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The Cumberland Islander Dec 25, 1920

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Array Provincial Library
AND ISLANDER
'M
1
With which Is consolidated tlie Cumberland News.
THIRTY-NINTH YEAB-No. 62.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1920.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Early Closing Bylaw
Passes Final Stages
The fornightly meeting of the City Council Monday night had
considerable routine and special business before it. His Worship
Mayor MacDonald occupied the chair, Aldermen C. J. Parnham,
J. Thomson, J. J. Wier, J. C. Brown, Thos. Bannerman, F. D.
Pickard and City Clerk Mordy being also present.
The Early Closing Bylaw was put through its final stages without amendment, a vote of thanks passed to the Canadian Collieries
for their generosity to the city, the returning officer appointed for
the municipal election, and a monthly sum granted to the Fire
Department during the winter months.
MacDonald Likely To Be
Only Candidate for Mayor
Application to Buy City Lot.
The application of Mr. Harry Armstrong to buy Lot 7, Block F, belonging
to the city, for the sum of $225, was
accepted* by the council.
Bills and Accounts.
The following   bills and   accounts
were reed to the council:
Cumberland Electric Light Co.—
Light, chief of police      6.27
Water        1.25
City, light     77.95
Water 50
Supplies and repairs    25.50
Water Works Co. Ltd., account
rendered       5.80
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., labor on drains       6.30
Islander, advertising       6.04
Supplies    29.75
Labor, repairs, etc    28.25
Salaries-
Chief of Police  110.00
J. Baird    120.00
T.  Mordy     55.00
Mayor, half-year    60.00
- Aldermen, 80 meetings  160.00
Star Livery Stables, hauling      3.50
C. H. Tarbell, Installing toilet... 113.50
Sundries     12.05
A. Thompson, fire pipe     2.50
Tout.
  1834.16
These accounts were referred to the
Finance Committee for approval.
Voters' List Certified.
The Voters' List which waB sent to
Victoria to Mr. C. X. Harrison to be
checked up with the list of registered
owners and certified, ln accordance
with the requirements of the Municipal
Act, was reported as returned ln order.
»10 Month Voted Fire Dept.
On the personal application of Fire
Chief T. E. Banks, the Council voted
the Bum of ten dollars a month for five
months to the Fire Brigade on account
of a good deal of work ln keeping the
fire going in the hall and thus having
the fire engine ready to be started at a
moment's notice. Mr. Banks thought
It was only fair that the Council should
vote this amount to reimburse the men,
who put in considerable time. It this
was not done the engine would be
"cold" and thus might cause considerable delay In starting ln a case of
emergency.
Aid. Wier thought any reasonable
request of the Fire Department should
be acceded to. It would be money well
spent. The engine must be kept fit for
service at any time. He moved that
the sum be paid monthly for 5' months,
December to April.
Aid. Brown, ln seconding the motion,
thought It was a pity the matter had
not been brought in earlier. If Fire
Wardens had been notified of it the
matter would have been attended to.
The motion carried unanimously.
While addressing the council, Mr.
Banks mentioned that the fire hydrant
near the Provincial Police ofllce had
been bumped with the car of the provincial police recently and was badly
bent. He thought the government
should bear the cost of repairs, If any.
Bequest ol II. II. C. If. Not Granted.
The request of the secretary of the
Union of B. C. Municipalities for extended municipal Information was not
The
American Consul
and Mrs. Clinton
At Home
at the American Consulate
on
New Year's Day
from 4 to 6 p.m.
complied with, tho mayor, pointing out
that the government was going ahead
with the problem of municipal taxation, and furthermore thnt In a similar Instance on a previous occasion it
had cost the city between three and
four hundred 'dollars.
Aid. Brown could not see how the
city would gain anything by giving
the information required. Aid. Bannerman urged that the taxation was
altogether too high as it was.
Karly Closing Bylaw..
The Early Closing Bylaw came up
for Us final reading and adoption before going Into force on the first of the
year.
a The mayor said he had been asked
to have a clause Inserted allowing the
stores to remain open until 10 o'clock
on the Saturday preceding a Monday
holiday.
Aid. Parnham thought that if the
storekeepers wanted a change at this
stage they should have sent in a petition. He could not see what beneiii
would be derived from it. There
would only be a couple of Monday
holidays in the course of the year, anyway.'
Aid. Brown said he had been approached by one or two storekeepers
wanting this provision made. He
moved an amendment to that effect.
Aid. Bannerman thought If the merchants wanted a change they should
have petitioned the council in the regular way. Without a petition he was in
favor of the bylaw as It, stood.
Aid. Wier was of a similar opinion.
If the change was worth having they
should have come after it ln the regular way.
There was no seconder to Aid.
Brown's amendment and on motion of
Aid. Parnham the bylaw was adopted
as read and wlll come Into fqree on
January 1. The bylaw ls printed ln
another column of this issue.
The mayor remarked that if the bylaw did not prove satisfactory it could
be easily amended as occasion arose.
Clerk Appointed Returning Officer.
City Clerk Mordy was appointed Returning Officer for the municipal elections to be held on January 13. The
City Hall was appointed as the place
of receiving nominations and election.
Trouble With Sewers.
Aid. Wier reported that a householder had complained about one of
the sewers giving trouble, being apparently partially blocked up. It was
said to be a menace to health.
Aid. Pickard asked that the Board
of Works attend to repairs of some of
the Btreets which were In bad condi-
tion.     #
Typewriter for City Hull.
The City Clerk in urging the need of
a typewriter said the work of the city
hall was suffering because of the lack
of one. After a god deal of discussion
the Mayor and City Clerk were empowered to procure a typewriter tor
the city.
Mayor MacDonald reported that he
had received a telephone request for
the city to grant a sum of money towards the Christmas fund tor the
children at Merville, but this was outside the council's jurisdiction. He and
thw aldermen were (fulte willing to
assist in any way possible otherwise.
The City Clerk reported that he had
received a cheque from the Canadian
Collieries tor (326, being one-third ot
the cost of the new hose.
Aid. Thomson proposed that the City
Council authorize the City Clerk to
write a letter of thanks to the Canadian Collieries for their generosity to
the people of Cumberland, mentioning
particularly their donation towards
the fire hose, tbe supply of gravel, and
many other ways ln which Mr. Oraham
had assisted the city. The Collieries
had been very good to the people of
Cumberland, said Aid. Thomson.
Aid. Bannerman, in seconding the
motion, also mentioned the use of the
stables allowed by the Collieries for
the city team.
The motion carried unanimously.
MAYOR D. It. MACDONALD, WHO SEEKS RE-ELECTION
At -the request of many citizens of the city, Mayor D. R. MacDonald has consented to seek re-election as chief magistrate for
the ensuing year.
There have been several names mentioned as possible candidates,
notably those of Aid. C. J. Parnham, Aid, John Thomson, Aid. J.
C. Brown and Mr. Thos. E. Bate, but for various reasons these
gentlemen do not conk'tni'laU' running*, leaving the field, as far as
we are aware, open to Mayor MacDonald.
Nominations for the offices of Mayor, Aldermen, SchqoLTruitee,
and Police Commissioners will clone on January 10, and the election, if necessary, will take place on Thursday, January 13.
The present council has one more meeting before concluding its
labors, that on Monday, January :>. ,
Early Closing Bylaw, 1920, No. 55
The Municipal Council of the Corporation of tho City of Cumberland
enacts as follows:
1. That from and after the 1st day
of January, A.D. li)2t, all classes of
shops within thc Municipality of Cumberland shall he closed and remain
closed continuously nfter or for the
hour hereinafter mentioned, that, is to
say:
(a) On any statutory legal holiday
for the whole of the day.
(c) On each half-holiday in eacli
and every week, made such hy any bylaw heretofore passed by the said
Municipal Council or otherwise made
and constituted a half-holiday hy any
Act of the Province of British Columbia or by virtue of any act or proceeding had or taken pursuant to any such
Act.
(d) On every other day of the week,
except Saturday, all classes of shops
within the said Municipality shall be
closed and remain closed at and continuously after li p.m. of the clink in
the evening thereof until S a.m. of the
clock of thc morning of tlie next following day which is not a statutory
legal holiday.
(e) On Saturdays all classes of
shops   within   the  said   Municipality
shall be closed and remain closed at
and continuously after eight of tlie
clock in the evening theresf until 8
a.m. of the clock of the morning of the
day next following which is not a
statutory legal holiday.
2. In construing this bylaw the
word "shop" or "shops" and the word
"closed" shall have the meaning respectively assigned (hereto by the
"Shops Regulation Act" and amendments thereto, of the Province of British Columbia.
'i. Tlie provisions' of this bylaw
contained respecting the dosing of
shops shall be subject to the reservations, limitations, provisos and conditions expressed ami contained in and
hy Sections 12, 13, 11 and IS of tbe
said "Shops Regulation Act" and all
amendments thereto,
■'. Any person contravening or violating any of the provisions of this bylaw shall be liable to a line or pcnalty
noi exceeding "ii" hundred dollars and
cost;, which fine or penalty and costs
shall bu recoverable and enforceable
upon summary conviction in flic manner provided by the "Summary Convictions Act."
f». This Inlaw may lor all purposes
he cited as the "Early Closing Bylaw,
1020, No. 55."
G. W. V. A. MEETING
ON TUESDAY EVENING
All members of the local branch of
the G. W .V. A. am requested to attend the regular meeting on December
»28th.    Business of importance.
Thu value ot Canada's fish production In lOlUJ was $56,486,570, of which
$40,478,580 waa ihe producl of British
Columbia and Nova Scotia. British
Columbia's canned salmon pack represented $13,842,140.
Special Christmas Features
FRIDAY NIGHT, DECEMBER24 (CHRISTMAS EVE)
Wm. Farnum, Wings of the Morning
SATURDAY—CHRISTMAS DAY
Pauline Frederick in Madame X
One of the Costliest Pictures Ever Shown Here.
Special Holiday Dances
FRIDAY (Christmas Eve) antl CHRISTMAS NIGHT
Monte's Five-Piece Orchestra.
Luxury Tax Now
Thing of The Past
Chief Reason for Dropping Tax
Is Unemployment in Large
Centres in the East.
The luxury tax imposed last session
is abolished and has ceased to operate,
except in certain instances. The abolition applies to all luxury tuxes
adopted ia the last budget except those
on spirituous and alcoholic liquors,
medicinal wines, patented and proprietory preparations containing alcohol,
lime and fruit juices, spirits and strong
.valet's, perfumery and toilet preparations, playing cards and confectionery.
VII luxury taxes, except those men-
lotted, are abolished, whether paid by
merchants, manufacturers or importers.
The sales tax remains lu force aud
•I'fect.
Itcason for Step.
The predominating reason for the
tep taken by the government, it is initiated, was tbe great unemployment
In tho industries, directly and Indirectly affected by thc luxury taxes.
The evidence on this point, it is stated,
had disclosed a very serious state of
tffalrs, Many important Industrie*!
-ire completely shut down, while others
have laid off large .numbers of employees due to lack of orders, a condition brought about largely by the
Idea generally held by the public that
this method of taxation was intended
to be of a temporary character and
must, sooner or later, be ahdlisbed.
With this idea,in mind, the public
bad practically stopped buying, with
the result that factories iu many
pecial lines could not operate and
their organizations were seriously dislocated. It appeared to the government, therefore, that Immediate action was necessary In the interest of
employees, manufacturers and the general public.
MRS. McLELLAN DIED
THURSDAY MORNING
The sympathy of the entire community will go out to Mr. W, H. Mc-
Lcllun in tbe sad bereavement he has
uttered in the loss of his young wife,
who died Thursday morning, leaving a
child two months old.
Mrs. McLellan, who was only 20
years of age, was the daughter of Mrs.
M. Mitchell of Cumberland.
The funeral takes place Friday afternoon at 2.30 from the Undertaking
Parlors of T. E. Banks.
POLICE COURT NEWS.
