25 a -Ill-pound
bag. All we got to say is thut somebody is losing money fast, we don't
think,
1850—Ye Olde Firme—1921
MADAME MELBA!
MADAME TETRAZZINI
These two great artists have purchased HEINTZMAN & CO. Grands; Mine. Melba for her home in
Australia and Mme. Tctrazzini for her castle in
Rome.
HEINTZMAN & CO. PIANOS ARE SOLD ON EASY
TERMS
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager-Box 23.1. Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 12, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
MAJOR BURDE ENTERTAINS THE HOUSE
J. Butterfleld in The Vancouver Province.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12.1921.
CUMBERLAND LOSES A WORTHY CITIZEN
Louis Frnnescini, one of Cumberland's best citizens,
occupies an untimely grave and the city mourns his loss.
Stricken down by tlie gun of a careless hunter, the young
man, for bo was only 31 years of age, has been* cut off
when life seemed at Its fullest. Louis, as he was familiarly
known by all, waB fired with ambition, and strove hard to
excell ln all that he undertook.. He did bis duty as he saw
it, and exemplified the golden rule of doiug unto others
as he would be done by.
In the mine among* his fellow workers, he was every
Inch a man, and nothing was too much trouble for him If
it would assist his fellow workers, or make the way easier
for another.
A year ago, when the Municipal Election was held, at
the request of a number of those interested ln the best
welfare of our city, he was returned an Alderman tor the
year now closing, and during tho time he was In ofllce he
did his share ot work, and did It with a grace and manner
that showed his desire to fulfil the obligation assumed. He
was appointed Chairman of the Board of Health and car
ried out the duties pertaining to that ofllce diligently.
Louis Francesclnl was particularly Interested In First
Aid and Mine Rescue work. Though somewhat handicapped at first by unfamlllarity with the English language,
he entered heart and soul Into the work and studied hard
and long, and had the honor of being a member ot the
famous No. 4 Mine Underground team of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) LUnited which won so many honors
during the past year; he also was a member of the Cumberland Mine Rescue team which swept all before it at
the Labor Day International Competitions.
In First Aid work none were more pleased than he when
his team was announced winner; he and his team-mates,
we understand, were on the eve of examination for the
much-coveted cup representing the Dominion championship, but since the death of their pal the rest ot the team
have not the heart to enter the competition at thla time,
and as a result there will be only one team entering from
Cumberland.
The funeral which took place on Wednesday was one
of the largest, if uot the largest, ever held ln Cumberland,
everyone seemingly attending to pay their last respects to
a worthy citizen.
Cumberland today mourns the loss of a good citizen
aud regrets the tragic manner in which their loss was
given. The deepest sympathy is extended to Mrs. Fran
cescini, her son, and relations.
When the honorable member for Alberni took the floor
to speak to the adjourned debate, tbe whole House settled
back to enjoy itself in the belief that Major Burde was
about to add to the joy of parliament and the gaiety of
nations. He has a ringing voice and a trenchant manner,
a mastery ot phrase and a command ot line sarcasm that
I have seldom seen equalled. After expressing sympathy
with tlie Premier for tlie way bis supporters were harassing him in order to gain concessions for their districts, or
advancement for themselves, he rounded off with the
ligurative assertion: "I even seem to see the shadowgraph
of a feminine clutch fastening Into the hoary beard of that
enerable chieftain"—111 reference to the suggested portfolio of the Hon. Mrs. Smith.
The major is well known to this coast as a newspaper
man. It Is thirty-one years since he came west to British
Columbia, and he has filled almost every possible post on
various newspapers ever since. He travelled north Into
the wild lands of the Yukon and travelled east to Winnipeg at various times. It is thirteen years since he founded
the Port Alberni News, of which he is still the proprietor,
He returned from tlle war In 1918, where he was closely
associated with Col. Lister, member for Kaslo, ln the 102nd
Battalion.
The major Is taking an active Interest ln tho Federal
election, because the main political needs of his district
deal with fisheries questions, aud are ln the hands of the
Ottawa government.
WHERE WOULD BE THE GAIN?
THE CORONER'S JURY VERDICT
The verdict brought In by the Courtenay jury empanelled
to inquire into thc death of Alderman Louis Francescini,
who met instant death when shot at by a careless hunter
on Sunday morning last, while possibly fulfilling the requirements ot the law, has tar from satisfied the public ot
Cumberland. The jury found that "he was accidentally
shot by being mistaken for a deer with a .303 Savage rifle
by Norman Whltehouse." Surely they could easily have
gone a little further and added a rider censuring the young
man for his carelessness.
Whltehouse's own evidence was that he "heard something
that Bounded like a deer . . . .saw a little brown thing."
He looked a second time and then fired.
This year the game regulations say that a hunter shall
not kill a female deer. It has been said that one ot the
main reasons that actuated the making of this regulation
■was the prevention of just such occurrences as this. Had
the hunter obeyed the law, Louis Francescini would now
be alive Instead of lilling an untimely grave and his young
wife and son a widow and orphan, while the city has lost
a citizen It can ill afford. Ot course accidents will happen
at times, in the face of due care, but to our mind this one
could have been avoided.
The Cumberland City Council has done well to bring to
the attention of the Attorney-General's Department the
frequency ot such occurrences and pressing for more
stringent Investigations into cases of this nature, with a
view to lessening their frequency.
FIASCO IN LEGISLATURE
There has been too much wlndjammlng ln the legislature
this session. For almost three weeks there has been little
but publlc charges, refutations, explanations, threatenings,
Innuendoes and all the acompanlments of a rudderless
regime manned hy ministers who are too weak to get down
to business first and guarantee n facing ot the music at
the proper time. *
If Premier Oliver were personally strong enough nnd
had as lieutenants a personnel of like calibre, business
would come first and enquiries later. Beyond a few tabled
reports, Utile has been done during a session which was
called for special business not yet tackled. This luxury of
a special session will cost in the neighborhood of (125,000.
While the public wishes to see any scandals uncovered, it
certainly desires something for its money at a time when
unemployment abounds and promises to get a great deal
worse.
There are many public questions, such as this same
unemployment, which the legislature can appropriately
handle now it Is met. Instead, without any suggestion ot
method, we have little but a series of side Issues which are
absorbing tar too much time.
The moment is far past when business order should be
restored and something definite ln the way of legislation
accomplished.—Kamloops Standard-Sentinel,
"From the national viewpoint, what has Canada to gain
by retiring Right Hon. Arthur Meighen from the post ot
Prime Minister and installing ln his place either Hon. W.
L. Mackenzie King or T. A. Crerar?"
"In Mr. Meighen tlie country has a leader endowed
with acknowledged talents of a high order. He ls ln this
regard admittedly head and shoulders over both ot his
rivals."
"Not a breath of evil suggeselon has ever been put forth
against his integrity"
"The Prime Minister is the champion of trade and fiscal
policy that has built up Canada, and which ls vital to Its
further development."
"Mr. King has no declared fiscal policy. We have nothing to say against his personal character. We view him as
a political leader seeking power."
"This is the time when sane and moderate counsel
should prevail; when the country's business should be ln
the hands of tried and trusty men with honest and pronounced principles. Above all there- is absolute need of a
leader whose virtues and capacity are known to the people.
1'hat man Is Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen."—London Free
Press.
SCHOOL DENTAL CLINICS
Modern educational systems neglect very few points ln
their efforts to develop useful citizens. Not so many
years ago a certain percentage of pupils in public schools
was set down as being Incurably stupid. No one knew
why they were stupid and no effort was made to find out.
Today when a child shows backward symptoms school
officials In the larger cities commence to investigate. Sometimes they find tliat thc pupil has defective eyes. In this
case the remedy is applied and tliat pupil once more takes
a place with other successful students.
In the last few years It has been found that the teeth
have a great deal to do with mental and physical activity
It the teeth are diseased a pupil develops stupidity. To
obviate this condition dental clinics have been established
in schools, where at regular nervals the teeth ot pupils
are examined. Proper care of the teeth Is an essential
to perfect health. School dental clinics form no small
part of the modern educational system.
COMING TO THE REAL SOLUTION
We sometimes are of the opinion that Vvhen some men
get on the public platform they leave their brains at home.
This thought Is prompted by the following utterance of
that great Liberal statesman, Hon. Rodolphe Lemieux:
"I wlll tell you why I am opposed to the Government
Merchant Marine, because Its ships are sinking almost
every week." So you see even the accidents and perils of
the sea are to be charged up against the government.
A parrot can talk all day, but tt doesn't know what It
is talking about. Too many of our curbstone orators and
backroom diplomats are just like that.
A very vignificant thing happened in England recently
when a group of business men—mind you not preachers or
social workers or a religious organization, but plain, practical business men—held a conference to consider the
establishing of a Christian order in industry. A governing
council ot fifty members Was named to promote Its alms.
