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The Cumberland Islander May 19, 1923

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Array CUMBERLAND ISLANDER   *
With which Ii consolidated the Cumberland .News.
FORTY-SECOND  YEAR.—No.  20.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, MAY 19th, 1923.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Complete Arrangements For
Kiddies Monster Celebration
A Bpeclal meeting of the commit-
teeB in connection with tlle Victoria
Day Celebration was held in the
Council Chambers on Thursday evening. The plans for this celebration
to be held on the Recreation Grounds
of this City on May 24lh are well under way, and given favorable weather
conditions tbe affair promises to be
a gigantic success, one of the most
glorious events ever staged tn Cumberland.
Special Train
The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited with tlielr usual generosity have consented to run a special train. Tills will leave Union
Day at 9:30 a.m. for Cumberland and
return at 9:00 p.m. This will enable
those from outside points to participate in the sports.
Interesting list of Events
Thirty-seven events are programmed to take place between 10 a.m.
and (J p.m. There will lie Items, of interest to old nnd young, one and all.
'Hie Cumberland City Band will be
In attendance all day. There will be
junior girls nnd boys races, obstacle
races, shoe scrambles, sack races,
and numerous other exciting events.
Pupils Assemble
At 1.15 p.m. Ihe pupils of the Cum-
lierland Public Schools will assemble
on tlle School Grounds. The procession will be headed by the Cumberland City Band followed by a beautifully decorated float for Queen Olga
and her attendants. It is expected
that a large number of decorated
cars will follow. The grand parade
will proceed via Penrith Ave., 3rd
Street and Dunsmuir Ave. to the Recreation Grounds. The committees
in charge have arranged for eight
trucks for the transportation ot the
younger children.
Queen Crowned
At 2:00 p.m. a song by the pupils of
the school and an address by Mayor
Jarnham will be followed by the
crowning of the May Queen, Miss
Olga Owen. She will be crowned by
the ex-queen, MIbs Johnson. Maypole
dances, and folk dancing will be given
by the pupils.
An especially interesting event to
sport lovers will take place at 4:00
p.m. when the Junior Football competition will be held.
The various committees are enthusiastically working for the success
of file affair, and It ls hoped that
they will receive the co-operation
and support of the entire district.
TICKET "117"
LUCKY NUMBER
"The first ticket drawn for the beautiful box of home-made candy raffled by the Macabees at the Children's
Fancy Dress Ball has remained unclaimed. This was again drawn for,
ticket 117 being the lucky number,
won by Mr. Nell McLeod.
CASE DISMISSED
The case of Robert Walker, Fire-
boss, No. 4 mine of the Canadian Col.
llerles (ID Ltd. who was prosecuted
under Section S, of the Coal Mines
Regulation Act on February 8th, was
brought before Magistrate Baird last
Thursday afternoon, and wns dismissed.
MINISTER OF
PUBLIC WORKS
VISITS COURTENAY
The Honorable W. H. Sutherland,
Minister of Public Works paid Courlenay a visit on Thursday evening
for the purpose of Inspecting the
work that ia being done on the new
bridge being constructed over the
Courtenay River. He wns accompanied by Mr. Phillip, Chief Engineer
of the Department. They left for
Powell River on Friday morning
nnd lt ls likely they will return this
way prior to their return to Victoria.
Mr. Wm. Weir, Ford Sales Manager for British Columbia paid a business visit to Corfield Motors last
week-end.
Mr. Dayton, President of the
Knlght-Hlgman Motor Co. of Vancouver paid a visit to his old friend
Mr. H. Everett this week.
Try Blunt k Ewart Ltd. (or a wash
and polish Job on your ear or for a
satisfactory repair job.
LADIES' AID MEET
CUMBERLAND RESIDENT
PASSES AWAY
MEETING OF
CITY COUNCIL
At  the monthly meeting   of    the
Ladies' Aid of Grace Methodist Church
held ou May 2nd, the following officers  were  elected  for  the    coming I
yoar.
Mrs.   Richardson,  President;   Mrs. |
Mounce. Vice-President; Mrs. Brown-
sey. Secretary; MrB. Haywood, Treasurer.
Will Hold Garden  Party
It was decided by the ladles to hold
a Garden Party on Wednesday, June j
Ctli   on   Mrs.   Mounce's   lawn.   There
will    be    homecooklng    stalls,    Ice,
Cream, afternoon tea, etc. Something j
new In the form of "Novelty Trees"
Will he Introduced. These will be for
grown-ups  and  children.
Reserve the date! Wednesday, June j
6 th.
CRIBBAGE COMPETITION
The  successful  winners    for    the
double-handed  crlbbage  competition
given nt "Joe and Mac's Place" was
won by Mr. J. Kirkbrlde, firBt prize,
and Mr. II. Waterfield, second prize.
The  following are  the draws  for
the Single-handed competition:
M.   Stewart  plays  M.   McAdams
R. Brown plays E. Pirrodl
.1. Scavarda plays H. Bates
T.  Plstonl plays H. Waterfield
Peanuts   plays  J.   Kirkbrlde
F. Crawford plays E. D. Pickard
J. 1'earn plays H. Gobs
A. Thompson plays S. Dough
J. Damonte, Jr. plays J. Larrigan
J. Bnigenlr plays J. L. Brown.
Don't forget  Flremens' Dance on
Monday, June 4th, In the Ilo-llo Hall.
CERTIFICATES CANCELLED
Infraction of Mines Regulations
at Cumberland Followed by
Action by Department.
Suspension of their special certificates for eighteen months has been
ordered In the case of Thomas Cunliffe. shift boss, and Mike Ballotovltch,
coal miner, as an outcome of recent
police court prosecutions and convictions against them at Cumberland.
Cunliffe was charged with having
violated the regulations governing
the mines of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited, by firing shots
In No. 4 mine without taking the required precautions; Ballotovltch was
convicted with having taken underground a safety lamp without firBt
having had the lamp examined by a
competent person. They were each
fined $10 and costs by the magistrate.
The suspension of their certificates
follows Investigation ordered by Hon.
William Sloan, Minister of Mines. The
investigation was made by Mr. W. H.
Wall.
The death occurred on Friday, May
11th of Andrew Beveridge, second
son of Mr. and Mrs. William Beveridge, of this city. The deceased was
in his thirty-seventh year and had
been ailing for some time. During
tbe time of the war in 1917. he served
with the Navy overseas. He will he
greatly missed by a largo circle of
friends. The funeral took place on
Monday afternoon from the family residence, Allen Ave. to the Cumberland Cemetery for Interment, Rev.
•Tunics Hood otfociatlng.
Tho deceased leaves to mourn his
loss, his Mother, Father, and two
brothers, William, of this city, and
Jack wbo Is now ln Vancouver. The
list of floral tributes ls as follows:
Pillow:—Beveridge  family.
Wreath:—G. W. V. A.; Mr. and Mrs.
Halllday and family; Pythian Sisters;
St. Johns Ambulance; Mr. and MrB.
A. Lochart and family; Mr. and Mrs.
J. Robertson; Ladles Auxiliary G. W.
V. A. | Knights of Pythians; Mr. and
Mra. R. Walker; Mr. and Mrs. G.
Robertson   and  family.
Cross:—Mr. and Mrs. C. Whyte;
Mrs. Bruce; Mr. and Mrs. Braes; Mr.
nud Mrs. Conrod.
Spray:—Mr. and Mrs. W. M.
Brown; Jemima Mitchell; Mr. and
Mrs. Banks; Mr. and Mrs. J. Frame;
Mr. and Mrs. D. Hunden; Mr. and
Mrs. D. Bannerman; Mr. nnd Mrs.
J. Bennie; Mr. W. Baird; Mrs. Yarrow; Mr. and Mrs. Freburn; Mr. and
Mrs   Bennet.
Crescent:—Mr. and Mrs. R. Burns,
Nanaimo. Cross: Mr. and Mrs. R.
Henderson and Ella (Nnn). Heart:
Mr. and Mrs. It. Lindsay and family,
.Nanaimo. Anchor.
OMISSION
The City Coucll held a very short
session on Monday evening last. His
Worship, Mayor Parnham occupied
the chair, and with the exception of
Alderman Ledingham. there was a
full attendance.
A [communication from the Vancouver General Hospital claiming
$250.00 for attendance to residents
of tills city was laid over, and will
lie dealt with at the next regular
mooting. Accounts were passed as
usual.
Aldennan Potter, Chairman of lhe
Hoard of Works, lit his regular report, stated that the lot adjoining the
North West Mounted Police qunrters
had been cleared up and the rubbish
removed. In future the police will
see ihat It is nol used as a dumping
ground. He nlso reported that the
City Employees were grading Penrith Avenue nnd several alleyways.
Tlle Mayor and Aldermen are very
anxious to find the party who
dumped n barrel of fish on the City
Dump. The Chief of Police will be
instructed to locate the guilty person.
The tenders for the remodelling of
the Fire Ilnll was laid over until next
meeting.
Ke.urned Men Invited to Attend
Returned men will be invited to attend lhe City Council meeting nnd
give the Knappet report their careful perusal, It is evidently the intention of the Council to serve the
returned Soldiers with a notice asking them to pay up their arrears and
live up to the agreement entered into with  the City.
The City Council decided to participate in the 24th May Parade, and
au in villi t ion will be sent tn the
Ceui'loffny City Council.
Elected By School Children
To Be Queen Of May
In the report of the St. John's Am-
balance  Association,  Home  Nursing
Classes  examinations  published  last i
week Uie name of Mrs.  H. Farmer;
was omitted by the secretary.
NOVELTY BAZAAR
GLORIOUS SUCCESS
CHILDREN'S
FANCY DRESS BALL
GREAT SUCCESS
FAREWELL PARTY FOR
MR.  AND MRS. WOOD
A farewell party was held at the
home of Mr. S. Fraser, Union Bay last
Tuesday evening In honor of Mr. and
Mrs. D. M. Wood who left for Belllngham, Wiash. last Wednesday morn
ing. A very enjoyable time was
spent by all present, many attending
from Cumberland and Royston as
well as Union Bay. The party was |
brought to a close by the singing of
"Auld Lang Syne". Much regret is
felt nt the departure of Mr. and Mrs.
Wood and they take wlUi them the
best wishes of a wide circle of
friends.
OPERATING FINE
DENTAL PARLORS
Dr. Wm. A. Neen and Dr. R. B. Dier
wish to announce the opening of a
modern dental surgery.
No expense has been spared to give
(o the citizens of Cumberland and
District tho same high class and up-
to-date denial service as given ln
onr Vuneouver, Niinnimo and Ladysmlth offices.
The latest and most scientific me.
Hinds nf eliminating pain nre used
In nil dental operations.
Prices are reasonable and within
the reach of all.
Both Dr. Neen and Dr. Dier, specialize In Plate and Bridge Work.
Their office, which Is situated at the
corner of Dunsmuir Avenue and First
St, Cumberland, will be open from
8 to 12 a.m.| 1 to « pjn. and 7 to »
pan.
The  Children's  Fancy   Dress   Ball j
under the auspices of the  Women's
Benefit Association of the  Macabees
was held in ihe Ilo-llo Hall last Frl-
day evening, and was a tremendous
success in every way.   The hall was
tilled  to  its  utmost  capacity,  many
adults and children coming in from
Union Bay, Courtenay aud other out- j
snde points.   The managing committee of the Association were Mrs. S. j
Davis,   and   Mesdames   Covert,   Gra- j
ham. Hudson, Potter and Davis. Great ]
credit ls due the ladles for Uie splen.
did way in which the affair was managed.
Children Beautifully Costumed
The costumes lorn by the children
were of varied colors and designs
and the effect produced was a beautiful one. This was particularly
noticeable ln the Grand March led
by Miss Alma Conrod and Master Wm.
Bergland. About 120 young people
participated in the Grand March. Au
especially pretty feature was the
Baloon Drill, given by a number of
the younger children. The multi-colored baloons and costumes winding
in and out the different measures of
the drill made a charming picture.
Special mention should also be made
of the French Minuet In which moBt
of the children took part, going
through each measure with a charming grace and simplicity which delighted the spectators.
Flowers Represented
Numerous flowers were represented ln costumes worn by the klddlcB,
alinoBt every flower being In evidence. Very many of these were tho
result of painstaking care and preparation on the part of the mothers
and adults. This waa much appreciated by the Association.
Ticket "401" unclaimed
Ice Cream and. home made candy
were sold during the evening. The
children In fancy dress were supplied
these free of charge. Ticket "201"
was the lucky number for the handsome box of home-made candy which
was raffled. However, up to the
present time, this has been unclaimed.
Dancing for adults commenced at
10:00 p.m. and this was well attended. Music for the evening was supplied by a three piece orchestra consisting of Mrs. Hudson, and Messrs.
Plump and Walker.
Last Wednesday afternoon in the
Anglican Hall the Ladles' Axillary of
Holy Trinity Church held a novelty
bazaar which without doubt was one
of the most successful held in Cumberland tor some time. From 3 to 6
p.m. th. hall was the scene of lively excitement no numerous were the
visitors.
Novelty Features
The novelty features of the afternoon were the every-day-ln-the-week
stalls. These were most appropriately and beautifully decorated showing
evidence of very careful planning and
hard work on tho part of the ladles.
Predominant in the decorative
scheme were dogwood flowers and
colored streamers, the latter closely
interwoven forming canopies for the
various booths. Monday's stall was
one devoted to washing and Ironing,
and was In charge of Mesdames Walton, Keller, Mumford and Harllng;
Tuesday, Shopping (Fancy wCrk.
etc.) Mrs. Treen and Mrs. Finch;
Wednesday, Afternoon Tea, Mesdames Pickard, Johns and Treen;
Thursday, Home Cooking — Mrs.
Bryan and Mrs. Symons; Friday,
Home Cleaning — Mrs. Short and
Mrs. Pinfold; Saturday, Home Gardening — Mrs. Leversedge and Mrs.
Cameron.
Busy Bee Stall
The young people's club called the
"Busy Bee" were In charge of the
stall for home made candy. They nlso looked after the Ilsh pond. Ice
Cream wns served during the afternoon.
Over fcHilMMI
The ladles were amply compensated for their many efforts to make
the Bazaar the decided success It
was. It is expected that the amount
realized, will exceed $250.00.
Miss Olga Owen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Owen of this city,
| has been elected by the School Children as Cumberland's May Queen for
I 1923. Queen Olga was born In Nanaimo fourteen years ago, and has
' been a resident of this city for the past five years.
Cumberland Boys Are Now Junior
Soccer Champions Of The Province
j Defeat Riverview 1—0 at Vancouver After Thrilling Game.
Riverview Misses Penalty.—
So does Farmer-Miller Scores
One—Boffy Makes a Hit.
By Alex. S. Denholme
MINING INSTITUTE
NAMES OFFICERS
Vancouver, May 14.—The British
Columbia division of the Canadian ln.
stitutc of Mining and Metallurgy today elected Mr. Thomas Graham Its
chairman, Mr. H. G. Nichols, vice-
chairman for the Coast district; Mr.