Before Magistrate John llnlrri.
Mah Doe, a resident of Chinatown,
who was arrested by Constables Dawlcy aud Sheppard, some time ago on a
charge of selling liquor, came up for
adjourned hearing Thursday evening,
when the case was dismissed.
Wm. Nicholas and Wesley Bowman
were charged with creating a disturbance al Union Bay aud were each lined
(50 and costs.
John Cole, charged with theft of an
overcoat from tbe Union Hotel, was let
go on suspended sentence aud ordered
to leave town immedlatly.
W. Bowman was find $15 for assaulting a Chinaman.
(IIIKOl'RACTOR SERVES
HIS TIME RATHER THAN
PAY FINE TO MEDICOS
VANCOUVER.—Elmo Marshall, who
was lined SI"11, with the option of one
months' imprisonment, on a charge of
practising medicine, declured his lu-
leutlou of serving the sentence rather
than paying tbe Hue. The case Is the
result of the activities of the Medical
Association against several chiropractors. The association gets the fines
lu such eases.
W. Coates and Dr. H. B. Kidd, who
were also convicted ou similar
charges, paid their tines, while the
cases or Drs. Sturdy and Downle were
adjourned until December 27.
The matter of these prosecutions
has been taken up with thc Ministerial
Association, and it Is understood that
a special meeting of this body will be
held to discuss the situation. Recommendations have also been sent to the
attorney-general by the chiropractors.
$884 Collected
For Red Cross
Splendid Response to the Local
Appeal for the Empire Re-
' lief Fund for Europe
The very gratifying sum of $884
was tin) response of tlie people of Cumberland and district to Hie appeal made
for the Empire Relief Fund recently,
towards bringing help to the millions
of starving and Buffering people in
E}urop%. The Chinese and Japanese
contributed no less than 52N7.1U of the
amount.
The report of the chairman and secretary-treasurer of thc local committee
is as follows:
'The appeal made in Cumberland
ou behalf of Ihe British Empire War
Relief Fund, wblch Is being used to
meet tlie appalling distress and disease
in the war-Stricken areas of Europe,
has met witli a most gratifying response. From Uie time of the public
meeting the people of Cumberland
have either as canvassers or as those
who were being canvassed shown their
sympathy and generosity iu a splendid way, with tbe result that eight
hundred and fifty dollars has been sent
to the Red Cross Headquarters in
Vancouver as a part of Cumberland's
contribution to this worthy cause, and
a balance of thirty-four dollars remains in the local bank, in order that
any further contributions may be received and sent to tbe same fund.
"The* committee in charge of the
canvass desire to express their thanks
to the citizens of Cumberland for their
generosity, and to the canvassers for
their ellorts, in this connection. In
this connection special mention should
be-made of the generous way iu which
tbe Chinese and Japanese i sldents of
the city and district responded to tbe
appeal, and to Mr. Column, Mr. Ucbi-
yama, Mr. Iwasa and Mr. Okuda and
tbe Chinese Free Masons for their
able assistance.
"The sums collected from tlie Chinese
and Japanese were:
Chinese  $ 80.40
Chinese Mission    27.70
Chinese Freo Masons   100.00
No. 1 Japanese    40.50
Royston Lumber Co    28.50
"Signed—
"D. R. MACDONALD,
"Chairman.
"W. liBYBHSBDGE,
"Secretary-Treasurer."
McKinnon Leaves
Y.M.C.A. Service
Cumberland's Quota to District
Fund Reduced to $195.93
In Consequence.
Mr. J. C. Brown, who is a delegate to
the Y. M. C. A. district meetings at
Nanaimo, but whu was unable to attend tbe meeting held recently, has received the following letter from Mr.
John W- Coburn, president of the
Y.M.C.A. Town and County Work. It
will be noted that Mr. McKinnon, is
leaving the jurisdiction of (be Nanaimo distriet on January 31, consequently Cumberland's Quota to the Y.
M. C. A. budget to March Hist next
has been reduced. The letter, wliieh
is self-explanatory, follows:
"Nanaimo, B.C., Dec. 20, 1920.
"Capt. J. C Brown,
"Cumberland, B, G.
"Dear Sir—With reference to the V.
M. C. A., I might slate thai the County
Committee met alld decided to tor-,
initiate the services of Mr. Mclvlnnm.
on December lilsl next.
The question was rained, however,
lu the meeting, aa to vhethr Mr. McKinnon   was  entitled   lo  a  month's
notice, and tbe feeling of the meeting
was tbat be should he paid another
month's salary.
"The total deficit, therefore, including the expenses to date, is $670.51,
and including the extra month's salary
makes $854,
Cumberland's proportion of this deficit is $105.08.
I sincerely hope that you will
make an effort to raise this at an early
a date as possible, iu order thnt the
committee can clean up all liabilities
and close out with a clean sheet."
On Sunday evening In St. George's,
Presbyterian Church a special Christmas message and appropriate anthem
will be given hy the pastor and choir.
Everybody welcome.
BIRTH
JACKSON—On December 18, at the
Cumberland General Hospital, to Mr
and .Mrs. E. Jackson, a son.
CANTATA ON WEDNESDAY
On Wednesday evening, December
29, there will he rendered In St.
George's Presbyterian Church, by the
Sunday School, a splendid cantata, entitled, "Was It a Dream?" An enjoyable time will be spent by all wbo attend, and everyone is invited. An
offering will he taken during the evening. fwd
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
December 26,1920.
TO all My Many Patrons and
1 Friends I Extend my Cordial
Wishes for a	
Merry Christmas
— AND —
Happy and Prosperous
New Year
T. E. BATE
P. O. Box 279
Compliments of the
Season    O    O   O
That Everyone May Enjoy
a Merry Christmas and a
Bright and Prosperous New
Year is the earnest wish of
Mumford & Walton
OVERHAULING
FORDS
With our New Improved FORD Machinery
we can make the very lowest price on FORD
MOTOR overhauls for old models. Complete
overhauls include reboring cylinders, 4 oversize pistons and rings, lapping in new pistons,
re-babbiting top-halves of main bearings,
straightening crankshaft and connection rods,
if needed, burning and running all bearings,
overhaul transmission and timer recharge
magnets, test out all coils, including new
transmission lining, new timer and wires, set
of new motor gaskets and renewal oil....$62.50
Any other parts that might be worn out
will be charged at regular list price.
This would make an old Ford motor as good
as new and should be treated as a new motor,
that is, it should not be run oyer 20 miles per
hour for the first 600 miles.
An ordinary overhaul (labor only) taking
up all lost motion, overhauling transmission,
grinding valves, cleaning timer, adjusting
coils $22.00
The above, less transmission $18.00..
Rear and overhaul, $5.00; Driveshaft, $4.00
Bearings burnt in by new process will stay
tight ten times as long as bearings scraped in.
E. C. EMDE
P. O. BOX 46
COURTENAY
\%
%
NAMES TO GO ON
MEMORIAL TABLET AT
G. W. V. A. HALL
Missing Names Are Requested
To Be Submitted Before
End of Year.
In connection with the proposed
Memorial Bronze Tablet to be placed
on a monument outside the G. W. V. A.
Hall, it has been decided that in order
to get tlie roll as complete as possible,
the list should be kept open until the
end of the year.
The names accepted are taken trom
the district covered by the Cumberland
District Patriotic Fund, being Bevan.
Cumberland, Royston, Union Bay, and
also Happy Valley.
The following are names of those,
so far as is known to the committee,
who went from this district and were
either killed on service or died from
the effects of war.
Relatives or friends of others who
went from the district named and who
were either killed on service of died
from the effects of the war, are re-
iiustcd to send Information of same to
Capt. J. C. Brown, Cumberland, before
I lie end of December.
ANDERSON, JOHN.
ARMSTRONG, C. T.
BURNS, G.
CAMERON, S.
CAMPBELL, WM.
CONNORS, J.
GILLESPIE, J. M.
HALCROW, W.
HAYWOOD, A.
JACKSON. E. M.
MILLIGAN, J.
MclNULTY, J.
McINTOSH, J.
NORMAN, R.
PICKARD, A.
SLAUGHTER, A.
SPEARS, J.
URQUHART, HARRY.
WALDRON, D.
WARD, ALBERT.
WHYTE, J.
WILLIAMSON, B.
WRIGHT, WILLIAM.
AM  lMIEPEJiDENT
A would-be member of parliament
hud been for some time vainly trying
to capture the interest of his audience.
At last lie made a desperat bid.
"What are the so-called party members in the House?" he yelled. "Humbugs, every one of them! Rubber
stumps! Parasites of party! I pledge
myself to no party. Rather would I
write across my forehead, in letters
easily read, the words "To Let!"
"And below them,' 'came a cold
voice, 'unfurnished.'"
FORESHORE  LEASE
Kelson District, Tbucoutw Island.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunamuir), Limited, of
Victoria, B. C, Colliery Owners, intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
high water mark three feet (3 ft.)
East from the South-East corner post
of Lot 11, Nelson District, thence East
sixteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to the
approximate low water mark, thence
Southerly along the approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
tho South-East corner of the North
Fractional half of the South-West
quarter of Section 32, thence West to
aforesaid corner of said fractional
part of Section 32, being the original
high water mark, thence Northerly
following original high water mark,
being the Easterly boundary of Section 32 and D. L. 28 in said Nelson
District to point of commencement,
containing ln all ninety-six (96) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Graham, Agent
Dated October 4, 1920.
NEW LAID EGGS AND
HOW TO GET THEM
By George Robertson, of the Experimental Farms,
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING CHONO, Cumborland
HONG CHONG & CO., Bevan.
Back Ache
Limber Up With Pinotratlnc
Hamlln'i Wizard Oil
For Lame Back, Sideache, Shoulder Fain, Stiff Neck, etc., use Hamlin's Wizard Oil. It. penetrates
quickly, eases the pain and drives
out the soreness. Keep it in the
house.
Wizard Oil Is a good dependable
preparation to have in the medicine
chest for first aid when the doctor
may be far away. You have no
idea how useful it will be found in
cases of every day ailment or mishap, when there Is need of an immediate healing, antiseptic application, as in cases of sprains, bruises,
cuts, burns, bites and stings.
Generoui ulze bottle. SBc.
If you are troubled with constipation
or elclf headache try Hamlln'a wizard
Liver  Whlpa.    Juat  pleasant  little pink
fills at druifltte for Sio,
Getting new laid eggs is "as simple
as falling off a log"—providing—
First—That you have early hatched
pullets.
Second—That these pullets are of a
good laying strain.
Third—That they are housed aud
handled properly.
Time of Hatching.
Birds of the type of the Rocks and
Wyandottes the best hatched between
the 15th of March and the 15th of May;
birds of the Leghorn type a couple of
weeks later. This does not mean that
good results cannot be obtained by
hutching either before or after the
dates mentioned. They can, but it
requires special treatment; the eUrly
hatched blrds-are fed to bring thorn
along slowly while those hutched later
are forced for development. Moist
earth, with lots of insect life and succulent green feed, goes a long way towards early development.
Strains.
If you are looking for eggs do not
select a strain simply because it wins
a lot of prizes at exhibitions. Look
rather to what It can do in tlie laying
pens. Select pullets as far as possible
sired by a male whose dam is known
as a heavy producer.
Handling thc Pullets.
From the time of hatching the pul
lets should be brought along so that
they will not receive any set-back
They should be put into laying houses
before they are ready to lay and careful attention paid to their feeding, so
tliat they will not receive a check.
Winter Quarters.
Elaborate houses are not necessary
The cheaper the house the better, pro
vided It is light, dry and free from
draughts. When putting the pullets
Into winter quarters they should be
carefully handled and any Bhowing
lack of constitution should be culled.