Some ot tbe business men at the meeting are quoted as
follows:
"Industry must create and develop human fellowship.
Any practices calculated to destroy such fellowship are
Immoral."
"Industry must consider among Its first charges the
provision of an Income sufficient to maintain in reasonable
comfort all who engage In It; provision for healthy conditions, development ot personality, talents, and self-
expression."
Regarding the Christian Order of Industry the Chicago
Evening Post says further:
"These business men came together in the name of their
professed faith in the Ideals of Jesus Christ, to discuss-
not foreign missions, or church extension, or better salaries
for the clergy, or more Sunday Schools, or any of the many
sorts of charity work—but how they might establish a
Christian order in industry. These men believe the Ideals
of Jesus Christ wlll work In commerce and Industry; they
believe the relation of employer and employees can be
governed by His principles; they believe the relation of
industry to the community can be made a Christian relation. They believe more than this—they believe that any
business or Industry which will not stand the test of the
Christ-standard ought not to survive. This thing will
happen In the United States one of these days. We hope
it will happen before the situation grows |s critical and as
dangerous here as It has become In England. But sooner
or later we shall discover as the business men across the
Atlantic are discovering, that It is mere waste of time and
energy to attempt to solve our human problems, social,
political or Industrial, by other methods than those which
are In harmony with God's standards as revealed ln the
teaching and life of His Greatest Interpreter, Jesus Christ."
Corsets
Distinctive Poise
is attained by the -Woman -who wears
d
Corstts
because she has tht assurance of being
perfectly fitted.
There is a Model for every* type of figure—
so have our Saleslady help you select pour \
particular style.
C/C a la Grace Corsets give untold comfort <>
ind wear, tnd an very economically priced.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
WEEK END SPECIALS
Tomato Ketchup, 12-oz. bottles, 5 for $1.00        B. C. Brown Vinegar, bottle 20c
Italian Prunes, in heavy  syrup, 2V2-lb.        Royal Standard Flour, 49's  $2.30
tins 3 for $1.00        Canned Crabapples, 2VVs tins, 3 lor $1.00
Rolled Oats, 6-lb. sacks, each 40c        Cooper's Plum Jams, 4-lb. tins 90c
Seville Orange Marmalade, 4-lb. tins.... 85c
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Rev. W. Leversedge.
24th Sunday after Trinity.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Roman Catholic Church
Rev. Father Beaton.
25tb Sunday after Pentecost.
Mass at 11 a.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
Ber. Jas. Hood.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m,
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
Grace Methodist Church
Ber. 0. B. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
He thought he'd go a-huntlng
And he grabbed himself a gun,
He shot the first thing he saw move,
His hunting now Is done!
Fashion note says women must wear
skirts longer. How much longer—six
months?
Now that Mexico has taken up baseball, we may expect
tho game to be revolutionized.—Brooklyn Eagle.
•Lincoln was right, of course; you can't fool all of the
people all of the time; but you only have to fool a
majority—Columbia (S.C.) Record.
Thos. E. Bate
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
COLLECTIONS
GENERAL AGENCY
Persons having property for sale are
asked to list same with us. Our clients'
Interests will have our best attention.
FOR SALE—Large house on full size
lot   A great bargain at $900; small
cash payment and very easy terms.
This wlll sell quickly.
"Next Dominion Member to be a Local Resident" Is the
big front-page heading In the Port Alberni News, ln relation to Alan W. Neill's nomination for the Comox-Alberni
riding.   Isn't it a case of the tail wagging the dog?
Many men would avoid failure In business if their wives
did not have such extravagant husbands.—Boston Shoe
and Leather Reporter.
The magazine writer who says a dog fills an empty place
In a man's life must have been referring to a hot dog.—
Oreeuville (S.C.) Piedmont.
Insurance at Low Rates
The good sound, non-board English
insurance companies which we represent recognize that the Tates charged
In Cumberland have been far ln excess of what they should be, taking
into  consideration  they splendid   fire
I protection which the 'city has, and
have consequently cut the rates very
materially. In some Instances they
are over a third less than prevailing
rates.
Thos. E. Bate
NOTARY PUBLIC
DINNER WARE
39-Piece Set, White and Gold, English  (gin  PA
ware, good quality   «pA«w.ilv
97-Piece Set, White and Gold, CO 7 K(\
price   «P*£ I .0\J
97-Piece Set, pink decorated, ^9*^ ftft
Blue Willow Pattern, English Ware, with gold lines,
semi-china, in tea sets or separate pieces.
Christmas Goods Now Arriving
We are showing a very large range of
BRASS AND STEEL BEDS, COIL SPRINGS AND
MATTRESSES
CALL AND EXAMINE THESE GOODS
The     .
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
NOTHING TO FEAR
Irate Golfer; "Vou must take your
children away from here—this is no
place for them."
Mother: "Now, don't you worry—
t'tiey can't 'ear anything new—their
fither was a sergeant-major, 'e was!
Customer: That Watch you sold me
the other day does not keep good time.
Jeweler:   It isn't the fault of the
watch.   Haven't you heard people say
Maxwell's Olllee    llunsmulr Avenue tl mt times are very bad Just now?
A boy who worked at a confectioner's shop had been engaged at a small
dinner party. When some dishes of
pastry were placed on the table the
hostess said: " What are these, William?"
"These, ma'am," said the boy, "are
a nickel apiece and them's four for a
quarter."
Peggy:   "Vou are a man after my
own heart."
Freddie:   "Darling!"
Peggy: "Hut you won't get It." I.1
I*
November 12, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
five
The mark of
QUALITY
Selected  Wheat
MANY are the reasons why the housewife feels sure of better bread when
purchasing the sack of flour marked with
the "Circle V." For instance, the wheat
used in milling
—il baizes
up the most
tasty loaf
Royal  Standard Flour
is the very flne3t selected hard wheat procurable on the North American Continent.
No expense, no effort or care is spared in
the selection and buying of the very best
wheat for milling into Royal Standard
Flour.
The uniform superior qualify assures you
of being able to bake better bread—
ALWAYS.   Order a sack eoday.
MADE IN B.C.
VANCOUVER MILLING AND
GRAIN CO., LIMITED
Campbell Ilighet, Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C. Telephone 33
THE
PIKET - ELECTRIC
W(e handle everything in the Electrical line.
EXPERT  HOUSE  WIRING
Don't throw your broken irons away.   Have them
repaired.
WHITE CAP ELECTRIC WASHERS, $135
LEN D7 PIKET
Phone 131R P. 0. Box 21 Courtenay, B. C.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE  RATTLE—
Or rather let us do it.   We know how to make your car behave,
and wlll give you a lot of tree advice ou the subject if you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
FIRST AID WHIST
DRIVE AND DANCE
(Continued from Page One)
deal of pleasure to be there that evening. In the recent competitions the
Cumberland teams had won four out
of thc five main events, which was a
great credit to the city.
The speaker strongly appealed to
the young men to take up FlrBt Aid
work in the classes now being formed.
The men comprising the two teams
had done splendid work, but more men
should take an active Interest ln FlrBt
Aid. Even If the knowledge gained
did not help them it would prove of
great help to their fellow workers
when needed.
The ladies also were appealed to to
take up First Aid work. He reminded
the ladles that teams from down the
Island came here last Labor Day and
took away the prizes unopposed, which
was not a credit to Cumberland.
Mr. Oraham then presented the
prizes to the following:
First Year Certificates—1, Charles
Nash; 2, A. Hyland.
Second Year Certificates—R.  Reid,
H. Boffy, J. Lockhart.
'   Third Year, Medallions—A. J. Taylor,   L.   Francesclnl   and   Jonathan
Taylor.
Special Prizes.
District Superintendent's (Mr. Cuas.
Oraham) special prize, a gent's toilet
set, for best first-year proficiency, was
awarded to Mr. Chas. Nash.
District Superintendent's special prize,
a very handsome bronze statue clock,
for highest general proficiency in third
year work, was presented to Mr. A. J.
Taylor.
Doctors Got a Surprise.
Mr. Oraham then asked Dr. MacNaughton and Dr. Hicks to receive a
BEER-BY-GLASS MOVEMENT GETS SUPPORT
OF CHURCH PASTORS
VICTORIA.—The movement' asking
for an amendment calling for sale of
beer by tbe glass, has started In dead
earliest, according to reports received
;it tlie provincial headquarters. It Is
stated, upon authentic authority, that
tbe demand is spreading all over the
province. Unions, miners, workers,
olllce men, merchants and even pastors, are entering into the call.
P'or the lirst time, probably, in th.
history of tliis province, pastors havo
gone on record In urging sale of
draught beer. In their pulpit utter-
ancea. Reports state that no less than
six ministers took the matter up last
Sunday in Vancouver, while two pastors of Victoria, one in New Westminster and one in North Vancouver, re-
luctanlly took up tlie topic, while deprecating the necessity.