M. E. Purcell, of Rossland, vice-
chairman for the Interior, and Mr.
H. Mortimer Lamb, secretary-treasurer.
The retiring president. Mr. F. W.
Guernsey, commented on the recent
nctlvity ln mining, staling that lt was
a matter of congratulation that production of 1922 showed an Increase
of 26 per cent over that of 1921.
Hon. William Sloan, Minister of
Mines, expressed his appreciation of
the work the institute was doing and
referred in optimistic strain to the
prospects for mining activity during
the preaent year.
Fighting like Trojans—combined
with superior football was what won
the Junior succer championship of
the province for the Cumberland Juniors who defeated the Riverview
team of Vancouver last Saturday 1
to 0. The score was a fair indication
of the play which was crammed with
thrills from start to finish.
Several hundred people attended
the match which was played in Athletic Park and it was evident from the
expressions of the crowd Cumberland
had as many supporters ns the Riverview team. Bcforo the game the
O. B. Allan cup which was at stake
rested 111 front of the front of the
grandstand beside Acting Mayor W.
Owen, who later presented the cup
to the winners. Mayor C. E. TlBdale
was to have presented the cup but
was nbsent from the city.
Boffy Brilliant
Young Boffy gave the nicest display of any goalkeeper of Junior
rank seen in action here for many a
day and was cheered by the crowd
on several occasions for his brilliant
work. The defense of Cumberland
was Impregnable with "Cotton" Miller hoofing Ihe pigskin from tho
danger zone limes too numerous to
mention nnd wus ably supported In
the back line by Marshall-always
consistent. The half line wns a
Chinese puzzle to the opposing forwards and Messrs. Wlcr, Farmer and
Mitchell made monkeys nut of their
opponents time and again. Aa was
expected lhe weakness of the team
was In the forward rank and It was
the brilliant work of Jock Stevenson nnd Andy Robertson that proved
the salient points of the attack.
A  Bustling Attack
Riverview did nol play the same
brand of soccer that Cumberland
dished up. Combination was not carried out as effectively and what they
lacked either In combination play
and football they nnulo up lu their
hustling attacks. Featuring the work
of the (cam was the grand defense.
Crawford the right back put up a
splendid display. McArthur the centre
forward was the bulwark of a strong
forward rank whicli was the most
formidable part of the team.
Tho toss was won by Riverview
who elected to kick the sun at their
back. They pressed from tbe start
and for the first ten minutes had the
upper hand. Waites, the Inside right
drove one at Boffy which tho goalie
had to fall on and saved ln brilliant
fashion. For a moment play reverted and "Peanut" Robertson narrowly
missed the goal mouth after some
fine pnslng leading to the goal
mouth,
Stevenson Dangerous
Boffy again was called upon to defend again and was applauded by tho
crowd when he jumped almost to the
top bar tipping behind a high drive
from McArthur'a toe. Cumberland began to find themselves and the halves
did their stuff. Farmer was always in
the limelight hut for placing the
ball a little too far ahead of the forwards. Joek Stevenson and Donald
Watson played a nice game on tho
left wing and the former wns the
most dangerous among the forwards. One Nelllce ln clearing sent
the bnll to the former who came
closer to scoring for Cumberland
than nt any previous stage when It
sizzled past the wrong sldo of tlio
post. Play was even and each goal
had a narrow escape from being penetrated.
Almost ii final
Then the fun commenced. Cumberland pressed and after a scrimmage
title goalie was lured from Ills
charge and lo save the ball from going across the goal line. Crawford
the right back fell on the ball grabbing It wilh his hands. Johnnie Robertson had It nt his feet but was
powerless to score. Referee Webb
awarded  Cumberland  a  penalty.
Took  Penally  Three Times
Amos Farmer captain of Ihe team
decided t<> take the penalty himself.
The first lime he hit the top bar and
was ordered lo shoot again for players crossing the penalty area line.
Players again repeated their action
and the hall sailed harmlessly Into
the net. For Ihe third time Fnrmer
(Continued on page 2)
Dont forget Flremens' Dance on
Monday, Jnne 4th, In lhe llo.Ilo Hall. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  MAY,  19th,  1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W  BICKLE
THE WORLD DO MOVE
SATURDAY,  MAY,   19th.   1923
KEEPING POSTED
It used to be an old-time joke that
some people were so found ot newspapers that they even rend lhe advertisements.
That might have been a humorous
remark years ago. At that period
some merchants would run an advertisement a whole year unchanged.
Clothing dealers would start 111 advertising January first with notice of
overcoats for sale, and would keep
on advertising overcoats until July.
Today people read advertising as
u matter of business. The women
read it Just ns a farmer reads price
current or a banker reads the financial laws. They thereby get ideas as
to how they can save on household or
personal expenses.
Probably a majority of the women
turn first to the advertising of their
favorite merchants and then read the
news later. The men also read the
advertising carefully. Even it they
have no business enterprises of their
own, they are interested in the advertising ns a reflection of the business
life of the town.
Hence, it is perhaps unnecessary
to suggest to the readers of this
newspaper that its advertising columns are worthy of the most careful
attention. Still it is worth while to
say that there Is no time when advertising is worth such careful attention as in midsummer. All kinds
of merchants have the proposition bo
fore them of cleaning out their stocks
before cool weather comes on. That
takes a good deal of publicity. The
goods will not move of themselves.
The public must be told about them
and in some detail.
The slory of what is happening ill
the stores will be found 111 the advertising columns of this newspaper.
Most of the newspaper readers are
teeing it, and it will repay their closest scrunlty.
Quite recently two aviators traveled across the continent, from const
to coast, in twenty-seven hours.
Through the night they rushed above
the clouds and when the dawn broke
[ they were relieved to recognize far
1 elow them a ring around a cemetery that assured them they had kept
the course and were headed right.
What a marvelous achievement!
Yet we read of this amazing feat ln
the evening papers and turned away
to the routine habits of the hour.
It ls an amazing age in which we
live, and no one can foresee the end
of human accomplishment within the
next decade.
To think that we should have lived
to see the day when men should fly
through the air, almoBt from Bun to
sun, a journey that fifty years ago
required months of hard travel.
Truly the world does move, and this
nicclianic.ll age is bringing marvelous
achievements. And yet we hear
young men rail at the lack of opportunity and see them waBtlng their
time In pool rooms.
What a splendid thing to be a young
man today if one only had the gumption to realize the possibilities of
youth.
llev. Livingstone—says there are
only a few persons bull-headed
enough to risk a long conversation
with a book agent.
Davis—says about one-fourth of
the world's work is repairing someone's mistakes.
*    *   *
The old-fashioned boy who was
whipped for playing marbles for
keeps now lias a son who won't even
play matrimony for keeps.
CHOOSE YOUR FRIENDS
A man Is known by the company
he keeps. You certainly are Judged
by your associates. In every small
town there are cliques and sets and
the Main street crowd never fooled
anybody. Did you ever stop to think
how you are actually Impressed, interested and molded by the circle In
which you move? It is your associates who stir your emotions. They
apply (he torch. Friends blow the
coals, stir the embers of your
thoughts. Companions start the pot
to boiling, rake up the dormant ambitions and rip up our natures.
If it is a raw and dreary day the
weather warps our disposition. It is
the train that is late that gets our
goat. We are all creatures of conditions that irritate or comfort us.
Our advice to our friends is to associate always with better brains
and bigger hearts. Cross the street
when you see a grouch coming. Avoid
the pessimist as you would stay away
from a house quarantined by a case
of smallpox.
People who upset you, who lash
you into a fury, stall your engine,
ruffle and fluster you, are dangerous
associates. People who waste your
time with idle chatter or lead you
away from the path of duty are bandits holding: you up. Walking with
tho wise, taking with the worthy encourage the right emotions and aid
your digestion.
Tramp with the.lame and you will
eventually sleep on a pool table.
Had habits are easily learned, but
virtues must be grafted on.
Look around and see If we are not
all judged by the company we keep.
THRILLING FILM
FEATURES WES BARRY
Freckled Screen Star Plays Heroic Role in "Heroes of the
Street."
Wesley Barry, the lad of the many
freckles and the smile that never
wears off, is announced for an appear
mice at the llo-Ilo theatre, Monday
and Tuesday, where he will be seen
in his latest picture. "Heroes of the
Street."
In this Warner Brothers production Wesley Is seen as a plucky boy
whose bravery helps him do things at
which his grown-up superiors fall.
Ile Is cast In a role that gives him
unusual opportunities to reveal a
side of him that was not called out ln
his other pictures, "Penrod," "School
Days" and "Rags to Riches." In them
he was a mischief-loving, frolicking
urchin always ready for a prank;
here he Is all this plus a new quality
Unit will the more endear him V> his
many followers among the men, women and children of this city.
Humor and pathos are Bald to be
persuasively blended ln this picture,
which wns written by Lem Parker
aad adapted for the Bcreen by Edmund Gouldlng. It is the story of
Mickey Callahan, very much Irish, as
his name indicates, and showing it
in the numerous fistic victories over
fellows of corner gangs who do their
best to lick him and end his lucky
streak. Mickey can handle them one
nt a time, and when they come on
Uio fast his bull terrier "Camisole"
ls always ready to do a little pursuing and come back with the tag
end of a pants seat. In the midst of
his checkered boyish life enters a mystery and tragedy, and then Mickey
changes (o n serious lad out to find a
certain crook and murderer.
A tender love story is interwoven
In this screen play, directed by William Beaudine. and including the
following supporting cast: Marie Prevost, Jack Mulhall, Wilfred Lucas,
Aggie Herron, Al Walling, Phllo Mc
Cullough, "Peaches" Jackson, Joe
Buttcrworth, Phil Ford, Wedgewood
Nowell, Lillian Leeds and Billie Beau
dine, Jr.
THE ILO-ILO THEATRE
RECEIVES A FAMED
FILM STORY
'The Flame of Life," Starring
Priscilla Dean Booked For
Early Showing.
Special   Bargain   Sale
Of Victoria Day Requirements
-FORONE    WEEK   ONLY-
Ladies, Misses and Childrens WHITE CANVAS FOOTWEAR, HOSIERY. WASH-
HATS, UNDER VESTS, RIBBON SPECIALS, FRENCH LINGERIE, WASH
GOODS, SILK DRESSES, SPRING and SUMMER COATS. SUITS and BLOUSES
i^aiaa'acHEiffi'aaaiaa^^ i^iBaiie^HiEEiaia'aaeM^^
MENS DEPT.
Special Discount of 20 per cent off all Mens, Youths and Boys Clothing During this
Sale.
10 per cent discount off all White and Brown Canvas Shoes and Sneakers.
Special Bargains in Boys Dept. BOYS SHIRTS and SPORT SHIRTS, VELOUR
CAPS, ST. MARGARET SWEATERS.
For further PARTICULARS and Prices—See Posters.
5iEUS@lDVElEV5ISfSI5JSfi3@J5fBfSlSfSIEISI5I5ISfSf@ISI5fBli31 agSIEJoHEliiHc^^
OBSERVATIONS OF A
FEDERAL MEMBER
April 17th,—Gen. Clark of Vancouver Introduced a "Want of Confidence" motion in the Govt, on account of discrimination In freight
rates in B. C. All Conservatives supported it.
The other members from B. C.
pointed out that the case for B, C.
was now before tho Privy Council
and any resolution at this time was
calculated to prejudice our case, if
it was rejected, and if it. passed
would mean the defeat of the Govt,
and the matter have to be begun all
over again. After spending a whole
day, the motion was defeated by vote
but without a division.
April 20th.—All Act passed to restrict the publication ill the Press of
details In dlvorco eases brought before the Courts.
April 23rd.—Proposal to amend the
Naturalization Act so that applicants
do not need to attend the County
Court twice, bul can upply direct to
tne Secretary of State. The Govt,
claim Unit the Secretary of State has
tiie responsibility now and has the
man's career In Canada thoroughly
investigated before grunting naturalization nnd that the proceedings
before tlio County Court are only a
source of expense to the applicant.
Tho Opposition claim that it is putting loo much power Into hands of
one man. the Secretary of State, who
retorts that II is nil in his hands now.
Debate adjourned.
April 24th.—A French Member Introduced a petition signed by 15,000
people in Quebec asking that the
exemption allowed under Income tax
Act of $300.00 for each child be Increased to $500,00 and lo totally exempt a father of five or more children.
April   2Gth.—Second    Reading    of
Francli  Treaty passed  on    division.
"Yeas   134."  Nays,—25.
April 27th.—Act passed to prohibit
the publishing of horse racing, odds,
tips, pools, etc.; also to raise the age
of consent ln cases of assaults ot,
girls, from 14 to 16 years.
April 30th—Govt, introduced Chinese Immigration Act, which excludes  all Chinese  Immigration  ex-
i cept merchants and students, the latter of whom have to   return   after
their education Ib completed.
Objection taken to the lack of dc-
| flnitlon of the word "merchant'' In
Act.    The Minister promised that It
| would be strictly defined by regulation so as to prevent any but bona
fida merchants engaged with considerable capital in a genuine export trade of our goods to China or
, their goods to us. Most of the B. C.
.Members wanted to see the definition In the Act but It went through
"subject to regulation" to be made
by tho Minister from time to time,
lhe argument being thnt lhe Minister
could ut any time change the regulation If found not strict enough, where
as a definition In the Act would have
1 to wait until the House met before
it could be altered.
The Act also contained provisions
j for all Chinamen now In the Coun-
try,  registering within a year from1
I date and u method of arrest and de-
, portatlon of those found Illegally In '
j the Province.
Canadian Highways Act introduced.
Shows thnt B.C. has still $135,000.00 '
; coming to her out of the old grant
hut that the grant will not be renewed thereafter.
Tho edict is that women's hair and
clothes must harmonize. That's why
they're hobbfng it.
Some people go to church more to
snve their faces than to save their
souls.
The struggle of human souls to-
] ward betterment of social conditions
; and mental standards has been the
theme of many great pictures, but in
the Hobart Henley Universal-Jewel
special, "The Flame of Life," coming
to the Ilo-llo theatre, this Friday
aud Saturday the atmosphere ls
strange to the screen.
It In the mining country in the
North of England, where people lived
In squalor and ignorance in 1870,
and were characterized by their mas-
ters as "little better than beasts."
"The Flame of Life" was adapted I
from one of Frances Hodgson Bur- j
nett's most    widely read books and ,
the  Btory  Is  considered    equal    to j
"Little Lord Fauntleroy" In coloring
and atmosphere, and far superior to
It in dramatic  pitch.    Elliott Claw-
eon prepared it for screening.
Pilscllla Dean has the most gripping role of her career In the new of-
fertng. As a woman of the slaving
peasantry, unable to read or write,
and possessing one work dress, and
one good dross, will be seen in a
characterization that is certainly unique.
The artistry of Miss Dean was
never better exemplified. She reaches emotional and dramatic heights;
that are remarkable even for this talented actress. Her performance
holds one spellbound. Tho entire
supporting cast Is excellent and was
chosen with grcnt care to insure perfect balance.