Each bird should be treated for lice
by rubbing a little blue ointment, a
piece about the size of a small pea,—
below the vent and under tlie wings
As the birds have been taking lots of
exercise while on the range, it is neces
sary to see that they do not lack in
this respect' whon put Into their new
quarters. Supply a good, deep litter
and make them work for all the whole
grain feed. While green feed is always
necessary, it is more so at this time
than at any other, as the change from
free range to close qunrtcrs is very
great.
Feeding Pullets.
Keep a hopper of dry mash before
the flock at all times. A good mash
may be made as follows: Bran, middlings, cornmeal, finely ground oats
and beef meal, equal parts.
In the morning, feed scratch grain
In the litter,—cracked corn, wheat and
oats, equal parts by measure, or some
simpler mixture. This should be fed
sparingly, just about a pint to 25 birds
will be sufficient. At noon give green
feed, sprouted oats, mangels or something similar; a little scratch grain
may be scattered to start tlie birds to
work.
A moist mash may be fed cither at
noon or In tlle evening, whichever is
more convenient. A considerable portion of this moist mash should be
greens. At night the (lock should be
given a full feed ot scratch feed. The
birds should have grit, oyster shell,
charcoal and clean water before them
at all times. If milk can be had, mix
the moist mash with it, also supply It
as drink; if milk ls not available, keep
a hopper of beef scrap before the
flock.
In feeding, the endeavor should be
to supply everything that is required
to encourage the flock to consume as
large a proportion of mash feed as
possible, as records show that increased production corresponds to increased consumption of mash.
Artificial Light.
Experience has shown that by using
artificial light the production may be
greatly increased at certain periods,
that Is, in pullets hatched at the times
previously mentioned, where tlie peak
of production would normally come In
February, March and April, by putting
them under artificial light to lengthen
the day two or three hours, the peak
of production may be advanced to December, or whenever It is desired. So
also, by this method, may late-hatched
pullets and old hens be brought to
production sooner than by allowing
them to come on normally.
Would you advise a man to become
interested in politics?"
"With all the women taking part in
politics," rejoined the successful candidate, "I don't see how it would be
possible to keep any right-minded man
from becoming interested."
Here's to champagne and drink divine
That makes us forget our troubles;
It's made of a dollar's worth of wine
Aud three dollar's worth of bubbles.
Merry Christmas
Here
you see
our Christmas tree, one
of the best
type, too, and
while, dear sir, 'tis
not a fir, yet it was    .
made  "flr" you.   'Tis
true you see upon this
tree no presents rich and
rare; yet please be kind and
bear in mind, in wish the gifts
are there. We wish you all, the
short and tall, young, middle-aged
and grey, the poor, the
rich,
white,
black
as pitch,
A MERRY CHRISTMAS DAY
Frost's Pharmacy
CUMBERLAND
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
I
To Wish One And All A
Very Merry Christmas
— AND —
Happy New Year
THANKING ALL MY PATRONS FOR THEIR
CUSTOM
The
Photographer
BARTON,
We have some Good Buys
in Children's School Shoes
GOOD SOLID LEATHER SHOES FOR BOYS AT
$4.25
What makes a nicer
Present than a pair
of Slippers ? What
is more serviceable
than a pair of Shoes ?
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
Next Door to Waverley Hotel CUMBERLAND
FOOTWEAR ONLY
Don't buy your shoes at the corner grocery stores—
buy them at the Shoe Store, where you can get good
solid leather shoes.
•fr'-*H?'ft',ft#'Wf »fr##fr# "fcip-je'fcipirif! *»*3jc»*»*»*-*|e*»'
"Who sows no seed, no harvest reaps"
The BEST CHRISTMAS GIFT
—An Independent Future
A small monthly payment, or a lump sum, paid in advance, will
assure to young and old a Canadian Government Annuity of fram
$50 to $5,000
a year for life payable monthly or quarterly. May be purchased
on a single life, or on two lives jointly. Employers may purchase
for their employees.
 '   Ufr
Apply to your postmaster, or write, postage free, to S. T. Bastedo, ti.
Superintendent of Annuities, Ottawa, for tew booklet and othei '..
information required.    Mention age last birthday nnd sex *T
4t
*
**
*
I
i December 28, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
With Every Good Wish to Our
Friends and Customers for
A Merry
Christmas
— AND —
Happy
New Year
MACKINNON
I
DESIRE to thank the public in general for
their support since opening up business, and
hope, by the continuation of low prices and
good service, to merit your support in t^e. fu^u^a.
f rusting that the good times vte are now
experiencing will continue and that the New Year
will bring renewed prosperity.
WISHING ONE AND ALL
A Very Merry Christmas
AND
Happy New Year
W. GORDON
THE CORNER ST0RE
CUMBERLAND
iftlftiCietCHMBCiC*^
Wishing You
the Compliments of the
Season
British Columbia Telephone Co.
three (
'Q!
PREMIER OLIVER SAYS
PROVINCIAL LIQUOR ACT
EFFECTIVE MAY 1 NEXT
SOME MORE DON'TS
Premier Oliver said the other day at
New Westminster that the government
hoped to have the new Moderation
Liquor Act lu force by May 1. This
statement was made at a special meeting of the city council when City Solicitor Martin asked the council whether
to proceed with the appeal in tlie case
of the confiscated liquor held by the
city and which the court decided must
be turned over to the provincial
authorities.
In taking this matter up with the
premier, Mr. Oliver advised that nothing be done further until the new act
was in force in May, an act that he felt
would appeal to the municipalities.
Premier Oliver stated that when the
new act was finally passed the municipalities would find it worth while to
apprehend all the booze runners and
bootleggers that they could get hold of.
GROCERS MAY BE
PERMITTED TO SELL
LIQUOR IN QUEBEC
MONTREAL.—The Quebec cabinet
held a session this week at which serious consideration was given to the
proposal to abolish the system of
liquor vendOV« and permit licensed
grocers to sell hard liquor.
RATS EATING MATCHES
NOT A. GAUSS OF FIRE
Elaborate   Experiments   Prove
They Would Rather Starve
Than Eat Match Heads
In the. lengliiy category of reasons
ant) excuses for Ares, that of friction
due to the gnawing of matcli heads by
rats and mice has had to bear its full
share. When all else could ornve an
ljbi (.lie rats were blamed. The increasing number of fires attributed to
this cause emphasized the necessity ot*
establishing the possibility of it being
bona fide,
The IJiiderwrlters' Laboratories,
Inc., of Chicago, after careful aud
prolonged experiments by its fire prevention engineers, has reached the
definite conclusion that rats would
rather starve to death than eat the
modern match heads.
This conclusion was arrived at
through a series uf elaborate tests,
covering a period of eight months and
more, ln which numbers of rats were
placed ln enclosures with boxes of
matches arranged so that they could
reach them. The first test was made
without feedlug or watering the rats;
in the second tbey were Riven water,
bt't. no f-oud; and in the third they
were given food and water for two
weeks and then starved, but supplied
with water until they died. Occasionally the strawboard boxes were
gnawed and the boxeB broken open
and matches scattered all around, but
although frequently the rate ate que
another, in nn (jasu were the match
heaijs gnawed nor wus there any apparent danger of lgultiun.
"With this positive evidence In their
possession, Investigators of fires will
view with greater suspicion a lire
which can be attributed to no other
cause titan that uf rata gnawing
matches,
Don't forget tlie mistletoe. Romance
still lives.
Don't forget that it ought to be a
merry Christmas.
Dou't deny tlie little ones' ideas
about Santa Claus.
Don't scoff at the lingering super
stitiuns ul' tlie good old days.
Don't retrain  from  giving becaus
you can't afford to give much.    The
intrinsic value of a gilt counts  for
uotliinc    It   is   thu   thought  which
prompts it that matters.
Don't let tlie wile give you a Christmas present in thc form of cigars. It'
she persists in doing su, don't smoke
them—give them away, without letting
her know about it, of course.
Don't forget to think at least ouce
during the day what Christinas really
means.
Don't give u present unless you want
to. Better nut give ut nil than give
insincerely.
Don't forget thai the giving of
Christinas boxes, like charity, should
begin ut home.
•Don't, It* you uro u girl, stand under
the inistluluu until yuu see the right
chap approaching,
Don't kiss somebody else's best girl,
even thought she is under the mistletoe.
Don't work on Christmas Day l( you
can avoid it. If you have to, however,
don't make a sung abuut it.
Don't give Johnnie a trumpet and
Peter u whistle and expect to have a
quiet time.   It's unreasonable.
NO ENGLISH PAPERS
FOR THREE DAYS
Publishers of all daily and Sunday
newspapers in Englund have agreed
to suspend publication of their papers
during the three days holiday of
Christmas, being Christmas, Sunday
and Boxing Day. This will be tho itrsl
time since the dallies begun publication that tlie country has gune witliuut
news for three days.
U. S. GOVERNMENT SUES
JOHN D. FOR ALLEGED
"FAKED" TAX RETURNS
NEW YORK.—The government has
filed suit against John D. Rockefeller,
charging liim with making "incorrect,
mlsleuding and false" statements concerning his income tax returns for
1916,
According to the complaint, Mr.
Rockefeller failed tu include us part uf
his income returns from 5U,1U'1 shares
of the Illinois Pipe Line Co. stock, and
Ii7,17(i shares n( Prairie I'ipo Lino Co.
stock,
Thc government asks Judgment for
(292,678, with a penalty of 5 per cent,
und interest at the rate of 1 per cent.
month from June 3D, lillli.
AllllltKSS I'Li-MSI*.
Local expressions sometimes take
i peculiar meanings when used iu
distant parts. Canadians speak of
wearing apparel which lias been luid
aside as "cast ull" or "second-hand.'
England they suy "put oft," Recently the following advertisement ap
pcared in the Lunduu Times* "Mr, aud
.Mrs. J have put off clothing of all
kinds.  They may be seen at No. -
Piccadilly, every afternoon utter three
o'clock."
BUYING A BEltTlI IN VAiNCOUVEK
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Baj and Night.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
"Let me have sleeping accommodations on the train to Seattle," I said to
the man at the window, who didn't
seem at a" concerned whether 1 took
the trip or stayed at home.
"For a single passenger," he finally
said,
"No,"  I replied, "I'm married but
I'm not taking anybody with me.   A
single shelf will answer.' '
"Upper or lower?" he asked.
"What's the difference?" I enquired.
"A difference ot fifty cents," came
the answer.
"Our prices to Scuttle are $2.50 aud
$3.00,"
You understand, of course," explained the agent, "the lower Is higher
than the upper. The higher prlco Is
for the lower bortli. If you want II
lower you'll have to go higher. We
sell the upper lower than the lower.
It didn't used to be so, but we found
everybody wanted the lower. In other
words the higher tlie fewer."
Why do they all prefer the lower?"
I broke in.
On account of its convenience," lie
replied. "Most persons don't like tlie
upper, although it's lower, on account
it being higher, uud because whon you
occupy an upper you have to get up to
go to bed, aud then get down when you
get up. 1 would advise you to take the
lower, although it's higher than the
upper, for the reason I have slated,
that the upper Is lower than the lower
because it is higher. You can have
the lower If you pay higher; but If you
are willing to go higher It will be
lower."
BOOKS
For Winter Reading
from the
Fairvicw Lending Library
568 Broadway West, Vancouver.
Monthly Subscription:   $1.00 for one
book weekly, including postage.
DR. R
P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ABSOLUTE OBEDIENCE
When Elsie cume home from i
neighbor's house munching a choco
late, her mother said reprovingly:
"Now, Elsie, how many times have 1
told you not to ask Mrs. Grey for
chocolates?"
"I did zactly what you told me to du,
mother. 1 didn't ask her," replied
Elsie. "I know where she keeps
them."
HOOKS llr'l i'Y.XY ADDED.
The folowlng are a few of the booke
recently added to my library:
'In Chancery," by Galsworthy,
'The Reluctant Lover," hy McKenna.
'The Mysterious Rider," June Grey,
'.No Defence," 1'urker.
'.Mrs. Warren's Daughter," Johnstone
"Tbe Vanity Girl," McKenna.
