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The Cumberland Islander Jun 25, 1921

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Provincial Library ,     -  - „. J /
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TIte«€tJMBERLAND ISLANDER
vi
With which is consolidated the Cumberland Jfcws.
FORTIETH  YEAR—No.  2&
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Touring Scots Easily Defeat
Upper Island All-Star Team
3000   People Witness   Famous
Team in Action at Nanaimo
—Score 4 Goals to 0.
The Scottish football team defeated
the Upper Island select team hy four
goals to nil before 3000 spectators al
Nanaimo on Monday last.
The weather was very much unsettled, rain falling until about It o'clock,
but afterwards the warm sun shone
and dried the ground. The weather
during the game was ideal for spectators and players alike.
Despite the downpour in the morning a very large number of football
fans from Cumberland made the trip,
some going by train aud many making
the journey by car.
' The Scots won the toss and Davis
kicked off for the Upper Island team.
The forwards immediately made for
the Scots' goal and continued to press
for the first few minutes. Davis tried
Brownlee with a slow shot, but the
latter had no difficulty in clearing his
lines. Then the Scots' forwards, by
some fine combination, worked . the
ball nicely to the home goal; Rankine
te*sted Shepherd but Salty saved at
the expense of a corner. Lowe took
the kick aud Bennett kicked past.
Scots Scare First Goal.
The Scots' forwards and half-backs
were working like a perfect machine,
showing the fans some pretty passing;
their trapping of the ball brought
rounds of applause on various occasions. After 8 minutes play Lowe and
Rankine, on the left, were demonstrating some fine passing, Lowe eventually crossing the ball to Wilson,
tliis player heading the ball into the
net for the first counter.
The home team was not discouraged,
the defence especially playing a good
game. When the forwards did get
away they somehow or other seemed
to lack tlie ability to combine, appearing to be disorganized when within
sight . of the goal. Robertson and
Hitchens had tries at the goal but
Brownlee was equal to anything coming his way.
After thirty minutes' play Scott, the
half-back of the visitors, received a
pass from McMenemey and scored the
second counter for the Scottish boys
with" a hard drive, giving Shepherd no
chance whatever to save. A few
minutes later Davis, the home team
centre forward, broke through by a
pass from Hitchens, but when about to
shoot, McBain, the centre half, tripped
him up, and a penalty was given the
home team. Dickinson took the kick,
Brownlee saved, aud on the rebound
Dickinson had another good opportunity, but kicked past tlie goal. No
further scoring took place in the first
half. Scottish team 2 goals, Upper Island, 0.
Scotland Scores Two More Goals.
The second half was somewhat
similar to the first, the Scots being
the far superior team and scored two
more goals, Wilson and Rankine being the scorers in this period.
The Scots gave a splendid exhibition and showed how the game should
(Continued on Page Two)
Tennis Club
Dance Tonight
A Whist Drive and Dance will be
held this (Friday) evening in the Anglican Hall under the auspices of the
Cumberland Tennis Club. This is the
first social to be held by this organization and the members intend to make
this a notable event.
Whist will commence at 9 o'clock,
followed by refreshments, dancing beginning at 10.30.   Admission 50 cents.
CITY COUNCIL MEETS
SATURDAY NIGHT
Owing to the Mayor and a number
of Aldermen being out of town, the
regular meeting of the City Council
was not held on Monday laat, but
was postponed to Saturday night at 7
o'clock.
The City Clerk will be in his ofiice
every afternoon next week from 4 to
6 for the purpose of receiving taxes,
etc.
ST.   GEORGE'S   CHURCH
The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper
will bo dispensed in St. George's
Presbyterian Church on Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.
Preparatory service will be held in
tlie church Friday evening at 7.30.
BISHOP SCHOFIELD
LEAVES FOR NORTH
On Monday morning last, Rt. Rev.
C. V. 'Schofield, Bishop of Columbia,
accompanied by Mrs. and Miss 'Schofield. were taken to Campbell River
by Rev. W. Leversedge, where they
joined tlie mission boat "Columbia"
and left for three or four weeks' visit
to norlliern points of the diocese.
MrB. and Miss Schofield arrived
Saturday from Victoria and with the
Bishop were guests at Beaufort House.
During his stuy in the district the
Bishop visited many points. On Sunday lie preached at the Comox Church
in the morning and at Courtenay In
the AeniHE.
DECORATION DAY
OBSERVED BY I.O.O.F
Sunday last, the annual Decoration
Day of the Independent Order of Odd
Fellows, was duly observed. A large
number of members of the local
Lodge, accompanied by representatives of the Rebekah Lodge, visited
(he different cemeteries in Cumber-
laud and Sandwick and placed ilowers
the graves of their deceased
Brothers and Sisters.
The members participating in the
observance were conveyed in carB belonging to members of the order.
OPEN-AIR CONCERT
SATURDAY NIGHT
City Band Will Play Selections
on Band Stand, Commencing
At Eight o'clock.
The Cumberland City Band wlll give
another musical entertainment from
tlle City Band Stand on Saturday
evening, commencing at 8 o'clock.
The programme which has been arranged is as follows:
March, "Iowa" (C. L. Barnhouse).
•Waltz, "Wild Flowers" (W. Kelfer).
Grand selection, "Bohemian Girl,"
by request (Balfe).
Overture, "Sky Pilot" (A. M. Laurens).
Serenade, "Autumn Romance" (K.
L. King).
Characteristic, "Princess Oskaloo-
va" (C. L. Barnhouse).
Waltz, "Moonlight on the Nile" (K.
L. King).
March, "Esplorex" (Fred. Jewel).
Mr. C. C. Halverston, bandmaster.
LOCAL BASEBALLERS
OUT-SWAT NATIVE SONS
Intermediates Pile Up Big Scores
at Nanaimo—Dangerfleld
Stars as Pitcher.
Cumberland Intermediates defeated
the Native Sons Intermediates of Nanaimo at the Cricket Grounds on Sunday by a score of 16 runs to 12.
The Cumberland boys made a very
good start by scoring 11 runs in the
first four innings and one run In each
of tlie remaining five.
Tlie Nanaimo boys steadied down
after the fourth inning and tried very
hard to overcome th^e big lead their
opponents got In the early part of the
game, but were only successful in
overcoming part of it.
Kuril Team I'sed Three Pitchers.
Nanaimo used three pitchers, T.
Allen, Sid Foster and "Fat" Edwins
Cumberland also used three, John
Bennle, Paul Courtenay and" Jim
Dangerfleld. This was the first time
Daugerfield had pitched for tlie local
boys and lie made a splendid showing,
lie has lots of speed and curve and
good control. He was put In tlle box
for the last three Innings, and in the
seventh he only pitched 10 balls and
there were three men struck out. All
the Cumberland pitchers did good
work. ,
The team that went down was as
follows: Catcher, D. Richards; pitch
ers. J. Bennle, P. Courtenay and Jim
Dangerlield; 1st base, A. Farmer; 2nd
R. Robertson; 3rd, A. Sommerville;
s.s., J. Clark; right field, V. Dalby
centre field, A. Wlnnlngliam; left
field, M. Stewart; manager, C. Mul-.
holland.
Manager Cullfgan of the Native Sons
expects to bring them up here in about
three weeks' time. He says that they
will he in better shape hy that time
and will give the Cmberland boys a
hard run for the game. The local boys
say they will be waiting for them and
expect lo do the same thing again.
Garden Party
Great Success
Ladies' Aid Favored With Per*
feet Weather—Big Attendance of General Public
held, giving the people an opportunity
of getting better acquainted as well as
helping the organizations giving them.
MRS. HARRISON MET
WITH PAINFUL ACCIDENT
Steering Gear of Car Got Out of
Order and Car Overturned—
Other Occupants Unhurt
On Thursday afternoon a painful
accident, which might have ended
fatally, occurred when a car driven
by Mr. Ollie Harrison, overturned on
the Island Highway betwen Royston
and Courtenay.
In the car besides the driver were
Mrs. Harrison, Miss H. Harrison aud
three children, and how the others
escaped serious injury is a miracle.
The steering gear Is said to have got
out of order, with the result that the
car went astray and overturned, Mrs.
Harrison suffering severe injuries to
a shoulder. The other members of the
party escaped injury.
The injured lady is being attended
by Dr. MacNaughton and ls making
satisfactory progress
VANCOUVER ISLAND
GETS $1000 PRIZE COW
Mr. V. L. Edwards, of R. R. No. 1,
Duncan, waB successful in winning tlie
first prize in the publicity campaign
contest conducted by Farm and Home.
Mr. Edwards' prize Ib a fine Jersey
heifer, valued at $1000. She comes
from a long line of producers and has
Just completed her record as a two-
year-old by yielding over 8200 pounds
of milk and 410 pounds of butterfat
in 12 months.
MEETING OF EMPIRE DAY
CELEBRATION COMMITTEE
There will be a meeting In the City
Hall on Monday evening at 7.30 for
the purpose of receiving the auditor's
report and financial statement of the
Empire Day celebration.
FOOTBALL CLUB
CONCERT WEDNESDAY
A concert and presentation of medals
to members of the Cumberland United
Football Club will be held in the Ilo-
llo Theatre on Wednesday evening
next. A good programme is in course
of preparation.
The medals to be presented ore for
tlle winners In the Upper Island and
Vancouver Island Leagues and the
.McBride Shield championship.
The Ladies' Aid ot St. George'e
Presbyterian Church were favored
with perfect weather on Wednesday,
on the occasion of tlle garden party
The beautiful lawn at tbe residence o^
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Parnham had beer
lent for the occasion and was gall;,
decorated with flags and lanterns
Scattered around the lawn were tin
various stalls and refreshment tables
giving a pleasing effect unuer tlu
shady trees.
A very large number attended thi
party in the afternoon and evening,
good busines being done by the ladles
at the stalls and serving the delectable*
refreshments. In fact the day's pro-;
cedlngs were very highly successful
from every standpoint, not alone financially but from a social standpoint
The children attending thoroughly en]
joyed themselves roming around on
the lawn and playing games.
During the afternoon and evening
songs were given by Mrs. McAdam,
Miss Beckwith, Miss Harling and MHJj
Harold Roberts, and were greatly appreciated by those present. j
The special feature of the evening'
was the attendance of the City Band.'j
which enlivened the proceedings with
several selections.
The ladies having charge of the various stalls and assisting were
Sewing and Home Cooking Stall-
Mrs. Rickson and Mrs. Fraser.
Strawberry Stall—Mrs. Lockner anBi|
Mrs. Jas. Potter.
Ice Cream—Mrs. Wm. Potter.
Cake and Sandwiches—Mrs. Chas.']
Whyte.
Tea—Mrs. D. R. MacDonald.
Tables—Mrs.  Campbell, Mrs.  Red-t
mond, Mrs. Wm. Brown,  Mrs.  John
Murdock,  Mrs.  John  Potter,  Mrs.  J.
H. McMillan, Miss C. MacDonald, who'
were-assisted by the young ladles.
The general opinion was that this
was one of the nicest garden parties f   a very successful whist drive and
over held in the district and that' more hjaucev was held by the members of
ot those pleasing functions should b-Sf-tb.fG.--W. V. A. In the Memorial Hall
Liquor Agent
For Cumberland
Robert Thomson Has Oilice in
Provincial Building—Only
• Beer Handled Locally.
Mr. Robert Thomson has been appointed liquor agent at Cumberland
and has an oilice In the Provincial
Building. He will sell all kinds of
permits but will only handle beer locally. A small supply will lie on hand
lu the Court House for those who desire small bottle purchases, but larger
Quantities will  lie delivered.
Today 50 barrels of Silver Spring
beer, which is said to be of an excellent (uuility and uot resembling Ihe
2 p.c, has been shipped here and will
arrive on Tuesday. This will bo distributed by Will. Douglas on order
from tlie local agent.
Hard liquor will be supplied from
Courtenay, at which place the Liquor
Control Board is establishing a store.
They were negotiating for one this
week bill the deal is said to have
fallen through. The Board may possibly have to build a store. Anyway
tt is their intention to have a store as
soon ns possible.
The government liquor vendor in
Courtenay will be Mr. Hugh Stewart,
assisted hy Mr. O. P. Herd.
DAILY DOUBLE STEAMER
SERVICE TO VANCOUVER
Commencing on Monday last the
summer schedule of the steamer service between Nanaimo and Vancouver
was inaugurated. This gives a double
daily service both ways, giving residents of tiie upper Island the opportunity of making the trip to Vancouver in one day. The new schedule
also carries with it the daily mall
service to and from Vancouver.
G.W.V.A. Notes
WHIST DRIVE  AMD  IUNTE.
on Friday evening. June 17, over ono
hundred people being present. There
were seventeen (aides occupied by tlie
whist drive, and the following won
the prizes: Ladies' first, Mrs. Parkinson; ludies' second, Mrs. H. Water-
field; gentlemen's lirst, Mr. J. H. McMillan; gentlemen's second, Mr. J.
Branch.