A smashing thrill In lhe form of n
great tunnels and shafts actually
were blown up for the picture, gives
a twist lo the climax, surprising and
gripping.
Robert Ellis, Wallace Beery, Beatrice Burnhnm, Kathryn McOulre,
Fred Kohler, Knmiett King. Nancy
Caswell, Frankie Lee. Richard Daniels and others support Miss Dean.
Hobart Henley directed.
Mr. Beery is at ills best in this
picture. Never has he given a more
convincing performance than he does
In the role of the brutal father who
lacks even the faintest spark of human sympathy. Praise also must be
accorded Robert Ellis for his Interpretation of nn extremely difficult
part. Kathryn McClulrc will bo recalled by many as the former come-!
dy and bnthlng beauty Btar. Her role
In this picture, however, is quite ser-
ious.
HORSE COMES TO
OWN AGAIN IN
THE HOTTENTOT
Horses to the right of him; horses
to the left of him! Horses thai bite
at him; kick nt him; leap garden
walls and land him in the prickliest
bed of shrubbery; crown him with
horse shoes and try to tramp on
him.
Poor Sam! Only a man with a
wooden face could keep from roaring
at the trials ot the horsefeariug
yachtsman In Thomas H. Incc's
screen version of "The Hottentot,"
who literally ls pitched headlong Into the fashionable hunting community which is the background for this
spectacular comedy drama. At the
same time the story has been told so
cleverly that the climax is a breathlessly dramatic sequence whicli
heightens the effects of all the previous laughs. The picture is showing
at the llo-Ilo theatre, Wednesday,
and Thursday, May 23-24th. 	
The producer has done something
novel In this picture for combined
with the hilarious comedy which piles
laugh on lnugh there la an undercurrent of real sympathy for the
chap who is the Innocent victim of
circumstances until finally he has to
risk Ills neck In a dangerous steeplechase or proclaim himself a coward
to the girl he loves. When be makes
his spoctacular ride, carries every
heart wilh him and the comedy becomes tense drama.
"The Hottentot" Isn't written—
it's built, line by line, scene by scene
nnd laugh by laugh., the critics said
when William Collier and Victor
Mapes produced their successful
stage play. Ince has followed the
same process In the screen Btory with
smashing effect. The story Is one of
the simplest and most effective ever
told.
The Intense comedy of the picture
grows out of the fact that while Sam
Harrington Is n crack yachtsman and
has braved the dangers of typhoons,
cannibals and hurricanes without a
quiver, he can't hear a horse snort
without a quiver. Trouble ahead Is
forecast from the moment he comes
snlllng Into the picture in a spick and
span yacht and finds an anciont
horse-rig waiting nt the landing to
taxi him to the country home he Ib
to visit. Trying to escape from the
insistent driver, Sam edges too near
the dejected old horse which promptly comes to life long enought to nip
his shoulder.
A strong note of love interest
throughout tho story makes possible
Uie effective transition from riotous
comedy to intense drama. Madge Bellamy who recently won such national applause in the title role of Maurice Toumeur's magnificent adaption
of "Lorna Doone" plays the role of
the vivacious Peggy with a verve and
charm that supply a Btrong and reasonable motive for the overwhelming
difficulties through whicli Sam
flounders his way to victory.
CUMBERLAND BOYS
NOW JUNIOR CHAMPIONS
(Continued from page 1)
took the kick which was legal but
alas lo the joy of a hundred Riverview hearts the ball sailed high over
the goal into the bleachers in the
rear.
Riverview carried the ball to the
other end and in clearing from a
scrluinge Boffy wns hurt. Pressure
wns still in the Cumberland area but
it ended when Cotton Miller cleared
an Impending gonl. When the whistle
was blown for half time Cumberland
was pressing. Half time: Cumberland 0; Riverview 0.
"Cotton'' Miller The Hero
Ross In goal was tested shortly after the resumption of the interval.
Andy Robertson tore down the right
wing and centred nicely and Ross
Fisted out a near goal. At this stage
Cumberland was pressing and played
a superior brand of soccer. Crawford
lhe right back for Riverview elbowed
in the penalty area. "Cotton" Miller
took the kick and scored the winning
goal with a high drive to the left
corner of the net.
Riverview smartened up and made
a determined effort to score. After a
lino rush down the field Boffy was
forced to clear at close quarters and
in doing so was pounced upon by two
opposing forwards. Boffy was
charged hy referee Webb with holding the ball from play. A free kick
In the goal mouth was awarded. Excitement ran high. Cumberland lined
up In front of the goal, the ball was
pased to the wing by the Riverview
man but the ball driven hard at the
goal met Miller's boot which saved
the situation.
Missed a Penalty
Cumberland (hen assumed the offensive. Andy Robertson was almost
In the net but was brought down at
the critical moment. Donald Watson
crossed nicely and Jock Stevenson
nearly scored. Cumberland's defence was In great form and Jlmmle
Weir and Mick Mitchell on the half
line showed their superiority.
Cotton Miller then conceeded a penalty when In the act of pointing his
fingers. He raised his hand at a
hard drive of the ball a few yards in
front of him. McArthur took the penalty for Riverview and lt is said
failed to score from a penalty for the
first time this year when the ball
missed the post by three feet.
"Peanut" Robertson received a
severe sprain of his left wrist in coming Into violent contact with mother
earth and went off for five minutes.
Still further weakened by the loss of
Johnny Robertson who was carried
off with a twisted knee and remained
off for the rest of the game Riverview started a dangerous attack.
Cumberland Only  Nine .Hen
Hopes ran high in the breasts of
the Riverview supporters ln the closing minutes with their team on the
offensive. Marshall saved a sure goal
at Ihe right side of the goal mouth
blocking a daisy cutter. Dewcr at outside left brought the crowd to it's
feet when he hanged one from tho
wing with Boffy hopelessly beaten
but lt whizzed past the wrong side
of the goal. ^fgjj
Handicapped as they were Cumberland tore down to the other end of
the field and after some nice crossing
on the part of Andy Robertson,,
"Peanuts" of the same namesake
could barely reach the cross which
was picked up by Donald Watson
who did not convert It to any advantage. Full time, Cumberland 1,
Riverview 0.
The Teams
The teams: Cumberland; Boffy,
Marshall, Miller, Mitchell, Farmer,
Weir, A.' Robertson, J. Robertson, R.
Robertson, Stevenson and Watson.
Riverview: Ross, Crawford, Nel-
lice, McGee, Tlsdale, Philllpson, Par-
Bonage, Waltes, McArthur, Pleney
and Dewey. Referee Webb. SATURDAY, MAY, 19th,  1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THREE
tf
Be Paris-Gowned at Low Cost / m
M
At Left: Effective long waist
line, smart short sleeve with turnback cuff, Etonian collar. Skirt
of Alltyme Crepe; bodice of Canton. Cocoa trimmed wilh
Sand, Lanvin Creen trimmed White, Ceramic Blue
trimmed White, Navy trimmed Grey. 16-20, 36 and 38.
At Right: Alltyme Crepe frock with coveted lone, line
effect. Flying side panel lined to match while bodice.
Ihdice contrastingly embroidered with siik to tone wilh
skirt and with glittering little French knot.', of gold scattered through design. Puckered hip line and odd girdle
are good touches. Lanvin Green trimmed White, Ceramic
Blue trimmed White. Cinder trimmed White. 16-20,
Jt< and 38.
m Silk Dress
you have always
wanted ...
-at such a little price!
N
'EVER before in-Canada, in the his-   specialized knowledge of silk buying in the
tory of silk dress manufacturing, nave   world's markets, of expert designing by
fashion authorities.
Few makers could afford to buy such enormous supplies of imported silks and raw
materials. None other hr.s the wonderful
manufacturing facilities no"- the style artists
necessary for exclusive creations.
such decidedly reasonable—almost
revolutionary—prices been asked for silk
frocks and sports dresses, Paris-slyled!
In their trimmings, their needling, their
finishing, those last-minute niceties of workmanship; in their exclusively modish lines
inansilip, in uien   exclusively   iiiuuiau  unto    ■• ~™,j  *-■ -..-■-—.  -•
so flatteringly trim; in their exquisite silk Your McMullen silk or sports dress this
fabrics of newest shades—McMullen spring and summer—with its chic truly
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Look for this Label
on Genuine McMuLLKN Dressc
dresses express every refinement
of good taste.
Their amazingly low price—so
welcome to many women of innate taste but modest means—is
the happy result of an intensely
The Henry McMullen Co., Limited, Montreal
Parisian—is wonderful value.
See McMullen dresses at the
store which advertises them in
your local paper.
Learn to look for the McMullen label—Silver
Swan on Turquoise Blue background.
McMullen
SUkcmd2)resses
Stores with a reputation for Fine Merchandise
will gladly show you the newest
McMullen Styles.
FOR   SALE   BY   CAMPBELL'S,   CUMBERLAND
OFFICE CAT
TRACE MARK
BY JUNIUS
. till It reached the moon: but the
candle fell on the farmer's straw, and
i he said I must settle or go to   law.
I And that la the way with the redon
shot;  It never hits the proper spot;
■ nnd the joke you  spring  that    you
1 think so smart; may leave a wound
in some fellow's heart.
You well may grin at thu speeder
who throws dust in your face. They'll
soon be throwing dirt In his.
Now that all stores have delivery
service, about the only thing the
average householder takes home is
his grouch.
Man Is an able creature, but he has
j made 82,647,889 laws and hasn't yet
improved on the Ten Commandments.
I shot an nrrow into the air; It fell
In the distance. I know not where,
till a neighbor sold it killed his calf,
and I had to pay a half. I bought
some poison to slay sonm rots, and a
neighbor swore it killed his cats;
and rather than argue across Ihe
fence, 1 paid him four dollars and
fifty cents. One night 1 sut sailing a
toy balloon .and hoped It would soar
in starling n spring garden, always
make it small enough for your wife
to finish.
The average motorist would rather
run into debt than to run out of gas.
Tiie absent-minded Cumberland
man surveyed himself In the hair
brush instead of the mirror.
"Gracious but 1 need a shave," be
mused.
Looks like the courts arc going to
take "Shiloh," Jack and the game
from tho hewhlskered Benjamin.
Troubles nnd thunder clouds usually seem black in the distance, but
grow lighter as (he approach, aptly.
To get to the top one usually has
to get in on the ground floor.
Maw Creek snys: "Pa has always
pouted a lot. When we wns first married I could make him happy with
kisses, hut now It takes fried chicken.
A narrow mind is one tlmt has not
had wide experience.
Let Vh Smile
The thing thnt goes the farthest
towards making life worth while,
That costs the least and docs the most
is just a pleasant smile,
The smile that bubbles from a heart
that loves its fcllowmen
Will drive nwny the cloud of gloom
and coax the sun again;
It's full of worth and goodness, too,
with manly kindness blent—
It's worth a million dollars, and it
doesn't cost a cent.
I'ps and Downs
Jack sailed out one fine evening
To call on a fair young miss,
And when he reached her residence,
tills:
like
the stairs
Ran up
Her father met him at the door—
He'll never go there any more,
For
he
went
down
like
this.
'"Woman, you make me see red,"
said the youth, as he gazed at her
rougd cheeks and painted lips.
That cafeteria man who ls advertising for a slogan might try: "Heaven helps those who help themselves."
Someone has discovered that It
takes 140 nuts to hold a Ford together
and only one to hold It ln the road.
How much money does the average woman want? asks a lady writer.
"More."—
The reason babies cry is because
everyone says they look like papa.
Be flush and the world is with you
Be broke and you must go lt alone.
Before and After
When she's a sweet young thing
with orange blossoms and a long,
sweeping, white veil, 'n' everything,
the organ strikes up the tune:
"HERE COMES THE BRIDE"
About ten or twelve years of marital meanderlngs, and the organ
might well strike up:
"HERE   COMES   THE   BROOD"
It's a funny thing that a lot ot a
woman's good points consist of curv.
Many an awkward position may be
avoided by keeping to the right, sermonizes.
* *     *
At twenty he thinks he can save
the world; at thirty he begins to
wish he could save part of his salary.
.    .    •
Be Damned
A little bee
Sat on a tree
And then he sat on me.
Oh  Qee.
* ♦     *
A man I know, ate too much angel
food cake the other night and has
felt like the devil ever since.
* *     *
Riding through on the other fellow's efforts is hazardous business.
* .    *
An air service supply company borrowed n coffee ad whicli reads like
this:
"Our parachutes are good to the
last drop."
Fireworks arc pretty—but
don't last long. Don't be a
works" advertiser.
they
"flrc-
The Postofflco Department Is having a NEW experincc. It's getting
along without WORK.
The only way to save daylight is to
. use It.
If you think your work is hard,
how about the hank clerks who count
other people's money all day?
The energy we use in getting even
might he used in getting ahead.
Turn your worries into thoughts
and your liabilities will become assets.
In the old duys a ford was the place
where you crossed the river. Now It's
every place you try to cross the
street.
Think twice before speaking and
then look around to see who's present.
.      .      a
A Donble Scoop
Yesterday, editorially, said the
able journalist, we were the first
newspaper to publish the death of
John L. Smith. Today we are the
first to deny the report. The Bugle Is
always ln the lead.
* *    •
I once knew a man who was so
much in love that he couldn't eat.
Flowers, candy, and theater parties
kept him hungry.
* *     *
"Haven't (lot Time"
Of all the excuses there are
By which this old world    Is    accursed,
This "haven't got time" is by far
The poorest, the feeblest, the worst,
A delusion it is, and a snare;
If the habit Is yours, you   should
shake lt,
For It you want to do what is offered to you,
You'll find time to do It, or make It.
* *     *
My girl's so Ignorant that when 1
told her she had red pigments on her
lips she said, "Naw I ain't neither, I
just washed 'm with n germ killer."
* *     *
It Is estimated thai there are now
enough chances for easy money to
keep our Jails occupied until 1967.
* *     *
What we seem to need In the movies are new faces of a different character and more character.
t    .     *
"I'm beginning to miss by husband," said Mrs. Murphy as the rolling pin grazed her husband's head
and hit the wall.
some day.
Signs
Abe says: "When you catch a girl
studying the marriage ritual the
breach of promise laws and the time
tables to Reno auhc same time you
can figure she's in an uncertain state
of mind."
* *     *
Threatened strike of raisin growers
in California should be of current Interest.
* «     •
What man ls demanding these days
Is a "fllvvlng Wage."
* *     *
When lovely woman stoops to folly she wears sixteen pounds of fur
In summer.
* *     *
Thinking Is the hardest job tn the
world. Thnt's why we have so few
successful men. Most folks avoid
bard thought.
* .     *
"Sltt'n down an' wlshln'
Doesn't change your fate;
Lord provides the flshln'
You must dig the bait."
* •     •
"Oh, 1 just love art," said the soulful maid,
And she heaved a soulful sigh.