The sentiment expressed was a wish
to see the least quantity of beer or
wine sold, and, stated some of the
pastors, this is possible iu sale of beer
by tlie glass, instead of beer by the
two dozen bottles.
Fernie miners have presented a petition. It is said the miners of Rossland are demanding draught beer.
Several labor unions of Vancouver
and this city have passed draught
beer resolutions. The demand is for
tbe sale of beer by the glass under
sensible, legal conditions, with emphasis on the point that this does not
mean tlie resuming of former conditions.
Vancouver Ministers Busy.
VANCOUVER. — Several Vancouver
pastors have gone on record In suggesting that draught beer would mean
an abatement of the sale of larger
quantities by the two dozen bottles,
but they urge a clause by which the
government shall control the sale of
draught beer, under any arrangement
that wlll not menu the restoration of
former conditions. The local press
is now containing letters from both
angles. Among the ministers who
who have come out in the open urging draught beer are Rev. Dr. J. A.
Cartwright and Rev. Cyril Reginald
West. The latter has recently returned from the United States, where
he was in conference with prohibition
workers. He is a retired churchman
of avowedly prohibition views, but
urges draught beer as "the less of
two evils."
SECOND DIVISION GAME
WON BY CUMBERLAND
The Cumberland City team whitewashed the North Wellington team by
Ive goals to nil In their first game of
the Upper Island Second' Division
league.
The Cumberland boys completely
mystified the Wellington boys with
Ihelr splendid combination and gen-
oral control of the ball. All the goals
were well taken. J. McWhlrter, the
centre forward, scored the first two
r.oals, followed by Jackson, Slaughter
ind (jihsou.
The half-hacks all played well, pluc-
ng well to their forwards. Gough
md McWhlrter were safe defenders,
"■toster had very little to do, but what
.ittle he had, he did it well.
HIGH SCHOOL AND
BEVAN PLAY TO A DRAW
LOSES YANKEE BRIDE
AND ALL HIS MONEY
VANCOUVER. — Wilfred Enrlght,
middle-aged farmer from the prairies,
has invoked the aid of the police of
two cities to seek his buxom bride
whom he says decamped with all his
money, amounting to $600, the day
after their marriage ln Seattle last
week. He says the arrangement was
for her to follow him to Vancouver
after "settling her business affairs."
hut that is tlie last lie has heard of
her. He paid her fare from St.
Joseph, Missouri.
SIAMESE PRINCE WANTS
TO KEEP POSTED ON B. C.
A brother of the King of Slam lately
visited Vancouver with his entourage
and made many friends by his democratic, genial manners. He speaks
English fluently. Word has just been
received from him by city hall officials
aud hotel men, asking to bo posted on
doings In the province. In whimsical
vein the prince says: "If I wake up
some day to find my country turned
Into a republic and myself without a
home, I may have to seek sanctuary
somewhere, so why not your splendid
British Columbia? I have saved up
enough for a ranch there."
slight token 111 recognition of their untiring efforts on behalf of the teams,
lo which the success of the teams was
mainly due. They were each presented with a set of gold cuff links.
Dr. MacNaughton, who was taken
quite by surprise, said he appreciated
vary much the sentiment which
prompted the gift. He also asked for
a much larger Interest in First Aid
work. In the near future classos will
be resumed for the winter months, nnd
the speaker invited every person who
could do so to take advantage of the
opportunity to become acquainted with
t'irBt Aid work. He assured his
hearers that It would be time profitably spent.
Dr. Hicks said it had always been a
great pleasure to help in tlie First Aid
work. To the men who had so successfully carried on the work tbey were
greatly indebted. They had brought
all the glory won during the past
year. He would like to see two or
three more teams formed to carry on
the  work.
Presentation to- President.
On behalf ot No. 4 Mine Surface
team Mr. Graham presented a gold
medal to Mr. Frank Bond for his untiring interest as instructor to the
team. Mr. Bond briefly responded,
saying It was always a pleasure for
him to impart what knowledge lie had
to others.
Refreshments were then served,
after which dancing was kept up until
2 a.m. Mr. J. Lockhart was floor
manager for the dancing, and the
music was supplied by Liddell's Orchestra.
Alice:' "Do the doctors give you
much hope regarding your rich
uncle's illness?"
Bob: "No; tbey say he may ^ive for
many years yet."
Get Double Wear
out of your
OLD RUBBERS AND GUM
BOOTS
Repair thein yourself with
Reliable Rubber Repair Kit
Easy to apply.        Tried and proved.
Price S.i cents postpaid.
Westminster Novelty Company
P.O. Box 1117, New Westminster, B. C.
Tl\e Cumberland High School team
vent to Bevan last Saturday and made
i draw with the junior team of that
.own, neither side being able to score,
t'he game was very evenly contested,
iach team having the advantage in
.urn. Mr. Stewart of the Cumborland
Jnited gave entire satisfaction as
eferee.
Small Bank Accounts
Many people put off opening a Savings Bank Account
until they feel they have a large enough sum to make
it worth while. This is why they never learn the habit
of thrift.
•Open an 'account with us by depositing $1, and add
$1 weekly or monthly until you can increase the
amount of your periodical deposit.
WE WELCOME SMALL ACCOUNTS
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
HIGH SCHOOL TEAM GOES
TO UNION BAY SATURDAY
The High Scliool football team will
ourney to Union Bay on Saturday to
play their return game in the junior
league with the seaside boys. Thc re-
ult of this game will be an important
'actor in tiie league standing. It is
expected that the High Scliool boys
.'ill force the pace and should at the
very least get a draw out of it. This
team is very much improved of late;
iheir team work is good, and the coni-
btnation play of their forwards out-
■ -lasses all other forward ranks In the
'3ague.
If Union Bay learn should win, they
will be well away for the league championship, but tbey will have to step
some to beat tlie school team. However, the result wlll be watched with
Interest.
JUNIOR TEAMS PLAY
STRENUOUS GAME BUT
SCORED NO GOALS
The Cumberland Juniors and Union
Bay Juniors played a scoreless game
last Saturday ln the Cumberland and
District Junior League game. It was
well contested throughout with the
Cumberland Juniors, if anything, having the edge on the clam boys. The
Cumberland forwards missed mauy
opportunities of cinching the game
tor their side.
Through these teams dividing the
points the league standing is all the
more Interesting, as a point only
separates these teams in leading the
league.
sounded like a deer going through the
thicket. He got down agaiu and
looked at the brown object, and it
moved a little—released safety catch
of rifle und fired. Heard a loud cry
and knew it was no deer, so went to
the thicket and saw feet of a man
lying down. Scared him so much that
he would not go in but ran back to
(lie track and told the train men.
Witness said lie was between 20 and
21 years of age and had lived in Vancouver most of his life. Came to Courtenay three years ago and had been
working in tlie logging camps. Never
hunted before coming to Courtenay.
bliot three or four deer last fall. Had
been out a good deal this fall and had
t.liot two bucks, one of wliieh was in
the same swamp. Was about 15 to 20
yards from thicket when he fired.
Questioned as to whether the brown
object resembled a deer, witnesB replied that It looked and sounded like a
deer to him after seeing the deer go
through the swamp. Was using a .303
Savage rifle with soft-nose bullets.
He said his eyesight was all right. Admitted shooting at a moving unknown
object before. Brown object would be
about 2Va feet high. Would be a minute
or so after seeing object before' he
tired.   Has shooting licence.
The jury was 40 minutes in deliberating and brought in the verdict as
stated above.
CUMBERLAND JUNIORS
PLAY BEVAN ON SUNDAY
The Cumberland Juniors travel lo
Bevan on Sunday morning to play the
l.oys of Bevan their return fixture in
the Junior League. Two weeks ago
the- Cumberland boys defeuted their
Bevan rivals by two goals to one, and
if the Juniors can repeat the performance their chances of winning tlie
l-'ague are very rosy.
The displays of the Bevan team bas
been somewhat disappointing of late,
tiley having only gained 1 point in
three games. However, less anxiety
in front of goal may bring better results. The same may be said of the
i'umberlaiid Juniors; though their deduce is sound, their forwards miss
i.olden opportunities in front of goal;
possibly Stewart's absence in thc front
line may be the cause of this; as Matt
is not feeling In the pink. Stewart will
1 e seen In the front rank on Sunday
for the Cumberland Juniors. A good
rnme Is expected and the result will
be watched with interest. The following ls the line-up tor tlie local team:
Boffy, Strachan, Walker, Lockhart.
Mitchell, Farmer, Slevenson, RoUert-
con. Bond, Stewart, Freloni; reserves.
Taylor and Gibson.
The game is scheduled to starUat
12 noon. The train will leave the
Water Tank at 11.30 prompt to carry
(lie team and followers; it will leave
lievan at 2 o'clock. All players and
reserves meet al the Water Tank al
11.15.