After the whist drive a very nice
lunch was served and then dancing
commenced and wus kept going until
the "wee snia hours." Everyone who
was present was satisfied that it was
the best time they had had in many
moony.
The G. W. V. A. desires to publicly
thank Mr. and Mrs. J. II. McMillan,
Mrs. R. E. Frost, Mr. W. A. Owen, Mr.
Colville (Bud) Graham, and Mr P.
Monte for the musical programme,
which was given gratis. The Association also desires to thank the Ladies'
Auxiliary of the G. W. V. A. for their
co-operation and the providing of the
lunch.
It is the intention of the G.W.V.A.
to have one more whist drive and
dance before the real hot weather sets
in, as several enquiries were made
by those who so thoroughly enjoyed
themselves at tbe last one, when the
next will be held. The date will be
announced later.
G. W. V. A. CONCENT
As announced in these columns last
week, the G. W. V. A. concert will be
held on tbe evening of July 6, in lbc
Ilo-llo Theatre. A first-class programme is being prepared, consisting
of vocal. Instrumental and Highland
dancing numbers. Tickets will be on
sale next week for the. concert, and
can be obtained from any member of
the G. W. V. A. al Ibe modest priee of
50 cents. The concert will he well
worth the price of admission.
The following have kindly consent
ed to assist with musical and vocal
selections, etc: Cumberland City
Band; violin-cello, Mr. W. A. Owen
and Mr. J. H. McMillan; vocalists, Mr.
H. Roberts, baritone; Mr. Howard
MacAuley, tenor; Mr. W. Carr, baritone; and Master Bradley, the juvenile
Dan Leno; pianists, Mrs. II. E. Frost
and Mrs. J. H. McMillan; Highland
dancing by Miss Jean MacNaughton
and Miss Helen Parnham. Other
lists will be announced next week.
Cumberland Schools Close
Today for Summer Holidays
The Cumberland High and Public
Schools closed loday (Friday) for the
summer vacation, which tliis year
will give the staff and scholars ten
weeks, the schools re-opening on the
first Monday in September.
(miikI Progress In School Similes.
The Summer Term examinations for
the Public Scliool have been completed. The Principal reports good progress being made in most of tho
grades, tlie percentage of passes being very satisfactory.
.Han} changes In School Stuff.
When the Fall term of the Public
Scliool begins it will be with several
changes in the start of teachers. Five
of tlie present start have handed iu
their resignations and it is possible
another one or "two may make n
change.
Miss Phyllis Partridge is relinquishing her dulies in order to continue her
studies, and will enter tiie B. C. University next term to study for the
Bachelor of Arts degree.
Miss A. Potter has received an appointment with the Vancouver School
Board and will report there beginning
of the term.
Miss Hilda Watson, who has given
suclf excellent satisfaction with the
Receiving Class, will go to Penticton,
where she has received an appointment.
Mrs. Barker Is resigning from the
teaching staff and will take up her
residence In Victoria.
Mr. McLean is leaving tlie local
scliool staff.
Miss H. Harrison had a good offer
to go to tlie Fernie School, but on
consideration has decided to remain
in Cumberland.
Mr. C. B. Wood, Prlncipat' of the
High School, has received some tempting offers from other localities, hut it
is understood he will remain with tiie
Cumberland High School.
Will Alleuil University Summer Class.
Mr. ChaB. E. Burbrldge, Principal of
the Public Scliool, Miss Colman ol* the
same school, and Mi*. C. B. Wood.
Principal of the High School, will attend the Summer School Class of tlie
B. CV University at Vancouver, which
begins July 4.
Appointments to Staff.
Mrs. C. It. Drader and Miss Ida McFadyen have been appointed to the
Public School staff. Mrs. Drader will
resume her old position, in charge of
the Receiving Class.
High School Results.
Tlie High School results will not he
known until about thc middle~5t July,
as the papers have to go to Victoria
for examination.
Public School Promotions.
Examination results and promotions
are as follows:
Division I.
Promoted lo High School on llccoiu-
iiieniliili.iii of Principal.
1, Willie Jones; 2, Connie Bird; 3,
Fanny Strachan; 1, I.illias Glen' B,
Mary Qallafrlo; U, Hazel Mounce; 7,
Mildred Oliver; 8, Cecil Fraser; 9,
Howard Carey; lu, Malcolm Stewart;
11, Edward Hughes; 12, Clifford Horwood; 1.'!. Margaret Bunbury; 14,
Ellen Waddington; 15, Katherine
Richardson; 16, Clifton Mounce.
Division II. Mr. J. McLean.
Promoted lo Senior Fourth.
I. Nora Glen; 2, Toshio Kajiyama;
3, Gwenneth Emily; 4, Mabel Jones;
5, clirissie Sutherland; ti, Tom Ahe;
7, .Mary Enrici; 8, Henry Watson; 9,
Edward Bickle; in, Alfred Maxwell;
II, Dorothy Liddell; 12, Edgar Tro-
liorne; Ul, Elizabeth CunlllTc; 14.
Lome Campbell; 15, John Strachan;
10. Wtlbcrl Hudson; 17, Oresti Fro-
liiiii: 18, John Richardson; 19, Arnold
MacDonald; 20, Charlie Bnbba; 21
Editli O'Brien; 22, Lizzie Brown; 23,
Jessie Maxwell; 24, llora Manlcor;
26, Meni Gozzana; 26; Olga Owen; 27
Olive Richardson; 2S, Katie Berllioldl;
29, Alex.  Clerk;   30,  Harriet Gomm;
31, Helen  Parnham;   32, Uklka Alio;
32. Edna Bennle; 34, Lillian Banks;
:',i,, Maud Baird; 86, Lena Allara; 37,
Mary liavis; 3S, Vera Picketti; 39,
George Blown.
Kl. Tom Little; 17, Roslc Manlcor; 18,
William Bennle; 19, Leslie Dando; 20,
Louie Lewis; 21, Evelyn Caroy; 22,
William Mossey; 23, Low Yuen; 24,
Jessie Brown; 2.5, Joel Baker; 26,
Beryl Hudson; 27 (equal) Jean Smith,
William Walker and Dick Choe; 30,
Charles Enrici; 31. Margaret Young;
32, William Mitchell; 33, Sam Stanaway; 31, Albert Gomm; 35, Cyril Neul.
Division IV. Miss A. Potter.
I'rniniilcil to Senior Third II.
I. Jean MacNaughlon; 2 (equal),
Shirley Bate and Prlscilla Cloutler; 3,
Toshiko Iwasa; 4, Irene Bate; 5,
Margaret .Thompson; 6 (equal),'Alma Conrod;, Jack Bird and Claudia
Harrison; 7, Marvel Bate; 8, Alastair
MacKinnon; 9, May Tnylor; 10, May
Hughes; 11, Dorothy Maxwell; 12,
Edna Smith; 13, Margaret Hannay;
II, Jack Hill; 15, Margaret Halliday;
16, Archie Dick; "17, Leslie RFrost; 18,
10, Archie Dick; 17, Leslie Frost; 18,
James Peters; 21, Willie Davis; 22,
Willie Devoy; 23, Leonard Shouldice;
24, Daniel Adamson.
Division V., Miss Partridge.
Promoted lo Senior Third Itender.
1, Lordnn Walker; 2, Stanley Dowling; 3. Clsao Abe; 4, Charlie Walker;
Jean Peters; 6, Mary Gozzano; 7,
George Itaga; 8, Joe Freloni; 9. Wilfred Colling; Id, Lilian McLennan;
11, Fred Leversedge; 12, Charlie Francioll; 13, Tom McLellan; 14, Janet
Bogo; 15, Willie Stant; 16, Lena Gali-
azzl; 17, Arthur Hpffeinz; 18, Margaret Richardson; 19, James Potter;
Mabel Williams; 21, Ella Conn;
Victor Marinelli; 23, Peter Piroz-
zini; 24, Andrew Brown; 25, Janet
Damonte; 2G, George McLellan; 27,
Willie McNeil; 28, Victor Bono; 29,
Norman Bateman; 30, Reno Perctto;
31, Jack Sweeney; 32, Charlie Tobac-
33, Moris Waddington; 34, Elsie
Young,
Division VI.   Miss Bannerman.
Promoted to Junior Third il.
1, Norma Parnham; 2, Lily Leversedge; 3, Eleanor Bergland;   4, Dick
Continued on Page Two)
CONFIRMATION  SERVICE
AT ANGLICAN CHURCH
On Friday evening last, St. Alban's
Day, the Right Rev. Bishop Schofield
administered the rite of confirmation
to a number of candidates at Holy
Trinity Church. There wns a large
congregation and the service wus very
impressive.
The Bishop was assisted by Rev. W.
Leversedge, who prepared the candidates for confirmation.
Candidates were the Misses Dorothy
Holly. Katie Richardson, Margaret
Bunbury, Mildred Oliver, Connie Bird,
and Leslie Merrifield and Frank
Street.
The altar was decorated with beautiful flowers brought over from Denman Island for the occasion.
COCO-COLA TRUCK HITS
COW AT FANNY BAY
On Monday afternoon, while proceeding to Nanaimo, a Coco-Cola
truck struck a "cow at Fanny Bay belonging to Albert Walker; the cow
was being taken home hy a lad named
Duuald McNeil at the time. The collision broke a leg of the cow aud it
had to he destroyed. The driver of
the truck reported the matter on arrival at Nanaimo.
Mr. H. B. Dawley, until recently
provincial constable at Courtenay. has
been appointed .chief of police of the
municipality of Esquimau.
Division HI. .Miss Beckwith.
Promotion In Junior Fourth.
1, Jesie Baird; 2, Lelaud Harrison;
'!. Josephine Bono; 4, Winnifreil
Young; 6, Eileen Dowling; 6, Mao-
Walker; 7. Reginald1 Laver; 8. Sandy
Bevis; !>, Olive Junes; 10, Gwendolyn
Williams; 11 (equal), Isobel Pryde
and William Urowu; 13, Mary Conn;
14, Martha Boyd; 15, Johnny Lockner;
Band Dance On
Thursday Next
A dance wlll he held lu the Ilo-llo
Hall on Thursday next, under tho
aiiHpices of the Cumberland City
Band, and il is expected a big crowd
will attend and participate lu a good
night's fun as well as helping it**
popular organization.
The band is attending the contest
at Ladysmith ou July 2 and is raising funds for that purpose. Dancing
will he from y.3u to 2.30, and music
will be supplied hy the band's seven-
piece orchestra.
Burning fur Prizes bailie Evening*
During the evening the drawing for
the gold watch and 14 other prizes
will take place, tickets for which are
now on sale at 2o cents.
ODD FELLOWS' PICNIC
WILL BE HELD LATER
The picnic of the Independent Order
of Odd Follows aud Rehekah Ludges,
which was io have been held Saturday
last at Royston, was postponed to a
later date owing to the inclemency of
the weather. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 28, id2i.
KEEP FLIES OUT
NOW IS THE TIME TO FIT YOUR HOUSE WITH
SCREEN   DOORS
AND
SCREEN WINDOWS
TO KEEP OUT THE DISEASE-CARRYING FLIES.
Lawn Sprinklers—-Garden Hose
We have on hand a large consignment of
BEAVER   BOARD
THE BATE HARDWARE CO.
Phone 31
P. 0. Box 279
FURNITURE
SALE
For the remainder of June
we will offer you genuine bargains in Furniture.
This is an opportunity to make real savings.
Watch for posters for particulars.
A discount of 10 per cent, will be allowed on all
lines not specially priced for this sale.
All Sale Prices for Cash only
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EXPECT "STILLS" TO
FLOURISH UNDER
PRESENT SYSTEM
SCHOOLS CLOSE TODAY
FOR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
(Continued from Page One)
Cheap Materials and Only Fine
To Pay May Induce Many
To Break the Law.
That tlie Liquor Control Act wil;
inaugurate a new era for the moonshiner is the belief of Inland Revenue
ollicials.
During the first years of the Prohibition Act stills flourished, and despite constant raids anil seizures by
revenue officers and police they continued to spring up in various parts ol
the country.
With the coming of allowance of
liquor imports by private persons for
their own consumption the moonshiner met wlfli competition that he
could not face anil the stills fell into
disuse.
l'njs No Taxes or Unties.
The high prices, taxes and added
duties now affords tlie illicit distiller
an opportunity, for lie can manufacture and undersell the government
for he has no duties to pay other than
the fine when caught.
One Inland Revenue official In
speaking on the subject, said: "I believe stills will spring up in the country in a manner that will give us all
the work wc can possibly handle.
"The foreign element has always
been Inclined to evade the law and
manufacture its own liquor, and with
the existing high prices to face it will
be more inclined that way than ever.
"Prices of fruits and other necessaries for the manufacture of moonshine have dropped considerably, and
even with the chance of being fined
the moonshiner can make and sell
liquor at a price that will be a temptation to those compelled to buy nt
the prices set by the government.
Liquor at U2 a Gallon.