"Art who? asked the flapper." I don't
believe
I have ever met the guy."
SYNOPSIS OF
LnNDACTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to $1 an acre; second-class
to 12.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which Is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary improvements on
respective claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims
for five years and make Improvements
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivation ot al least 5
acres before receiving Crown Orant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation
not less than 3 years, and has made
proportionate Improvements, he may,
because of Ill-health, or other cause,
be granted Intermediate certificate of
Improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent
ot $360 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make Improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than 6 years, and Improvements of $10.00 per acre, Including
ii acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required.
Prc-einplor holding Crown Orant
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land in conjunction Willi
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory Improvements
made and residence maintained ou
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as homesltes.
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing und industrial purposes
nrcas exceeding 040 acres may he
leased by one person or company.
.Mill, factory or Industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions Include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upuu construction of a
road to them. Rebate of one-half of
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purchase price, la made.
Pre-Emptors'  Free (Jranls  Act.
The scope of this Act Is enlarged to
1 Include all persons joining and serving with Ills Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act is extended from for one yenr from the doath
of such person, as formerly, until one
your after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege is nlso made re-
trocative.
No fees relating lo pre-emptions
arc due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes are remitted for five
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 1914, nn account of payments,
fees or tuxes ou soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment tn March 31, 1920.
Null-Purchasers uf Crown Lands
Provision mnde for Issuance of
Crown grunts to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lnnds, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where subpurchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, iniri-lia.se price due and
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Applications
i must'he made hy Mny 1. 1920.
0 rating
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic.
development of livestock Industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner, Annual grazing permits issued based on numbers ranged; prio-
*     *     * 1 rlty  for established  owners.    Stock-
Hint to motorists: Be polite to eve-  owners may  form Associations   for
ry pedestrian; he may bo a trafllc .«»| J^EgR ,&»$,
or travellers, up lo ten head. rOUR
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  MAY, 19th, 1923
REVISION OF VOTERS LIST
Comox   Electoral  District
NOTICE is hereby given that I
shall, on Monday, the lSth day of
June. 1923, hold a Court of Revision,
for the purpose of hearing and determining any and all objections
against the retention of any name or
names on the Register of Voters for
tbe Comox Electoral District, Such
Court will he open at the Court
House. Cumberland, at tu o'clock in
the forenoon.
Dated at Cumberland, B. C. May
7th.  1928.
JOHN'   BAIRD,
Registrar   of   Voters.
LABOR ORGANIZATION
IN CANADA, 1922.
Annual Report Issued by Department of Labor Shows another Loss in Trade Union
Membership.—Increase in Expenditure for Trade Union
Benefits.
The figures published in the
Twelfth Annual Report on Labor Organization in Canada, covering the
calender year 1922, which has just
been issued by the Department of
Labor, show that during the three-
year period from 1920 to 1922 there
has been a decline in trade union
membership in Canada of 101,426.
the loss in the last calender year being 166 in hrances and 36.699 in members. The total membership of all
classes of trade unions in the Dominion at the close ot 1922 stood at
276.621, comprised in 2,512 local
branches. There arc in all 92 international organizations operating in
Canada, and between them ihey have
2,108 local branches in the Dominion,
witli a combined reported membership
of 206,150. These Ilgures indicate six
fewer international orfianlzations
operating in the Dominion, with losses of 115 in branches and 16.716 In
members. There are eighteen of
what are termed "nou-intcrnational"
organizations, an increase of three
over the year 1921, with totals of 272
local branches and 22,937 members, a
gain in branches ot eight, but a decrease in membership of 1,507. The
number of independent units of trade
union organizations lias decreased
hy two, there now being 25 such bo.
dies, the reported total membership
being 9.063, a loss ot 6.5S1. The unions commonly known ut "National
nnd Catholic" number 100, with a reported membership of 38„135, a decrease in unions of 14 nnd in members of 6,635. Of the 34 local units
of the One Big Union which were in
existence in 1921 only one reported,
nnd ns the general officers of the
body refused to furnish any information as to Its standing, all of the
non-reporting branches have been
dropped from the report. Tho figures recorded above Indicate that, although the international organizations had the heaviest decrease during the year 1922, this group represents approximately 74 per cent of
the total trade unionists in the Dominion. The membership of nil classes
of organized labor in Canada, as reported to the Deportment for the past
twelve years, has been us follows:
1911 133,132 1912 160,120
1913 175.799 1914 106,163
1(115 148,343 1916 160.407
1917 204,630 1918 248,887
1919 378.047 1920 373,842
1921       313,320 1922 276,621
Trade Union .Membership by Provinces
The 2.512 local branch unions of
nil clnsses iu the Dominion tire divided by provinces us follows: Ontario. 1,046; Quebec, 150; British Columbia, 235; Alberta. 209; Saskatchewan, 163; Manitoba, 134; Nova Scotia, 147; New Brunswick. 114; nnd
Prince Edward Island, 9.
Trade  Union   Membership  In  Chief
Cities
There are in Canada 29 cities, n decrease of two. having not less thnii
20 local branch unions of nil (dosses. The 1.311 branches located In
these cities represent 54 per cent of
the local branches of international
and non-lnternnllonal anil Independent units, nnd contain approximately 42 per cent of tho trade union
membership in the Dominion, as reported from the head offices of the
central organizations. Montreal, as
in tiie past, stands in lirst place
among the cities as to local branches,
having 181 of ull classes of unions.
Including the National ami Catholic,
112 of which reported 35.724 members; Toronto ranks second with 148
branches, 90 of which reported 22,091
members;   Vancouver   stands     third
The Cost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable' and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical instillation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has to be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far us it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the BEST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with the valvee of the matns of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out that It in a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parties he apprehended, they will be prosecuted (o the very fullest extent uf
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
k GREAT
MONEY SAYING EVENT
that should interest every "Man," "Woman," and "Child" in Cumberland.
You won't buy as cheap again for a long, long time so take our advice and buy
shoes now at
Cavin's Great Clearance Sale
May 13th to May 30th
Less Profit and a Quick Turnover
We believe it is better for you and for us also when we take only a few cents
profit on each pair of shoos.—We save you from 20 to 30 per cent and at the same
time increase our volume of trade enormously.
Here are a low bargains wo are offering.   Wo have hundreds more in our store.
One line of Mens Solid leather Black Calf
Shoes, round toe. Gopd year welted.—Just
in. Any Size. Especially
priced ;it     	
S5.75
A few pairs of Ladies White Canvas
pumps high heels and with nice buckles.
To be sacrificed
at
$1.50
One line of Mens Solid Leather Good Year
welted Brown Calf Shoes, recede toe. Sizes from G to 71/o, Special (fir rjr
sale price      tpD. I O
A large number of Mens Dress Shoes, odd
lines and sizes. Values up to $10.50 to be
sold at the give-away (fin rfC
price of        tpOe I D
We are offering a large number of ladies
pumps and Oxfords too numerous to mention here at real give-away prices from
$1.75 to $4.50
These are all real bargains and it will
pay you to look them over.
A large number of Mens Solid    Leather
work shoes all good make. To be sold at
loss than cost. Extra
special value   	
Leckies Youths School
Shoes at 	
$3.75
$4.50
I.eckies Double Sole Miner
Shoes   	
$5.50
A few pairs of Ladies white Canvas Hi- One line of Misses Pat   Ankle   Straps.
lace Shoes, leather soles   with   medium Leckie made. Value $3.75.   Special sale
heels. Values up to $4.75 to    (fi-t   Ijr price
be sold at        JplilO at    	
$2.50
In fact shoe bargains are to be had at this sale for every member of the family. For
Mother — Dad and the Kids.
Call around to the shoe store a look these bargains over and be convinced that
we are offering you the biggest values ever offered in Cumberland.
CAVIN'S   SHOE   STORE
"EVERY PAIR GUARANTEED"
Impossible For You to Get More
Tire Value—Needless to Get Less
DUNLOP
TERES
Matchless
as a
Non-Skid
Supreme
in
Mileage
with "li brunches, 57 of whicli report-
il 0.1G3 members; Ottawa is fourth
with 73 branches, 55 of which report-
d U,40fi members. Other cities In order of branches of all classes aro:
Winnipeg, 71 branches, 50 reporting
6,166 members; Quebec, 08 branches,
12 reporting 0,750 members; Hamilton. 04 branches. 12 reporting 3.703
members; Calgary, 58 branches, 41
reporting 3.821 members; London, 57
branches, 81 reporting 3,189 members; Edmonton, 55 branches, 41 re-
portlng 3,518 members; Victoria, 41
branches. 31 reporting 1.528 members; St. John, 37 brnnches, 20 reporting 2,103 members; Saskatoon,
1-1 branches, 24 reporting 1,16.1 members; Ileglnn. 34 branches, 26 reporting 1.231 members; Halifax, 32
branches, 22 reporting 2,101 members;
Moose Jaw, 32 brnnches, 22 reporting 1.103 members; Windsor, 30
brunches, 10 reporting 1.348 members; St. Thomas, 20 branches, 21 reporting 2.203 members; Fort Wllli-
nm, 27 branches, 10 reporting 812
reporting 727 members; Drandon, 25
members; Ilnuitford, 25 branches, 17
brunches, 21 reporting 1,080 members; Moneton. 22 branches, 11 reporting 1,780 members; Kingston,
22 branches, 13 reporting 454 members; Sault Sto. Marie, 22 branches,
in reporting 772 members; Stratford,
22 brunches, II reporting 1,212 members; I.othbrUlRo. 21 1.ranches, 18 reporting  1,083 members, Belleville, 20
branches, 17 reporting 1.071 members; Niagara Falls, 20 branches. 10
reporting 873 members; Peterborough, 20 branches, 15 reporting 458
members.
Trade I'nlon llcncliciiirj  lent tire.
The report also contains information as to expenditures made by labor
organizations for beneOt purposes,
the disbursements amounting to many
million of dollars. Of the 02 International organizations operating lu
Canada 58 reported the amounts paid
out during 1022 for ono or more benefits, the expedlture for each class
of benefit being as follows:
Death  henents   $8,516,123
Strike   benefits    13,540.717
Sick nnd accident benefits 1,440,408
Unempl, and Irav. benefits 753,704
Old age pensions nnd other
henents       2,113,777
Four of the eighteen non-lntcrnn-
tionul organizations reported having
expended $41,180 for benefit purposes,
the lnrgcst amount ever expended In
nny one year for henents by these
bodies. The disbursements for benefits by the International organizations nlso show an Increase of ?2.-
288.893 over the expenditures for
1021.
lloiicllts Paid by I.ncul Brandies
llesldes Uie   expenditures   ot   the |
central   bodies   a  statement   Is   also
published In the report showing the
The Secret of a Beautiful Skin
Cleopatra knew it. That was the secret of
her power." Every day her skin was thoroughly
cleansed with palm and olive oils. Then as now
these oils were famed for their mild, soothing,
cleansing qualities.
She too used other cosmetics, but every day
these were removed by thorough cleansing. In
this way she was able to keep her tkin smooth,
firm, fresh and youthful.
Today these same oils are scientifically
blended in famous Palmolive Soap. They give
it mildness, wonderful soothing qualities, profuse creamy and refreshing lather.
Powder and rouge will not harm the skin if
you wash daily with a mild soap. A thorough
cleansing with Palmolive will tone your skin
and help it do its own beautifying. Smoothness
and a charmingly natural color will result.
You can buy Palmolive Soap at all first
c,«s  Dealers.
Made in Canada
Volume end EfUcitncy
Produce !fcent
(futility for
10<
amount paid in benefits for Ihe year
1022 by local branch unions In Call-
adn to tlielr own members. The
amount disbursed aggregated 8535,-
prevlous yenr, the total dfsburse-
450, n decrease of $008,105 over the
ments for each class of benellt being:
Death   benefits    $121,278
Unemployed benefits     48,643
Strike henents    123.003
Sick henents      201,107
Other   benefits         411.720
Other Important features nf Ihe
lieporl
Besides the statistics furnished, the
report gives particulars concerning
certain revolutionary labor organizations of recent formation und tho
doctrines which Ihelr promoters arc
endeavouring to propagate In Canada as well us in other countries. The
volume nlso contains much general
Information as to the activities of
organized labor in Canada, as well as
both at home und abroad. As a differences to Important labor events,
rectory of trade union in Canada, and
also lists of central organizations
and delegate bodies, together with
tlio names and addresses of the chief
executive officers for the year 1923.
A chapter in the report Is devoted to
un Important class of organized
wiigeetirners who are not connected
with the organized labor movement,
Included in which nre associations of
school teachers, commercial travellers nnd govcrment employcos. In all
thcro are 03 such bodies having a
combined reported membership of
81.373.
All mothers, says a woman politician, should have the vote. But no
amount of representation will force
the teething infant to let them have
an 8 hour night.
* •   +
A  Builder's Creed
■More faith in ourselves wo need;
.More faith In the other man;
More faith In the friendly deed;
More faith in the helping hand;
Mor faith In our nation's glory;
More faith ln the men who lend;
More faith in love's old story—
Let's take that for our creed!
* e     *
It your job only requires one eye,
It is better to keep the other on the
Job ahead than the clock. SATURDAY, MAY, 19th.  1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
PAGE FIV
z$
Tailored To Measure Suits For Men
Guaranteed Quality Materials, Expert Workmanship
Very Reasonable Prices
When you place or order for a suit of cloth
rest assured that you will be completely s
Mr. C. Kent has been in charge of his own
from now on every order placed with his
under his personal supervision.
The reason why we feature the tailor
big new shipment of English Tweeds and
will make up into suits which we can tho
strictly reasonable.
BLUE SERGE SUITS—
An extra good quality, of pure wool
twill serge; made in England; twenty
two ounce weight; guaranteed fast
dye. Exceptional value, men's suits at
$54.00
TWEED SUITS—
A suit that will give every satisfaction and will prove an    economical
aiBEiaiBiBiaiaiBEiaiasiaiBiaiBiaiaia EHMSHSiaEiaiaaa
ia
|       HOUSE llltKSSES-
| Ladles Gingham and print house
dresses.      Superior    quality and
pretty  patterns,  Keg.  $1.60    ond
81.80.   Saturday
$1.35 & $1.55
SEBGE DRESSES—
Sleeves and hem of skirts nre
beautifully     embroidered with
Silk.    Every woman should sec
ibis special value
$9.50
es with our tailoring department you can
atisfied with the result.   For fifteen years
tailoring establishment in Victoria and
Courtenay establishment will be executed
ing department at this time is because a
Worsteds has just been received.   They
roughly recommend and the prices will be
purchase.   Many   splendid   patterns   to
choose from. CQK AA
Prices from        «POO.UU
WORSTED SUITS—
An English Brown Worsted in a neat
herringbone pattern has proved one
of the moat popular clothes we have
shown in many years. A suit of this
material is reasonably (IMA AA
priced at     tP4l»/*UU
laiaE/aiEraaiaBffflaMtiHaiBiiSE
ENGLISH GlNflHAXS-
We have just unpacked a big
new shipment of English Ginghams providing a choice of many
beautiful patterns. Keg. 50c per
yard.   Saturday Q("»
2 yards for        OOC
GIRLS SKIRTS—
White and navy blue skirts. A
new shipment of attractively designed skirts which we have
priced low for immediate disposal.