Romember   the   little   brown
leads to the little town jug.
^ ^        —Kitsilano Times.
Jug
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
* HOTELS AND CAMPS |
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO I
* . *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
EVENING CLASSES AT
CANADIAN COLLIERIES'
OFFICE, UNION BAY
Many  Young  Men  Taking  Instruction in Mechanical
Engineering.
Evening classes in Mechanical En
gineerlng are being continued In the
'ecture rooms of the Canadian Col
lories (Dunsmuir) Ltd. oilice at Union
lay. Over twenty young men, Including shop apprentices, are taking up
'echnical studies In connection with
hop work and steam engineering.
The classes were organized in 1917
:*.nd are assisted by the Department of
'"ducutiun, Victoria, through the Un-
on Bay School Board. Anyone over
14 years of age and debarred from at-
.-.-tiding day school, can be admitted
-3 pupils. Messrs. Ellis and Graham.
ertifled instructors, are in charge of
he work.
ALDERMAN FRANCESCINI
SHOT WHILE HUNTING
(.Continued Irom Page One)
CHAMPIONS SCORED
EASY WIN ON SUNDAY
The Upper Island Footbal League
game played last Sunday on- the local
grounds between the B. C. champions
and Granby, was nothing more than a
practice game for the locals. The
C ran by team was no match for the
Cumberland boys, who won easily by
four clear goals, and had it uot been
for the brilliant performance of the
\ Isitors' goalie, it might have been 14
goals.
(■lite Benefit Amounted to $124.
The proceeds of the gate were devoted to Mr. Fred Bedding ton, a member of the Granby team, who was unfortunate .enough to lose his home by
fire a few weeks ago. A fair crowd
witnessed the game, and the total proceeds, amounting to $124, were sent to
.Mr. Beddiugton.
News in Brief
During October Ihe Canadian National Railways have loaded an aver-
tge per day of 1100 curs of wheat,
with 1339 cars as tlie highest of any
day's loading. From the beginning of
tlie new crop movement, August 16.
tlie National Railways handled 33,471
ears up to and including October IB,
as against 15,853 handled during the
same period last year.
A wreath of Australian wild flowers
recently arrived in England to be
placed on the Unknown Warrior's
grave in Westminster Abbey. The
wreath was frozen in a solid block of
ice, and when the flowers thawed they
proved to be just as fresh as when
they were gathered, In spite of their
x weeks' journey through the tropics.
Fresh Icebergs—those that have but
newly broken away—have a green or
blue color. Others, often rising two
hundred and fifty feet in height, present the appearance of dazzling white
chalk cliffs of the most fantastic
shapes. What one sees is really only
a small part ot the whole iceberg, the
amount below the surface being some
nine times that of the portion visible
above.
A river of Ink Is formed In Algeria
by the union of two streams, the water
ot one being Impregnated with iron
and the other, which drains a great
swamp, with garlic acid.
The loss of two consecutive nights'
sleep puts a strain on the human body
from which it takes at least lifteeu
days to recover. *
No bird Is more prolific than the
partridge, tlie hen laying from fourteen to eighteen eggs, and usually
hatching them all.
All Illinois fence manufacturing
company, said to be the largest con-
icrn of the kind In the United Slates.
establishing a plant in Canada.
LABOR CONDITIONS
SHOW IMPROVEMENT
VANCOUVER. — Labor conditions
ore apparently bettering here, although the number of unemployed ls
great. The Influx of .workless from
the prairies lias not come up to anticipations, although it ls feared many
are on their way. Tlie municipal
publicity commission Is spending
S'1000 in propaganda in an effort to
keep strangers away. It Is expected
that greatly Improved lumber odlidl-
tious will have a favorable effect upon
Ihe labor held of the whole province.
The Imperial Oil Company will keep
its thirteen oil boring rigs now established in Alberta, operating all winter. Ollicials of tbe company believe
I hat the possibilities of the province
fur oil production will be fully established by the end of another year.
UNION BAY PUBLIC
SCHOOL TEAM WON
THE  FIRST MATCH
Satisfactory demonstrations, made
by experts of Alberta University, have
proved the possibility of making building material out of straw. By means
of a set-tot process, chopped straw Is
mixed with other Ingredients und the
resulting euniposilion is said to be
material capable of withstanding more
severe tests than concrete. With the
large quantities of straw available
rioin Ihe grain crops of the prairie
provinces, this new nuiterial Is expected lo revolutionize the building trade.
On Saturday last tlie Public Scliool
football team played a spirited game
against a team from the Union Bay
school. The game was played in Cumberland anil thc visitors proved the
winners by two goals to one.
The local boys* say this verdict will
be reversed on Saturday when tho
teams play n return matcli at Union
Bay.
The following will be the line-up of
the Cumberland school team for Sat-
titdny's game: Tom Stanaway, Bill
Slant. Arnold Macdonald, Heury Wat-
son, Tom Little. John Strachan, Bill
Mitchell, Edward Bickle. A. Clark, S.
U"vis, J. Lockner.
Novel and yet very reasonable was
M.irjorle's excuse for her baby sister
who had pulled some hooks off the
In hie. "She's so little," said Marjorie,
"her know-better hasn't growetl yet."
IOIII BOVS' (LIB  DONATED
(I1AIHS TO GENERAL IIOSI'lTAI,
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
The committee of tile .lolly Boys'
"lub has utilized the surplus money
'rom last season's dances to the pttr-
hase of a table and three wicker,
chairs for use of the nursing staff of
the General Hospital.
THE value to the public of telephone service is based
oil the reliability, promptness and accuracy of that
service. Quality of service depends on the economic
operation of all telephone activities. From the time
raw material is produced until the furnished equipment is complete, it is a matter of continuous exhaustive tests to get the best. Alter installation, ceaseless
vigilance is maintained to gut the best character of
service. All efforts are directed toward the highest
standard.
British Columbia Telephone Co. THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 12, 1921.
^omen
fCanada
"lath from all the people of Canada an earnest review of the real issue before Canada to-day. I ask
from men and Tinmen a calm, thoughtful consideration of serious public questions; and, so far as I
sun concerned myself, I ask not favors but fairness."—ARTHUR MEIGHEN.
Why U.S. Congressmen
Support Protection
w
OMEN OF CANADA, the coming General Election will be one of the most
momentous in Canadian history, and Arthur Meighen asks YOU to give the issue
fair; unbiassed consideration.
Women and men alike are called upon to decide whether political, industrial and
economic stability is to be replaced by class rule, political and industrial chaos and
possible economic bankruptcy.
The facta are clear, and every Canadian woman will do her own thinking. She wlll
not be misled by others. She will not blindly follow family political precedent, neither
will she be carried away by the false theories or empty "isms" of theorists and extremists. Every woman will arrive at a personal decision by the application of
practical common sense.
The great issue ls the Tariff and here are briefly the facts.
The present Canadian Tariff, so far as it affects the necessaries of life, is a very
moderate One. It Is simply a tariff maintained to keep Canadian factories in Canada,
employing a steadily increasing volume of Canadian labor and developing Canadian
resources.
Meighen stands firm for the continuance of a reasonable tariff. It Is now even more
imperative than In the past. All other important countries are retaining or increasing
their tariffs in order that they may hold their home markets for their own people.
Under Crerar's Free Trade policy Canada would be swamped with foreign goods,
principally from the United States, Canadian industry would be ruined, thousands
of men and women would be out of work with all the hardships to themselves and
their children that must result. The farmer's great home market would be seriously
affected, taxes would be increased, and Canadian working men would have to go to
the United States for employment.
While King's Tariff policy is wobbly It nevertheless tends toward the destruction of
the Tariff and would bring with it practically the same results.
MEIGHEN'3 POLICY EVERYBODY KNOWS.   It is the only    means    whereby
confidence may be maintained and employment given to all classes of the people.
The foregoing is a plain statement of logical conclusions arrived at from the facts.
Think the matter over carefully "without favor but with fairness".
Make your own decision, stand by it unmoved and be sure to exercise your vote.
Canada Needs Your Vote; and—
The National Liberal and Conservative Party
Publicity Committee
Apropos of the present tariff discussion, it will be interesting and informative to call attention to the arguments advanced by United States congressmen in support of the Pordney
Bill. There has recently been a strong
revival of protectionist sentiment
throughout the United States and the
reasons given for this are equally
applicable to Canada. The United
.Slates have adopted a protective tariff
In national self-interest; Exactly the
suae necessity for tariff protection
now exists In Canada.
Following are the views of a number of congressmen on this question:
HON. W. G. GRAHAM, of Illinois:
"I am a protectionist. In what study
1 have given to schedules and tariffs
1 have found tariffs framed along Republican lines to be, in my judgment,
Dost for the interests of the country.
However, I believe my Inherent faith
in the efficacy of a system ot protective tariffs ls based largely on my
reading of the history of my country.