"No duties are paid by the moonshiner and oven if he carries on his
business but a short time he can
make enough profit to offset the fines
imposed under tlie Inland Revenue
Act.
"Splendid fruit liquor, distilled
from raisins, dried apricots, peaches
and apples can be turned out in a
crude still at $2 a gallon.
"This liquor is unlike tlie product
of grain mashes for it does not contain the same percentage of fusil oil
and other impurities that necessitate
ageing iu wooden casks. It may ht
used shortly after distillation without
a decided Injurious effect upon the
drinker.
"Bought by the bottle a good brand
of Scotch whisky costs the consumer
$27 a gallon when purchased at a government store, where the moonshiner
turning out his product at $2 a gallon
can take a chance and sell his product
at $10 a gallon, with a profit that
makes the chance worth while.
"The moonshiner has always had to
take the risk of his buyers Informing
on him and 1 do not think that the
section of the Liquor Control Act
making it compulsory for a man convicted of drunkenness to be a witness
against those supplying him with
liquor Is sufficient added risk to prevent him from operating.
"Drinkers who want liquor for immediate consumption will buy where
they can get their supply cheapest
and for this reason I think that there
will be a boom In moonshlntng,"
PRESERVING
Strawberries
WE CAN SUPPLY YOU WITH
No. 1 Gordon Head Strawberries
EXTRA CHOICE
LEAVE US YOUR ORDER—WE WILL PROTECT
YOU ON THE PRICE
The Corner Store
WM. GORDON
Phone 133
TOURING SCOTS EASILY
DEFEAT UPPER ISLAND
ALL-STAR SOCCER TEAM
(Continued from Page One)
be played. Their clean work and
fine combination, especially wll
nenring the opponent's goal, was
sight worth going far to sec. Their
passing called for much favorable
comment. The homo hoys played a
hard game throughout, but were outclassed by superior play.
The final score was four goals* to
nil In favor of the Scots,
The Uni".I'|i.
The teams were as follows:
SCOTS—Coal, Brownlee; hacks, Mccormick and Orr; half-hacks, Scott,
McBain* and Gordon; forwards, Bennett. McMencincy, Wilson, Rankine
and Lowe.
UPPER ISLAND—Goal, Shepherd;
backs, Strang and Campbell; halfbacks, Dickinson, Roberts and Stobbart; forwards, O'Brien, Robertson.
Davis, Hitchens and Home.
Referee, W. Burnip.
Linesmen, J. English and J. Dawson.
Nannlllio   Hands   Supplied   .Music.
The Nnnnlmo Silver Cornet Bund
and the Nanaimo Pipe Band rendered
several selections before thc game and
also at half-time.
The visitors were entertained by
the Nanaimo Burns Clubs In the evening to a concert, banquet and danco,
which was greatly appreciated by tho
Scottish boys.
HI
Marpole; «. Edna Conrod; (i, Fusayo
Sugimorl; 7. Eleanor Davis; 8, Kathleen Emily; il. Mary Hunt; 10, Reggie
Davis; 11, Barbara Grant; 12, Louis
Bartoldi; 13, Ernest Boffy; 14, Doris
Waterfleld; Iii, Robert Dunslre; 16,
Margaret Hughes; 17, Mali Shun.
Promoted to Senior Second.
1 and 2 (equal), Edna Davis and
Ellen Intrear; 3, Low Leong; i, Klshlo
ICaga; 5, Joe Williams; 0, James
Brown; 7. Tommy Bate; S, Victor
Howling; li, Lena Merletli; 10 and 11
(equal), Alko Yoshikuni and Shizue
Tahara; 12, .Mary Sweeney; 13. George
Logan; 14, Sarah Young; Iii and 16
(equal), Elsie Bevis and Tomb Comb;
17. Kiln Johnson; IS. Gordon Keenan;
III. Robert Burns; 20, Josephine
Welsh.
Division VII., Miss Reese.
Promoted to Senior Second from
Junior First
1. Margaret Salmon; 2. Norman
Frelone; 3. Robert Colling; 4, Jackie
Watson; 5. Willie Thompson; 6. Jean
Braes; 7. Willie Smith; S. Charlotte
•'.tanl; 0, Percy Jones; 10, Willie
Allnra.
Promoted to Senior Second from
First Render.
1. Barbara Westfield; 2, Annie
Walker; 3, Dorothy Redmond; 4,
Allen Glen; 5, Snrah Laurence; 6,
Jean McWhirtei", 7, Hotoshl Sugimorl; S, Jemima Mitchell; 9, Yoshio
Kawaguchl; 10, Mildred Lockner; 11,
Alice McLennan.
Promoted lo Junior Second from First
Header.
1. Jimmie Chin; 2. Isabel Brown;
?,. Floyd McMillan; 4. Reta Devoy; 5,
Willie Pryde; 0. Victor Tomasi; 7,
Margaret MacDonald; 8, Russell McMillan; 0, Jean Brown; 10, Beatrice
Cnvallero; 11. Josie Burgheimer; 12.
Hazel Gibson; 13. Thelma Ronald; 14.
Bessie Nicholas; 15, Minora Tahara;
in, Steve Htldock; 17. Kathleen
O'Brien; IS, Clarence Lewis; 19,
Norah Wallace.
Division VIII., Miss Colman.
Promoted to Junior Second Reader.
1, Esther McLennan; 2, Tso Lin Ho;
3, Tasku Oyama; 4, Leslie Farmer;
5, Rosenn Thompson; 6, Annie Brown;
7. Kimeyo Kaga; S. Mntsuyo Abe; 9.
Nellie Walker; 10. Low Ping; 11, To-
kio Nakana; 12, Andrew Hudock; 13,
Mitchuski Ashikawa; 14, Hotsui Mat-
suliiira; 15. John Hoftcing; 16, Teruko
Doi.
Promoted from Second Primer to First
Bonder.
John Bingheimer, Robert Cassai,
Hugh McNeil and Dan Stant.
Division IX., Miss Harrison.
Second Primer.
Promoted to Junior Second Header.
1, Norma Frost; 2, Cheyako Kajiyama; 3. Sedako Iwasa; 4, Thomas Tobacco; 5, John Comb; 6, Hatsuml Mlyahara; 7, Wong Hong; 8, Harriet
Horbury.
Promoted (<> First Render.
1, Violet Williams; 2, Ena Young;
3, Olga Benora; 4, Alven Frelone; 5,
William Mcintosh; 6, Mary Barker;
7, lidmond Carrigan; 8, Dorino Gal-
lcazzi; 9. Annie McLeod; 10, Lena
Tomassi; 11, Lem Gee; 12, Douglas
Baird; 13, Oswald Reid; 14, Norio
Herosi; 15, Kitty Prior; 16, Veshu
Comondono; 17, Esther Allara; 18,
Takeru Kawaguchl; 19, May Brown;
20, Donald Graham; 21, Tom Adamson; 22, Helen Saunders; 23, Bernice
Stant; 24, George Bird; 25, George
Mah; 26, Tadachi Ito; 27, Kate Hudock.
Division X, Miss J. E. Robertson
Promoted lo Second Primer.
1, Nina Shields; 2, Catherine Brown;
3, Muriel Partridge; 4, Molly Cooke;
5, Viola Reese; 6, Irene Davis; 7,
Cazuko Iwaso; 8, Albert Cooper; 9,
Cyril Davis; 10, Alden Francescini;
11, Eunice MacKinnon; 12, Edna Watson; 13, John Chong; 14, Nellie
Chong; 15, Second Merlettl; 16, May
Beveridge; 17, Alfred Jones; 18,
Ronald Derbyshire; 19, Tommy Con-
rod; 20, Irene Oyama; 21, Doris Hannay; 22, Hesnko Nakano; 23, Shiku-
era Kiyona; 24, Winona Baird; 25,
Mamoni Tahara; 26, Heroshi Okuda;
27, Sidney Hunt; 28, Yuerako Miy-
himi; 29, Lily Picketti; 30, Mary
Comb; 31, Jlosayo Naghi; 32, Archie
Welsh; 33, John Chapman; 34, Mary
.Small.
Division XL, Miss Watson.
Promoted to First Primer.
1, Jenny Laurence; 2, Irma Co-
inondona; 3, Muriel Harrison; 4, Ung
Dick; 5, Chow Fung; 6, Wong Oak; 7.
Joe Whyley; 8, Irvin Banks; 9, John
Danyluk; 10, Shigeru Yaguchl; 11,
Jack Marpole; 12, Dick Yeun; 13,
Willie Nicholson; 14, Ham Woo; 15.
Willie Tobacco; 16, Enls Benora; 17,
Masaka Kaga; 18, Mali Dock Lung;
19, Hideo Imasho; 20, Mnsalu Sora;
21, Harvey Herd; 22, Ben Nicholas;
23, Choo Foo Lung; 24, Chiyabo Sugl-
raori; 25, Kikuye Nishlkawa; 26, Isu-
gino Matsultura; 27, Mary Mae Millar;
2S, Harry Waterfleld.
Division XII.   Mrs. Barker.
Promoted to Junior Third A.
Sadaik Asao, Lena Bogo, Peter Bar-
dessono, Jennie Boffy, Mary Clark.
Kathleen Cooke, Harold Conrod,
Joseph Dueca, Tadashi Dol, Sydney
Eccleston, Margaret Gibson, Ague;
Iloffheinz, Norman Hill, Jack Hor
bury, Tatsuml Iwnsl, Shlgeo Kawaguchl, Clifford Laver, Lllah Lewis.
Charles McDonald, Sarah Oyama,
Emma Picketti, Josie Pirozzenl, Margaret Shearer, Joe Stanaway, Isabel
Yarrow, Ethel Hunt and Sam Waddell.
The RED CROSS
Public Health
CAMPAIGN
Public health is the foundation upon which rests the happiness of the people and the strength of the nation. What is the
state of your health? The average man and woman is wont to
say, "Oh, I'm healthy enough—I'm perfectly safe from epidemics,
etc." You may think you are safe—but YOU ARE NOT! Disease
■ in many guises may be lurking near you, ready to strike you
down at any time with its deadly poisons.
Where ignorance of the laws of health and hygiene exist, sickness must inevitably follow—whether it be in the slums of the
city or in the remote and sparsely settled districts. There is
today an appalling percentage of people in this Province who are
ignorant of the fundamental rules pertaining to thu maintenance
of a healthy mind aud body.
The Red Cross, in its public health campaign, is teaching these
people how to combat disease in every form. It wards off disease
from your children—the child who is yet unborn, and makes the
world a better place for him to live in. It wards'off pestilence
and contagion from your own community, thus protecting tlie
whole province. It is aiming to weld the people of our own
country and all other countries into tliat common brotherhood of
sympathy so necessary to keep humanity in tlie patli of progress.
It is accomplishing these things by going into the homes where
sickness and danger exist. It is teaching the people how to
prevent disease, or, if it does creep iu, how to cope with it
intelligently.
By its general propaganda and educational programme it is
bringing public health problems to tlie attention of a greater
percentage of the people than ever before— it is arousing and
evoking their interest in public health work.
The Red Cross today is the vision of a wonderful ideal. Your
faith in its principles—your moral and financial support of its
Membership Enrollment Campaign wil carry it to a glorious
reality.
WANTED $1.00
from every man and woman In Cumberland as an enrollment
fee In the B. C. Division of the Canadian Red Cross Society.
JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP, 25 CENTS
(For children up to 18 years of age)
JOIN  UP  NOW
Make your application to either of tho following, who are
authorized to Issue Membership Certificates and Bullous:
Rev. W. Leversedge, District Secretary; Kev. James Hood,
Rev. Geo. Kinney, and Ben H. Gowen, Islander Ollko.
The Red Cross Solicits Your Support and Needs Your
Influence.  Can You Spend $1.00 to Better Advantage?
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves ou the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it ls a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the lew.
\m
NOTICE
May 25, 1921. M
On and after May 27th* all services and meter loops §
installed must be in conduit with externally operated |§
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance H
with Underwriters' Regulations. g*s
This applies to meter loops moved from one location g
to another in the same building. |§
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the B
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical =
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National |§
Electric Code. §||
Any person moving meters belonging to this Com- S
pany, altering, disconnecting or connecting service 5
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law. =s
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain B
sockets and switches are required in certain locations, g
and new installations will not be connected without B
them.  Old installations in which brass or other metal =
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this =
date will be disconnected.   And further be warned that §§§
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of j§|
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge ss
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets ||
and switches are used when same are within reach of m
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will fgj
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such B
fittings are used. [|§
Our authority for above regulations is written in- ||
structions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity, |§j
which instructions may be seen at our ofiice by inter- |§
ested parties. {H ■M
June 25", 1921.