'Poor Mun's Rock," Sinclair.
'Children of Storm," Wylle,
'Top of I lie World," Dell.
'Bincq Bartlemy," Parnol.
'Mrs. Wll." .Milne.
'Sweetheart's Unmet," Ruck.
'Harriet und the Piper," Norris.
'The Devil's Paw," Oppenlieiin.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on the
second und fourth Wednesdays in tlie
Fraternity Hull, liuvis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially invited.
Prank Bond, Chief Ranger; rims.
O'Brien, Secretary; Jas. L. Brown.
Treasurer.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  - -  B. C.
Our Selling Out
Sale Now In
Progress
WE HAVE A LARGE STOCK OF ARTICLES VERY
SUITABLE FOR
Christmas Presents
Including a beautiful and comprehensive selection of
LADIES' BLOUSES
In Geogette, Crepe de Chine and Voile.
CAMISOLES BOUDOIR CAPS
ACCORDEON-PLEATED SILK AND SERGE SKIRTS
FANCY HANDKERCHIEFS
FANCY WOOLEN SWEATERS, IN BOTH COAT
AND PULLOVER STYLES
Every Article at or Below Cost
2 Beautifully Dressed  life-Size
Dolls Given Away Free
RIDEOUT'S
Christmas Presents
When looking for a Christmas present that will give
lasting satisfaction and appreciation, call at
McLean's   Jewelry Store
and select something from his very choice assortment
of seasonable goods, many articles of which have just
arrived and are on special display.
Worthy Of Special Mention Are
Watches, Rings, Brooches, Tie Pins, Cuff Links,
Shaving Brush and Mug, Wrist Watches, Necklaces,
Untarnishable Antimonyware, and  Sheffield  Cutlery.
LADIES* PURSES AND HANDBAGS
A Beautiful Line Of Silver-
plated Ware Just Opened Up
Some very choice pieces of Silverplated Ware
have just been opened up and are now on display.
These include—
Silverplated Tea Sets.
Bread Trays with ivory handles.
Teapots, Vases, Etc., Etc.
Butter and Marmalade Jars.
MANY OTHER ARTICLES TOO NUMEROUS TO
MENTION.
See the window displays, or better still call in ami make
a closer inspection of these beautiful goods,
T. D. McLEAN
THE JEWELER
CUMBERLAND
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C. *****
Four
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
December 25, 1920.
TheVirgin's Lullaby
Hush Thee, hush Thee, little Son,
Dearest and divinest One:
Thine are all the untamed herds
That upon the mountains go,
Thine nre all the timid birds
Thine tlie thunders aud tlie snow.
Cry not sis. Huslio, my dear!
Thunder shall not come Thee near
While its roar shall frighten Thee.
Mother holds Thee safe and warm;
Thou shalt walk upon the sea
And cry "Peace" unto the storm.
Thou shalt take the souls of men
In Thine hand, as I a wren.
But not yet, not yet, my Son.
Thou art still a babe asleep;
All thy glories are unwon,
All mine own Thuu art to keep.
Some day 1 shall see Tlice stand
King and Lord of every land.
Now I hold Thee to my breast,
And delight to feel Thee near.
Some day—ah! this time ls best,
Hash Thee, hush Thee, Babe most
dear!
Misletoe and Holly
The mistletoe is gemmed witli pearls,
Red berries hath the holly.
Remember, all ye modest girls,
The mistletoe Is gemmed with pearls,
And when it hangs above your curls,
Away with melancholy!
The mistletoe is gemmed with pearls,
Red berries hath tlie holly.
Since mistletoe Is hard to find,
Wo do not need It, Mollie,
Oh do, I beg of you he kind,—
Since mistletoe Is linrd to And,
Pretend that you are color-blind,
And kiss beneath tlie holly.
Since mistletoe Is hard to find,
We do not lied it, Mollie.
A CHRISTMAS SONG
Sing a song of Christmas,
Puddings full of plums,
Four and twenty  Bnow-birds
Picking up the crumbs;
Stockings full of candy,
Books, and games and toys;
Isn't it a merry lime
For birds and girls and boys?
CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
Over the world, with outspread wings,
The Spirit of Christmas broods and
sings
Of happy, hopeful, helpful things,
All for you and me:
Charity, wide and deep and high,
Love, that reaches from earth to sky,
Peace, that close to the heart doth lie—
Ail these gifts are free.
SANTA CLAUS
If a body hears a prancing—
On the snowy roof—
While she's banging Christmas stockings—
As of reindeer hoofs—
If they're coming near, and nearer,
She won't run because
She will know, this little lassie—
That it's Santa Claus!
If a body meet a body
With a jolly face,
*While he's stuffing Christmas stockings
In tlie chimney place;
If he's short, and stout, and rosy,
She won't run, because
She wlll know, this little lassie—
That lie's Santa Claus.
Chrees'mas Time
Chrees'mas time ees vera fiinna!
I do feci dees way bityfore.
I gon' out un' spenda mona
Till I no gat nny more.
Jus' blowed dollnr'n half for Rosa—
Doliar'n half for buy a ring!
All for her!  I no suppose
She gon' gev me anyt'lng.
Chrees'mas make your heart so tender
Like a snowball wenn eet melts;
You no care how much you spenda
Jus' for pteasin' some wan else.
Dat'sa way" dees Chrees'mas fever
Catena me.   I got eet had!
I no care how much I geev her,
Jus' so long eet mak' her glad.
I no want her gecv me notting;
I gon' mak' dees praisant free,
Jus' baycausa Rosa tol' mc
She gon' marry wcetha me.
Chrees'mas time ees vera funna!
I no feel dees way bayfore.
I gon' out an' spenda mor.a
Teel I no gat any more."
—THOMAS A. DALY.
The Management and Staff of the Cumberland Islander
Extend to all its Readers Best Wishes for a
Very Merry Christmas and Happy
and Prosperous New Year
The North Wind's Christmas Tour
IT was the last month of the year, and the last
half of the last month, the very busiest and
most perplexing, as well as the most interesting and delightful time of the year, because it
brings with it that day of all days—Christmas.
The Christinas bustle and stir were in full tide"
all over the globe, and away up in his far northern
home the old North Wind was making ready for
his December tour around the world.
"Bless me I" he blustered, glancing at his calendar—the sun—"the year is almost ended and
Christmas will be here in a few days. I must
hurry, or I'll not get off in time to help Santa Claus
with his work, and he is unusually busy this year,
I understand, and needs my help."
Now it would have surprised some people, who
consider the North Wind a cold, gruff, boisterous
old fellow, to hear him talk of taking part in the
Christmas festivities, and in the role of helper to
good old Santa Clans, too; but he spoke in a very
matter-of-fact tone, and went on with his preparations for his journey just as though a Christmas
tour and helping Santa Claus were quite a matter
of course and the regular order of things with
him.
"Well, I'm off," said the* old fellow at last, his
preparations completed, and with a whirl of his
coat-tails that sent the snowflakes flying in every
direction, away he went. Up hill and down,
through the valley, over lake and river and pond,
past field and village and town, he sped, filling the
air with flying snowflakes and covering the earth
with ice from his frosty breath.
"Ii will make Christmas so -much merrier for
the children and young folks," he roared to himself. "And 1 noticed that the older folks like a bit
of snow and ice, too, at Christmas, to say nothing
of how much easier it makes things for Santa
Clans and his reindeer."
"Hello! Guess we're going to have a spell of
weather," said the farmer, looking out over his
brown meadows. "Mighty glad to see this snow,
too. The*wheat needed it, and crops are always
better when snow sets in at Christmas. Regular
norther we're having," he added. "Guess maybe
I'd better take a load of wood and some potatoes
and truck over to Widow Jones Christmas morning. Those young ones of hers have good hearty
appetites, and the widow's so high-spirited, a body
can't do much to help her out. But this cold snap
will be a good excuse, and she can't object to a.
Christmas present." And he went into the house
to consult with his wife about the kind of "truck"
most likely to be acceptable to the Jones family.
"Whew! how cold it's getting," exclaimed the
merchant, as a blast of cold air rushed into the
well-heated store from an opening door. "Snowing, too; that's good. This will help trade immensely. We always have a fine trade when we
have a cold, snowy Christmas. This change in the
weather is worth a thousand dollars to me. I can
afford to give tho wife and children a pretty good.
Christmas this time, thanks to old Boreas."
Then came the thought to those to whom Chifst-
mas brought no good cheer except as charity
should bestow it, and going to his desk he filled out
a check for fifty dollars and sent it to the committee who were arranging a Christmas feast for
the poor and neglected of the city.
Meanwhile the North Wind, still speeding on his
jorney, had reached the warm southland, where
the terrible Fever Spectre had been holding high*,
carnival for weeks, seizing upon men, women and.
children and laying them upon beds of sufficing;
and pain, and in many cases death.
"Aha!" said the old North Wind, aa he saw the
state of things, "this is where I'm needed. I'll
soon put an end to this. A pretty Christmas
they'd have here if this went on!"
And giving his cloak an indignant whirl, he
rushed over the land so fiercely and determinedly
that the Fever Spectre, who had hesitated and faltered in his work of destruction at the first icy
breath of the North Wind, now dropped everything and fled in terror and dismay before the indignant old fellow's terrible blasts, leaving his
poor victims pale and weak, but happy and thankful enough over his departure and their escape
from his clutches.
"Thank God for this north wind," said the doctor, returning from his round of visits to his
patients. "This frost and snow will effectually
end the fever's ravages, and we shall have a right
Merry Christmas yet."
"There!" pauted the North Wind, "that finishes
my journey, and now I must get back home in time
for my own Christmas dinner. Hello! what's
this?" and darting down the chimney of a big
tenement house over which he was passing, he
brought up a slip of paper on which something
was printed in a child's unskilful hand.
"Thought maybe I'd find some little matters to
attend to on my way home, and here's one of them
now. Looks like one of those letters Santa Claus
is always getting from the children. Yes, that's
what it is," he continued, blowing the folded sheet
open an dexamining it hastily. "A letter to Santa
Claus from some of those poor little fellows in
thmat big, forlorn house. I suppose I missed it
when I went this way before, .and now it's too late
to get it to Santa Claus in time for him to attend
to it, for I'll not get home tonight before he starts
out on his trip. I'll just have to look after it
myself." .
All this time he was twirling the little soot-
stained note around thoughtfully and tossing it
from one hand to the other. But now he caught
it up, puffed out his cheeks, and with one strong
whiff of his breath sent it flying, across streets
and houses, straight to the window of a pleasant,
comfortable-looking house a few blocks away,
where it fluttered, fell, and rested on the broad
window-sill.
"Oh, mamma! what's that?" exclaimed a young
girl sitting in an easy chair close lo the window,
as the little letter danced before her, and quickly
opening the window, she drew in the little missive,
eagerly unfolded it and read:
"Deer Santy claws plese cum to our hous
and bring us som crismus gifts and we will
luv you.
"Robbie and Minnie Brown."
"Oh, mamma," said the child, "if we only knew
where they live, we could send them some Christmas gifts. There's the doll I dressed, and the
scrap-books 1 made; and I have enough pennies to
buy something for the little boy, if we only could
find them," and the sweet voice was trembling
with excitement and regret.
"Well, dear," said the mother, smiling at the
child's eagerness, "1 think we can find them, for
on this side of tlie children's letter is the name of
the street and the number of the house. Some one
has evidently begun a letter and got no further
than that. But this is all we need; and when Aunt
Alice comes 1 will get her to sit with you while I
go out and hunt up your little proteges."
"Oh, goody, goody!" exclaimed the little girl,
clapping her hands joyously. "And if you find
them I shall have a happy, happy Christmas, for
I could not bear to have everybody doing so much
for me and not doing anything for anybody."
The North Wind had lingered to see if his further services would be needed in behalf of the
children's letter, but on hearing this he laughed
softly and resumed his journey. "No need to give
myself any uneasiness about that," he chuckled.