I huve observed that when my country
was conducting its affairs with a protective tariff system, properly protecting the Industries, labor and agriculture of the country, the country pros-
pored, and when it departed from this
course the country then was in distress.
"This ls a protective tariff country.
We thrive best under that system. It
there were nothing else upon which to
base my faith, I would be content with
tlie example of 130 years of national
life."
HON.   |HARRY   McL.   WURZBACH
of Texas:
"1  believe  in  the protective tariff
policy because It is an American policy.   It may be a seliish policy, but it
is a selfish American policy. We stand
•or the proposition that before the foreign producer—and that includes the
lorelgn laborer—cun come into tills
ountry and lake away from us the
,ni«rican market, he must pay for
ant privilege by paying a tax or tariff
•r duty equal to the difference in tlie
ost of production here and the cost
f production bi other countries."
HON. ISAAC BACHARACH of New
.ersey:
"We have endeavored to give to the
country a tariff which will, lirst ot all,
.insure to the country the continuous
employment of our people at wages
.oniuieitsurate with Ihelr labors. To
lo that, It Is necessary for us to give
o the manufacturers of the land that
.egree ot protection which will enable
neui to compete ill our home markets
with the products of Europe and the
Orient produced with labor employed
.it wages that would not suffice iu our
jwn country.
"We cannot guarantee the one without affording the other. Employment
.ind protection must travel hand In
>iund."
HON. EDWIN D. RICKBTTS of
Ohio:
"Our Industries nnd our resources
have shown thc greatest development
Iti the past sixty years nnd during
forty-seven years of thnt time we have
hud a protective tariff law, and with It
prosperity unprecedented.
"For thirteen years of that time we
have had free trade and a tariff for
revenue only, and during these thirteen years tiie people of the United
States have experienced unprecedented hard times.
HON.   CHARLES   E.   FULLER   of
Illinois:
"1 am u protectionist. 1 believe In ->
protecting by adequate duties every
American Industry Hint employs only
American labor and pays the Anterl-
('iin scale of wages. ... I approve and
heartily endorse the protective provisions of this bill. I am more than
pleased that it will give adequate protection to the farmers of the country
on their products."
HON. JOHN. Q. TILSON of Connecticut:
"If such a policy (low tariff) means
anything, It means that an Increasing
proportion of articles formerly produced in this country wlll hereafter
be produced abroad. This means that
a smaller proportion of the products
used and consumed here will be produced here. This means that a smaller
number of working men and working
women wlll be employed here. This
means that less wages will be paid to
those who have work to do. This
means that the buying power of the
country will be correspondingly reduced, the demand for farm and other
food products lessened and all business except that of the Importer of
foreign goods will pay the penalty.
MI am not In favor of the foreigner
making the goods that we heretofore
have made, thereby destroying those
industries ln our country."
MILLION-DOLLAR GRAIN
ELEVATOR ON COAST
VANCOUVER.—A new grain elevator ls to be erected in Vancouver, the
cost of which will run about one
million dollars. Word has been verified that certain Winnipeg interests
are linked with the deal.
Census man (to tramp): "Now, let's
see, what Is your religion?"
Tramp: "Oh, stick me down as a
Roaming Catholic."—Sydney Bulletin.
LOOKlMi FOR TROUBLE
A woman asked Representative
Willis of Ohio to sponsor a bill limiting the cut of ladies' waists and skirts,
and barring transparent stockings.
Sbe would be laying up trouble for
herself and Reprenestative Willis, too.
A NEW RELIGION.
You hear a lot about a prophet being without honor in hla own town.
We are inclined to think that is because he does not know how to utilize
his home paper for advertising purposes.
"I conclude that's a fly," said the
young trout, and he was presently to
learn how wrong it Is to jump at conclusions.
EXTERMINATE RATS
WITH MOTOR FUMES
A Texas man has hit upon a novel
Idea, which is entirely his own, for
exterminating the rats ln his barn
and other buildings. He attaches a
hose to the exhaust pipe ot his machine, places the other end of the hose
In a hole In the wall or floor, and lets
the motor of his engine run with a
heavy mixture of oil. The machine
throws off dense and powerful fumes
which soon kill the rats or drive them
from the building.
No one knows why wives have more
relations than husbands.
HON. NICHOLAS LONGWORTH of
Ohio:
"Americanism means protectionism,
and protectionism is Americanism. It
means that the American producer,
whether by his brain or the sweat of
his brow, shall have at least the same
opportunity to sell his goods ln the
American market as is accorded producers of other nations. It means that
he shall have at least a fair chance of
competition ln the markets ot the
world, for unless he can preserve a
foothold here it ls a mere idle dream
to Imagine that he can secure a foothold elsewhere.
"Retention of the protected market
Is the pre-requlslte to the gaining of a
position of anything like real Influence or power In the markets of the
world. That is protection doctrine
and it is American doctrine."
HON. CALEB K. LAYTON of Delaware:
"I have been for a long lifetime a
ilrni believer in the policy of the projective tariff. It has been, to my mind,
the one fundamental national policy,
it has nol otily developed our great
natural resources, increased our population, augmented our wealth, established our Incomparable Industrialism, but conserves our highest wcl-
iare, safety, and Independence, milking us In effect the mighty continental
nation that we are.
"The protective policy wus wisely
the first national policy to be inaugurated by our fathers—the tariff ot 17811
iieing the first legislative measure
passed by the 'Federal Congress.' Although from the beginning it was
made tbe football of politics and the
excuse for sectionalism, it became the
established policy, and with few intermissions has been practically maintained until sectional lines are broken
to such an extent that the advocates
of this national principle are found
not only north, east and west, but
I south as well.
"There Is no reason to spend any
further time, nor shall I do so, in!
lauding the results of this policy of
protection to American industries, for
it has spoken for Itself throughout the
whole wide world in such tones of
power that there is no land nor any
people who do not boar witness to the
magnificent evolvement It has brought
to us in wealth, ln art, In science, in
industrialism, in every form of national development, beyond that of
any other people in the same space of
time."
HON. EDWIN B. BROOKS of
Illinois:
"I am a protectionist. I have seen
Ihe benefits derived as a nation from
n protective tariff system. 1 huve seen
the desolating results to my country
nf the free trade system and thc tariff
for revenue only.
"I believe in tlie safeguarding of
American interests; I believe In tho
adequate protection of every legitimate business which is vital to the
welfare of the people of the United
States. Such n tariff has been proven
In lie a stimulus to nil lines of Industry In every section of these United
Stales. It has been an incentive to the
best efforts put forth by that man who
is a distinct creation of this great
country, that man whoso efficiency ls
recognized and has never been surpassed—the American business man."
PERCOLATIONS
Taking Exercise.—Vernon's fat men
are having n contest all their own
these days, now that a scales haa
been stationed on the depot platform.
—Vernon News-
is Rooster a Wild Anlntull-In the
Keuora suit of Kibbee vs. Vaughan, In
which plaintiff seeks $5000 damages
for his son's loss of an eye, pecked
out by defendant's rooster, the Issue
resolves itself into whether a rooster
may be classed as a "wild animal."
CASCADE and
U. B. C.
Assessing a Kiss' Worth.—Through
Mme. A'era Ostenski protesting that
she had been forcibly kissed by
wealthy Ebernezcr Whitfield, a Paris
court lias been obliged to assess the
pecuniary worth of a stolen kiss,
which it places at flO cash or thirty
days' hard labor.
BRILLIANTLY clear and sparkling, with a flavor that satisfies,
CASCADE BEER is just what you want. There is no purer beer
made. It is brewed with all the care and experience of a
great plant, the culmination of thirty years' progress in brewing British
Columbia's favorite beer.
Union Brewing Co., Ltd.
Distributors
Nanaimo. - - B. C.
HON. WH1TMELL P. MARTIN of
Louisiana:
"I conceive it to be the duty of
Congress to so legislate that no citizen of a foreign country shall be permitted to offer for sale in this country any competitive article under conditions more favorable than are enjoyed by an American citizen.
"If It be possible to draw the line
of demarkatlon at this time between
'tariff for protection' and 'tariff tor
revenue,' then let us rename this bill
and call It—a 'tariff for prosperity.'
"I believe that we are all agreed
Ihat something is wrong with the economic situation in this country.
"What then Is the remedy? Certainly it cannot be contended that the
remedy lies either in free trade or
the reduction of the tariff. Prosperity
cult never be attained by shutting
down our shops and mills, giving our
labor nothing to do, and by purchasing our supplies and manufactured
articles from other countries, and it
cannot be attained by compelling our
farmers to sell their grain and food
products In competition with the
pauper-paid laborers of distant parts
of the world.
'For the Industries of this country
to compete with Europe and other
foreign countries, we must do one of
two things—either the labor of this
country must be reduced to the low
level ot that ot other countries, or we
must place such duties on competitive
articles coming from other countries,
as will equalize the cost of production.