MB   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Illlllllll
|l   Coal Versus Oil
F. AIKAWA
Boat Builder and General
Carpenter
Boats built to order.    All sizes
of Boats for Sale
I  F. AIKAWA
Royston Rd. i
McLaughlin
Sane progress, both in engineering and body design,
won the unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
Thus the Master Six is better known and more widely
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for the
Master-Six a fixed value that makes its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK,  WILLEMAR & WAIN
Phone 25 COURTENAY, B. C.     P. 0. Box 153
I
New Cars for Old
II     Make that Car look hke a new one     H
| Phone 135 Courtenay |
m AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE =
1 K. P. Auto Painting Co. 1
ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
mi
Teach Your Children
the Value of
Open Savings Accounts for each one
of your children.
Insist upon regular
deposits from pocket
money. Thrift will
gradually become a
strong trait in each
child's character.
There is a branch of this
Bank near you and a
Savings Department at
every Branch.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
F. A. McCarthy, Mgr.
Cumberland Branch
INDIAN CLAIMS DEBT
OVER 100 YEARS OLD
Charley Stlclunlheniud, un Indian.
Is Impatient over a hundred yeu:*s delay by Washington In sending his pay.
Diligently, but with a secret fear that
they are being "spoofed," twelve
clerks of the quartermaster corps at
Washington are searching through
the army records of the last 100 years
for the name of Charley Sllekinthe-
mud. Charley has just written from
Thorp, Wash., to claim back pay for
a century of soft-footed scouting
which he claims to have put in as an
Indian guide for the army.
Charley wrote that he helped "lit"
the redcoats with General Jackson at
New Orleans aud then scouted "bad
Indians" in the West until the Civil
War. His last service claim is for
going to Cuba with "Colol Roscfent*
and the "Ruff Riders," for which li?
says he did not even receive trans
portation, and had to paddle his own
canoe from Havana clear back to
Montana. Charley says he Is 130
yearB old, and asks plaintively if be
must "walght another one hundred
years" for his pay.
The other day we pointed out the
general loss of business the Province
is suffering through the use of fuel
oil in place of native coal. We referred to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company as one of the principal
offenders; but It is not the only one,
and, in the beginning it had at least
some justification. Some of our volatile politicians got all worked up on
the question of forest protection.
Forest fires were traced to sparks from
railway locomotives, or so it was
alleged, aud the result was legislation which practically compelled the
C. P. R. to change from coal to oil
on their railway system In B. C. In
their care and concern for the standing forests, the politicians responsible
for this legislation gave no consideration to the injury and detriment they
indicted upou the coal mining Industry.
Another Instance of almost criminal thoughtlessness has been brought
to our attention, and if it Is true ought
to have been promptly Investigated
and stopped.
The Government of Canada recently
ventured into tlie shipping business,
and ships of the Canadian Marine
service have been soiling from local
ports to Australia and other coun
tries. With the world slump In all
trade, It Is a bard matter to get car
goes, and according to our luforma
tion some of these vessels have loaded
up with Australian coal. This was
bad enough in itself, aa it meant that
the ships on arrival here would nol
need to take on bunkers, with a consequent loss of trade to the local
mines.
We are told, however, that some ol*
them have not only loaded up with
Australian coal, but, on arrivel at this
skle of the Pacilic, have tried to sell
It in B. C. As we say, we cannot
vouch for the truth of this information; but It is certain that when the
Canadian Government went into the
shipping business It had no Intention
of entering into competition with the
local coal industry with imported
coal.
To go back once more to the question of coal versus oil, and the direct
bearing it has on the general prosperity of the province, it is estimated
that at present there is as much oil
being used as fuel in the province as
the total of all the coal being mined
on Vancouver Island.
This means that were oil fuel eliminated the Island coal mines would
have to double their present output.
This would easily be accomplished,
and Its first effect would be to materially reduce the cost of production and
so ensure cheaper coal to the consumer.
Assuming that, as things are, there
are 6,000 people employed In the coal
mining industry ou the Island, double
thc output could be obtained with only
about half as many more employees.
With three thousand more men employed at the mines, look at the Increase there would bo ill business,
not only tn and around the milling
communities on the Island, but also
throughout the Province generally. In
addition to this increased business
from which tlie Province generally
would directly benefit, the cost of
production relative to the total output
of the mines would be cut almost in
two, and the saving in the price of
coal to the consumer would also add
to the general prosperity of tlie Province. As against such a condition of
things as this, we have now millions
of dollars annually going out of the
Province, and retarding rather than
assisting In the development of the
country, it is not only the coal Industry which Is suffering, but the general well-being and prosperity of the
Province are being sacrificed to the
interests of the oil magnates of the
United States.—Herald.
65,000 GIRLS LOST LAST
YEAR IN UNITED STATES
Sixty-live thousand girls disappeared
In the United States last year without
leaving a trace. The great majority
were lured to the big cities from small
towns and farms. They dropped from
sight and their fate is an unsolved
mystery.
This story was brought to the
national congress of Mothers' and
Parent-Teachers' convention held in
New York recently, with a plea for the
creation of a central bureau to help
And missing girls.
Lieut. Catherine Van Winkle of the
District of Columbia police department told the convention one of the
biggest needs of the country was to
save the army of girls who annually
are lost in the maelstrom of the big
cities.
There's   safety   In    numbers—two
wives excepted.
A lame wolf hns been responsible
for the deaths of no fewer than twenty
children In the eastern portion of the
Tehsil, India. It waB thought originally that a pack of wolves was responsible for tlie deaths of the children, but, after tho beast wns shot by a
workman, the killing ceased.
BREAD
Do you ever get out tlie jam
pot anil sit down to a good old
lunch of bread and jam?
Try it. lt'.s an experience
worth while.
Nothing like broad to satisfy
a real appetite—
Eat Bread with jam, witli
jelly, with butter, with anything.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
is a really delicious loaf.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Ihinsimiir Avenue     -     ■Tuinlierlaml
WATER NOTICE
USE AM» STORAGE.
TAKE NOTICE thnt the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, whose
address is Belmont House, Victoria,
B.C., will upply for a licence to take
and use 20 culm; feet of water per
second out ol! Tsu-Abl River, also
known as Baynes Bound River, which
flows in an easterly direction and
drains into Baynes Sound, about 5
miles south ol' Union Bay. The storage dam will be located at Langley
Lake, water being diverted thereto
from Tsa-Abl Kiver. The capacity of
the present reservoir, Langley Lake,
is about 5UD acre feet, and will be increased to about 600 acre feet, and it
will flood about 10 additional acres of
land. The water will be diverted from
the stream at a point \\'» miles more
or less, approximate bearing S. lili degrees, 48 minutes W. (ast) from N.W.
corner of Lot 2A, Nelson District, and
will be used for -Mining, Coal Washery
and Steam purposes upon the Mine and
Washery described as located in Block
33 or Block 34 or Lot 2A or E. & N.
Ry. Land, adjacent to Block 33, Nelson
District, and Lot 2S, Nelson District,
Unfon Bay. This notice was posted on
the ground on tiie 2nd day of June,
1921. A copy of this and an application pursuant thereto and to the
'Water Act, 1914," will be filed in the
ofiice of the Water Recorder at Nanaimo. Objections to the application
may be filed witli the said Water Recorder or with thc Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Uuildiugfi,
Victoria, B.C., within 80 days arter the
first appearance of this notice iu a
local newspaper. The date of tlie first
publication of thi;; notice is June 4th,
1921.
CANADIAN  COLLIERIES   \OUNS-
MU1II)   LIMITED, Applicant.
CHARLES GRAHAM, Agent.
MAN RECOVERS AFTER
BEING HANGED BY NECK
An amazing story ot being kidnapped, taken to a stable and hanged by
the neck, was told by Captain Smytlie,
Auxiliary Cadet, who was awarded
$9,000 by the Dublin Recorder. He
was cut down and left for dead. Recovering const lousuesa in the morning, and finding a revolver still in his
possession, he shot his guard, a boy,
and escaped. He was pursued by two
men who Bred on him. A bullet grazed
his leg, but he succeeded in evading
his pursuers. He is now a nervous
wreck.
DESERTEKS' DISCHARGE
FROM CANADIAN ARMY
Regulation:-, lor Hie discbarge of
deserters and absentees withoul leave
from the Canadian army overseas
have been provided lor by order-in-
councll. The applicant for discharge
must produce from the militia headquarters nt Ottawa or in his military
district a form of release and must
also sign a confession of desertion.
According to the circumstances of the
case, he will be discharged by reason
of "misconduct," "demobilization" or
"being medically unfit." If the deserter
finds il necessary lo apply personally
to a competent military authority, he
will do so at his own expense.
RICH CLAIM REPORTED
VERNON.—A lot of ore taken from
various sections of the deposits recently dstcovored hy A. P. Clarke was
sent lo, Victoria for assay and Hie results aro very encouraging, lending In
the conclusion that tin's is a large deposit of exceptional value.
The sample sent iu assayed 07.71
ounces in gold and 12 ounces in silver, and this at $20 for gold and 9oc
for Hilvor would represent a tolal
value of $13ti;",.tjo per ton of ore.
f0
Thres
A
Are You Thinking of
Travelling ?
The Travellers' Cheques issued by this Bank are
payable (without delay for identification) at all the
principal points in Canada, the United States, Mexico,
West Indies, South America or Europe either through
one of our 535 branches or by the correspondents who
represent us throughout the worl.
You will find these cheques a very convenient and
safe way of carrying your funds.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITA I,
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager,
Why We Sell
"Auto-Shoes"
We have been in the tire business a good
while. We have sold them all. We know
the "stayers"—the tires that give mileage,
that are dependable, that never vary in
performance.
Wc put Ames Holden "Auto-Shoes" in
•that class and wc know that once you
fit a set you will come to us regularly for
them.
Because they are real value—mileage that
costs less—dependable tires, made by a
dependable firm, guaranteed to the last
shred.
If our roads are knocking the "stuffing" out of
your tires come to us and let us fil your car with
a set of Ames Holden "Auto-Shoes." You'll be
quite satisfied with your investment.
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
Cord and Fabric Tires in all Standard Sizes
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland Phone 77
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of tho
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BRKWKKIES.   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water ttt*Z£! Pure
CaSCade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO. B.C.
Telephone Service Always
Relied On
The telephone is one of the special factors of everyday life. It heeds no barrier of mountain or waterway; it is unmindful of distances; it spreads its network of communication throughout the province.
You take for granted tlie service the telephone gives
you; what science in construction has created, and
what efficiency of workers has maintained. By so doing you offer a fine tribute to the organization which
has created this service.
British Columbia Telephone Co. Pour
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 2S, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher,
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATl'KDAY, .11 NK I!.".,  liC'l.
THOUSANDS LOSE THEIR VOTES
Many thousands of voters throughout the Province have
had their names -struck off the Registers of Voters, for
which the voters themselves are mainly to blame. In
order to keep the lists as free as possible of names of
absentees and people who had died, the Legislature very
wisely, following the "plugging" scandals of recent years,
made provision that the names of all who did not vote at
an election should automatically be removed from the list
The last session of the Provincial House made an amendment to the Elections Act whereby the voters so affected
would be notified by thc Registrar and given until the ait-
ting of the Court of Revision to file another application
and have their names retained on the certified, Register of
Voters.
On Monday last the Court of Revision for the Comox
Electoral District sat in Cumberland, when a very large
number of names were struck olY the list because no such
applications had been made.
The consequence is that these persons will be unable to
vote In the next election if the present list is used for that
purpose. A Dominion Election is not far off—probably
this Winter—and the provincial list may be used for this
election also. Through their own failure to vote in the
first place and negligence to make application for their
names to remain on the list many thousands of voters have
disfranchised themselves.
Our politics will never he clean until the people wake
up to the heritage which is theirs in the right to vote—
and exercise that right to the fullest extent.
THE  SILENT SCOURGE
While the majority of us go merrily on our different
paths in life, enjoying ourself each in his or her own w
interested in littlo else but our personal, social or business
affairs, thoughtlessly or indifferently careless of our duty
to our country, there has crept upon us the silent scourge
of the Grim Reaper. Quietly working behind the scenes,
unobserved by all except those who ceaselessly maintain
vigil over our welfare, the sweeping scythe of the ruthless
destroyer—the Angel of Death—has reaped a terrible harvest among tho tiny morsels of humanity which one day,
with proper care, might haye developed into sturdy progenitors of the generations which are to come.
During the year 1920 in British Columbia nearly 100(1
babies under one year of ago, died. Sixty per cent, of this
number, according to excellent authority, succumbed to
diseases which were preventable. In short, of the 893
babies who died, r>:;o might have been saved through proper treatment.
Hon. Dr. "McLean, minister of public health, in a recent
statement declared tliat education of the public in the
matter of health is most essential. He pointed out that
there is no reason why thc same care should not be exercised in regard to the people now as was evidenced In the
army. The minister emphasized the fact that smallpox and
typhoid were almost unknown quantities in the army, yet
the soldiers lived under conditions at times that would
never be tolerated in civil life.
FLORAL INSPIRATION
Some thirty years ago an Owen Sound boy named
Butchart left his native land and came to British Columbia. Like all young men he was venturesome. He
stumbled and struggled along as best he could in this vasi
far western province. He made head as the years advanced and Dually located a gypsum deposit near Victoria.