C. KENT & Co., Courtenay
News of Courtenay District
MR. ARTHUR MORTON
VISITS DISTRICT
Mr. Arthur Morton, director of
Sheep and Swine husbandry under the '.
department of Agriculture, of the
Dominion Government was in the di- (
strict this week in company with Mr. !
W. M. Fleming, of Duncan, Provin- j
cial District Agriculturist, whose ter-!
rltory extends ns far north as Comox Valley. Mr. Fleming was certainly a very busy man while here
and was catechised, cross-questioned and examined by nearly every
one of those with whom he came In
contact, showing that the importance
of his office was not underestimated
when the Department was asked lo
station him at some more central
point than Duncan, so that ho could
have more ready access to the Comox Valley, where so much development work ln Agricultural pursuits
is being carried on. Mr. Morton nnd
Mr. Fleming distributed cash prizes
to the members of the Boys and Girls
Pig Clubs In the District and said
that iu ndditlon to the individual
prizes that have In the past been donated jointly by the Provincial Government, tho Dominion Government
and the Local Fair Association, there
would be cash prizes given by the
Dominion Government Agricultural
Department for the best Pig Club
In the Province.   The first prize will
be sixty dollars, tlle second flifty-
seven fifty, and so on until every
club has received a prize and the money is to be divided by the officers
of Ihe Pig Clubs among the members. Mr. William Stubbs has consented to act as secretary in this district and Mr. Hugh Morrison has
kindly offered his services in the advancement of the Industry, Mr. Morton was also Interesting sheep growers in co-operative marketing of
wool through the British Columbia
wool growers' Association. Better
prices could be obtained than selling
Individually, He hoped to make another visit to Courtenay nnd district
ln  the nenr future.
J. D. WINNINGHAM LAID
TO HIS LAST REST
JpMS/aJBIEIiilli^^
EASTBOUND 1
SUMMER  EXCURSIONS 1
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
WINNIPEG (Prjrt AA
MINNEAPOLIS ® ' *«W
ST. PAUL
DULUTH
CHICAGO   #8«.(lll LONDON   $118.75
DETROIT 1105X3 TOItONTO   $118,713
NIAGARA FALLS. (180.63
MONTREAL   *l!!2.7.'. QUEBEC   «141 .SO
ST. JOHN $160.30 HALIFAX   $1I!0.».".
BOSTON. $1511.60
NEW YORK. #147.4(1
$13.00 additional for ocean trip between Vancouver-Prince Rupert on sale daily lo Sept. 16th, Final return limit, October
31st.    Choice  of routes—stop-overs  and  side  trips
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PARK
$40.25 Return from Victoria
E. >W. BICKLE, Agent C. F. EARLE, D.P.A.
Cumberland, B. C. Victoria, B. C.
Canadian National Railways
aiBJSffifSIBIBIBIBIS^^
I
>)
"The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People  Trade
SPECIAL
Corn, lKlb. tins, 15c. d»1 A A
All kinds of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables always
on stock.
Mumford's Grocery
THE'SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell Vou the Highest Class Groceries
nt the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 5fi—We Deliver.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORlHiK.
Pressing    •    (leaning    -     Repairs
Telephone 1.     -     P. 0. Box 17
CI'.UIU>RI.ANU, B. V.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
For Results Advertise in The Islander
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leav-
ing Cumberland at 8 a.m.
The funeral of tho late Mr. J. D.
Wtnnlngham who died last Saturday
at Comox hospital was hold on Tttes-
| day from Sutton's Undertaking parlors bring attended by a large con-
I course  of   friends   nnd   follow   lodge
. members.
I Tlio late Mr, Wiunlnghani was a
member of the Masonic order and representative bodies of members from
both Cumorland ami Courtenay lodg-
1 es attended the obsequies,
The Courtenay Volunteer Fire Department attended in a body, the do-
censed having been a member of that
organization and having nt all times
taken a lively interest in its affairs.
He was nt the time of being taken 111
outside Superintendent of the Courlenay Electric Light and Waterworks
j Departments' and by his passing the
city has lost u most efficient, painstaking and faithful employee. He
came to the District nearly a quarter
of n century ago nnd was until four
years ago employed as electrician for
tho Canndinu Collieries  Company.
He removed in  milt to Courtenay
where lie hud niiiile his homo    ever
since.
He leaves to mourn his loss a wl-
| dow,  daughter of  Mrs.  A.   Hood, of
j Victoria nnd had been married about
a year;  also a daughter, Mrs. John
Carwlthen, of Sandwlck and a son;
Albert, now residing in Seattle.
Many floral tokens were In evidence
I at the funeral, these being sent as a
| last mark of esteem by the Masonic
Lodges of Cumberland and Courtenay, the Courtenay City Council and
Ihe Courtenay Volunteer Fire Department. The Interment was made in
the Anglican cemetery at Sandwick
Pallbearers were nil members of
tiie  Masonic order nnd  wore:
Dros. C. I'iiruliani, F. Pickard, J.
Bransfleld, F. Bond, A. Walker and
.1. Will ton.
COURTENAY OBSERVES
CLEAN-UP DAY.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES  AT  LOWEST PRICES.
VVe Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 : Night—134-X Courtenay
\dded reach
moan
tem
isters
The added length of MAPLE
LEAF MATCHES means greater safety
when lighting ranges, stoves or lanterns.
They will not glow after use. They are
not poisonous. Rats won't gnaw them.
They withstand more moisture.
They are Different and Better.
Wlworthffiabox
MAPLE LEAF
MATCHES
Ask for them
by name
THE CANADIAN MATCH C9
,6   LIMITED, MONTREAL
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - • B. C.
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
C.urtenay, B.C.
Clean-up day was observed in
Courtenay on Wednesday. The day
was opened iu cleaning tho highways and byways of much rubbish
Unit had accumulated since last clean
up day, and the work was participated In by not only members of the
Council and ninny adults, but tho
scholars of the public school hod a
merry time chasing empty pork and
bean tins, boxes, old cartons and
much other rubbish.   Alderman Hn-
garty spent the day painting the
water system hydrants u prelty red
with a trimming of aluminum. Since
the inseptlpn of cleanup day in
Courtenay throe years ago a great
many unsightly places have received
attention and generally the efforts of
those concornetl have been rewarded
by complimentary remarks and appreciation by those who have visited
the town or by those who have boon
Unable to lake purl in tho dirt removing campaign.
With The
Churches
Mr. Alex. Cleland spent purt of
this week In Vancouver on business.
11111} lliirslinll. Say Leo whoro or
how can I gel n pair of golf stockings'
Leo.—Wear  your  old   ones   until
they have eighteen holes.
Cumberland Sunday, May SOtli
HOLY TKIMTV, ANGLICAN
Itev. W. Leversedge
Services  11  n.m.  unless  otherwise
announced and 7 p.m.
Sunday School 2,30,
ST. GEOKGK'8 PRKNBYTEIIIAX
Rev. James Hood
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class 1.30. Sunday School 2,30
Evening Service 7 p.m.
Music for St. Oeorgla Church Sunday evening 7 o'clock.
Anthem by the choir.—"He will
walk with mo". Solo by Mrs. Wm.
Gordon —"He gave His Llfo for mo."
A welcome Is extended to all.
-Mr. and Mrs. Robert Atnsleo are
visiting tiie tailor's parents, Mr. anil
Mrs. Thomas Becltonsell, Comox.
T.WHERRY
TAXtDERMISr&TANNER
fiend for price. Hat of
WOT k—III IQBtlhi:
headi,  •to.
€29 Pandora  Ave,
Victoria,  B. C. -
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
I'nion Ray Road PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY, 19th, 1923
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
News of Courtenay and District
GOLF COMPETITION
S
RIDE  A C.C.M.
CLEVELAND
JUVENILE
$40—45
MENS and
LADIES
$55 to $70
Get my prices on Bicycles, new and second hand. Parts
Tires and accessories, before buying elsewhere.
Tennis Rackets $3.50 up. Golf Clubs $3.50 up.
REPAIRING OF ALL DESCRIPTION
All work quickly and promptly executed. Prices right.
E. T. ELLISON
Gunsmith and Locksmith
BICYCLE AND SPORTING GOODS
Located  in  McBrides old Store, Courtenay
The Courtenay Golf Club will hold
a handicap competition on Victoria
Day. May 24th.
1st prize   6 Golf Balls
2nd prize   4 Golf Balls
3rd prize   2 Golf Balls
Score cards must be turned ln to
W. Moncrieff or W. Shilcoek not later
than Monday, May 28th.
All those who did not finish 1st or
2nd In the last competition will have
four strokes added to their handicap.
Players may make their scores any
time from Thursday, May 24th, to
Sunday, May 27th, inclusive.
SHOWER FOR BRIDE
Last Thursday at the homo of Mrs.
E. C. Anderton, Comox, a "shower"
was held in honor of Mrs. Edward
(Todd) McLennan (nee .Miss Mary
Macdonald).
The gifts had all been placed in
baskets and were carried into the
reception room by Miss Olive Anderton, Miss Helen Anderton and Master George  Dargle.
Dainty refreshments were served
nnd Mrs. McLennan received the
congratulations of a great number
of friends.
The young son of Mr. and Mrs. M.
11. Tribe is in hed suffering from an
attack of rheumatic fever.
Mr. Ernest Kerton is ill at home,
and is believed to he suffering from
sleeping sickness.
Mr, George Edwards Is building a
lnrge place on the Union Bay Road
for Mr. Dalton Cudmore.
UNION OIL PLANT
ALMOST COMPLETE
The plant of the Union Oil Company is about complete, three of the
lnrge tanks having been received
and placed in position this week.
The fourth will arrive in a day or
two, when the plant will be ready
for business. The expenditure has
run to nearly twenty thousand dollars.
The coming of the Union OU Co.
lo Courtenay is a distinct Btep tn the
development of Industrial Comox.
CONSTRUCTION
OF NEW BRIDGE
Active operation on the construction of the new bridge over the Courtenay River has begun and thin
j week saw the driving of the plica tor
the reception of the concrete abutments.    The bridge has been closed
•* 1H
SPECIAL
SALE
Introducing our new departments and giving an
opportunity to secure real value for your cash. Sale
continues for four days only.
SATURDAY. MONDAY, TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY
See posters for special prices.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
588
Mr. Edwards will occupy this building when completed with a supply of
builders'   materials  and   will  manu- I lllia wepk to vehicular traffic but is
tnoture sash and doors. [ °»c" t0 l"rtC8triana.   It ts hoped to
1 have the road open again in a day
=»—■- I or two but It will be closed again
1 when   ihe  permanent    structure    ls
ready to be put ln position.
PREPARE YOUR CHILDREN
NOW FOR THE
Victoria Day Celebration
MAY 24TH
WE STOCK
CHILDREN'S BLOUSES — CHILDREN'S SHOES
CHILDREN'S HATS and CAPS,
CHILDREN'S TIES
AND OTHER GALA-DAY WEARING APPAREL
Wc can also outfit adults and our Prices Are Right
Open Saturday Night till 10 o'clock
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
PROMOTION
Mr. Alex. D. Martinlch has been
promoted to the position ot Freight
, agent at the E. & N. Rallfay in place
Lot Mr. Charles Beasley, resigned. Mr.
[j, Mather, of Chemainus has taken
; the position at the freight shed form-
j erly occupied by Mr. Martinlch.
ADDITIONAL GARAGE
One more garage has been added
to  Automobile  Row  in    Courtenay,
Messrs.   Meredith   Bros,   and   Pelton
|. having started business in the pre-
|; mises opposite the MacDonald Elec-
j i trie Co. on Union Bay Road.
Mr.  John   Swnnsky,  ot    Campbell
River, was in town on Thursday.
Mr. Albert Witiningbam returned
to Seattle, Wash, on Wednesday
morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Archie McGregor, ot
Headquarters left on Wednesday for
l  a holiday,  going to California.
Mr. W. L. Culliton, the well known
Vancouver Contractor was In Courtenay on Monday on his way to Theo-
dosla Arm, where he will construct
six miles of railway for the Merrill
& Ring Logging Company. Mr. Culliton wns contrnctor on the E. & N.
extension into Courtenay in 1914.
BASEBALL GAME
PROVES COMEDY
Last Sunday at the Courtenay Ball
Park the Cumberland nggregation
put it ovor the homesters to the tune
of fourteen to five. There was a
good crowd present and though the
exhibition was not of the highest order there were a number of redeeming features that made the afternoon an enjoyable one. Several of
the Courtenay team were out of
town and this made a great difference
to the playing of the farmers. Tom
Smith tossed them over in the first
three innings for Courtenay but was
relieved In the fourth stanza by Lefty Larson. Neither of these pitchers
seemed to exert himself and with only one player on the Courtenay lineup In his regular position the result
ot the day's play could not have been
different. King on the mound twirled In big league style and had the
Courtenay team at his mercy at all
times. The five tallies that Cumber-
laud's opponent's chased ncross the
plate came when King allowed the
second string pitcher to relieve him
In the eight frame. This week the
Courtenay team will be in better
shape with all their players on hand
and the team that beats them will
have to go some.
Cumberland-
Plump  lb.
Bannerman ss
Hitchens  CF.
Marocchi 3b
McKay LF
James   2nd
Richards C
Daugerlleld
King P.
Vann P.
Farmer & Miller
R
H
E
2
1
1
4
2
1
2
3
0
2
2
0
1
0
0
2
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
II
0
0.
1
0
—
—
—
14
11
3
R
H
B
1
1
5
1
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
n
1
0
l
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
Courtenay—
Pettlgrew  3b
Dickson 2nd
Brown C.
Larson   1st   P.
Ogilvle  SF
Aitken ss
Walker rf
McLean If
Smith  P.   1st
S      5     12
Score  by  innings:—
Cumberland      20023 301 3—14
Courtenay 00000006 0—5
2 base lilt Richards.
Hits of King ln 7 Innings 1, runs 0
Hits of Venn 2 innings, 4, runs 5.
Hits of Smith 4 Innings 3, runs 4.
Hits of Larson 5 innings 8, runs 10
Struck out by King 7 Vann 1
Struck out by Larson 8, Smith 2.
Bases on ball King (1) Vann ID.
Time of game 1.40. Uumplre Aitken.
rJT
u
AFTER WE SEM, YOU
A BATTEKY-
our service to you has not ended, but
has just begun. We stand ready at
all limes to soe that the battery you
buy from us shall give you maximum
results without trouble. Our battery
service is worth while.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE,
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENBRAL FACTORY WORK
Write For PrlceB to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
(Mice 2820 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.V.