"As between the two, I cannot hesitate in making a choice. I sympathize
with the poorly paid laborer of Europe
but I tan never consent thut the
American laborer shall be dragged
down to his level.
"The wages ot labor are just like
values and prices. They seek to find
a common level, and without protection, the natural tendency would be
for wages in this country to sink to
the level of the wages of foreign countries.
HON. WILLIAM R. GREEN of Iowa:
"But the Republican Party Is a
party of principle and action. It believes in preserving American markets for Americans and It proposes to
take action accordingly. This bill
merely carries out Its policies.
"A low tariff on the part of this
country would not so much benefit
those nations which owe us, as It
would nations like Germany and
Japan which owe us nothing and from
which we are now experiencing serious competition. In fact, these two
nations are the only ones whose trade
will have any rightful cause ot complaint.
"By this bill we confidently hope
iind expect thut the wheels of Industry
will once more be set in motion, unemployment will bo greatly lessened,
lltut business will be revived, and wc
know that a great sunt will be added
to our revenue, most of which will be
paid by the foreigner."
To Light Campaign Cigars.—Anticipating a stimulated demand for
matches during the ensuing few
months, a mammoth new match factory is to be establishel in Canada.
.More Commercial ('undo.—Oddments
in boys' boots, all one price, 5|-; lace
boots, scliool boots. Will only last a
few hours.—English paper.
Loggers' Litany.—Wanted:' Minister
of the gospel for lumber camp; must
he good card player.—Advt. In Winnipeg Tribune.
Tlle Do-Dade.—The town dads are
busy now. Main street Is being graded
and together with our fine cement sidewalks we're some class.—Algoma Advocate.
HON. FRANK CROWTHER of New
York:
"I am a Republican protectionist 24
hours a day. I will support any measure that ls for the protection ol
American labor and American capital.
I am for America and Americans
first."
Lived In Spite of It.—Mrs. H. H.
Smith lived to 95 and read the Telegram daily.—Toronto Telegram.
Want Something Different.--People
demand something out of the ordinary.
That's why, lu the play at the movies,
and In the books, "They are married
and live happily over afterwards.'
Has Its Kffect.—"Night has a thousand eyes," warbled the poet as he
gazed at the stars. "But moonshine
will dim them all," replied the bootlegger.
HON. SHERMAN E. BURROUGHS
of New Hampshire:
"The American protection tariff doctrine has played a most Important
part In the political history and the
economic development of the United
States.
"Protection has never been held as
a principle, but rather as a great
fiscal policy. It Is a means, a method,
nn Instrumentality, by which, and
largely because of which, America has
been able to achieve to a greater extent than any other nation In tlie
world her economic independence.
"What we are seeking by this legislation Is to see to It beyond all question that the American producer may
maintain American standards of living and American scales ot wages,
and not be put out of business in his
own market by a foreign competitor
whose production costs are far lower
than ours.
"We believe that our duties should
be adequate, and by that we mean
that they should be high enough so
that our manufacturers can fairly
compete with the foreign product."
Incumbrances Welcomed.—Wanted:
(lood general servant with family of
two.—Orlllia Packet.
lfnrkltran Belle Mourns.—Left last
Friday nt the ball ground, Uxbrldge,
a black lady's new parasol.—Advt. in
Uxbrldge Journal.
Never Mind Ih' Flxln's.—We hope
to have the phone in the village as
soon as the boles are dug and the
poles are ready for erection.—Bolton
Enterprise.
Slamming n Friend.—The town has
been quite free of serious crime the
last few days, the absence ot Chief
Friend on his holidays having a beneficial effect.—Osbawa Telegram.
Didn't Want a Ride.—After having
beeu burled under grain and hay for
nine days, Louie Johnski of Hamilton
awakened in a hearse while being
conveyed to tiie hospital, believed to
be dead. He ls now making a good
fight to postpone a second ride in the
grim chariot, m . _ :sewes
l*
November ii, Mi.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
For Quality
and Service
Try
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF THE FINEST
QUALITY  GROCERIES
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN
SEASON
SPECIAL AGENCIES:
GREAT WEST TEA PERRIN'S BISCUITS
CRYSTAL AMITE SOAP
TRAILS CONVERGE TO
CANADA'S NORTHWEST
Dominion Stands Today "On the
Threshold of an Era of Development That Points to the
North," Says Feature Article
In Big American Magazine.
THE  REDUCTION  IN  PRICE
HAS CONSIDERABLY
INCREASED THE SALES
FORD TOURING
CARS
NOW SELL AT
$782.09
IN CUMBERLAND
GET   ONE
Corfield Motors
FORD GARAGE
COURTENAY
JUST ARRIVED AND ON DISPLAY A BIG SHIPMENT OF
Crockery Ware and
Sybil Pattern China
In stock patterns. We cttn supply one piece or a full
Dinner Set. The Sybil pattern is a very captivating
one and is having tremendous sales in the cities.
ALSO A NICE DISPLAY OF
Hand-Painted Nippon Ware
These comprise some beautiful specimens of Japanese
high-class painting, and are very suitable for presents.
Come in and view these goods at your leisure.
Kitchen Chair Special
$2.25
Good strong, solid chairs,
at a special price, each	
We have on display some nice Cut Glass Water Sets,
FURNITURE — RANGES — HEATERS      |
...   i
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. Bate Hardware Co. ^
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland
The possibilities of northwestern
Canada are the theme of a copyrighted feature artiele, written by Hal. G.
Evarts, in a recent issue of the Saturday Evening Post, Philadelphia, "The
million or more square tulles of the
Northwest Territories," said Mr.
Evarts, "is a field of immense possibilities, almost totally utiexploited up
to tlie present time; but Canada stands
today on the threshold of au era of
development that points to the north."
The writer regards the great Norman oil gusher as the opening wedge.
"It is doubtful," he says, "if In all the
spectacular annals of the oil game
there is another page fraught with
quite the same significance as that
which pertains to tills well on the very-
edge ol the Arctic.
Mr. Evarts' article, which is entitled
"End of Steel," abounds, not only with
paragraphs upon the outcropping
natural resources of Canada's wonderful northland, but with vivid bits of
description which present Northern
Canada and Its people as they are today.
Travel On and Off
"The country." says the writer,
nut-rating the trip after leaving Edmonton, "was heavily timbered, and
so liberally dotted with lakes that approximately a third of the landscape
consisted of water. Tlie train advanced with .a series of disconcerting
hitches, a stole of location due primarily to the muskeg underlying the
road bed.
Tlie popular belief that a trip to the
Arctic by way of the Interior waterways is accompanied by hardships and
perils after once leaving the end oi
the railroad is a fallacy, for the hardships are encountered on the branch
roads themselves, and after onee taking the rivers one may travel ln comparative luxury.. This road was built
originally for a logging road and operated in the winter when the muskeg
wus frozen and consequently solid.
The government, as part of Its policy
of developing the north, has taken
over the Alberta and Great Waterways, and the amount of work accomplished In the last two months Is truly
remarkable. If the present rate of
ballasting is continued it is conceivable that in a few more months the
traveler can reach End of Steel in a
single night's ride in a Pullman.
The North Canadian.
"There are certain outstanding
cliarcteristics among those North Canadians. First a quiet sense ot humor,
and Inclination to make a mild jest ot
every hardship and every deprivation.
Just beneath this casual surface Indication there is an undercurrent of
more serious vein, for the country is
landmarked by recollections of good
men overtaken by mishap on many a
dim trail of the north. - Hospitality is
almost a religion among them. They
have an insistent desire to feed the
stranger ou sight in this land where
food is precious. These things were
evident at every Btage of the journey.
By no stretch of the imagination
could a journey over the A. & G. W.
be termed a pleasure jaunt, yet there
are more complaints registered every
hour of the most sumptuously appointed train de luxe than were voiced
throughout the whole three days on
this primitive string of cars crawling
sluggishly across the muskeg.
"Freight was stacked in great heaps
round End of Steei' the lirst evidence
of congestion. Baggage was lashed
on mud sleds to be transported to the
liver. The road had been churned
into a bottomless bog by heavy freighting, and tho horses floundered to their
bodies m the oozing slime. Two sleigh
loads of baggage were so lncrusted
with mud as to render accurate identification impossible. Pedestrlan3
skirted mudholes, wherever feasible.
Vast, piles of freight marked the shore
ut the confluence of the Clearwater
and Christian Rivers. Flat scows
were being loaded out for Fort Mac-
Mu-rray twenty-odd miles down stream
and ,'Jihors waited for passengers and
baggat,**
The ,'tcauiboat MacMurray, a little
paddle-wh'eel. steamer belonging to
lie Hudson"*'" Bay Company, dropped
down the Ai'iabasea River two woekB
before her ui'ual date of departure.