"The Brown youngsters will have a Merry Christmas without any more help from me," and he
nwved briskly on. "Time's flying," he muttered,
and I must be getting home; but there's just one
more matter I must look after, if it takes the rest
of the day." And gathering up his cloak-with a
determined air, he swooped down upon a highly
respectable looking and unsuspecting gentleman
walking briskly along the street, and lifting his
.ha-f from his head, carried it off down" the street
mnd-tiround the corner at a great rate.
The gentleman followed as quickly as possible,
but he was not so brisk as the North Wind, and
would have given up the chase in despair; but a
boy, light of weight and swift of foot, came to his
help and soon brought back the missing property.
The gentleman thanked his young helper, and
noticing how scanty was his clothing for such a
(Continued on Page Five)
Little Brother of All
The Christ Child unto the stable came,
'Twixt the midnight and the morn;
His Mother laid Him softly down,
By the beasts of hoof and horn.
The friendly kine a-near Him stood,
In the frost of the early day,
And, little Brother of all the poor,
Ho slept ill tlie fragrant hay.
The Christ Child slept iu the stable dim
And over Him flamed the star,
That was golden-bright with the light
of Heaven,
Where God and the nngelB are.
Then journeying far, came  king  and
priest,
With a wealth of spices sweet,
And, little Brother of all the rlclir
They knelt to kiss His feet.
The Quest Of
The Magi
Out of the East the Magi came
In quest of the long foretold;
Three kings they were of royal fame
ln the wondrous days ot old;
Afar they came from the morning-tide,
Through valley and meadow sweet,
And sandy wastes ol' ilio uesert wide
Were tracked by the camels' feet.
Through drowsy heats of the burning
noon,
Through lonely and desolate lands,
Where the wayside palm-trees droop
and swoon
In the hot and burning sands;
In starlight camp of the journey long
The dreams of their sleep outran,
The slow-paced march of the motley
throng,
In the trail of the caravan.
Weary and slow they traveled far,
Out of the land of the morn,
Led on alway by the guiding star
In quest of the King new-born;
Till over the Syrian hills at night
Where the dreaming shepherds lay,
The windows of  heaven  aglow with
light,
Made clear the gloom ot the way.
And through the streets of the white-
walled town
They sought Him on royal throne;
While the starlight sifted softly down
In the court of a stable lone;
Through  city  and street,  the desert
past,
Full weary and slow they filed,
Till the King they sought was found at
last
In Bethlehem's wondrous Child.
They brough Him-gifts of the costliest
things—
Sweet myrrh arid many a gem—
The homage of hearts and treasures of
kings,
To the manger of Bethlehem;
Then back they turned to the morning-land
And with joyful feet they trod
The wastes of the desert's burning sand
With faith in the Christ of Odd!
This wns the quest of the sages old;
Now the Christmas bells renew
The sweetest story that time has told
The sweep of the ages through;
So carol, 0 heart, with chime of bells,
And open thy lips and sing,
Willie the joy of the earth Its rapture
tells
To the world's Redeemer King.
—Bcnj. J. Leggett.
On Christmas Eve
At Christmas-tide the open hand
Scatters its bounty o'er sea and land.
Ring out the old—Ring iu the new.
Ring out the false—Ring in the true.
Almost any man can say it,
Can say, "Baby, go to bed";
But how many can enforce It,
When a little tnusle-head
Perks his head up sort of sideways
In the way we dnddles know,
And says, half a smile, half fearful,
"Papa, me don't 'ants to doe."
And pleads, "Me ain't s'eepy, papa,
Me don't 'ants to doe to bed."
And you see the curls a-tumble  •
On the little baby head;
And you look up at his mother,
In a deprecating way,
And you hide behind your paper,
And you let the baby stay.
Yes, most any dad can say It,
Can say, "Baby, go to bed";
But how many can enforce It
When a little tousle-head
Says, "I'ms busy now a-watchln'
For Santa Claus, don't papa know?"
Smiling, "I'ms ain't s'eepy, papa,"
Pleading, "I'ms don't 'ants to doe."
—Judd Mortimer LewlB. December 25, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE .
. Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2B, 1920.
THE NORTH WIND'S CHRISTMAS TOUR
(Continued from Page Four)
RED CROSS RELIEF FUND
. In answer to the appeal made ln Cumberland and district on behalf of the Red Cross for funds to relieve the
suffering and distress so prevalent In Europe from the
effects of starvation and disease, the people of this district responded generously and contributed no less a sum
than $884.
The thanks of the community are due to those who
worked hard to Initiate the campaign, to the ladles and
gentlemen who canvassed the district for funds, and also
to the Chinese, who contributed so liberally.
LUXURY TAX ABOLISHED
As a contributing factor towards reducing the cost of
living the luxury tax has failed. Its eifect is quite unrelated to tbe general reaction against high prices which has
begun to make Itself felt. It may have curbed Individual
extravagance in tbe purchase of non-essentials. The reduced demand for those commodities very probably has
created a number of serious situations in tbe larger industrial centres of Eastern Canada.
But (he abolition of tbe tax is scarcely likely to be followed by a revival in tbe demand for the articles no longer
affected. At best it was experimental legislation. It
served one outstanding purpose. It provided the govern-
ment with a new excuse for avoiding the Imposition of a
sensible graduated income tax through whose agency it
would be possible to assure a larger measure of support
to the economic stability of the country.
Living costs will come down and tbe general public Is
familiar with the fundamental influences upon domestic
bookkeeping. In the meantime the Federal Treasury has
earned something by the luxury tax; but the government
admits that Its operation has caused a slump in manufacture and unemployment. What the country and the individual have gained from the experiment may be gathered
from this condition.
The official commentary upon the effect of the tax ls best
reflected by the government's order-in-council abolishing
it—Times. ' ,
cold, snowy day, was prompted to ask his name.
When the boy gave the information asked, the
gentleman turned pale, hesitated, then asked
where he lived. The boy told him, and the man
turned paler still; then taking the boy by the arm,
he said in a choked voice:
"You must be my nephew—my sister's child.
We disagreed when we were young, and I haven't
seen her since. I thought she was living in a distant city.  Take me to her."
And as the rich, prosperous man went off with
the poorly-dressed boy to find his sister, the North
Wind laughed aloud with delight and capered
about like some giddy, frisky little April breeze.
"A good day's work, and now for home," he
said, settling down to a steady, even pace. "I confess I'm a trifle blown and somewhat warmed up,
and shall be glad to have a chance to cool off and
get my breath."
As he drew near to his own comfortable quarters he met Santa Claus just starting out on his
Christmas eve tour.
"Many thanks for your help," shouted that jolly
fellow, "and a Merry Christmas to you."
But the North Wind's work was not complete
until he had presented himself to his Master and
made his report. When he had finished the Christmas Angels gathered about him and sang a beautiful Christmas carol to his praise. But the Christ
Child, whose birthday is the Christmas Day, and
who is the Master of the North Wind and Santa
Claus and all the Christmas Angels, smiled approvingly upon him and said, "Well done."
5W@S-*B«Cf**^^
&mmThe Season's Greetingsw&sm
IS  IT  LOST?
Should we count the time lost which we spend socially?
Some think so? But are they right? Is it time lost when
a large number of people, full of good will for one another
and radiant wltb smiles, meet and greet In some gathering
place? Is that time lost when neighbor chats witli neighbor
and friends Interchange thought and greetings with
friends? Are the handshake, the cordial salutations, the
inquiries as to welfare, the mutual expressions of concern,
the fraternity and the enthusiasm which gathered numbers
always make, a nothing, a blank, a dead thing, an empty
Incident?
This thing is true: After neighbors have met in church,
In community gatherings of any kind, in social occasions,
ln any of the functions that bring humankind together, and
after all have gone home, there is an unconscious thought
in thc mind of each that the world, after all, isn't halt bad,
that there Is a lot of innocent and beneficial happiness to
be found In it if it is only sought. It is a thought that the
home town is a good old town, that It Is full of good
friends, that it Is a delightful place to live ln, and that all
the world Is not a mere game ot business, of toil, of stocks
and bonds, a workshop, a dead nnd dull routine, a place of
clouds and worries, a land In which there ls no sun.
"CHARITY SUFFERETH LONG AND IS KIND"
It may often be impossible to provide work for those who
seek it. It is never Impossible to lend a helping band to a
comrade in distress. It is not the gift of money which is
most needed when tbe iron enters a man's soul. It is
sympathy. The whole world cries out for sympathy, aud
half our problems might be solved by It. We were touched
en Armistice Day to an Ideal of comradeship. Its virtues are
needed every day where men and women pass and repass
along life's line of communication. For all have their spell
in the front line of life's battle.—London Express.
THE PULPIT AND THE COMMUNITY
Every time there is a new movement launched—a new
reform attempted—a new measure for the common good
projected—the minister is asked to take it up In his pulpit.
He complies gladly, giving to the community service of inestimable value and asking nothing more than a consciousness of a duty well performed.—Los Angeles Times.
A Great Saving
Aroused to the high cost of chop suey, the Chicago
authorities are going to find out what the dish Is made of.
Publication of their findings may serve to reduce the price
without further action.
Men have forgotten that peace is not made in any proclamation or parchments, but is the soul of man.—Archbishop of York.
What Santa Claus Thinks
Hi! another one!  Whnt's all the world about?
Don't these people know that I'm most worn out?
Millions of 'em coming year by year;
Every youngster wretched If I ttyn't appear.
First, they want a rattle, then a ring to bite;
Then a box of sugar-plums, then a doll, or kite; *
Next a story-book to read, then a bat and ball-
Santa's back is broad and strong, he must bring them all.
•
Gratitude they talk about,—not a bit for me.
First you know they get so wise, cry out ,"Fiddle-de-de!
No such chap as Santa Claus!" Can't deceive them so;
Never And a six-inch stocking hanging in the row.
Here's this jolly little chap, scarcely here a week;
Don't I know he rules the house, though he looks so meek;
Both his eyelids shut up tight, mouth wide open, too.
S'pose he got a look at me, wonder what he'd do?
Sleep away, my little man, trouble comes with years;
You are bound to get your share, In this vale of tears.
Rattle, is It? Well, all right!  Yes, I've got my pen;
Finish out your little nap and Wl be round again.
Heap on more wood; the wind is chill;
But let it whistle as it will,
We'll keep our Christmas merry still.
|OHN," said Mrs. Struggles, a little bashfully,
I "you know Christmas is coming?"
" Mr. Struggles tried to appear astonished. "My
gracious! Again 1" he demanded.
Mrs. Struggles nodded a solemn assurance of
that inevitable fact.  "And—and—" she hesitated.
"Of course," assented Mr. Struggles, resignedly.
'Well, how much ?"
"I've figured and scrimped and economized and
cheese-pared all I possibly can, John," began Mrs.
Struggles, apologetically.
"You haven't got it down it down to where your
Christmas presents owe lis money, have you ?" interrupted Mr. Struggles, hopefully.
"Not quite," replied Mrs. Struggles, "but—but
—well, I don't see how I can posibly get along with
less than one hundred."
Mr. Struggle's face had grown graver and
graver. "That's a good deal of money, my dear,"
he objected, hopelessly. "Especially just now.
Can't you posibly drop some off your list or cut it
down some way ?"
Mrs. Struggles shook her head. "Really and
truly, I've"done my best already, John, dear," she
said.
"Mum-m," considered Mr. Struggles, woefully.
Well, my dear, every dollar counts like a lightning calculator, just now, and so suppose you drop
me. I'll take the will for the deed."
"I'd hate like everything to do that, John. It
won't seem like Christmas to you at all."
"But it will seem like heaven to save all that
expense," argued Mr. Struggles.
"Well, if you are sure you honestly would rather.
I might just this once." •
'That's settled, then," decided Mr. Struggles.
hastily taking out his check-boolt before she could
reconsider. "Nom, how much is it ?"