— —— ___
Wood for Sale
*T*HB blended per-
X {timet of 26 flowers
—the fragrance in
Talc Jonteel is an
odor indescribable,
because like nothing
you bave ever known
—alluring and elusive.
And the powder itself
—smooth and fine,
cool and toothing. Ask
here for Talc Jeatct)
today,
I
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's
Send us Your   Mall Orders
-
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
Courtenay
$6.001 Auto Painters
Bring your cam ln for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor.   nf  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite   Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
C. G. WILSON    Try Blunt *Ewart LM# for n wash
i and polish Job on your car or for n
ronrtenay British ( olitnibla. satlsfaelory repair Job.
A Good  Square
Deal in Footwear
For All
We Constantly aim at giving the biggerst Shoe values
in Cumberland, and we are doing this by way of
LOWER PRICES
A QUICK SALE
LESS PROFIT PER PAIR
A LARGER TURNOVER
We are now showing some exceptional values in
Holiday Footwear. In Ladies Brown Oxfords, 2 strap
and with Buckles in Patent Leather, 2 tone effects
in the New Baby Louis Military and the Low Heels.
Ladies Brown Calf Oxfords at the (fi A  C A
reduced price of     jJJ^ttlvr
Ladies 2 strap slippers in black and Brown Calf. New
Prices at
$4.50, $5.85, $6.50
Extraordinary value in Mens Fine Footwear. Special
price for Saturday and Mondays selling in Brown and
Black Calf. Recede and regular shapes, nothing newer,
price regular $8.50 (fir QC
Now only     «DU.Ot)
less than Vancouver prices.
ODD LINES OF WHITE FOOTWEAR for Women,
Misses and Children, at sale
prices from, per pair	
Don't Miss These Bargains
See Windows for Prices
$1.25
Clothing and Shoe Store
The Model
Frank Partridge   -  Cumberland SATURDAY, MAY, lfith.  1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
IVEN     C>7
SEVEN
Modern Golf
^^(j)rankcJhompsot\ '
fc
NOTED CANADIAN GOLFERS
PLAY NATURALLY
There Is a lot of fallacious and dang I
erous teaching about the work the
wrists do ln golf. Some Instructors
advise turning them one way, others
In a different way. Or the advice
may be given ln reference to tho I
club face, to turn It away from the
ball, which Is practically the same
thing. This has always appeared to
me as artificial and unnatural. None
of the caddies are ever conscious
of doing this, and, what Is more,
ui^ne of the real stars do It. By rolling the wrists nt the start, I have
nn hesitation In stating thnt all
chances of a correct swing are gone
—unless the player is somewhat of a
Juggler. As a general working rule
the player will be well advised to :
scrutinize carefully any piece of advice that recommends anything which
does not come naturally. He must,
of course, distinguish between what
Is novel or new and what ts natural.
Any new movement will feel awkward at Ilrst. but this should pass
with practice.
If the player has been instructed ln
the mechanical principles of the
game (which are not many nor hard
to understand), he will learn to distinguish the essential points In a
swing from the accidentals and the
mannerisms of the player. It must
be remembered that no two human
beings are constructed exactly alike;
and therefore no two will swing a
golf club In tho same way, bo It will
be wiBe before a beginner adopts another player as his paragon, to first
ascertain if there is the greatest
agreement in tlielr physical builds.
lt is useless for a short stout man to
attempt to swing (he club exactly as
a thin elongated one. Therefore, If
the fundamental principles of the
game are appreciated, the blind mimicry of unimportant details will be
avoided. The fact that Ray smokes
a pipe while playing Is no reason
■why anyone else should, and If you
<lo so because he does this is likely
to be the only thing you will have In
common. I appreciate the fact that
a pipe may be a great aid ln concen- '
trillion; but unless it comes naturally, avoid It.
The greatest players in golf as ill
everything else, nre those who developed themselves. Do not always
bo running to your pro for every
little detail, for there is no short
road to success. Practice can not be
eliminated. Learn the little shots
first. Practice the others also. Fifteen minutes at a time Is sufficient
and then play a competitive game, for
this is the testing ground. If one's
game should go back entirely, then
consult the pro; but ns the principles
of the game arc clearly grasped off
days will tend tn disappear.
In golf one should feel his way
more than think lt, for golf Is prima,
rlly a game of action and not of
thought. In fact, it has been said
that to play golf well, one docs not
need brains. Moreover, too much
gray matter has been snld to be a
hindrance. Some even suggest that
one's game is in inverse ratio to his
intellect. Some of the best players
certainly will not be shot for their
literary abilities; but then there is
a large number of people who would
willingly become "duds" if it meant
playing well. This criticism confuses two different things. Golf ls a
game of action and not principally a
study of metaphysics. Usually the
man of science has boon so busy in
his line that ho has not given the
time to the game until late In life,
and then he tries by mental concentration lo make up for lost time. This
nientitl agitation usunllly takes place
when the stroke is being made.
The theoretical player, and most
business men are such, should know
Ihat to think of how u shot is to bo
performed while making the shot Is
the surest means of bungling it. This
spoils concentration . It Is like watch
ing one's feet going down stairs,
which usually causes one to stumble.
The best concentration is achieved
unconsciously and therefore effortlessly; whereas thinking of how the
wrists, knees and head should work
while making the stroke will not
produce a natural easy one, but a
labored effort.
The beginner at golf is oftentimes
discouraged because he cannot do
what he would. Tho cause of failure Is not always due to a misconceived theory of the game, although
this is quite common, but rather be-
cuuse of muscular inability. Even
although a person has played other
games, the driving of a golf ball requires the use of muscles which are
little used 111 other sports, and these
muscles must be made supple and
pliable. Playing golf is the surest
and quickest method of developing
them. During the novitiate of a
golfer, ho is always trying tips and
short cuts to success. The more
complicated these short cuts are, the
more one seizes upon them with nvi-
illty. I suppose this is due Io the
fact that man is pre-eminently a
creature of intellect. If man were to
do things intuitively and Instinctively ns the bees and ants are supposed
to do. I am sure this would be better
for his golf. However, wc must do
things as is our custom. The Indi
viilnnl who reasons about all his actions will In all probability theorize
about bis golf.
I hope I shall not be misunderstood. It is absolutely essential and
will save (be player a lot of time if
he clearly understands the mechanical principles of the game, and also
its psychological aspects. But when
once these are grasped, it becomes
largely a question of practice and it
should not bo necessary to try out
the suggestion of every friend. Remember it Is results that count. If
one could drive a ball farther by
standing on bis head, that would be
the correct method for him. Every
player must fall Into his own style
and so long as his individual methods arc not transgressing the mechanical principles of the game, no
one can say that his methods are
incorrect..
*     *     *
Next   Article FUNDAMENTALS
SLAT'S DIARY
By Boss Fnrquhar
Friday—Well ine and pa had a good
joak on ma today. Heveing bin sick
and ill for a cupple
days the Dr. had bin
comeing evry once and
a wile to see her & ast
a lot of fulish questions and etc. well today the preecher frum
are chlrch cums to see
how was she a getting
along and when he
cums in and nst her
how did she feel she
was absent minded and
put out her tung at him
like she had bin in the
habit of doing at the
Dr. & he diddent hardly no what to think till he seen me
and pa spitting arc sides Open laf-
flng nnd then he seen the joak and
larfed hnrtllly with us.
Saturday—Grate game of hall today we beat the South End Ruff
Necks 27 to 19. I personly nocked a
3 bagger for 3 Bases. I gess I made
a name for myself all rite. A comeing home on the buss I give up my
sent to a older lady and she sed
Thank you I hate to Deprive you out
of yure seat but I replyed and sed It
wassent no Depravity a tall.
Sunday—Got all the Sunday palters but not a wlrd of my 3 bagger
und still these noosepaper men calls
there self sporting Editors. This
goes to show how well they-are onto
there Job.
Monday—Pa cum home sick this
evning and ma puts a mustard Plaster on his hed and put his ft. in boiling water and he smiled dlsturbedly
and sed he felt like the Candle witch
was getting burnt at both ends at
once.
Tuesday—1 ast ma what was tho
reason thnt sum men makes money
& others has a hard time getting a
long. And she sed well sum men
sells there self to the wirld wile they
are other men witch just give there
self away. And then she give a look
at pa witch sed nothing and repeated
it over.
Wensday—1 of are neibors is a In-
venter and now he says he has invented a machine witch will do 4
wlmmens wirk. Frum what pa sed
ma thinks she married 1 of them.
Victoria Day
Celebration
to
to
to
MAY 24TH, 1923
TO BE HELD ON THE FOOT BALL GROUNDS
CHILDRENS' RACES. SPORTS. ETC 10. A.M.
to
to May Queen Parade at 1.30 p.m. jg
to to
to MAY POLE DRILL — CHILDRENS' FOLK DANCE j^
Pi - and - lr^
to to
£ Crowning of the May Queen S
£7? On Return Of Parade E_?
FOOT BALL FINALS AT 1 P.M.
By Courtesy of Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd. Train Leaves Union Bay
9:30 a.m., Bevan 10:15 a.m.
Train Leaves Cumberland 9:00 p.m.
Tliirsdiiy—Arc preecher told ma |
he was a going to preech a good sermon about Liars. But ma plrswaded |
him to put It off till sum ralney Sunday because if it was a nice day all
the people he wanted to hit wood be
out on the Golf llnx a playing there j
favoret past time.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Eat Bread
with butter!
Eat Bread
with jam!
Eat Bread
with milk!
Eat Bread
by itself!
or with anything at all!
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
There is no food on earth so
tempting when it's really pure
and wholesome like
—the loaf that's all Bread.
HALLWAY'S BREAD
is Bread at Its Best- Insist on It.
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store   "
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bftkcrs
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS WILL FIND LONG
DISTANCE TELEPHONE SERVICE A TIME
AND EXPENSE SAVER
Travelling men can save themselves and their
firms endless time and travelling expense by regular
use of our Long Distance facilities.
Within a few minutes, direct personal„conversn-
tion can be had with any desired number of customers
or patrons who could not ordinarily be "covered" and
"spoken to" without the loss of many days' time and
the many discomforts, inconveniences and delays incidental to country travelling.
In addition to these factors it will be found cheaper to telephone than travel.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
fl
WHITE  COAL
Use White Coal during the hot months—
— We Stock —
RANGES, PLATES, TOASTERS, FANS, IRONS, ETC.
RADIO PARTS
FIXTURES, WIRING, ESTIMATES
Call and Inspect Our Stock
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Courtenav EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  HAY,  19th,  1923
OFFICE DOG
Howdy neighbors, remembering is
often a whole lot worse than forgetting.
A Net Loss
"Dear me." murmured the landlord
as he turned on the parlor light and
saw the young lady hoarder feverishly Irving to free her hair net from
the young man boarder's coat button—Whoovcr'd      think   that  a  hair
net could catch a fish!"
*   *   *
The law of contracts will not hold
When one contracts a bloon ' .' cold.
I kissed her, for I knew not what,
A cold she had which now I've got
.....
Freeze to your job," said the ice.
'     "Many a man gets credit for be-
' ing a cheerful loser, when he is merely too lazy to try very hard."
* *     *
Boulevard Tragedy
They met atop the buss,
But they never met again,
For she was a chorus jane,
And he wns a handsome cuss.
But a brakeman on a train.
* *     *
We can speak neither French nor
German. But from the amount of
noise coming this way It should be
called the "Iloar Valley."
* *     »
The Fickle Sex
Some men were jilted In their youth,
and all their lives lived by their
lonely;
And others married their sweethearts
And nre now paying alimony-
Houston Chronicle
A man Is Jilted in his youth,
Is unit cold by his honey;
Hut she returns to claim his heart
When he's made gobs of money.
»     «     •
"If I trade out of my neighborhood,
and you trade out of your neighborhood, what will be come of our
neighborhood?
* *     *
Notice—Lost, a gentlemen's gold
watch; $25. reward and no questions
asked—unless my  wife answers  the
door."
* *     *
When it comes to bills—we    give
i the Stork credit for having the longest.
Jlggs enn go out at night when he
gets to lie a ghost
Dear Colyum; I've just been wondering if, when Jiggs dies, Maggie
will put this inscription ou his tombstone; "At peace, till we meet again"? |
.Maw Creek.
The difference between an empire
and an umpire is tliat an umpire
slicks to what he says.
Sir Crabtree now buys his jitney
only one quart of gas at a time. He
is trying to wean It.
* *   *
The only seasons that make people
lazy, besides spring, arc summer,
autumn, nnd winter.
* •   *
At fifty miles
Drove Ollie IMdd
He thought he wouldn't
Skid—but did.
* *   *
Ahsent-Minded
Absent-minded (falling down an
elevator shaft): Dear mc. I forgot to
close the door nfler me.
.   *   *
«Hnm And" For l's
Just one other thing that is wrong
about our present  education system i
is that every domestic science grad- j
unto comes  out of school  with  tho
idea picked up somewhere In the cur-!
riculum that creamed codfish makes
a nice breakfast dish.
* a     e
Getting wealth Is a hard job. Keeping it Is another.
lt is all right for a girl's clothes
to be called "stunning" or "shocking" but it is well to draw the line at
"ripping."
»     #     *
One eternal triangle that no longer
appears in our midst, is eat,   drink
and lie merry.
* *     *
When the average man gives to the
needy lie feels cheated If he doesn't
get his money's worth of gratitude.
* *     ♦
Nowadays most people spend two-
thirds of their time chasing the phan-
tonio pleasure an the other third try-
Ing to dodge work
# *     *
Anybody will make a mistake once.
"Fools mako the same mistake twice,"
try to beat yesterday's record today.
• «     •
Whether it be barns or blondes, a
little paint does wonders. In the first
case, the paint save the surface, ln
the second, it serves the face
*   *   »
A young Cumberland chap had proposed to a beautiful girl. The girl,
blushing and weeping a little, had accepted him. lie folded her in his
arms, pressed his lips to hera and
whispered: "Dearest, is this the first
time you have ever loved?" "Yes,"
the girl sighed, "but it's bo nice that
I hope It won't be the last.."
All the women arc now wearing
King Tut garments. What's going to
happen if the archcologlsts dig up
Adam and Eve's tomb.
Joey  Iloollltle Says KKItRECT
Some fokes' idea of savin' up some-1 mHow i3 thc milkmaid?"
thin' for n rainy day Is to buy n au- ,    u0 sa|(| vvitli a bow.
tomoblle   equipped   with   storm   cur- ' "jt jwn't   made, sir,
tains, on the installment plnn. ;    |t comes from a cow."
Maybe some people don't pray because they want to kncecononiize.
As for fishing yarns, the one about
Jonah Is a whale of a one.
For your Information we pass along   Hoses arc red, violets are blue;
thc alfldavlted Information that n. A. This column  pays.
Darling lives at Klssimmcc, Fin. like hell she do.
the ingredients printed
on the label of your baking powder tin include
Cream of Tartar—your
cakes, biscuits and other
foods will be more healthful and have a finer texture and taste.