Behind us was Fort MacMurray, the
last link of telegraphic conimuniea
Hon with the outside world; ahead lay
thirty-live hundred miles of lake an 1
river travel before we should return
to It. There was thirty-odd passengers aboard, all headed for the oilfields with the exception of a few
missionaries and traders.
"It Is almost Incredible that these
great waterways, some three thousand
miles of navigable streams used by
the traders for over a hundred years,
have never even been traversed by
surveyors until the present season.
Secretary Finnie had sixty-odd surveyors running the traverse of the
Slave and Mackenzie Rivers. The
parties were given definite territories
to cover so there would be no overlapping of work. Clear down beyond
the Arctic Circle we could pick up
with our glasses the white bull's-eyes
planted by the engineers, and It is
probable that the traverse of these
two streams and the establishing base
lines throughout the entire course
will be accomplished before tho
freeze-up.
"The hundreds of  tons   of  freight
crossing the portage, the erection ot
log buildings for government olllces,
the boat-building operations of those
headed for the oil fields—all had
helped in the transformation of Fort
Smith; from a sleepy post it became
overnight the scene of more activity
than any other point iu the district,
tlie temporary capital of the north.
In November of last year Fort
Smith was a sleepy little post boasting a dozen whites, stores and twenty-
odd native cabins. Today one uiiglit
comb a city of two hundred thousand
mid be unable to pick a representative
body of men whose standing in their
respective professions would rank
with that of tlie men operating out uf
Smith during June of this year. For
a time at least this spot may well be
considered the capital of the Mackenzie District, a territory comprising
more than half a million square miles.
Prospectors Active
"At the present time there are many
parties prospecting for minerals in a
ountry never before scratched by a
pick. Already several gold and silver
laims have been recorded. It is conceivable that a rich strike may be
made at any time and cause a rush of
men to tliat locality. Means of communication are limited und thu length
of time necessary for correspondence
with the outside world ls considerable,
and in view of these (acts the Dominion Government mude a very wise provision in the appointment of Secretary Finnic He ls not vested with
legislative powers, wliieh would authorize his Instituting new laws or
regulations, but he lias full sway in
administrative matters under existing regulations. This grouping of authority under one head eliminates departmental duplications of effort and
consequently unrolling of red tape.
Above all, it means that all government parties operating in the district
may be marshaled (ind concentrated
at any point where the necessity of the
situation demands prompt action.
"Secretary Finnie was given free'
rein to chose his own assistant, either
from civilian sources or from any
governmental department, and he appointed Major McKead, an old organizer and banker of twenty yenrs' experience. Under tbe management of
these two men the difficult recording
situation of the Mackenzie District
was first ironed out. Formerly it had
been necessary for the prospectors
and oil iperators to travel from one
to two thousand miles to record their
claims after staking them. A recorder's ofllce was opened at Fort Smith
and another at Fort Norman, a move
which was most heartily endorsed by
every white resident of the district.
Furthermore, they have Secretary
Fiunie's assurance that recording
offices wlll be established at any other
points advisable as soon as analogous
conditions may ariBe. Thia assurance,
together with tangible proof of' Its
sincerity In the shape of two offices
already established, will undoubtedly
furnish added stimulus lo prospecting of ail sorts throughout a vast territory where the expense and uncertainties of such operations were formerly prohibitive.
EPIDEMIC OF BAD CHEQUES
VANCOUVER.—Merchants and others in the interior cities are urged by
the police to be on their guard
against worthless cheques. Tbe larger
cities of the province report an epidemic of worthless cheques, most being passed by straugers. It is believed they are Americans who are
working a system. An unusually
large number of these drafts have
been passed upon victims here thii
week. Many have been passed at
stores by well dressed and apparently
respectable shoppers. Two women
who passed bad cheques were accompanied by children. One is an elderly
woman of venerable mien. Police
think she Is cleverly "made up" for
the occasion.
Sews Headline: "Summit School
Teachers Are Among Leaders in Val
ley Poultry Contest."—Tacoma Daily
Ledger.  Some chickens, eh?
Christmas
Leather
Goods
Souvenirs of
Cumberland
Pick  Out Your Holiday Gifts
WE WILL  RESERVE
ANYTHING
PERFUMES DIRECT FROM PARIS
STATIONERY OF THE FINEST
BOOKS UP-TO-DATE
CONFECTIONERY  UNEXCELLED
FRENCH IVORY  (KANTELL'S)
FOUNTAIN PENS  (WATERMAN'S)
EVERSHARP PENCILS (in Silver and Gold)
/
—*
10,000 Christmas Cards
to choose from
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
OLD   COUNTRY
Tl
FALL AND CHRISTMAS
A WORD      S AILIN G S FOR ALL MAKE
TO           STEAMSHIP LINES Reservations
THE  WISE    ARE  AVAILABLE —IF EARLY
    YOU   ARE   PLANNING  '
A TRIP TO THE OLD COUNTRY THIS WINTER SEE OR
WRITE
E. VV. BICKLE
Agent
Cumberland, II. 0.
I'lisspnrls Arranged
BOOKINGS
Canadian NaNonal Railway
i
a
Style   -   Quality
Fit
These are the three essentials in a good Suit of
clothes. We can give you these combined with good
workmanship and comfort.
Prices range from $25.00
GIVE US A TRIAL—WE AIM TO PLEASE.
CLEANING, PRESSING, REPAIRING and DYEING
at City Prices
NOTE.—Will Club members please pay at tho store
in future.
J. M. GARDNER
ILO-ILO BLOCK
CUMBERLAND
^==^?
■fei Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 12, 1921.
We are now showing
Whip
m
The Arrow
Form-Fit
Collar
for Fall
THESE HAVE JUST ARRIVED
ALL ARROW COLLARS, 25c EACH
Ladies' New
Velour Coats
Just arrived. We offer a very special line in Velour,
all shades, at our special price $19.50
PLUSHETTE COAT, good quality, lined throughout.
Price   $39.00
EXTRA HEAVY VELOUR COATS, beautifully lined
and strictly tailored; guaranteed to give satisfaction.
Price  ,  $39.00
LADIES' NAVY SERGE SKIRTS, Allwool Serge, well
made and all sizes up to 36 waist. Prices from $6.75
RED MIDDIES FOR GIRLS AND LADIES —Just
what is required for these cold days.... $4.50 and $5.75
Phone
134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Smuiny*:
Heating Stoves
Sunbeam Oak Heaters
Coal burning. A good
solid stove, of pleasing design, nicely nickeled trimmings, shaker grate, cast
fire pot.
No. 13 $19.50
No. 15 $24.00
No. 17 $29.50
Hot Blast
Heaters
No. 140 $30.00
No. 160 $35.00
Franklin Open Grate Heaters
Coal or wood. A very handsome heater; front door slides out
of sight, when heater nssumes appearance of open fireplace; full
nickel plated front.   Two sizes:
No. 12, full nickel  $27.00
No. 14, full nickel  $32.00
Cast Lined Empress Heaters
A handsome heater, well designed; body of heavy planished
steel; top, bottom and front cast Iron, nickel plated ornamentation.   Absolutely tlie llnest airtight heater on the market.
18-inch   $21.00
20-inch   $23.50
24-inch   $29.50
A Full Line of Cheap Air-Tights
and Cast Box Stoves
MANY OTHER STYLES AND SIZES
C. H. TARBELL & SON
Hardware and Sporting
Goods
Phone 30
Cumberland
CUMBERLAND WON THE
BASKETBALL GAME
The Cumberland basketball team
went to Denman Island last Tuesday
and played a return game with the
boys who had beaten them previously.
Tills time tiie Cumberland boys turned
tables on the home team, defeating
them by 24 to IS, in a splendid game,
giving tlie teams one will each. W.
Kerr as guard played a splendid game,
while Joe Dallos was the star of the
local forwards, securing half of Cumberland's baskets.
Mr. Frank Dalby handled the whistle
in a very capable manner.
Following tlie game a very enjoyable dance was held, music for which
was supplied by Colville Graham, A.
Wiuuinghnm aud it. Robertson. Altogether the visitors had a very pleasant
trip.
Tbe final game will be played on
or about Wednesday, 23rd, which will
be followed by a dance, with the Bame
orchestra in attendance.
Basketball will get a big booBt ln
Cumberland when the alterations to
tlie old band hall on tlle hill are completed. It Is expected that about eight
teams will be formed, which should
provide some good competition.
G. W. V. A. MASQUERADE
BALL TONIGHT IN ILO-ILO
Many new costumes have arrived
or have been made locally for use tonight (Friday) at the annual masquerade ball of the Great War Veterans'
Association. Many who never donned
a costume before will be on the floor,
aud the unmasking will have some surprises. Dancing commences at 9 and
the grand march at 11.
Personal Mention
Mrs. Ralph E. Frost will receive on
Thursday, November 17, and on the
third Thursday of each month during
tlie season.