Tliero he erected cement works and scum was on tho road
to fortune.
Fortune continued to smile on this Owen Sound boy.
Larger and larger grew the output of tlie cement works
and greater and greater became the fortune of It. 1'
Butchart.
As the rock was quarried and crushed into powdei
great ugly excavations were made here and thero In thi
heavily wooded country on the coast near Butchart Inlet
But the Owen Sound boy had an eye fur tbe artistic at
well as foi* cement making, and soon he began in a small
way lo transform the landscape into dreams of floral
beauty. Bit by bit the wilderness was redeemed; a beautiful residence was built in a nook iu the forest, surround-
ed by gardens of the most beautiful Ilowers. Today one ot
the sights of the city of Victoria, to which thousands of
tourists are driven each year, is known"as the Butcharl
Gardens. These are private ground:-., but so beautiful are
they, and so hospitable are Mi-, and Mrs. Butchart, tens of
thousands of Victoria's visitors and citizens enjoy them
each season.
Words failed the eastern editors and their wives on
their visit to these gardens last Sunday morning, says the
Okanagan Commoner, whither they wero taken as guests
of the Victoria newspapermen. The sunshine was bright
and mellow, a slight breeze cleared and cooled the atmosphere; wide, beautifully paved roads led through miles of
home grounds and small fruit orchards. Seventy or eighty
autos driven by Victoria citizens, members of the Automobile Club, followed tho sightseeing cars to Butchart's
Gardens. When tlie ears unloaded at tbe gardens and
the 400 or more newspaper people dropped into the shady
nooks or rev#lled ln the gorgeous beauty of the sunshine
and flowers, it was to many like being dropped into a corner of Paradise.
Mr. and Mrs. Butchart threw open their home to the
visitors, aud it was here the inspirational climax came.
Tears of joy calne to the eyes of hundreds; hearls o'er-
llowed witli feeling as they gazed in dumb admiration upon
the magnificent coloring effects of floral massed beauty.
There was an atmosphere of service ond of Godlike
fellowship in the surroundings. Clue's admtrntlcn for the
flowers gave way before the greater splendor and freedom
of the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Butchart. who conceived
and carried out the idea of transforming old limestone
quarries into those sunken gardens of such inspiration
and beauty; a sermon in every bush; an inspiration and a
divine influence at every turn of the road nr pathway aud
iu every flower.
between $30,000 and $40,000 last year, which $40 or $50
worth of vaccine would have prevented
The Department of Public Health, realizing the benefits
of education of the public in preventing disease, has given
its heartiest endorsement of the plan for employment of
public health nurses throughout the province. An amendment to the act affecting this work was passed, making It
permissible tor school trustees to employ a public health
nurse, the government paying the same proportion of her
salary as Is the case with school teachers. The sum of
$12,000 was placed in thc estimates this year for this work.
These nurses are trained In the University of Britisli
Columbia, taking special courses in public health nursing
with the Intention of entering the homes of the people and
carrying the teaching directly to them.
In this connection, Hon. Dr. MacLean pays tribute to the
Red Cross Society who, under their peace-time programme,
are co-operating with the government. The Red Cross, he
said, made It possible for the government to begin its public health nursing campaign. The minister explained that
literature, fully covering this health work, is avallablea nd
anyone may secure it by writing tiie Provincial Department of Health.
Capital is the result of self-denial. Some people seem
to think that the abolition of capitalism will bring about
the millennium. But in countries wlt^re capital is least
the wages are least and the squalhl condition of life low-
t. We ought not to lie content, however, until every
worker lives under Ideal conditions, lull do not let it be
thought that can be done by dethroning capital. It is more
capital and knowledge of how to use it tliat will lift conditions. Capital is the servant of labor, and capital which
has become unproductive disappears into thin air. There
is some idea that a speedy way out of our war difficulties
Smallpox cost the province|will be the confiscation of wealth.    That has been aptly'
described as "killing the goose that lays the golden eggs.'
The unemployment we are suffering from is due to tht
denudation of capital which should be used in new enter-
prise. The Socialist idea would build up a bureaucracy
but will that not take away the power to produce? Tht
whole dream is founded on a wrong idea.—Lord Lever-
hulme.
Should the suggestion that ladies lie appointed to ihe
Canadian Senate be adopted the new members need not be
lonely. It is said there are several old women there
already.
A Portland auto thief recently drew a four-year sentence.
A few terms like tliis and auto thefts will soon become
as rare are horse stealing.
The net debt per capita in British Columbia, 1921, is
$93.23; Ontario's debt per capita in 1920 was fin. and
Quebec's debt for the same year $22 per capita.
THE CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENTS
if we
lif we
This ls the time of thc year when visitors from all parts
of the world flock to British Columbia. Let them see ilia:
we believe in our own province, the Industries in ii. anil
the people who gain their living from them, by patronizing
home Industry to the fullest extent of our buying power.
The outlook in British Columbia is what we make it.
If we believe in the intrinsic stability of British Columbia;
e reulize our problems and meet thenrwith confidence;
e think of progress instead of stagnation; if we prove
By the new amendments to our criminal law, punish-|our Wth-ta ourselves and our province by giving our
ment becomes reformatory and not merely vindictive. 8UPPor', °ur thoughts and our time to putting our weight
Insane criminals are to be given special treatment, prl-1behind British Columbia industry; then no one can doubt
soners will get a chance to do industrial work of some lhe outcome,
value and will be paid for it, schools will he established
In penitentiaries and a regular penitentiary board will be
established.
In other words the Inmates of Canadian penitentiaries
are to be given a chance to make good when they get out.
It is one of the little ironies of our penal system that the
men and women who offend against the law are to be sent
to prison with thc pious hope of the tenlcnclng magistrate
ln their ears that they will use their time in resolving to
become useful members ot society when they get out. And
then we subject them to a system that Is well calculated
to stamp out of their minds tlie Inst trace of any desire to
reform. Useless labor, silence, long periods In cells alone,
no chance to earn a little for the assistance of those who
may have been dependent on them in the world outside,
who through their fault are left at the mercy of thc community, above all no chance to learn to better themselves
mentally or physically for ^renewed activity when the
prison gates have at long last opened. It is little wonder
that many ex-convicts do not make good; the wonder is
that any of them do.
There are not many of our criminals who arc not capable
of being made serviceable to the race and the state, if
tbey can but be turned to tho right and made to see that
it pays to keep stright ou.
Amid the financial pessimism of the railroads, the report
of the Chicago, Burlington ft Qulncy line Is Intotestlng
It show*3 that the railroad last year earned 20.CS per cent
on the $110,839,100 capital stock then outstanding.
When people from the. surround
town kept neatly painted, they
Paint attracts trade.
Ing country come Into
feel that the place has a spirit of enterprise, and that It l's
a good centre for their business relations. They are
similarly repelled from a place that is not kept up. Everyone who paints his buildings this season is helping to
maintain the appearance and substantial progress of his
home town.
For having a swab covered wilh scarlet fever girms
shoved down their throats to see if thc Infection will
"take," 12 persons were paid $70 eacli. If it "takes," stub
of them as survive are to receive $1000 each. A Chicago
hospital ls making thc experiment for the advancement
of science.   Employment must be scarce lu the Windy City.
As an example of the inroads the Oriental is making
Into business and other enterprises in this province, tlie
figures of the number of grocers in Vancouver supply interesting Information. Of the 487 grocers in Vancouver,
167 are Orientals. The encroachment of the Asiatics in
this business is proving a serious problem to the members
of the Retail Merchants Association.
LADIES' DEPARTMENT
Special showing this week of the newest in La'dies'.Brushed Wool Knitted Capes, in
plain heather shades and combination colors.j Also the newest styles in Brushed
Wool Cape Scarfs. -• -
Ladies' All-Wool Knitted Jersey Suits, with plain Skirt and Tuxedo style Coats, in
heather mixtures, self white and black and white.   Special prices, from $30 to $35.
Just received a large shipment of Cotton Crepes, in plain colors and fancy stripes, in
first Quality Crepes, at 45c per yard.
Newest styles in Ladies' White Canvas Oxfords, Pumps and Theo Ties.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Men's Khaki Pant Overalls, in fine Drills, with cuff bottoms and belt of same material
attached.   Special prices from $3.75 to $5.00.
Men's Khaki Fine Drill Shirts, to match overalls; in all sizes.  From $2.25 to $2.!)0.
Mechanics' Combination Overalls, in khaki Drills; sizes 36 to 46. Prices $ 1.00 to $5.00.
Special lines in Auto Duster Coats, in fawn and grey.   Special price $3.75.
Special line of Men's Brown Canvas Leather-sole Shoes, with reinforced leather toecap
and straps.   Special value at $4.75.
Special Value in Men's Brown and White Canvas Shoes, in both leather and rubber soles.
SPECIAL SALE OF MEN'S NAVY SERGE SUITS— (PQO   r A
Regular value $42.50.    Sale price   *pOtU*d\J
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Royal Standard Flour, 49-lb. sacks.. $3.10
Purity Flour, 49-lb. sacks   $2.90
Victoria Cross Tea, reg. 65c, now 40c
Pineapple, large tins, each  25c
Sardines, Brunswick, per dozen  $1.00
Jelly Powders 2 pkts. 25c
Corn Starch   2 pkts. 25c
Laundry Starch 2 pkts. 25c
Shelled Walnuts, per lb 45c
Peanuts, fresh roasted, per lb 25c
Lunch Tongue, '-.Vs  SOc
Potted Meats   3 tins 2£c
Condensed Coffee, Reindeer, tin  35c
Condensed Cocoa, small tins  20c
Pilchards 2 tins 25c
Corn Flakes   2 pkts. 25c
Lime Juice, Montserrat, large bottles.. 60c
Limeade, large bottles  '15c
Grape Juice, Welch's  50c
Lemonade Crystals, lins  30c
Sherbet, tin   30e
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
|   The Studebaker   |
Light-Six        I
i * n
1   The World's  Greatest   Light-Weight   Automobile   1
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car., It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—eaae of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Become a home-owner. It will cost you more than rent,
but you will at least be profiteering on yourself.—Boston
Had Franklin K. Lane been born in the United States Transcript
Instead of on Prince Edward Island In Canada, it Is within the range of political probability that he would have     Lots ot men are given to blowing their own horns win
been President of the United Slates.-N. Y. Evening Post. I have no knowledge at all of music.
Workmen In the building trades, accused of '.'loafing on
the job," explain that they were lured into the habit by
employers operating on the "cost plus" system, being
encouraged for the employers' own profit.—Washington
Exchange.
Weeks Motors
LIMITED
m     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.     M
fill! <?>
June 25, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Five
^0^   Music and Photoplays
THE WORLD AND HIS WIFE
Dramatic and Vividly Interest
ing Story of the Love of a
Beautiful Spanish Girl
The renewed Interest in modern
Spanish literature, brought about in
large measure by the success in thia
country of Vlncente Blasco I
country of the novels of Vlncente
Blasco Ibanez, has been reflected in
motion pictures.
"The World and His Wife," featuring Alma Rubens and coming to the
Ilo-llo Theatre oil Saturday night, Is
based upon a classic of the Spanish
stage that has an interesting history,
"The World and His Wife" is a romantic drama of old Spain, adapted
from a play by the most popular of all
modern Spanish dramatists. The play
has already been translated to the
American stage and had a successful
Broadway engagement for a whole
season. In its motion picture form it
lias all the dash and color of romantic
Spain and at the same time reveals
depths of sentiment in the Spanish
character seldom touched upon In
dramas of that country. Alma Rubens, who was the beautiful young
heroine of "Humoresque," is the featured player.
An Appealing Story.
Feodora, a beautiful young Spanish
girl, marries  Don  Julian, whom   she
loves dearly, though he is much older
than sho. Fulfilling a promise, Don
Julian invites Ernesto, a youthful
writer, to come and live with them,
upon tlie death of Ernesto's father.
Ugly stories, utterly without funda-
tion, begin circulating about Ernesto
and Feodora. Don Julian's brother,
Don Severo, and Mercedes, his wife,
come from a distant town to warn
Don Julian of the scandal.
Don Alvarez, a trouble maker,
awakens Don Julian's suspicions still
more, and Ernesto goes to live in i
other part of the town, lu a cafe, Don
Alvarez makes a sneering remark
about Feodora, and Ernesto, hearing
it, knocks him down. This means
duel. Don Julian realizes that Ernesto was seeking to defend Feodora's
honor and. knowing that Don Alvarez
is one of the l)e.st swordsmen in Spain,
deliberately insults him and takes
Ernesto's place in the duel. Don Alvarez is killed and Don Julian, fatally
wounded, is taken to Ernesto's studio.
In the studio he encounters Feodora, who has come to beg Ernesto to
leave town. Don Julian believes her
presence there confirms his worst suspicions and denounces her. Then
comes a thrilling climax.