That is one of the reasons why thoughtful
women insist on
ROYAL
Baking Powder
Made from Cream of Tartar
derived from grapes
Contains No Alum—Leaves
No Bitter Taste
MADE IN CANADA
H
ere an
dTh
ere
Seeding in Alberta was twu weelca
Inter this year than last.
A second party of Swiss immigrants
recently arrived nt St. John aboard
the Mclita and are en route for tha
West, where they will engage iu
agriculture.
Twenty-two thousand immigrants
to Canada from the United States
were inspected ou trains and highway crossings at the '6H points from
I'ort Arthur to Kingsgate, B.C., during March of this year.
'fo daU the port of Vancouver has
shipped or booked 17,000,000 bushels
oi wheat to the Orient and South
America. The railroads expect at
least 2,500,000 additional bushels to
be shipped this way in the near
future.
The memory of the early missionaries of the Oblate Order will i c
perpetuated by the Canadian Pacific
Rtilway, and several stations on tho
extensions of their lines between
Kipawa and Quinze will bear names
of early members of that organization v,'»>.'h did so much for the
colonization of the country.
There are thirteen new paper
making machines being installed in
Canadian paper mills this year.
When erected and running full these
machines will consume more than
350,000 additional cords of wood a
year. Canada is already annually
consuming and exporting more than
5,000,000 cords of pulpwood, representing the growth of a century or
more on 1,250,000 acres of land.
A new service for motor tourists
desiring to pass between the mainland and Vancouver Island has been
inaugurated between Bellingham ami
Victoria. The Motor Princess, with
a capacity for fifty automobiles and
250 passengers, plies twice daily between the ports. This boat is motor
driven and the first of its kind to
be operated on the Pacific side of
the continent.
In 1922 Canada produced 2,118
tons of salt cake, valued at $54,804,
and 1,320 tons of Glauber salts
valued at $42,7111, according to government figures. There are a number of immense deposits of Glauber
salts in the province of Saskatchewan, which are ut the present time
only in the initial stages of development, but it is anticipated that the
next few years will see a considerable increase ill production.
The Canadian exhibit at the British Empire Exhibition, to be held in
London from April 20th to October
31st, 11124, is to be financed, eon-
trolled and directed by the Federal
Government. The estimated cost is
$1,000,000. The two Canadian railroads are planning exhibits on adjoining sites, each with a floor space
of 10,000 feet. The cost nf the Cann-
di n Pacific exhibit is estimated at
$800,00(1.
The Canadian Pacific steamship
"Empress of Russia," upon her last
sailing, carried a shipment of Canadian frogs for Japan. Cool space
was reserved in the hold of the liner
and the travellers were well packed
in ice. On being taken ashore at
Yokohama these frogs will be gradually warmed until they are ready to
be let loose, when they will be liberated on the lawns of Japanese
importers, with thc idea of giving
the Japanese a new industry in the
production of frogs legs.
The Canadian Pacific Telegraphs
have announced the following reduced rates per word for cable mes-
aages to the following countries
effective to-day:—Austria, 30 cents,
Belgium 23 cents. France 22 rents,
Germany 25 cents, Great Britain and
Ireland 20 cents, Greece .15 cents,
Hungary 33 cents, Italy 20 cents,
Spain 83 cents, Switzerland 27 rents.
The 25 cent per word rate to Great
Britain and Ireland is still in effect
for special rush cables. Corresponding reductions have teen made in
the rates to other countries in Europe
and beyond via Atlantic cables, und
the new deferred rates will be one-
half of the full rates quoted above
except to Great Britain and Ireland,
where the existing deferred rate ol
9 cents per word it unaltered.
George C. Hay, British Columbia,
director of the Canadian Co-operative
Wool Growers' association, is well
pleased with the outlook for this year.
He recently visited the wool-producing districts of Vancouver Island, also
the lower mainland, and reports that
everywhere tho sheep men arc entering the association, and practically
100 per cent, membership is now anticipated. The organization has bad
two outstanding objects: Tn got more
money for Canadian wool growers
and to raise the standard of Canadian wool. Both of these objects hnvt
been attained, for thc members received for their 1922 clip 8 cents per
pound more than the average paid by
Independent buyers, and Canadian
wool now competes favorably with
that of Australia, Now Zealand anil
Argentina; ln fact, with thut of the
world. This Is due entirely to the
grading Instituted by the central selling agency. The association has also established a friendly relationship
with the millers of Canada and lhe
United States, who arc Interested and
pleased with the market improvement
In Canadian wool.
Why You Should
Use a Mild Soap
Harsh soap dries the natural oils and is
apt to irritate the skin and make it scaly.
In the mild, soothing, creamy lather of
Palmolive you have an ideal cleanser, lt is
lotion-like in its action. It soothes while it
cleanses.
Artful application of rouge and powder
may lend your skin the appearance of smooth
freshness, but when this is washed off, what
a cruel revelation I
You can easily possess a fine complexion
by giving your skin proper care. Instead of
putting your skin to sleep with cold creams
nnd cosmetics, wake it up with soap and
water. Cleanse each tiny pore and skin cell,
revive sluggish circulation. Get rid of the
blackheads which are only accumulated dirt.
Use Palmolive Soap and apply it with your
two hands. Massage it thoroughly into your
skin and remove with many warm rinsings.
This treatment makes your skin fresh as a
rose.
You can buy Palmolive Soap at all first-
class dealers.
Palm and olivt oils
-.nothing else—give
nature's green color
to Palmolive Soap
Made In Canada
Volume and Efficiency
Produce 25cent
Qualify for
10c
LISTEN! LOOK!
STOP
sending your films away to be developed and prints made. Bring, semi
or mail iliom to
F. B. ELLS
( OI'Ili'KNAV. It. ('.
All w.nli loll at the Union Motel
Cumberland, will receive careful ut-
tontlon,
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
[factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co
Cumberland ami Courtenay,
UNION   HOTEL
CU.nitKUI.ANI), It. c.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
2f>   rooms,   electrically   healed.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phono 15.
It. VATKS. Manager.
Nervousness
REMOVED  IIV   UIIIKOI'HACIiC
At Clnrko's Residence.
Hours: Any Buy Between I imil 6 p.m.
E. O. IIAUKERAL, Chiropractor.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S
WEAK
Dainty Creations at Hosl Reasonable
Prices
Buy Here and Save Money
ARMSTRONG'S—Cumberland, II. C.
L00V4 Dunsmuir Street
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.M Kit lilKIKI.I>,    l'inuii.loi'
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
NURSING HOME
Try Blunt & Ewart Lid. for n wash
ondi polish Job on jour ear or for a
satisfactory repair Job.
Courtenay now boasts of a
private instil ul ion where maternity cases will be given thc very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attrec
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 YEARS' EXPERIENCE
FOR   SALE
ANDERSON PAVILION AND BOAT HOUSE
situated at Comox Lake, including 32 ft. Gasoline
Launch, Dwelling House, Ice Cream Parlour
Table, Chairs.—Complete equipment.
Business as a going concern with beautiful surroundings. — For further particulars, apply
EDWARD ANDERSON
Comox Lake.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR  TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND  OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
"-' ■- »
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very-
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
—*
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
Car   For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
Clothes Pressing
Cleaning and Repairing
We will call for and deliver work
of any kind.
Satisfaction  Guaranteed.
A. KINGSBERRY
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Adjoining B. ft B. SATURDAY,  MAY, 19th.  1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
NINE
qt
Ilo=Ho Theatre
Friday and Saturday, May 18th and 19th
The great story of the North of England Coal Mines.
" The FLAME of LIFE "
STARRING
PRISCILLA DEAN
Out of a Fiery Chaos, an Inferno of Raging Flame—Came Love!
Hundreds of fear-crazed women and children, in drab, pathetic groups at the
mouth of a mine—awaiting the result of a fearless girl's attempt to stem the mad
stampede which followed disaster hundreds of feet below the surface of the earth! And
this heroine, with a cod courage born of love, seeking the man who had taught her the
gentle things of life, amid crashing walls and roaring flame! A situation and a scene
which will bring gasps of sheer admiration to the lips of every man, woman or child
that, sees it!
Look at these on the same bill "THE SOLITARY CYCLIST" a Sherlock Holmes
story—and
A 2 reel AL ST. JOHN COMEDY.
Matinee Saturday 2.30 P.M.
MONDAY and TUESDAY
Wesley Barry (Freckles) in "HEROES OF THE STREET" here is the greatest
picture the freckled faced kid ever made, remember him in "DINTY" and other big
features, then come and see him in "Heroes of the Street" you will be more than
"pleased with this picture.
LOOK Coming Specially selected for the Holiday
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, May 23—24th
"THE HOTTENTOT"
Without doubt this is the best comedy and .thrill picture made for many a day.
We booked this some time ago so as to hold it for these days, this picture will undoubtedly please everyone who sees it. «
Extra attractions are "A Resident Patient*' a Sherlock Holmes story and —
"VAMPED" a 2 reel comedy.
SPECIAL MATINEE MAY 24th at 2.30 P.M.
Coming soon Harold Lloyd in "SAFETY LAST" 7 Reel
RHEUMATISM
BANISHED BY CHIROPRACTIC
Sec- Me at Clarke's Residence, Pienr
Union Hall, Any Day Between
4 and 5 p.m.
E. 0. HAUKEDA1, Chiropractor.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   vVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and floods ot Any Kind
Delitered to All Ports of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE    CO    TELEPHONE
or lea»« Orders at Vendome Hotel
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyolng Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Cleau or
Dye all kluds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop In and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you on nny work you wish
to have done.
Onr   Work   and   Service
Hill  Please You   :i   ::
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.       !      Phone 8303
Try Blnnt & Ewart lid. tor u wash
and polish Job on your ear or for a
satisfactory repair jell.
G.
w
V. A. NOTES
Members and all    ex-
service men who wish
to take advantage    of
#K
the special rates etc. to
mV
7*/
ffl
Vancouver during  re
VsES
union  week    are    re.
T^t
quested      to    give   In
OAftAOA
"• <■■•
their names to the lo.
on I G
w
V.
A. Secretary.
Dont forget Flremens' Dance on
Monday, June 4th, In thc Ilo-llo Hall
Croups of men from outside points
desiring tent accommodation for the
week should make up their parties
as early as possible and advise Reunion Week Manager, 304 redit Fonder Bldg. Vancouver as to the number at the earliest possible moment.
* »     *
Reunion Week Encampment is not
lonilncd to members of the G.W.V.A.
ONLY, All ex-service men will be
welcomed and given thc full privileges of the programme.
* *     *
"As You Were" the Reunion Week
i'ubllcatlon containing details of prizes—free trips—free drawings etc. In
connection with this event, can be
obtained free, from the local secretary.
* *     *
A good programme of special interest to ex-service Athletes has been
arranged by thc sports committee.
* *     *
Full Information as to entries in
the band, athletic, aquatic and other
contest will be published in the June
Issue of "As You Were."
* *     •
The Dominion Convention is
scheduled to take place in Vancouver starting July 3rd, In conjunction
wilh re-union week.
* *     *
Tbe latest wires from our National
Headquarters at Ottawa, advise that
the Board of Pension Commissioners
are not giving due consideration to
the recommendations of the Royal
Commission in regard to pensions
and re-esttnblishmcnt, and are adopting a most defiant attitude. This In
spite of thousands of claims in hand
that effect many dependents and disabled men.
* *    *
Our Dominion Command has remanded a statement from thc Board
of commissioners and have picketed
the offices of the Board of Pension
commissioners without result.
* *     .
All G. W. V. A. Branches throughout the Dominion have wired their
member, urging support to the Royal
Commission's   Report.
A social and dance was held at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. R. K. Walker on
Saturday last, when a very enjoyable
time was enjoyed by all present. The
guests Included Mr. and Mrs. J. O.
Quinn, Mr. and Mrs. S. Robertson,
Miss E. Henderson, Cumberland, Mr.
and Mrs. II. Buchanan, Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Weir, Mr. James Weir, Mr. and
Mrs. W. Williams, Mrs. A. Aitken,
Robert Aitken, Mr. and Mrs. S. Ca.
moron, Miss Jean Cameron, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Irvine, Mr. nnd Mrs. J. Boag,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Miller, Arthur Williams, Mr. J. rDummond, Mr. Booth-
man, Cumberland, Mr. and Mrs. E.
Thomas, Mrs. F. Vahlc, Mr. aud Mrs.
Wm. Vahle, and Mr. and Mrs. R. Aitken.
Those rendering vocal selections
were: Mr. J. Quinn, Mr. W. Williams,
Miss E, Henderson, Mrs. R. K. Walker, Mr. J. Boag, Mrs, J. Irvine. Refreshments were served at midnight,
after which the good time continued
until the wee small hours ot the
morning. Music was supplied by Mr.
S. Robertson and later he was joined
by Mr. Robert Strachan of Cumberland and Mr. James Walker.
FORESHORE LEASE
Nnnnlnio land District
District    nf  Newcastle,    Vancouver
Island, B. C.
TAKE notice that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited of
Victoria, B, C„ occupation Mine
Owners, Intend to apply for permission to tease the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted 374
feet North   (Ast.)  from the    South
' West corner of Lot 1, Newcastle Dl.
; strict, Vancouver Island, B. C. at the
, approximate high water mark   aud
■ point ot   beginning,   thence   North
: (Ast.) to low water mark, an appro-
| xlmate distance of 752 feet more or
t lesB, thence meandering along   the
said low water mark, northeasterly,
I northerly,  northwesterly and  southwesterly to Uie Intersection of a line
, produced North (Ast.) from the West
; boundary of said Lot 1, thence North
(Ast.)  to  approximate  high    water
: mark, a distance of 168 feet more or
less,  thence  northeasterly, easterly,
southeasterly      and      southwesterly
' along said  approximate high  water
mark to point of beginning, and containing In all 42 acres more or less.
: CANADIAN    COLLIERIES     (DUNSMUIR)  LIMITED.
I Date, May 14th, 1923.
Albert  Crompton  Lymn,  Agent.
Jy. 21.
ATTRACTIVE FEATURE
AT MAYTIME FROLIC
IN VICTORIA
Indians whose fathers saw the
first white men land o nthe shoree ot
the Pacific Coast will be assembled
ln Victoria during the next few days
to show the present generation ot
whites the dangers undergone by thc
early pioneers on this Island. The
red men are being brought to Victoria from all parts of the coast of
British Columbia to stage a night attack on two big settlers' forts which
nre being built for the purpose as
features of the Maytlme Frolic to be
held in the British Columbia Capital
May 24, 25 aud 26.
The Indians are to be carefully
schooled iu this attack bo that it may
he carried out with careful attention to historical detail. They will
wear the costumes ot their ancestors and travel iu the dug out canoes
that their tribes have been using for
hundreds of years. The actual assault upon the two forts will be left
to them so that they may carry It
out ln true Indian style.
One of the forts is being built now
on a big raft in on arm of the sea
which cuts through one of Victoria's
parks. At this point the outgoing
tide creates a swift current and
foaming rapids. The Indians will
slip down the rapids in their war canoes after dark, painted and armed.