News has been received that Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. Thomson, late of Cumberland and now of New York, are now
the happy parents of a line son, which
was born to them on October 23. Mrs.
Thomson is a daughter of Mrs. D.
Mitchell of Cumberland, and her hus-
iiand Is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomson. Both are natives of Cumberland.
It will be remembered that Mr. Thom-
ion left here last year to enter the employ of Mr. Henry S. Fleming.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir) Limited, left for Nanaimo
and Ladysmith on   Monday   aud   reamed Wednesday.
Mrs. A. MacKinnon returned from
,'nncouver Wednesday evening.
Mr. W. S. Wilson, representing
Lever Bros, of Vancouver, was In
town during the week.
Tender Wanted
Separate Tenders wanted for
Underpinning and Re-Shingling
house on Dunsmuir Avenue.
Tenders close November 18,
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
Apply
'      DUNCAN THOMSON.
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. L. Francesclnl, son and
relatives wish to convey their
sincere thanks for the many expressions of sympathy, also for
tho many floral trlbues, during
their sad bereavement.
IN FLANDERS' FIELDS
In Flanders Fields, the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark ourjplaee; and In the sky
The larks, strll bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we
lie
in Flanders Fileds.
Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you, from failing hands, we tbrow
The torch. Be yours to lift It high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep,   though   poppies
blow
In Flanders Fields.
LT.-COL. JOHN McCRAE.
PEGGY'S PIERROTS PAY
RETURN VISIT TUESDAY
Peggy's Pierrots, who have delighted Cumberland audiences of late, will
pay their last visit this season on
Tuesday next at the Ilo-llo Theatre,
when they will put on a play entitled
"The Devil's Daughter," all the action
of which takes place in a cabaret.
Entrance Class Thanks G.W.V.A.
The Girls' Entrance Class of the
Public School wish to thank the G. W.
V. A. and the Woman's Auxiliary for
the loan of the Memorial Hall on Fri-
last, on the occasion of their social.
POLITICAL MEETING
TONIGHT IN ILO-ILO
Tlie first big guns to be fired locally
In the political campaign will be let
off tonight (Friday) in the Ilo-llo
tonight, when Mr. Alan *W. Neill of
Alberni, who is the Independent candidate, will speak. He will be supported by Major R. J. Burde of Alberni
and Rev. Thos. Menzles, both members of the Provincial Legislature.
The meeting starts at 8 o'clock.
Envy's Artistic Touch
Wanted: Houseworkers, general,
two girls, colored, one green.—Advt.
In New York Times.
Tower of the Press
Owing to lack of space a number of
births and deaths are held over until
next week.—Bridgeport Herald.
In the Morning Particularly
There is very little change In trousers this season.—Clothier and Furnisher.
WANTED
SMALL COOK STOVE WITH OVEN.
Good price given. Address S., Box
418, Post Ofllce, Cumberland.
LOST
BETWEEN NANAIMO AND CUMBER-
land, 1 tire 30x3'/i, tire carrier,
licence number, 18931!, and tail light.
Finder rewarded on returning to
Foo Yuen, Chinatown, Cumberland.
FOR SALE
TEN-ACRE FARM, HAPPY VALLEY,
2 miles from Cumberland; 6 acres
pasture land, 3 acres good timber;
pasture land, 4 acres good timber;
4-room house and barn; ten tons ot
cheap; half cash, balance arranged.
Chlu Youk, Happy Valley, or c|o Box
322, Post Ofllce, Cumberland.     3-48
1900 MOTOR WASHER; ALSO FIRE
Screen.   Apply Mrs. E. W. Bickle.
FRESH VEGETABLES DELIVERED
to your door every Tuesday and
Saturday. Ripe Tomatoes, Potatoes,
Brussels Sprouts, CarrotH, Turnips,
Cabbage, etc. E. C. Eddlngton, Cal-
houud Ranch, Sandwick P.O.      2-44
PIGS AND POULTRY
Mr. W. A. Owen returned from Na-
mimo Wednesday afternoon.
Mr. Geotge O'Brien, former Safety
Engineer of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., returned from California on Friday.
Mrs. David Roy returned from Vancouver Wednesday.
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR PIGS
and Poultry. Kwong Yick, Chinatown, Cumberland. Telephone 5-F.
P.O. Box 282. 13-52 | M
Mrs. J. Quinn and family of Bevan
ipeut the week-end in Nanaimo.
Mrs. H. Brown and Mrs. R. Gibson
of Bevan went to Vancouver over the
,veek end.
Mr. H. Knappett and Mr. W. Woods
notored to Victoria on Saturday, returning Sunday.
Miss Beatrice Bannerman of Bevan
ias her sister from Vancouver visiting
her.
Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy of Vancouver
ipent the week end aud Thanksgiving
vith Mrs. Jeremy's sister, Mrs. Nunns.
Miss C. Dalton spent the week-end
uith her parents ln Vancouver, re-
umlng on Monday.
Mrs. J. Richardson has returned
liter visiting Rev. and Mrs. Comley at
Vletchosln.
Mr. James Pinfold met with a pain-
rui accident to his eye a few days ago
when a piece of coal flew up and hit
the eyeball. It Is expected to be all
■ight In a few days.
Professor W. G. Fearusldes, head of
;he Department of Geology, Sheffield
University, England, was a visitor to
Cumberland during the week. He is
-pending his sabbatical year in the
laudable endeavor of tearing all he
■an of the geology and mineral re
■ources of North America.
Mrs. Sarah Brown, Maryport Ave.,
returned Wednesday after spending a
week In Vancouver and Nanaimo.
Mr. Ferguson, of Vancouver, arrived
Wednesday for a few days' visit
Mr. Thos. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, is ln town on his usual visit of
Inspection of the local mines.
Mr.  H.  Wilson was  ln  town  this
week.
Mr. H. H. Ryall of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, left for Victoria
on Friday.
Mr. F. J. Dalby left for Denman Island on Monday for a few days.
For Complete Satisfaction   Use
Cream of the West Flour
49-H). Sacks
at 	
$2.35
24-lb. Sacks
at 	
$1.25
Green Ribbon Seeded Raisins, 2 pkgs. 45c; 5 for $1.00
Teco Pancake Flour 2 pkgs. 35c
Sunflower Salmon, flats 2 for 25c talis, each 25c
Canned Corn 5 tins for $1.00
Empress Cocoa, 35c lb 3 lbs. for $1.00
B. & B. CHOICE TEA, per lb 50c
OUR SPECIAL BLEND CEYLON TEA, lb. 60c
Quaker Pork and Beans 5 tins for SOc
Libby's Pork and Beans, 20c tin 6 for $1.10
Sultan Pineapple, flats 3 for 50c tails, 4 for 90c
Jelly Powders, all flavors, 2 lor 25c 9 pkgs. $1.00
FOR FLAVOR TRY OUR FRESH GROUND
COFFEE
B. & B. SUPREME, per lb 70c
B. & B. No. 1, per lb 60c
B. & B. No. 2, per lb 50c .
B.C.
APPLES
Buy them By the Box and
Buy them
NOW
IT IS THE ONLY ECONOMICAL WAY
No,
Reasonable Prices
1 GRADE, ALL CHOICE <J»Q 7K   <0*Q QK
PACK, per box tyOi I Of tPO.O-t»
No. 2 GRADE— £9 OR   <j»0 KA
per box tyAttUOy $&*0\J
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
A Vancouver syndicate has taken
up 30 miles of placer gold claims on
Bridge River and will install machinery to work them. From 1848 to 1885
the gravel and sand bars of this creek
Lave up a large amount of gold, and
recent examinations have disclosed
the fact that stores of the precious
metal have been replenished.
During September, 2,255,500 pounds
of fish, valued at $225,500, was landed
al. Prince Rupert.
Of course the eyes may be the windows of the soul, but It is through the
mouth that you learn there is nobody
home.
Have you sold the government any
hootch yet?
An Inch of rain means tliat one hundred and one tons ot water has fallen
on every acre of land in the affected
district.
Ladylike Journalism
Two gentlemen calves featured the
anti-dry parade here Saturday.—New
Orleans Picayune.
ll!llll!llllllll!!=
Announcement!
Another special display of the newest modes in
Women's Winter Apparel will take place next Friday
and Saturday (November 18th and 19th) at John
Sutherland's Store.
A cordial invitation is extended to the women of
Cumberland and vicinity to attend this exhibition,
'where our Miss Mavis will have for sale a diversity of
our most popular modes in:
—pure wool, hand-embroidered Serge Dresses; priced
from $18.00
—dainty Taffeta Dresses from $22.50
—Canton Crepe Dresses from  $35.00
—Winter Coats of duvetyn and velour ,with trimmings
of natural or dyed opossum, weaverine, etc. Priced
from $45.00
Scurrahs Limited
"The Island Home of
Uorrect Fashions for Women"
Victoria, B.C.
nil

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