William Fox, who has leased a
studio in Rome, has sent his director
abroad and will produce films there.
The players will be largely recruited
on the continent.
Quality maintains economy. You may pay less
"per gallon" for other lubricating oils, but you
get more lubrication "per dollar" when you buy
Imperial Polarine Motor Oils.
CUTS
OPERATING
THE economy of using Imperial Polarine
Motor Oils   extends  over  practically
every item of motor operation.
The lubrication afforded at every friction point dnd
the gas-tight piston-to-cylinder seal means a big
saving in fuel bills and a noticeable increase of power.
Through perfect protection of all motor parts, undue
repair bills are avoided and depreciation is greatly
reduced. By using Imperial Polarine Motor Oils
you can save dollars this year on maintenance alone.
Besides, you realize more profit and greater usefulness
from your car.
Always use the grade of Imperial Polarine.recommended on our Charts for your type of motor. See
Charts at your dealer's or write to 50 Church Street,
Toronto, for a copy of our interesting booklet,
"Automotive Lubrication," which contains the complete Chart of{Recommendations. t
IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED
BRANCHES IN ALL CITIES
For a Clean,
Efficient Motor
Dealers displaying this sign will
thoroughly clean the old oil and the
grit and the dirt out of your crank-
case; will flush your motor crank-
case with Imperial Flushing Oil and
refill it with fresh lubricating oil.
Your crank-case should be cleaned
every 1,000 miles or less. It means
more economy and more satisfaction to employ Imperial Polarine
Crank-Case Cleaning Service.
"IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE"
Bryant Washburn Has Excellent
Role of Live Wire Son in
Film Farce Comedy
It Is graduation day at college, and
the pampered son ot a millionaire returns home. His father, who owns a
string of soap factories, figures up in
a detailed account just what his son
has cost him since his birth and arrives at a total of two hundred and
ninety-three thousand dollars. The
father starts his boy to work in one
of his factories. This is the situation
that starts all the complications in
"It Pays to Advertise," a ilnw Paramount-Artcraft picture starring Dry-
ant Washburn, which will be shown at
the Ilo-llo Theatre on Tuesday night.
The picture Is from the play by the
same title, which was one of the most
successful of Broadway plays.
This Is said to be one of the most
successful light comedy vehicles in
which Mr. Washburn has yet appeared. The action is tilled with sparkling
comedy and the climax is a triumph
for the 'truth of a well-known slogan.
A delightful romance runs through
the story. Lois Wilson Is the leading
woman.
IL0=lLO THEATRE
The klssless wife, of whom so much
has recently been heard in the courts,
has her masculine counterpart in tlie
klssless husband In George Loaue
Tucker's latest photoplay, "Ladies
Must Live." The role of klssless husband is played by Robert Ellis and the
kissless wife by Betty Coinpson. Why
don't they kiss and have It over with
That's a secret which wlll be dls
closed when the photoplay is shown.
The English beauty, Dorothy Ward,
of 'Thoebe of Quality Street." has received so many flattering motion picture offers that she says she does not
know which to choose. However, she
has. decided to remain on this side of
th Atlantic for the coming season.
June Mathis, who made the screen
adaptation of "The Four Horsemen of
the Apocalypse," has completed the.
lllm version of "Lillom." This will be
released under the title "A Trip to
Paradise."
Claire Windsor, of the Lois Weber
studios, Is declared to have the most
perfect teeth of any actress in film-
dom, and the reason is explained by
Miss Windsor as follows: "When I
was a girl a little boy filled with gasoline each chocolate ln a box of candy
that was given to me. Tbat spoiled
my taste, for I have never eaten any
sweets' since then."
Tox Mix, who stars In western
ph)ys for William Fox, was at one
time head cowboy for 101 Ranch show.
Now the circus folk are"trying to get
him back under the big top, and have
offered him $100,000 for a season of
twenty-six weeks. Tom sends word
that he will continue making pictures
for Fox.
As William Farnum'-* birthday is
July Fourth, he will return from Europe to celebrate it at his Sag Harbor
home.  He is now In Italy.
The stage has again claimed H. B.
Warner nnd his wife, Rita Stanwood,
who have been making pictures for J.
D. Hampton. Botli have returned tn
New York and Warner ls rehearsing
a new play.
Eric Von Strohelm was so rough
witli Dale Fuller lu a scene for "Foolish Wives," that she halted on a corner of a dresser minus two teeth. A
dentist had to be called before work
could continue.
Pauline Frederick Is getting cold
chills from a certain mystery slory
she has been reading. These she will
pass on to her admirers because she
is to produce it as thc lirst picture
under her new contract with Robertson-Cole. She is to receive $5000 a
week.
The famous stage play, "The Girl
of the Golden West," will be Ethel
Clayton's next production. This is the
lirst time since she has been a Lasky
luminary that she lias played an out-
of-doors part.
Montagu Love will play Colonel Ib-
betson, the role played by Lionel
Barrymore on the stage. In thescreen
version of Du Maurier's "Peter Ib-
betson," in which Elsie Ferguson anil
Wallace Reid are now being co-
starred.
A Scotchman named Macdonald was
very proud of his ancestors, and was
never tired of boasting about them,
On one occasion ho remarked to i
iriend that his clan had lived bcton
the Flood.
"Woe!." replied the other. "I never
heard of the name Macdonald ganging
Into tho Ark."
"Noah's Ark?" retotjed Macdonald
contemptuously. "Who ever heard nf
a Macdonald that hadn't a boat of his
owu?"
Saturday, June 25th
COSMOPOLITAN   PRODUCTIONS
THE WORLD AND
HIS WIFE
By Charles Frederic Nirdlinger
FEATURDJG
ALMA RUBENS
WITH MONTAGU GLASS, GASTON GLASS, PEDRO DE CORDOBA
ANI) CHARLES GERARD
A PULSING ROMANCE OF JEALOUSY AND LOVE. ON A GAY AND
DANCING BACKGROUND OF FANDANGO AND CASTANET.
The bride was young, her Spanish blood a-leap with life. The man was
rich, but young no longer. When a youthful friend came into her hj>me
to live, the tongues of their world began to wag with gossip.
Her husband, wounded in a duel to shield her honor; carried to the home
of tho man whom gossip,linked with her name, he found her there in hiding! Only one of the crashing moments in this great romance of love at
war wilh scandal.
A PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT PICTURE
Tonight, Friday, June 24th
The Western Producing Co. presents
THE   CLIFFORD
Eckardt Players
In a Rural Drama in 3 Acts
The Fun Riot of the Season.   Clever Dialogues
Stirring Scenes and a Snappy Story.
Prices: 25c, 50c. and 75c.
Tuesday, June 28th
JESSE L. LASKY PRESENTS
BRYANT WASHBURN
— IN
It Pays To Advertise
By ROI COOPER MERGUEand WALTER HACKETT
A  PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT  PICTURE
Absolutely guaranteed to bring relief lo grouches, peeves and ingrown
dispositions.   Fine for thai heart-achy, down-in-the-inotith feeling.   One
dose cures a pain in the conscience and turns a blue funli into a rainbow
of joy!   Use freely afternoon antl night!
BRYANT   WASHBURN   SAYS:
"I faced Ihe world, at an early age, with nothing but dad's millions,
thirty suits of clothes aud two bull pups.
"Found that my college education had failed to prepare me for the
smell of pop's soap factory.
"Result: Started my own soap business—"13" soap—unlucky for dirt
—the sotip thai will cleanse everything from baby's face lo the politics of
Europe.   Price, with wrapper, fifty cents; without wrapper, a nickel!
"How did 1 do it—eseape jail, beat dad at his own game, win a phony
countess, and furnish a thousand laughs for this movie'?
"Advertising!   Come ami watch me work!"
m
If **********
Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 25, 1921.
EVENTUALLY:
THEN WHY NOT NOW?
Eventually you will, like music lovers everywhere,
want to get
A Heintzman & Co. Piano
Why not get the best now?   It is the cheapest and
best policy in the long run.
Besides,  the  price  is  little  more,  and  we  can
arrange terms to suit any customer.   Write us.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS. Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
EASTERN CANADA TOURS
Low Excursion Fares
EDMONTON  AND CALGARY
Direct Rail Line   *50.tHI
One Way via Steamship and Prince Rapert ttHMHI
Both Ways via Steamship and Prince Rupert  $7U.tKI
Meals and Berth Included on Steamer
SIPKI*       flJQrT nf. ST. PAUL
NEAPOlIStPO t .OU   DCLUTH
WINNIPEG
MUffl
CHICAGO  IHIII.xil     TOHONTO, LONDON $135.80
MONTREAL  $158.98     QCEBEC  $159.15
ST. JOHN  $188.68     HALIFAX  $197.33
NEW YORK $178.14
War Tax Extra
E. VV. BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland, B. C.
Canadian National Raj I uuaijs
m
y
WHEN  YOU  WANT  A  SATISFYING,  HEALTHY
DRINK, ORDER
SILVER
SPRING
BEER
WILLIAM DOUGLAS, Distributing Agent.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
FOR  SALE
Acreage   on  Royston-
Cumberland   Road
Price $30.00 E
Acre
M     APPLY-
I P. Leo Anderton
|| NOTARY PUBLIC
jl PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
H FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
YOUR TEETH
By REA PROCTOR MoGEE, Editor ol
"Oral Hygiene."
IRREGULAR TEETH
il
When thc teetli come into theii
natural position in the mouth there
is seldom any disturbance during thc
process of eruption.
Teeth that are irregular require
much more effort on the part of nature
than those that are normal.
It is like the ninety and nine that
went not astray. The good sheep
caused no trouble and walked right
into the fold, but the one irregular
one kept the shepherd out all nighi
in the wet when he should have been
asleep.
One of the causes of irregularity in
the teeth Is the uneven development
of the jaw hones themselves due to
the effect of childhood's fevers and to
abscesses or too early or too long retention of temporary teeth.
Thc density or hardness ol" the jawbones is produced hy the orderly laying down of lime salts—any inflammation may cause this.
More than usual resistance to the
movement of an erupting tooth
through the bone will cause the tooth
either to choose the routs of least resistance oi- to give up hope and become impacted, that is, not to erupt
at all.
Whenever the teeth of a child are
irregular that child suffers not only
from lack of proper mastication and
appearance and form of the mouth
and face, but actually from a very
considerable backward pressure of
blood from the region of the jaws.
This causes adenoids and congestion of the membranes of the nose aud
in a great many instances nervous
conditions that interfere with the disposition and development of tho child
Irregular teeth should be straightened
at the first opportunity.
LATEST IN TYPEWRITERS
There is a new typewriter upon the
market which sets up a whole line of
type before printing. The impression
is. made directly from the inked type,
without a ribbon, and tlie operation is
practically silent. For a fifty-live letter line there are fifty-five perpendicular rows of keys, each containing
forty characters, making a keyboard
2S by IU inches. Tbe operator works
from left to right, depressing one key
in each column about one-eighth of an
inch and sometimes setting whole
words with one motion. The line finished, a lever is pulled, which ink:
the type and presses the platen and
paper against it, the lever's return
restoring  all  parts  to neutral.
STETHOSCOPES NOW
USED IN WORKSHOPS
Most of us are, unfortunately, more
or less familiar with thc stethoscope
which the doctor uses when listening
for signs of defective action in our
lungs or heart. It is not so widely
known that the same kind of instrument can be employed to detect abnormal noises in moving machinery.
The latest development in this work-
ship stethoscope, due lo a British engineer, lies in the use of a kind of
telephone receiver in place of the
stethoscope roy. The advantage of
this device is that every faring ami
every gear in a factory can be fitted
permanently with a receiver and all
the receivers can lie connected by
electricity wires to a single rod board
in the manager's ofiice or any othet
convenient spot. By means of suitable switches the manager can examine each hearing or gear in succession
without moving from the board. Sine
abnormal internal noise is often the
first sign of trouble which may lead
to a breakdown, tliis simple and rapid
means of detection is an Invaluabh
aid to the factory owner,
FUGITIVE HUSBANDS
TO HE PROSECUTED
VANCOUVER.—A vigorous efforl
will be made iu future to arrest and
punish Vancouver husbands who desert their wives and families. The
police court prosecution and the city
relief officer concurred Monday in reporting tliat such desert Ions are increasing. To catch the men and punish them will cost money, but the aldermen came to the conclusion that
it ought to be done, and the expenditure was authorized.
"Such men ought to be lashed," remarked Aid. Hoskln.
The relief oflicer explained that in
cases of desertion the wife cannot ob-j
tain any assistance from tbe provinci
unless the husband has been absent
for eight months. For this period,
therefore, the cost falls on the city.
"I presume discretion will he used,"
said Aid. Scribbins. "Sometimes men
cannot get work here and have to go
away."
"Our ofllelals are supposed to have
common sense," replied Aid.  TisdfUl,
MAKING  AN  UPSET
CANOE  A  LIFEBOAT
Now that the canoeing season is in
full blast al lover the Dominion, some
advice as to the various methods of
handling a capsized craft would seem
o be in order.