Mrs. Struggles' lips and fingers moved sychro-
nously as she murmured a rapid mental calculation
in which her husband, with ever increasing expectation, noted that a number of different amounts
seemed to be involved. At last she reached a total,
looked up brightly and announced:
"You can make a check for only ninety-nine
dollars and sixty-eight cents, John, dear!"
Poor Papa
At Christmas-time, poor papa tries, hy sundry means and
shifts,
To save from out his salary, to buy the children gifts;
And though he needs a new felt hat, he takes tlie cash, ol
course,
To get his precious baby boy a great big rocking-horse.
While all this time he must protest that it's the sheerest
folly;
He walks, to save bis car-fares up, to purchase Maude <i
dolly;
He don't get nice hot dinners now, hut just a lunch Instead.
And thereby he contrives to buy his eldest son a sled.
He badly needs a pair of gloves—the ones he wears aren't
mates—
But does without them, for a while, to get the twins both
skates-
And all bis nickels and his dimes Uo now finds very handy
To All the children's stockings up with popcorn, nuts und
candy.
But how they all will thank him soon, perhaps you think
to say;
Well, this is Just the way things go, when   comes   glad
Christmas Day:
Dear mamma tells them they should all lie quite good girls
and boys—
For 'tis the good old Santa Claus has brought them these
nice toys.
—ELSIE DUNCAN YALE.
That Happiness and Prosperity    '
may be Yours this
Christmas
and throughout the
Coming Year
Is the sincere wish of
$®^CAMPBELL ^ROS.®®®^
THE CHRISTMAS LIGHT
Along thc slopes ol* an ancient bill,
Lo, we are shepherds and watchers, still.
Behold Uie flocks of our shepherd-care:
The faith we hold and tbe love we bear.
Lo, we are shepherds, tlie same as they
Who kept the Christmas of yesterday,
Who rose at even and followed far
The golden path of a princely star.
Ueside all memories watching here
This holy night of tlie passing year,
Across the vale and along the bill
The Light of Christmas is with us still.
And wo arc glad of the sacred sign
As were the shepherds of ancient Hue.
We rise to follow—what less might we
Than tbey, the watchers across the sea?
We rise to follow—and home we fare,
Our gifts of incense and myrrh to bear,
And lay them down, with the rest, beside
Tlie blessed Child of tlie Christmas-tide.
For 'ncath the roofs of tbe homeland far,
We still keep faitli with the Christmas Star
And Love is Master, ami Love is all
Tonight wherever its rays shall fall.
Another Price Suggestion
DOUGHNUTS and CRULLERS
DOUGHNUTS! There
is nothing more wholesome and delightful than
doughnutaS or crullers rightly made. Their rich, golden
color and appetizing aroma
will create an appetite
quicker than anything else
in the world.
"Here arc the famous Dr.
Price doughnut and cruller
recipes:
Doughnuts
•T tah] .-spoons shortening
% cup auyar
l egg
% cup milk
1 tmHpoon nutmeg
1 U-a-Hponn salt
3 cups flour
4 teaspoons Dr. Price's
Baking Powder
Cream shortening; add sugar
and well-beaten egg; stir tn
milk; add nutmeg, salt, flour
and baking powder which
have been sifted together and
enough additional flour to
make dough stiff enough to
roll. Roll out ou floured board
to about Yi inch thick; cut
out. Fry in deep fat hot
enough to brown a piece of
bread in 00 seconds. Drain
on ungjazed paper and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
•OR'
PRICES
CREAM
BaKiqspoHder
Made from Cream of Tartar,
.  '   derived from grapai.
MADE IN CANADA
Afternoon Tea Doughnuts
2 eggs
Stable
nsBUgar
<•, teaspoon salt
u teaspoon grated nutmeg
.! tablespoons shortening
6 tablespoons milk
2. • iips Hour
3 teaspoons I)r. Trl-Va
Baking Powder
Real eggs until very light;
add sugar, salt, nutmeg and
melted shortening; add milk,
and flour and baking powder
which have been sifted together; mix well. Drop by
teaspoons into deep hot fat
and fry until brown. Drain
well on unglazed paper and
sprinkle lightly with powdered sugar.
Crullers
i tablespoons shortening
1 cup miKar
I eggs
3 cups Hour
1 teaspoon clrmamon
•A teaspoon salt
3 teaspoons Dr. Price's
Baking Powder
% cup milk
Cream shortening; add sugar
gradually and beaten eggsj
sift together flour, cinnamon,
salt and baking powder; add
one-half and mix well; add
milk and remainder of dry
ingredients to make soft
dough. Roll out on flowed
board to about Yt inch ttwrk
and cut into strips abotft 4
inches long and Yi inch wide;
roll in bands and twist each
strip and bring en-Is together.
Fry in deep hot fat. Drain
and roll in powdered sugar.
All measurements for all materials are level Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
December 28, 1920.
To wish one and all
A Merry Christmas
and a
Happy New Year
And thanking all my patrons for
their custom.
SnA VIS    Dunamuir
.   MJuf\yiJ,    Avenu«
Music and Photoplays
i
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
CHRISTMAS STOCKINGS
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
Fancy Boxes of High-Grade
Chocolates for
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE  CREAM  PARLORS
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS DAY
ATTRACTION
Madame X
In Which Pauline Frederick Has
One of the Most Notable
Roles of Her Career
Fate Is often tlie crudest of jesters.
Jacqueline Floriot's piteous life story
hears vivid evidence of this. Turned
from hei' home and family by her .remorseless husband, a deputy attorne}
of Paris, si.*, iii unable to escape the
dread shadow ot a *»ffl 'bat crosses
her baffled footsteps With mt increasing menace. Fate, In 'M Buibl*
of her husband's unjust suspicions,
denies her the right to see her son;
fuce. places in her hands the weapon
which destroys a blackmailer who
would ruin the career of her husband,
now a judge; and fate brings her before the bar of justice where her husband presides and places her light for
life in tlie hands of her son—counsel
for tbe defence. And baring played
trumps to the last, fate plays its joker,
the highest card of all—death.
Pauline Frederick in tlie role ot
Jacqueline Floriot brings an emotional art to the screen more intensified than any ever displayed by this
popular star. You may hare seen the
stage version of this famous play-
most everyone has, but you will want
to Bee this masterful, heart touching
picturization.
'POLLY OF THE STORM
COUNTRY" SWEET STORY
Poverty Couldn't Dim Polly Hop
kins' Sunshine—Love Proved
Stronger Than Hate
begs him to send for a doctor.
The old man, eager to sare money,
forces a "home" remedy on her Intend. It is a generous wedge of his
favorite tobacco—the chewing kind.
Ho forces it into Millie's mouth, the
train lurches around a sharp curve
and—Millie gulps and swallows hard
Thereafter she becomes genuinely ill
and "Doctor" Turner is called in
From this moment the fun is fast and
furious, Millie being rushed to a sani-
lariuin for an operation. What hap.
pens there is beyond conjeiiti're. It
must he seen to he appreciated.
The i'lirco opens with li May party
such as one sees in n country town
The mayor presides and the richest
girl, of course, Is slated for tbo queen's
honors. Mabel Normnnd, as Millie
.Murtin, the poorest, watches the fes-
liviiies trmii (fie top of a tree. There*
is the ytllttge bund with tint iisuaj perspiring trombone I>*<W, the sawing
fiddler, the Haunting flutist and all the
rest. Near by a Hash discloses
freckle-faced girl licking a lemon, The
disaster which overtakes the trombone
player is easily imagined.
From that point the fun develops,
reaching an uproarious height when
Millie precipitates the May queen Into
a stagnant pool and the girl reels back
to her court with her gaunt figure too
cruelly silhouetted by wet and flimsy
garments.
"FELIX O'DAY"
An
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
IF YOU UEQl'lltE
Windows, Doors
Frames
write for pricos to
THE MOORE-VVHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Offlce 2620 Ilrlilge Street, Victoria, B.C,
The uplift of an entire community
through the faith and belief tiiat "lore
is stronger than bate," on the part of
one little girl plays an important pari
in "folly of the Storm Country," in
which Mildred Harris Chaplin will be
seen iu this attraction at the Ilo-llo
on Monday evening.
Polly Hopkins, liring with her aged
father and little brother iu a squalid
shack, is the idol of the squatter country. She is the friend of Erelyn Robertson, whom Oscar Bennett, a greedy
farmer, had married secretly years
before she had a fortune. Marcus McKenzie, rich landowner and arch
enemy of the squatters, wliom ho seeks
to drire from the country, lores Evelyn, and Polly keeps secret her knowledge of this affair. Bennett tells Erelyn he will give her a divorce if she
will Influence Polly to marry him.
Robertson comes to the settlement and
champions the rights of tllc squatters,
and rescues Polly one night from Oscar. Their mutual admiration turns
to love. In a terrible storm Oscar is
struck by lightning and taken to
Polly's cabin. Evelyn is there and
when Robertson enters and sees the
dying man in bed she exclaims, to protect herself, tliat Bennett is "Polly's
man." Robertson leaves loathing
Polly. Bennett dies and Evelyn marries McKenzie. With her father in
jail on a trumped up charge and her
brother about to be placed in an institution, Polly's lore for humanity turns
to hate and she joins tlie plotters in a
conspiracy to kill Evelyn as a means
of frightening McKenzie into ceasing
his persecutions. Polly is about to
slay the woman when tlie sight of u
lied Cross poster giren her by Robert
stays the hand with tlie axe.
Appealing Story of Love,
Romance and Revenge.
Is tiie motive of revenge ever justifiable or should it be supplanted by
thoughts of love? That ls the ques
tion tbat is propounded and answered
in "Felix O'Day," a Jesse D. Hampton-
Pathe feature starring H. B. Warner,
which shows at the Ilo-llo on Wednesday of next week.
An honorable nobleman, devoted to
his wife and his father, is suddenly
.reed with the unscrupulous machinations of his supposed dearest friend
who not only embezzles his father's
fortunes bul also steals away the lore
oi his wife. Now that he has sipped
uie hitter draughts of disappointment,
Felix O'Day has but one object ln life
—rerenge.
To New York City, the melting pot
of tlie world, the trail leads. But fate
takes a hand. The footsteps of Felix
are drawn to a little antique shop. It
is here that he tastes his first touch
of happiness. How he finally discord's his wife and method of rerenge
tliat lie receives, forms one of the most
tensely interesting and entertaining
film dramas seen for some time.
WILLIAM S. HART A
BANDIT CHIEFTAIN IN
"THE TOLL GATE"
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double!load)—$5.00
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
CUMBERLAND
WM.MERRIFIELD,
HOTEL
Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, B.C.
WHEN DOCTORS DISAGREE
Mabel Normand Swallows Quid
of Tobacco, Then Things Begin to Happen Fast.
Mabel Normand has defied convention ovcr and over again on the screen.
Now she docs it again and with sucli
vigor that tradition hasn't a leg to
stand on. Swallowing a juicy quid
of tobacco Is her latest hit of dlalerio.
Of course it occui-b In her newest
Goldwyn picture, "When Doctors Disagree." The feat will bo seen whon
the picture is shown at the Ilo-llo on
Tuesday evening.
As Millie Martin, she goes on a railroad journey with her father (George
Nichols) and becomes interested in a
young doctor, or, rather, a man who
pretends that he is one. In reality ho
is a carpet layer who is fleeing from an
imagined crime, using a physician's
pass and hag of instruments as a
blind. When John Turner (Walter
Hiers) will not respond to Millie's
ogling sho determines to enlist his
professional services. She tells her
father she has an awful toothache and
Making  Scenes   for "The Toll
Gate" Nearly Fatal for Big
Bill and His Horse
William S. Hart, the famous motion
picture star, firmly belieres that there
Is no human lore or loyalty that exceeds tliat of an animal for a man.
Probably Mr. Hart's most cherished
possession is his beautiful Pinto pony,
the veteran of many a hazardous feat
before the camera. Since the filming
of "The Toll Cate," the new Hart picture coming to the llo-Ilo Theatre next
Saturday, New Year's Day, Bill loves
the Pinto more than ever, with reason.