The fort, which will be carefully
modeled ou the plan ot    the early
trading posts, will be attacked In
force as the red men swarm up its
walls. The white Inhabitants, over,
come by tbe attackers, will take to
their boats and make their way to a
second fort to be erected on the
shore. Here they will make their
last stand as their first fort Is
burned to the water's edge.
What will be thc outcome of the
fight has not been divulged but It is
said that Canadian sailors will take
a hand In It. The fray will be
staged at a point where it will be
visible to thousands lining thc batiks
and huge naval searchlights will
play upon the Indians and whites as
they grapple iu tbe water. American motorists who are expected to
attend tbe Maytlme Frolic in considerable numbers will have a particularly good view of the fight as lt
will occur In the water opposite the
new motor camp opened by Victoria
for  visitor.
The provincial authorities are
planning to have the government
lands at Point Grey laid out on a
town planning scheme so that the
district may develop Into a model re.
stdental section. An announcement
of the first sale when small parcels of
the 3000 acres will be placed on the
market will be made shortly.
*    *     *
A party of Scandinavian immigrants came west this week. They
appear to be a very desirable class
of settlers.
ENJOYABLE SOCIAL DANCE
Decorate
And   Celebrate
May 24th, Victoria Day
We have complete Stock of
Fancy Colored Paper
Flags, Confetti, Etc.
Lang's Drug Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's      Send us Vour   Mall Orders
Complete reorganization of the provincial police is planned by attorney-
general Manson nfter hearing reports
of the conference held recently between Col. J. II. McMullen, new superintendent of provincial police and
the provincial Inspectors Dutnvoodle,
Owen, Fernle and Parsons.
The whole provincial policing sys.
tem will be put on a seml-mllltnry
basis, under a commissioner with Inspectors, sergeants, corporals and
constables of lirst, second nnd third
classes. Men token on thc force will
be known as probationers and required lo pass examinations in their
knowledge of police work, criminal
law and kindred subjects.
Uniforming the police was recommended on the grounds that It would
develop greater efficiency nnd tend
to foster esprit de corps iu the ranks.
The system generality will be in many respects similar to the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police, though of
course, the men will not be mounted.
Hon. Mr. Manson ls also ln favor
of a criminal Investigation department ln connection with thc provincial police, such as exists in other
provinces. There would also be a
co-ordination of thc police force with
the Inspectorate of liquor control
and the R.C.M.P.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   * -    Proprietor
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
809 B.C. Permanent loan Bldg
PHONE 2(118      VICTORIA, Il.t. TEN
vmm
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY,  19th, 1923
BOYS
SUITS
Brown heather all wool tweed
Suits. Made of a beautiful quality, trimmed, good linings, well
tailored, every suit guaranteed
to give satisfaction. Sizes 26,
27, 28
$9.95
Sizes 29, 30, 31,
32 and 33 	
$12.75
Boys Navy Serge Suits made of Fox's   real   Serge,
smartly made. Sizes 26 to 28 (fiQ Af?
for      «pO*«/V
$10.25
Sizes 2!) to 83.
Price   	
Roys Mercerized White Ties a splendid range of colorings, good washing, 35c Each (fil AA
3 for        «D1.UU
Boys Real Khaki Shirts, Sports Collar with pocket
on left side. Sizes 12 14 14 f>-|   A(f
Price         fPL.idD
Boys Khaki Hats ventilated at sides, well (fi-t   {?A
made, most sizes. Price      tpJLetJv
Boys Sailor Suits made of regulation Navy Serge.
Sizes 2 to G years (fiA  AC
$5.50
rrived from
he little fel-
$1.75
and    	
Boys Footballs, another shipment, just arrived from
the factory direct. Size 8, Footballs for the little fellows, price ~  ~
Complete   	
Large size Football, size 5, complete (fin AJf
with bladder. Price      ty&l.htD
Regulation Footballs for Seniors Al quality. A standard ball d» t  mr
Price            «JjTC» I D
13 Pannel hand made Football, one of the best as
used in English Cup Tie Matches (fit*  CA
Complete        «J?U«lJU
PHONE  131
J. Sutherland
I    Dry Goods and Gents' Furnishings
H
CHEVROLET
FOR ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION
DISTINCTIVE FEATURES
LOW COST OF OPERATION.—The New SUPERIOR
Chevrolet is continually making new records in gasoline mileage 30 to ^5 miles to the gallon being not uncommon.
Oil consumption is so low as to surprise owners
who have driven any other car. Tire mileage is equally high.
CURTAINS OPEN WITH DOORS. A very decided and practical improvement. There is also a new
device on the engine hood which effectually stops all
rattles.
IMPROVED DESIGN.—With the new high hood,
crown panelled fenders, sloping windshield, plate glass
windows, large radiator and drum type headlights,
stream lines and fine finish, Chevrolet takes its place
among cars of higher price on an equal footing for
value.
COMPARISONS SELL CHEVROLET and your
close inspection of the New SUPERIOR models is sincerely requested before buying any car at any price.
BLUNT & EWART
District Agents
THE COURTENAY OARAGE
Phone 61.
Veteran's Wood
Supply
■T1:!.^! $6.00
Any length required,
PHONE YOUR ORDERS TO »■«.
A. A. BROWN.
Royston Road
Local Briefs
i CUMBERLAND vs.
UNION BAY
Mr. and Mrs. James Hayworth motored to Victoria last week-end.
Mrs. Bunbury and daughter left
for Vancouver last Saturday morning.
Mrs. James Hood returned home
on Saturday after visiting In Pcntlc-
ton.
Mr. George Mlchell left for Victoria Wednesday morning.
Mrs. Coleman went to Vancouver
on Wednesday whero Bhe will visit
her daughter, Miss Coleman.
An exhibition game of baseball will
be played on Cumberland Recreation
Grounds next Sunday at 3:00 p.m.
Cumberland Seniolrs. versus Ujiion
Day Seniors.
'MOTHER'S DAY"
OBSERVED SUNDAY
Mrs. (!.  n.  Kinney  returned  from
Vancouver on Saturday.
Mrs. Wm. Harrison arrived In
town on Saturday on a short visit to
hor pnronts, Mr. nnd Mrs. John
Frame. Mrs. Harrison ls leaving
shortly for Honolulu.
Last Sunday was observed as
"Mother's Day" at all churches.
Rev. James Hood of St. George's
Presbyterian Church preached a
most effective sermon on this subject to a largo and appreciative congregation. The Interior of the church
wns decorated with the symbolic
white flowers. Appropriate solos
were rendered by Mr. George Ramsell and Mlss-,1. McDonald, and a
beautiful anthem sung by the choir.
Special Sunkist
Week
HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS
J
Daily They Come To Mc
Tattered and Torn
Back They Go Looking
Like New The Next Morn.
From The
Family Shoe Repairer
S. DAVIS, DA™Tuueir
Mr. Thomas    E.    Hnnks    returned
from Vancouver on Saturday.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent. Canadian Collieries (Dl
Ltd. left for Vancouver on Sunday.
Mrs. F. Oliver and   son    returned
from  Vancouver on  Sunday.
Miss Gladys  Dando  returned  from
Vancouver on Sunday.
Mrs. Lowe of Nanaimo has been
visiting Mrs. Thomas Qraham nnd
returned to her home on Wednesday.
Mr. CharleB Graham, District Superintendent, Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd, returned from Vancouver on Saturday.
Mr.   George   Robertson     left    for
Dniinhelller. Alta. last week end.
Mr.   Henry   Devlin,    Inspector    of
Mines, visited town this week.
Mr. W. Bateman of South Wellington arrived on Tuesday on a visit to
relatives in town.
The following is the standing nf the I
pupils  of   Cumberland   High   School
as n result of the recent term examl- i
nations:
Senior   Matriculation—Hector   Sto-1
wart, Jack Fouracre.
Junior Matriculation—Beatrice
Bickle, Douglas Partridge, Etta
Hood, Abhy Coleman, Douglas
Sutherland, Harold Thomas, E.
ditli Hood.
Junior Grade—Florence Jones, Con
stance Bird. Willie Jones, Mildred Calnan. Margaret McNaughton, Fanny Strachan, Keith McLean, Edward Hughes, Clifford
Horwood, Howard Carey, Malcolm Stewart.
Preliminary Grade—Toshlo Kajly-
nia, Tom Abe. Chrissie Sutherland, Edward Bickle, Margaret Bunbury, Lilly Mussatto, Nora Glen
nnd Sadie Brown (equal), Gwen.
neth Emily. Nellie Potter, Henry Watson. Charlotte Dallos.
TENNIS COURT
UNDER WAY
Nice Juicy Oranges, 3 dozen for	
Also   DUC & I DC per dozen.
Lemons, Large OUC per dozen.
Florida Grape Fruit, large size, 2 for
California Grape Fruit, 4 for 35c or per
dozen 	
95c
35c
$1.00
Vegetables
Full stock arriving every freight
Fresh Tomatoes Cucumbers
Head Lettuce Cauliflower
Leaf Lettuce Cabbage
Green Onions Celery
Local Rhubarb Carrots
Potatoes Onions
See Our Windows for
SPECIALS
Burns  & Brown
SERVICE
B. & B. Grocery
PHONE 38
QUALITY
Mr. Louts Marks of the Canadian
Explosives, Victoria was a visitor in
town this week.
The foundation of the second board
tennis court is well under way, and
it is hoped that this will be ready tor
playing in a short time.
Mr. J. Dickson, Inspector of Mines
visited Cumberland on Thursday.
Don't  forget Klremens' Dance on
Monday, Juno 4th, in the llo-Ilo Hall.
LOCAL LADS BRING
HOME THE BACON
limit   forget  Klremens'  Dance on
Monday, .lime 41b, In tho llo-Ilo Hall.
MRS. HICKS ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. E. R. Hicks entertained at
six tables of bridge on Thursdny
evening. The successful prizewinners were: Miss Sehl, ladles first,
Mrs. Walton, consolation; Mr. A. C.
Lymn, gentlemen's Ilrst, and Mr. R.
C. Lang, consolation. A most enjoyable evening was spent by all.
MRS. HOOD HOSTESS
Mrs. Hood was hostess last Wednesday afternoon when she entertained some twenty guests at tea.
During the afternoon vocal selections were rendered by Mrs. Lymn,
Mrs. McCulloch, Miss McDonald and
Miss Edith Hood.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE:—PURE BRED FRENCH
Bull-Dog Pups. Eligible for Registration. Apply J. Vernon-Jones, Islander office.
FOR SALE:—JERSEY COW DUE
now with second calf and a rich
milker splendid family cow $45.00.
Berkshire Pigs from 7 weeks up
to 3 months.— R. Wnddell
 I
PUPS FOR SALE.—THOUOUGH-
hred Cocker Spaniels, from splendid retrievers, ready for Fall
Training. C. B. Sturrup. Arden, opposite Urquhart's  Mill.
—M.   20.
Every good Citizen of Cumberland
feels proud of our Junior Football
Team who carried away the honors
from Riverview at Vancouver last
Saturday, No doubt the Boya played
a good game and deserve all the
praise we can give them, several of
these young fans, who, after seeing
our new "Sure Fit" Cap have declared it the very newest and best ln
hendwear they have ever seen, and
the price Is so moderately low to he
within the reach of- all.
Our new Boy's Khaki Shirts and
Punts nre now on hand, and the price
will sell them fast.
We have just    received a special
shipment of Basket Ball Shoes    for
[toys and Men and we Invite your Inspection  before buying elsewhere.
GORDON'S, Phone 133
Adversity often serves as an Inspl-
! ration. The worm turns even more
[ vigorously after lt gets the hook.
. . .
! Other crops may be failures, but
J neither drought nor flood, hail, in -
I sects or anything else prevents an
i abundant crop of politics nnd politicians.
Whoa!
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland. B. C.
SLAZENGERS
Tennis Rackets
From $3.50 up
BICYCLE NEW and 2nd HAND
REPAIRING of all Description
L T. ELLISON
Gunsmith and Locksmith
McBride old Store    Courtenay
SEMBIHSHBIH^
FOR SALE—BARRED ROCK HATCH
Ing Eggs, from good layers. 10c each.
Apply Stalkers Ranch, Happy Valley. Phone 03 M.
FARM TO RENT.—70 ACRES GO-
lng concern. 12 cleared and fenced
qpd in crop this year. Over an
acre in bearing Orchard, owner
took mbrc than $200 last year. Four
roomed house, two large barns, 9
cows, team, chickens, etc.—$350 per
annum for two or five years.
Don't forget Klremens' Dance on
Monday, June Ith, In the Ilo-llo Hall.
IT IS MAY
—FARM FOR SALE. COMOX.—
One Acre, Vi cleared and all fenced
spring water and buildings for
quick sale at Kye Bay. $1100. cash.
Apply F. R. Fraser. Biscoe, Courtenay, B. C. T.f.n.
WANTED: — CAPABLE IIOUSE-
kcepcr for farm homo—three men
nnd aged lady. Modern house, hot
nnd cold water, linoleum on floor.
No outside work. Wages $30.00.
Apply, Box 62, Comox P.O.
All the best of the year 1923 now
lies ahead of us.   The winter Is gone
and the spring is here.   The season
of buds and flowers, ot sunshine and
bright days Is nt hand.   The housewife is busy with the renovation of
thc home and thc husband is oiling
up  the  lnwnmowcr  and  taking  thc
kinks out ot the garden hose. It is a
fine thing to be alive these glorious
; May days.    How wonderful are the
! workings of old Mother Nature.   For
| centuries  this  battle-scarred     earth
has responded to the touch of spring,
and thc sower litis gone forth to sow
' with  the  faith  that as he sows    so
shall he reap.   What are we that our
petty Ills should stand in the way of
the march of the seasons?
May ls here at last and soon we
will he "knee deep In June."
j   .\'cs, it's great to be alive    these
| wonderful days.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
Remember the Ilrst time your lips
met hers and how foolish and em-
barresscd you felt; remember the
other night when you broke the
worlds record endurance test.   What
a change.
*   *   *
Udell—Is strong for science, but
thinks it Is unfortunate that every
Important new invention keeps
people up 1 ater.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Beveridge and
j family return hearefelt thanks to their
■ many friends for kindness and sym-
; pnthy and beautiful floral tributes
\ received during their recent Bad be-
I reavement In the loss ot a loving eon
and brother,
SOMETHING NEW
For years we've talked about and
sold nothing but "Real Cake Ice
Cream Cones" but now we have something new to offer you.
(Chocolate coated Ice Cream Bars)
For samples or Information concerning chocolate coated Ice Cream
Bars, apply dirct to our store.
Made by us.
Busy Bee
Confectionery
COURTENAY, II. C
At Vancouver
Prices
We  carry  a  line    assortment    of
Mouldings   and   Mounts.
Call and   sec them at the
MARSHALL  MUSIC  STORE
Cumberland or Conrlcnay
W. Emeric
MUSIC STORE COURTENAY

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