Dr. Elliott Smith, a veteran river
man and past master of the Sea Scouts
if Kansas City, whose knowledge of
•anoeing was gained chiefly from the
Indians on the Canadian lakes and
rivers, says:
"An overturned canoe is a life saver,
if properly handled. But the natural
endency of a man in the water is to
ry to climb on top. That is a fatal
nove nine times out of ten. When
C0U 'roll' tbe canoe you let the air
•scape from underneath and you have
punctured' your life-preserver."
When a canoe overturns, Dr. Smith
iXplained, there is a layer of air on
nit ef ihe water, underneath the craft.
I'lic secret of self-preservation lies iu
teepiug the air there.
"There are several ways in which
two men can save themselves with
ui overturned canoe," he continued.
•The surest and easiest way is to
clasp two hands together over the
top, using their free hands and two
feet to paddle and steer. Twenty
five persons may be saved in that
manner on a 16-foot canoe.
"Another way is for oue to seize
each end of the cane and paddle their
way out. That is much more difficult,
however, especially for the man on the
front end.
"Once the canoe is righted it is ex-
tremely difficult to make It serve the
purpose. It usually comes up full of
water and only an expert swimmer,
hy jerking and splashing, can empty
it sufficiently to hold him. If a man
can float, it is possible to remain on
top inside the canoe until help arrives,
"The only way to get into a righted
canoe is over tiie end. Then you have
lo be able to 'chin' yourself to make
it, Only an expert can crawl in over
tbe side without dipping water.
"II is possible to remain on top, un-
derneath a capsized canoe, by holding
in the gunwales or seat. Usually
there is sufficient air there to keep
two Or three persons alive for some
lime, and there is always room for
one's  bead and shoulders  above  the
ONE HUILDING TO LOT
WEST VANCOUVER.—The building
bylaw of this municipality was put
through all its stages at the meeting of
the council this week and received the
official seal of the municipality. The
chief clause states that no more than
one dwelling can he placed on a lot
measuring r-jiJOu square feet.
LAND HUNGER IN
NEW SOUTH WALES
Land hunger is a new terror that is
now troubling Australia. For three
blocks of land in the Wa Warialda
district, of Xew South Wales, there
were (144 applicants, and preliminary
investigations pronounced 457 of these
suitable for settlers. The inability to
obtain land is driving many young
men to the cities, where, having no
trade, they join the already swollen
ranks of the unemployed, while millions of acres of arable land remain
beep-runs.
TANK SCOWS TAKE
LIVE FISH TO MARKET
In Norway and Holland huge tank
scows, which are in efleet floating
aquaria, have long been used to fetch
iisbes from the fishing grounds to
market, acording to an exchange. Thus
they reach the latter alive aud in line
condition.
This idea has been newly adopted
for use on this side of the ocean, and
several such scows have been built
ur traffic between Canadian Atlantic
waters and American seacoast cities.
Tbey are built of wood, their IiuIIh,
which are long and narrow, having
several compartments to hold a
number of fish. Tlie compartments
are perforated with holes in order
that the sea water may flow freely
through them. Watertight bulkheads
at bow and stern keep the craft afloat.
Some of the fisnes inevitably die or
sicken in tbe course of a long voyage,
and these are scooped out with long-
handled nets and thrown away. The
scows are sailing craft, but it is
planned to equip them with gasoline
engines for faster travel. One of them,
24 days out from Quebec, reached
Xew York the other day with 1000
tons of eels, caught in chicken-wire
traps in the St. Lawrence River,
which were delivered alive and wriggling at the Fulton fish market.
An Important milestone In the history of coal mining in Cape Breton,
Nova Scotia, has been reachel in the
issuing of Edison electric lamps to
miners employed by the Dominion
Coal Company. Hitherto the oil lamp
called the Glanney has been ln use in
that province.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE~a7d MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets ?15G.G73,215.00
Life Funds     58.GG7.8G0.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27.G22.28G.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by tlie Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
Acreage for Sale
6V*2 acres of Land for sale,
2V4 acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEKHIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. B. C.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed Wlille U Wait
PHILLIPS' JIILITAIIY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
s. davis, DAuvnruue
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
riione ee
Cu niberlii ml
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Hare fan tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Bcelt It Is delicious.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 21320 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
GOOD  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open liny nnd Stunt.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$S.,r>0 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W, C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE  AM)  LIFE  ISSCRASCE
Cunilicrliiud, II. C
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation,    Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at thu
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - • B. C.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business June 25, 1921.
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven '*
I OS
Place Your Order
FOR
PRESERVING
STRAWBERRIES
Owing to the warm rains of the last few days
Strawberries are maturing quickly and will be on the
market in abundance next week. The price has
dropped considerably.
WE  HANDLE COMOX  BERRIES
We have arragned for a supply of Comox Strawberries, and can supply them fresh from the grower
to consumer.
Place your order early for these delicious berries.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
We sell Genuine
Ford Parts at
prices set by the
Company.    Our
labor charges
also are set.
You know the
cost before you
buy Ford Service
E. G. EMDE
Ford Dealer
COURTENAY, B. C.
Automobile
Owners
If you have a Leaky or Damaged
RADIATOR
ship It to
Hargreaves the Radiator Expert
We   repair  Radiators,  Fenders,   Car
Bodies, etc.      All work guaranteed.
W. HARGREAVES
51 Commercial St.      Nanaimo
Phone £43
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER!
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing s Sseclalty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
NOTICE
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited Medical Fund.
All parties laying claims to Reserve
Plots in the Cumberland Cemetery,
and who can not produce receipts
that they have paid for the same.
are requested to call on the Secretary
of the above Fund at the offlce of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd..
who, upon sufficient proof, will Issue
the necessary receipt.
By order.
1 THE MEDICAL BOARD.
4-26.
Women Form LniKue Against Indecent
Fashions in Dress.
The women ot Quebec have formed
a league against indecent fashions in
dress. Already 10,1)00 women have
taken the pladge not to "exceed the
limits of good taste in a desire to be
fashionable," and also to establish
correct standards for women's dress
In Canada. Thc league is nonsectar-
iun. and has both Protestant and
Catholic members.
NEWS IN BRIEF
Sugar Prices Steadily Dropping.
The wholesale price of sugar declined still further tills week. The
Vancouver wholesale price is now
$9.50. The sugar market has been
steadily slipping for the past two
weeks, and since the lirst of June the
aggregate drop amounts to $1.25 a
hundred. This will come as welcome
news to those contemplating their annual fruit preserving operations.
I'liveriiniciil Wlll Take Over Victoria
Shipyards.
The Dominion Government has decided to take over the shipyard ami
the uncompleted ships of the Victoria
Shipowners, Ltd.. and complete the
programme. The impasse in tlie
wooden shipbuilding situation, .which
has existed for the past six months,
has been broken by an announcement
from Ottawa.
Revised Postal Rules Announced.
There has been a change In the rates
of postage on pnrcels within Canada.
Parcels addressed to any postofflce
in this province beyond 20 miles cost
10 cents for the lirst pound and live
cents each extra pound up to 11
pounds. Parcels to any postofflce in
Alberta or the Yukon tin summer)
are 10 cents a pound and seven cents
for every extra pound. Rates to Saskatchewan are nine cents after tlie
first pound and to Manitoba 11 cents
after tlie first two pounds.
Quebec's Population Expected  (o  he
About 2,250,U00.
The provincial secretary's department of the province of Quebec issued
a statement this week, according to
which the census now in progress is
expected to show that Quebec has a
total population of about 2,250,000.
When the last census was taken the
population was 2,002,232.
Minister of Labor Urges Public to
Lay In Winter Coal Now.
Before leaving Calgary for the East
Senator G. D. Robertson, Minister of
Labor, strongly advocated that the
public of western Canada, as far as
practicable, Immediately secure their
coal supply for the coming winter.
1(1,(100 Anthracite Miners Struck.
Nearly ten thousand anthracite mine
workers employed hy the Pennsylvania Coal Company, Wilkesbarre.
went on strike Monday, claiming tbe
company is not paying wages in accordance with the argreement signed
last year.
Would Fine Females $25 If (aught
Smoking In Publlc Places.
Female persons" must not smoke
cigarettes lu Washington, so Representative Johnson of Mississippi told
them in a bill which he introduced
aud which would charge the women
$25 for the first time they were caught
smoking in public places, and $100
per cigarette for each subsequent
offence.
lieu I). Lister Called to Xuuiiimo.
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church,
Nanaimo, at a meeting on Monday
decided to give a unanimous call to
Rev. D. Lister, minister of St. Aldan's.
Victoria.
Amundsen's  Ship  Disabled and  Will
Be Take nto Seattle for Repairs.
Masses of early Arctic ice last
August locked In a rigid grip the
vessel Maude, on which Roald Amundsen, discoverer of the South Pole,
hoped to drift past the North Pole,
and a terrible blizzard swept the
schooner ashore, 90 miles from Cape
Serge, and smashed her propeller.
Captain Amundsen appeared in Nome
last week with the tidings that his
ship was disabled, and he would have
her towed to Seattle for repairs, later
returning to the exploration.- He left
Norway in 1918 and has been iu the
Arctic seas 19 months.
Mine Disaster in Switzerland.
An explosion of firedamp on Monday destroyed the greater part of tlie
Mont Cauls mine, Berne. Twenty-two
men nre known to be dead and a large
number Injured. Of thc 300 who were
In tlie mine at the time of the disaster,
only 120 are accounted for.
E. & X. Railway  Will Erect a Nen
Tcrmlnul Station ut Victoria.
The Esquimau & Nanaimo Railway
IC. P. R.) will erect a new terminal
building on Store Street in the early
future.
A parly of experts is now investigating the requirements of tlie Ogden
Point Outer Docks with a view to
Increasing their utility.
Tlie Canadian National System is
desirous of developing passenger business ou the Alberni branch of the line
and Is anxious to draft a schedule
which may be an improvement ou the
present one.
These announcements were made I"
the City Council Monday night by
Mayor Robert J. Porter as port of bis
report on the trip he recently look lo
Toronto, Montreal, Halifax and oilier
Eastern Canadian centres.
Vancouver Council Tukes  Action on
Anglo-Japanese Treaty.
The Vancouver City Council has decided to cable Premier Meighen asking blm to use bis Influence to prevent
any renewal of the Anglo-Japanese
treaty which would not leave the admittance of Japanese Into the various
British Dominions entirely within the
jurisdiction of the Dominions concerned. Tills action was taken on tlie
ground that tho present alliance provides for unrestricted entrance of
Japanese into British Columbia.
British Columbia can produce practically all that It needs, and yet It is
the heaviest Importer per capita of
the commodities it produces of any
province in Canada. Buy goods made
in the province and there will be considerably less unemployment with all
its evil effects.
LATE JAMES WEBSTER
LAID TO REST SUNDAY
Large Number of Relatives and
Friends Pay Last Respects
To Old-Time Resident.
rhe
On Sunday afternoon last the
funeral uf the lute James Webster
look place from the family residence.
Penrith Avenue, and was largely attended. A number of relatives and
friends came up from Nanaimo and
Ladysmith to pay their last respects
lo the deceased gentleman, who had
been a resident ol* Cumberland for
some thirty years.
Hev. .lames Hood, of St. George's
Presbyterian Church, conducted the
burial service, tbe Interment taking
place in the Cumberland cemetery,
lallbearers were .Messrs. Clark.
*"nn. .1. II. Grey, Logan, J.
nd Duncan Thomson.
Alniij   K lorn I Tributes.
in* number of beautiful floral
were received, among which
were a floral pillow irom the family
'if tlie deceased; wreaths from Mr. and
Mrs. A. Clark, Mrs. Dugdale (Lady-
■iniiltt. .Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Webster,
Jr., .Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Yarrow, Mr.
and .Mrs. F. Partridge, .Miss Phyllis
Partridge, Master Douglas Partridge,
Mis., Isabel Yarrow, Mrs. Jno. Stant,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Jones (Ladysmith I.
Miss I.ily Plketti, Miss May Clark,
Mr. anil Mrs. T. Conn, Mr. nnd Mrs.
Logan, Mr. and Mrs. Westfield, Mr.
Choci Pack, and sprays from Mr. and
.Mrs. II. 11. Watson (N'anaimo), Mr.
and .Mrs. A. Watson (Nanaimo), Mr.
■mil Mrs. Alex. Cameron, and from
the Harmony Rebekah Lodge.
A  l.t
rlbute
A Baltimore woman bad her lost
speech restored when a dentist extracted two of her teeth. Her husband does not speak to the dentist
now.
Battery
/ Truths
That    Willard   Threaded
/   Rubber Insulation can be de-
I     pended upon to outlast the
battery plates. Ends the expense
of Wood-separator replacement.
That wood separators tnay
seem cheaper at the beginning
but insulation is always cheaper in thc end.
That our responsibility to
you lasts as long as your battery
is in service.