In his role of Black Deering, leader
of a bandit gang, Bill Is hotly pursued
hy a sheriff's posse. He escapes them
at one point by making a leap of over
sixty feet from a cliff into the raging
river below. But again they pick up
the trail. This time Bill, as Deering,
seeks to elude them hy riding his Pinto
pony into the river bed and following
the stream as It leads into a subterranean passage under the cliffs.
Tlie location of tills scone was Sonora, In Northern California. Bill rode
his pony into tlie Stygian blackness of
the underground water trail. But
suddenly the water grew deeper. The
Pinto started to swim. Its hoofs struck
an underwater ledge, and he slipped
backward, throwing Bill Into the Icy
cold stream. The beast tried ln vain
to climb tlie steep sides of the cave.
He tumbled backwards. Then followed a grim fight with death on the
part of both man and beast, until at
last the Pinto saw a glint of light and
swam to It with mad speed, dragging
Bill Hart after him.
"He sure sared my life," said Bill
later, "and he can hare all I hare got."
FRIENDLY ADVICE
The Young Tiling—"What kind of
husband would you advise me to look
out for?"
Well Meaning Friend—"You let husbands alone, my dear—it's asking for
trouble—you get a single man!"
I
ILO1L0 THEATRE
CHRISTMAS DAY-Saturday, December 25th
m*.
The Highly Emotional Actress
PAULINE FREDERICK
In the Magnificent Production
MADAME X
ONE OF THK MOST EXPENSIVE FILMS EVER SHOWN HERE
Adopted from* thc French of Alexander Bisson,
In "Madame X" Pauline Frederick gives the greatest performance of her
brilliant career. This picture has been called greater than the play, which
ran for years and stands as one of the most sensational success of the stage.
I
Monday, December 27th
POLLY OF THE STORM
COUNTRY
DEPICTS THE THRILLING BATTLES OF SQUATTERS AND RICH —FULL OP
HEART THROBS, LOVE AND ROMANCE—STARRING
Mildred Harris Chaplin
As Polly, Mildred Harris Chaplin has role of girt clinging to belief that love is stronger
than hate, while an unscrupulous chum seeks safety pledging her to secrecy about ***,
clendestine marriage—Polly holds to certainty of love until circumstances created by
secret bride wrecks her home, convicts her father and casts her crippled brother on
charity—Then, with hate surging where love had guided, she seeks revenge and finds
a new and startling future before her.
in 8
Tuesday, December 28th
Mabel  Normand
— IN
When Doctors Disagree
"She Took a Correspondence Course in Love!" The beauty quacks thought she was an
"easy mark" and made her the walking advertisement for all the fake brands of cold
creams and pink powders on earth. Then Millie got next to herself! She resolved tq
show 'em BEAUTY and BRAINS minus appendages. Something terrible happened!
What was it? See Mabel Normand in "When Doctors Disagree."   It's a scream I
Wednesday, December 29th
The Screen's Most Courtly Star
H. B. WARNER
— IN —
"FELIX   O'DAY''
NEW YEAR'S DAY, Saturday, January 1st
A Paramount Artcraft Picture
WILLIAM S.HART
— IN-
The Toll Gate
"In my opinion this is the best picture I ever produced."—William S. Hart.
A two-gun tale of an outlaw who fought on the square—Loaded with robbery, getaway, chase, and battle—Fired by bandits, renegade "greasers" and posses of daredevil
troopers—Wiped clean by the love of a woman and the tiny hands of achild.
Special Dance Christmas Eve and New
Year's  Eve, in  addition to the  Usual
Saturday Night Dances.
21
•■;;
1 December 25, 1926.
IHE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SeveH
CHRISTMAS 1920
The President, Directors and Officers of
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANa4DA
desire to offer to the Customers
and Friends of the Bank their Best
Wishes for a Happy Christmas
And a Prosperous New Year.
li
iil!l!ll[lllllllll[[|||||li!llllllll[[l!llllllll!!illllllll!![! llinilllllllllllllllllliNlllllllinilllllinillllllHIIIIIIIIIIIillllW
The Cave Man    |
Started |
Something |
When He Accidently Struck (
the Spark That Supplied |
Both Light and Heat 1
He then set out to control
these to his purposes. Man has
struggled with the night all
through the ages. The primitive
fire baskets, crude splinter-
holders, open-flame oil and
grease lamps, kerosene and various kinds of gas, serve as milestones on the road of lighting
progress. Each marked a new
era in social and industrial
development. Then came electricity, which has culminated in
Fixtures and Lamps, such as
those on display at our store this
week. See them—they are the
last word in modern illumination.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
WITH ALL GOOD WISHES TO ONE AND ALL
FOR A
Very   Happy   Christmas
and
Prosperous New Year
Cumberland Motor Works
Our Workshop will be closed during the coming week
owing to alterations and repairs.
Talks on Music
lit
By PROF. C. C. LAUGHER
Mus. But-., Sarnla, Ont.
No. IX.—The First Violinists.
The perfection of the violin making
was completed during the latter part
of the sixteenth century and the beginning of the seventeenth century.
The development of the violin making to the unsurpassable perfection attained by the great violin makers
naturally co-incided with the remarkable development of the technique of
violin playing.
The Italian violin makers during the
course of the seventeenth century
brought their skill up to the highest
perfection and put into the hands of
the performers the most perfect instrument for expression that human
ingenuity seems capable of devising.
The central idea iu tbe soloist's mind
ls to make effect by melody with subordinate accompaniment.
One of the first to make good with
the violin was Lully, bom at Florence;
his musical talent wub discovered by a
shoemaker monk, who taught him
rudiments of the guitar and by somo
means he got hold of a violin and between the time of wash floors and acting as scullion In the kitchen, his
spare moments were used on the
violin.
Lully was overheard playing popular airs on the violin and wus soon
given a place in the Princess' band,
where he quickly excelled; hut being
of a mlschlevious disposition lie was
caught writing rude verses about the
princess, who promptly dismissed him.
In the same period, Baltzar, a famous German violinist, won a great
reputation In England, lu fact, he was
the first great performer on tlie violin
heard in England. Mb art seemed
touched with magic.
Speaking of his wonderful execution, Anthony Wood wrote: "None in
England ever saw the like." Wilson,
the greatest judge of music at that
time, stooped down to Baltzar's feet to
see If he had cloven feet, to see if he
was a devil, because he acted beyond
the parts of man. Wilson also declares that he became so popular that
so many delighted to drink with him
and making liim drunk, and that by
drinking he was brought to the grave.
The first to arrange concerts for
profit was John Banister, an English
violinist of the same period, who established a,series of concerts in Lon-
don for money making. These were
held at his own house and were continued until a short time before his
death.
At this period the greatest violin
makers had brought their skill up to
the highest perfection iu violin making.
The actual Inventor of the violin is
not known, nor have we the correct
date.
The Arst mention ot the violin as
part of the orchestra Is made by Mgyi-
teverde, when he gave a performance
of the opera Orfeo iu 1650.
We also hear of one Baltazarnl giving performances in England in 1577.
The principal Italian makers of the
seventeenth century were the Amati,
the Guarneri and the Stradivari families, "all the Cremona" who so jealously guarded the peculiar secrets of
their manufacture that no modern
maker has so far been able to reproduce Instruments of the same quality.
So valuable are these violins that
the high record price for a Stradi-
varius is said to be $15,000, and
Guarnerius, formerly belonging to
Wlenlasky and since sold to John Mc
Cormack (the tenor singer) for
|18,000.
The violin was considered at one
time the common property of man, yet
many failed to obtain proper instruction and would adapt his own ease in
playing it, the result was "sluvonly-
ness," for he simply fiddled at playing,
hence the name "fiddle," which reminds us of the boy who asked his
father: "What ls the difference between a violinist and a fiddler?"
"About three hundred dollars per
evening, my son ?" answered the father
SHOES    SHOES    SHOES
JUST RECEIVED ANOTHER LARGE CONSIGNMENT OF SHOES DIRECT FROM
THE EASTERN MANUFACTURERS.  MY STOCK OF
Shoes for Men, Women, Boys
Girls and Children
IS NOW COMPLETE, and you have the opportunity of making your selection and supplying your nesds in this line from the largest stock in the city at lower prices than have
prevailed for some time.
Below are a few of the Lines offering:
MEN'S STRONG WORKING SHOES, made from heavy stock, in solid
leather.   Good value at $7.00 per pair.  My price 	
$5.50
BOYS' STRONG SCHOOL SHOES, with thick heavy soles,
similar to men's; just the right shoe fo
SAME SHOE FOR YOUTHS, sizes 1 to 5,
similar to men's; just the right shoe for this weather    «PO«DU all(j «bO»«/U
ME  SHUfc   1'UK   YOUTHS,   sizes 1 to 5. (ft J   pA (ft J   fnf.
Per pair      M.OU and -M.-HU
We can recommend them for durability and you would do well to try one of these lines.
WE HAVE A NICE RANGE OF FELT AND LEATHER SLIPPERS
Suitable For Christmas Presents
Rubbers   and   Gum   Boots
To Suit Everybody at Right Prices
THE MODEL CLOTHING AND
SHOE STORE
Note the Address—Opposite the Post Offlce
F. PARTRIDGE
No. 443180.
IN THE SITHE.WK COITIvT OP
JIKITISII COLUMBIA.
Between
"KKANK MARTIN, Plaintiff,
aud
*    JUNO YET, Defendant.
NOTICE is hereby given that a writ
of summons was on the eleventh day
of March, liiao, duly issued out of the
Vancouver Registry of their Honorable Court whereby foreclosure of
your mortgage to the Plaintiff, dated
Nov. IS, 11112, is sought.
AND NOTICE is further given that
by order of Mr. Justice Morrison made
herein the 0th day of November, 11)20,
it was ordered tliat copy of the said
writ be registered to the Defendant
Jung Yet at P. O. Box 127, Cumberland, and that a notice of said writ he
published for four issues in the
Islander newspaper, published at Cumberland, B.C.
AND NOTICE is further given tliat
by said order you, Jung Yet, are required to appear to said writ, if you
tlo appear, within 10 days from the
publication of the Inst of thc said four
Issues of the Islander.
Dated at Vancouver, B. (.'., this 23rd
day of November, A.D. 11120.
E. N. HARVEY,
Solicitor for Plaintiff.
To Jung Yet, Cook,
Cumberland, B.C., Defendant.
NEWS TO HER
Merchants Casualty Co.
HEAD OFFICE:   WINNIPEG
Our MERCHANTS VICTORY SICKNESS and ACCIDENT
POLICY
PAYS accident benefits for life.   All accidents covered.
PAYS sickness benefits for every known disease.
PAYS full Illness benefits, whether confined to the house or not.
PAYS extra benefits for operations and towards hospital expenses.
This poUej has numerous other liberal provisions. For full particulars see
VAL A. DALBY, Local Representative
A travelling man one night found
himself obliged to remain in a small
town on account of a washout on the
railroad, caused by a heavy rain which
was still coming down in torrents.
Entering the dining-room of the hotel
be said, "This certainly looks like the
flood?"
"The what?"
"The flood. You're read about the
flood and the Ark landing on Mount
Ararat, surely."
"Gee, mister," she returned, "I ain't
seen a paper for three days."
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
I'liiini* mi
I  Iicrlilllil
SINCE jj1870      **WnWl!1
ILOH
30§?8PtCOUGHS
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese   .
Have yon tried our I'lcklcd Perk
and Cornell Heel'.' II Is delicious.
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water j
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer,
Aill line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Sueclnlty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aflluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT  ALL  THE   LEADING   HOTELS.
That's  all
wanted.
u  woman  wants—to   be
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C. eight
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
December 28, 1626.
The Compliments of
the Season   s
Wishing you all a
Very Merry Christmas and a
Bright and Prosperous
NewYear
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
CHRISTMAS GIFTS LIABLE
TO CUSTOMS DUTY
OTTAWA. — The Impression that
Christmas presents are exempt from
duty is corrected in a brief statement
issued from the Customs Department
as follows:
"Articles sent to Canada as gifts are
subject to the usual provisions of the
tariff with the exception that casual
donations from abroad sent hy friends,
and not being advertising matter, tobacco, articles containing spirits, or
merchandise for sale, are admitted free
when the duty otherwise payable thereon does not exceed 50 cents tn any one
case."
FORESTERS ELECT
OFFICERS FOR NEW TERM
The election of officers of Court
Bevan, No. 9830, Ancient Order of
Foresters, for the term eliding June
HO next, was held in thc Fraternity
Hall on Wednesday evening, and resulted as follows:
Chief Ranger, Bro. Frank Bond.
Sub. Chief Hanger, Bro. D. M. Davidson.
Secretary, Bro. Chas. O'Brien.
Treasurer, Bro. Frank Slaughter.
S, W.t Bro. Ed. Gomm.
J. W., Bro. A. J. Fouracre.
S.B., Bro. A. Derbyshire.
J. B„ Bro, F. Kynock.
Organist, Bro. W. C, Edwards.
Court Surgeon, Dr. 0. K. MacNaughton.
CITY BAND GAVE
SPLENDID CONCERT
One of the Finest Musical Enter
taimnents Given by Band—
Very Well Attended.
Special
Christmas Dinner
CELERY OLIVES
CREAM TOMATO SOUP
ROAST TURKEY
OYSTER DRESSING   CRANBERRY SAUCE
MASHED POTATOES
CAULIFLOWER IN CREAM
PLUM PUDDING, BRANDY SAUCE
TEA
CHOICE OF PIE
COFFEE
NUTS
$1.50 per plate
PHONE  YOUR  RESERVATIONS
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
LLYS
"THE HOUSE THAT
QUALITY BUILT"
CONFECTIONERY
&CAFE.    '
The musical entertainment under
the auspices of thc Cumberland City
Band, which was held in the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Sunday evening last, was
largely attended and proved to be one
of the most enjoyable concerts held
by the band, which is making very excellent progress under the conductor-
ship of Mr. Monte.
Mrs. L. Piket sang beautifully and
was repeatedly encored. Mrs. Frost
accompanied her on the piano and Mr.
f'olville Graham played the violin
obllgato.
Mr. Colvllle Graham is Improving
greatly, his violin solo being splendidly
played, for which he received an enthusiastic encore but did not respond.
The selection, "Poet and Peasant,"
by the band was very well received,
appealing to the audience more than
any other band selection.
Mr. Stun Jones, the local tenor, was
In great form, rendering two songs In
u very masterly way. A triple-tongue
cornet solo by Mr. Vincent, and a song
by Mr. llamsoll brought the entertainment to a close.
Special mention should be made of
the triple-tongue solos rendered by
Mr. Vincent, his control of the difficult
tongue work being excellent. We hope
In hear more of Mr. Vincent's music In
the nenr future.
Personal Mention
George and Marjorie Mordy, who
have been attending the University of
British Columbia iu Vancouver, re-
turned home Tuesday for the Christmas holidays.
Mr. and MrB. C. R. Drader, of Berke
ley, Cal., arrived on Thursday and are
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bickle
during the Christmas and New Year's
holidays.
Mr. and Mrs, B. Pinder of Stuart, B.
0., arrived on Monday and are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Lymn
during the Chrlstinus holidays.
Carrie Richardson and Alice Cole
man, who ha've been utteuding Normal
School at Victoria, and have been successful in passing their preliminary
examinations, are home for the Christmas holidays.
Mr. George O'Brien, Safety First
Engineer of the' Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir. Ltd., returned from an oill
clal visit to the Wellington Mines and
Ladysmith on Wednesday.
Mrs. James Dick and son left for
Alberni Thursday morning.
Miss Maudie Evans arrived in town
during tho week, and will spend the
holiday with her sister, Mrs. J. Bergland.
Miss J. McDonald arrived from Fernie on Tuesday evening and will spend
Uie holiday here.
Mr. and Mrs. Mcladdo arrived on
Saturday lust on a visit to Mr. aud
Mrs. It. Robertson.
Mr. James Dick leaves for Alberni
Saturday morning.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd., left for Victoria
Tuesday and returned Thursday, accompanied by Miss Violet Oraham,
Miss A. E. Hurst left for Victoria
Friday morning.
Miss Nell Kouald arrived In town
Thursday, and will spend Christmas
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S.
Ronald.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Ladysmith
Monday and returned Thursday.
Mr. R. Brown left for Nanaimo Tuesday morning.
Mr. F. Ray left for Victoria Friday
morning.
Mr. E. Haywood left for Victoria
Thursday morning.
Miss Delina WilBon, of Victoria, arrived home Friday and wlll spend the
holiday with her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
T, Wilson.
Miss O'Connell left for Victoria Monday morning.
Air. C. M. LIghtbody, of the stall of
tlie Canadian Bunk of Commerce, left
for Vancouver Thursday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Marshall left for
Alberni Thursday morning.
Mr. George Millard arrived in Courtenay on Monday.
Mr. C. Reynolds returned fro Ladysmith Wednesday and left tor Vancouver on Thursday.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
Who Is the new "minister" in town?
Which Oilice Boy spent .$1.50 on a
face massage and all the "lixln's" to
go to the High School social? McLean
has some nice engagement rings?
Why the new broom at the City Hall?
It is a hint for a clean sweep?
Why one of the Council complained
of cold feet Monday evening? Ami the
election so near?
Why "a" certain sweet brown-eyed
girl is more thun usually happy these
days?
Who IS the mysterious lady?
Why so much Christmas "spirit" this
year?
Why a Cumberland beauty is seeking mistletoe?  Quite unnecessary!
Who was the fellow that dropped a
parcel near the Islander olllce Wednesday night—and broke the bottle?
To one and all we extend
hearty greetings for a
Merry Christmas
and a
Prosperous New Year
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38. Limited
CLOSING EXERCISES
AT PUNTLEDGE SCHOOL
A ('IKSTION OF WILL
"I hear Mrs. Rox Is going to break
her husband's will." "How can she?
He never lind one after he married
her."
Land for Sale
To close out nn estate the following
parcels of land are offered for sale:
I'url l.:is acres, more or less, and
purl Til.*!!! acres, more or lens, of Lot
lil, Newcastle District, II.C, and com-
iininlj- known us tho "George Stevens
property.''
Persons desiring to acquire said
lands or any pnrt thereof may Becure
particulars respecting the same and
the price asked therefor, by writing to
the undersigned.
CLAUDE L. HARRISON
Barrister, Etc.
Law Chambers VICTORIA, B.C.^
Church Notices
HOLT TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
CHRISTMAS DAY.
Celebration of Holy Communion at
11 a.m.
Sunday, December 201 li.
Children's Christmas Service at 2.30
p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. G. It. Kinney, U.A, F.H.I..S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday at
7.30 p.m.
S. B. Club, Tuesday at 7.30 p.m.
Basketball Clubs, Tuesduy night.
Bible Class Study, Wednesday, 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday at 7.30.
W.H.O. Club, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Sunday School at 2.30.
Evening Service at 7.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday evening
at 7.30.
Choir practice Friday evening at
J.30.
Before a large and very interested
audience the pupils of Puntledge
School rendered their closing exercises
on Thursday last. The programme
was as follows:
1. Overture, Miss Marshall.
2. Song, "Hey, for a Merry ChrlBt-
mas," school pupils.
4. Duet, "Berceuse," Douglas and
Mrs. Hamilton.
5. Dialogue, "That Bag," Dorothy
and Myra Thompson.
0. Song, "Bring Back Those Wonderful Days," Mr. Gamlen.
7. March, "Merry Christmas," primary children.
8. Duct, Angus nnd Mrs. Hamilton.
9. Recitation, "Christmas Morn,"
primary children.
10. Song, "When tho Great Red
Dawn Is Shining," MIsb Marshall, Miss
Cornwell.
11. Violin and piano duet, Agnes
and Mrs. Hamilton.
12. Dance of the Fairies, primary
girls.
13. Recitation, Myrtle Haines,
Verua Ramsay, Cuthbert Gamlen.
14. Piano solo. Gertrude Pettys.
15. Play, "The Patriotic Auction,"
school pupils,
10. Piano nnd violin duet, Douglas
and Mrs. Hamilton.
17. Song, "Come, Sing a Song for
Santa."
Miss Marshall presided at the piano.
Father Christmas Distributes Gifts.
During the lust carol Santa Claus
entered and distributed the gifts.
Miss Marshall was the happy re
clplent of an umbrella and gloves pre
sentod by Mr. Pettys, master of cere
monies, on behalf of the school children and residents of Puntledge.
After the concert dancing was
dulged in until one o'clock.
Public Notice
m
ROBT. DOLLAR CAMP
DANCE AT UNION BAY
Monte's   Five-Piece   Orchestra
Highly Complimented on Its
_ Splendid Dance Music
On Friday evening last a dance was
held In the School at Union Bay under
the "auspices of the Robt. Dollar Logging Camp, at which there was a big
attendance and a very happy time was
spent by the merry throng, dancing"!
being kept up until 4 o'clock.
Monte's Five-Piece Orchestra was
engaged for the occasion, to play until
2 a.m., but the splendid music rendered by this popular aggregation of
music artists so pleased the dancing
folk that they Insisted on the orchestra
playing until 4 o'clock.
MORE CRITICAL
"Then wc are engaged?"
"Of course."
"And I am the flrBt girl you ever
loved?"
"No, dear; but I'm harder to please
now than I used to be,"
PUBLIC NOTICE ls hereby given to
the Electors of the Municipality of the
Corporation of the, City of Cumberland
that I require the presence of the said
Electors at the Municipal Council
Chambers on the 10th day of January,
1921, at 12 o'clock noon for the purpose of electing persons to represent
them in the Municipal Council as
Mayor and Aldermen (six) and Police
Commissioners (two), and School
Trustee (one).
The mode of nomination shall be as
follows:
The candidates shall be nominated
In writing; the writing shall be subscribed by two voters of the Municipality as proposer and seconder, and
shall be delivered to"'the Returning
Officer at any time between the date of
the notice and two p.m. of the day of
the nomination: the said writing may
be in the form Numbered 5 ln the
Schedule of this Act, and shall state
the names, residence and occupation
or description of each person proposed
in such manner as sufficiently to Identify each candidate, and In the event
of a poll being necessary, such poll
wlll be opened on the 13th day of
January, 1921, at the .City Council
Chambers, of which each and every
person is hereby required to take
notice and govern him or herself accordingly.
The qualifications necessary for
Maybr are: (1) Must be of the full
age of 21 yearB and a British subject,
possessed of unencumbered property
ln the Municipality of Cumberland of
not less than $1000, which has been
registered In the Land Registry Offlce
In nominee's name for six months preceding date of coming election.
Qualifications necessary for Alderman, Police Commissioner or School
Trustee are: Must be of full age of
21 years, British subject and possessed
of unencumbered property In Municipality of Cumberland of not less than
$5110, which has been registered ln the
Land Registry Olllce not less than six .
months previous to date of somlng
election.
Given under my hand at Cumberland,
B.C., this 24th day of December, 1920.
(Signed) T. MORDY,
Returning Officer.
LOST
LOST—Wednesday night, on Dunsmuir
Avenue, a Silver Watch. Suitable
reward on returning to the Islander
Ofllce. 1-52
WANTED
WANTED—A SECOND-HAND HIQH-
land Fling Costume, for girl of 9, or
material suitable to be made Into
Apply Box 310, Cumberland.
ANNOUNCEMENT
F. C. Fraiee, Chiropractor, has opened an offlce at Mrs. Cairns', Victoria
Street, Courtenay. Consultation Free.

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