That the Willard Threaded
Rubber Battery is the highest
point in battery achievement.
We're here to tell you about it
—the only battery with Threaded Rubber Insulation.
Willaid
Batteries
SPARKS CO.
COURTENAY
WMIMO   and   IMNCAN
J*
%
35'
Why Your
Dentifrice?
YOU use a dentifrice to keep your teeth
white—to give health to the gums, and
cleanliness and comfort to the mouth.
Dentists say this is all any dentifrice can
cutely do. And this is what Klenio Dental
Creme accomplishes perfectly. The dentifrice famous for its lingering Cool, Clean*
Klcmo Feeling.  Get a tube today.
ODAK
AND
Brownie
Cameras
ASK FOR NEW CATALOGUE
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We huve just installed a large
Dry Kiln and are now in a position to supply complete house
bills.
Send us your "specifications
and we will give you a close
figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
Salmon Doomed to Extinction In l'mrci
Sound mid Fraser.
extinction of the sockeye ami humpback salmon industries is th rea toned.
Dr. ('. II. (illbcrt ot Stanford University told a public: meeting in Seattle,
called by the State Fisheries Hoard.
\ larger number of lish must he spared
[rom tlie cannery ncls lo teach spawning grounds If such varieties are to
mrvlve. explained Dr, Gilbert, He
aid the "big runts" wero it thing of tho
past
Scotch Capital to Develop Coal Mine-*
In Alberta. '
The large coal deposits west of Edmonton. Alta., which have been known
lo exist for some time, will bo developed by Scotch capital in the very
near future, it is reported. It is the
intention of the Lucar Collieries, under which name the new firm will bo
known, to confine their development
work to the Mountain Park region,
ami if preliminary surveys warrant,
more extensive development work will
bo undertaken. Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 28, 1621.
€*-
■^%<m>&4'-
*
Standing, sitting and walking correctly
are the first essentials to good health
and that elusive charm we call style
I
«
LL women wish to be well; but all women
do not appreciate the vital importance
of correct corsetry as an essential to
good health. The well-known medical
authority, Alice S. Cutler, M.D., warns us:
"As a physician who knows that if it were
not for ill-fitting and the wrong kind of
corsets we would have very few female in
valids, I am naturally determined to do
everything in my power to educate women
in the proper fitting of corsets. Most
learned physicians now recognize the modern
corset as a hygienically healthful garment
and one that is often thc best means of'pro-
viding corrective support for many bodily
ailments."
|
The Original-Unequalled Front Lacing Corsets
have attained their unquestioned superiority
by assisting nature to perfect expression.
Every Gossard is hygienically correct. Properly fitted to tlie figure for which it was
designed it will give scientific support to
abdominal and back muscles, with no chance
of undue pressure at the waistline; the organs
of nutrition will be free from pressure; the
erect posture which is induced will encourage
deep breathing and tlie diaphragmatic mus
cles become strong with use. A woman so
corseted will have the undeniable beauty_of
health and that' grace of body, standing,
sitting, or walking, which is best expressed
in thc one word, style.
We unreservedly recommend Gossard Corsets
as the complete expression of modern corsetry.
Our highly specialized corset service is maintained with a full appreciation of the exacting
needs of the modern, active woman.
Gossards are priced at ?2.50 ?2.7S ?3.°° ?3.50 H.0t) ^5.00 ?>5.S0 and
more
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
*-
-♦*&<&:og4**>-
♦;♦
2 Days
Celebration
— IN —
Ladysmith
ON -
July 1st and 2nd
BIGGER AND BETTER THAN ANY OTHER YEAR
CHILDREN'S SPORTS, OPEN ATHLETIC EVENTS
ARTISTIC   PARADE,   BABY   SHOW, BASEBALL
AND FOOTBALL COMPETITIONS, ETC.
Four  Big  Bands
WILL COMPETE ON SATURDAY, JULY 2nd
This is the first Band Contest in British Columbia, and
as such marks an epoch in the musical world of the
Province.  Come to the epoch.
SACRED CONCERT IN
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
A sacred concert will be held in St
George's Presbyterian Church on Sunday evening, at the close of the evening service, 8,15 p.m. It is expected
tbat a number of people from the otbci
churches will attend utter the evening
services.
A good programme has been prepared and will be well Worth hearing.
A collection will lie takon up during
the concert. The programme i- as
follows:
1. Anthem, "Stand Up for Jesus,"
by the choir.
2. Solo, selected, Mr. Howard Mac-
A u ley.
I!. Anthem, "Seek Ye the Lord." by
tbe choir.
4. Duet, "Watchman, What of the
Night." Mr. Harold Roberts and .Mr.
Howard MacAuloy,
",. Solo. "The Watchman," Mr. ll.
Roberts.
il. Antliom, "Malta a Joyful Noise
Unto the Lord," by the choir.
7. Duet, "So Thou Llftest Thy lii-
vinc Petition," Mr. Harold Roberta
und Mr. Howard MacAuley.
8. Anthem. "Onward." by the choir,
A hearty welcome is extended to all.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW?
Personal Mention
Mr. Rober) Thomson went to Vicloria Friday morning.
Mrs. Vi. A. Duncan, wife of the City
Clerk of Xew Westminster, and Miss
Bridge, of the Columbia Hospital
staff, arived .Monday and were the
quests of Mr. and Mrs. John Sutherland for a few days.
Miss 0. Lewis, of the staff of the
Post  Ofhee. is away  on  two  weeks'
vacation.
.Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Mordy motored
to Vicloria on Monday, taking in the
football game at Nanaimo on the way.
Mr. Mordy has been attending Grand
Lodge sessions at Victoria.
Mrs. T. II. Mumford went to Victoria
Monday tor a few days.
Mrs. C. J. Parnham accompanied
Mr. Parnham on ills trip to Victoria
Monday to attend Grand Lodge.
Mr. B. W. WHlington and Mr. H. F.
Knott, of the Moore-Wbittington Lumber Co. Ltd. ul* Victoria, were here on
a visit Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. It. Thompson and Mrs.
J. Thompson  returned from Victoria
on Thursday.
Mr. J. H. McMillan left for Victoria
Thursday morning.
Mr. G. W. Clinton returned from
'ictoria on Thursday, where he had
ieeu attending tlle Grand Chapter
ouvention of Royal Arch Masons.
Miss M. Evans and Miss Edith
Tenant of Vancouver are arriving
Sunday morning and will spend a
week with Miss Evans' sisters, Mrs. B.
Bergland and Mrs. Tremlett.
Mr. Thomas Graham,.General Superintendent of the Canadian  Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Victoria ou
Monday and will return Saturday.
  /
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Nanaimo and
Victoria .Monday and will return on
Saturday.
Mrs. R. Yates returned from Victoria Thursday.
.Mr. T. II. Carey and .Miss Lena Carey
left for Victoria Monday morning and
will return Saturday.
Mr. T. R. Jackson,, Inspector of
Mines, arrived ou Thursday evening
on his usual tour of Inspection.
Miss Violet Graham, who has been
attending St. Ann's Academy, Victoria,
tor the past year, arrived home on
Thursday and will spend the summer
vacation with her parents.
.Miss Gladys Lidstone, formerly of
Cumberland, is spending a short vacation with .Mr. aud Mrs. John Sutherland.
Mrs. John Newton of Nanaimo arrived Saturday and is spending a
short vacation with tMrs. Thomas
Graham.
.Miss Annie Watson, who has been
in town for the past three weeks,
leaves tomorrow morning aud will resume her duties at the Vancouver
General Hospital on Monday.
EASTERN STAR
GRAND CHAPTER
Which young lady bosses ber hubby
about on tlie tennis courts?
Why a certain young man is so
lonely this week?
Why some fellows get so sore when
an innocent joke is on themselves?
Who was the promising young musician who turned an ancient organ into
a modern jazz orchestra.
Why was "she" so delighted that
hubby devoured all tho pie?
Why golden hair is so' downcast
these days?
Who will wear the coat with the big
collar this week?
Who went chasing butterflies on
Wednesday night?
Why our friend was so anxious
about "Brown Eyes" on Friday morning? Was he in tlie same predicament?
Tlie Grand Chapter of the Eastern
Star held a three-day convention in
Nanaimo this week and was very
largely attended, there being members
present from as far away as New York.
Members attending from Cumberland
included Mrs. J. Thomson, Mrs. T. Wilson, Mrs."!'. Eccleston, Mrs. Williamson, Mrs. A. Walker and Mrs. JaB.
Burns.
The convention is said to have been
most beautiful aud the entertainments
of a very high order indeed. At the
banquet no less than 301) sat down.
There is a movement to establish a
Lodge of the Eastern Star iu Cumberland.
PRESENTATION TO
MRS. WADDINGTON
The Women's Auxiliary of the 0. W.
\". A. met on Thursday night to honor
one of their members, Mrs. Waddington, Sr.. who Is leaving the district
Some thirty members Had friends of
ibe Auxiliary were present, aud after
cards bad been indulged in for a short
lime, Mrs. McAdatu, accompanied by
Mrs. R. E. Frosf*. sang two solos, which
wore well received. .Mrs. Waddington
Jr. also sang. Refreshments were
then served, there being an abundance
of good things.
After the tables were cleared Mrs.
Marsh, president of the Auxiliary, said
she had a most pleasing duty to perform, tliat of presenting Mrs. Waddington a small present in appreciation of all she had done for the auxiliary of the G. W. V. A. She asked Mrs.
Waddington to accept a cut glass salt
and, pepper shaker and cut glass
celery dish.
Mrs. Waddington, taken completely
by surprise at this token of their appreciation, thanked the ladles for
their kindness.
Cards and dances were again in-
lulged In, the party breaking up at 11
o'clock with thc singing of "Fer She's
a Jolly Good Fellow."
Summer Drinks
CHURCH'S GRAPE JUICE, Pints and Half-Pints
LOGANBERRY CORDIAL, Pints
RASPBERRY VINEGAR, Quarts
STOWER'S LIME JUICE, Pints
LIMEADE, Pints
SHERBET AND LEMONADE POWDERS
STRAWBERRIES
Gordon Head and Ladysmith Strawberries
will be at their best for Preserving in the next
week, as the season will be short.
Leave your order NOW for No. 1 Berries.
LOWEST MARKET PRICE
Picked and Delivered to You the Same Day.
Full Stock of Fresh
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
ARRIVING  DAILY
CHERRIES
PEACHES
PLUMS
APRICOTS
CANTALOUPES.
BANANAS
ORANGES, all sizes
GRAPE FRUIT
LEMONS
APPLES
GOOSEBERRIES
LOCAL HEAD LETTUCE
HOTHOUSE TOMATOES
NEW BEETS
NEW CARROTS
NEW TURNIPS
GEM POTATOES
ONIONS
RHUBARB
CUCUMBERS
ASPARAGUS
SILVER-SKIN ONIONS
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
,  B. & B. GROCERY
CARD OP THANKS
Mrs. Webster and family wish
to convey their sincere thanks to
the many friends for their kindness and sympathy shown them,
also for the many floral tributes
received, during the sad bereavement, through the loss of a loving husband and father.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHUKCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Fifth Sunday After Trinity.
8.30 a.m., Holy Communion.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Sixth Sunday After Pentecost.
Mass at 11 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning service at 11. The Sacrament ot the Lord's Supper will be dispensed.
Preparatory service will be held In
the church on Friday at 7.30 p.m.
Evening Service at 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Ber. G. B. Kinney, B.A., F.R.G.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
FOR SALE
1920 MITCHELL ROADSTER FOR
sale—Equipped with cord tires and
one spare tire; $11150 cash, or $2000
on terms. Car insured for $2700.
For particulars telephone 16, Courtenay.
TWO 5-ACRE LOTS FOR SALE—
$175 for both. Lots 1 and 2, Trent
Road, on Royston Road. For further particulars apply P. o. Box 70,
Cumberland. 4-29
1919 CHEVROLET TOURING CAR—
In good order and appearance. Apply by letter, P.O. Box 490, Curaber-
herland, or residential address, No.
17, Camp.    Price $750. 2-26
CHEVROLET CAR, 1918, IN Al CON-
ditfon; thoroughly overhauled; new
battery, spare tire. Price $575. Box
343, Cumberland.
FORD TOURING, 1918; SPARE TIRE
and tubes; Al condition. Price
$450. Apply P.O. Box 343, Cumberland.
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in the Memorial
Hall.
Ancient Order of Foresters
The hext meeting of Court Bevan,
No. 9830, wlll be on Wednesday, July
16, in the Fraternity Hall, Davis
Block, Dunsmuir Avenue. Visiting
brethren cordially Invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; P.
Myers, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
SECOND-HAND STOVE. APPLY TO
Mrs. Waddington, opposite Anglican
Church. 1-26
FOUND
FOUND ON DUNSMUIR AVENUE,
a Gold Brooch. Owner can have
same by applying at tlie Islander
Offlce.
TENDERS  WANTED
Tenders are called for the Clearing
ot Two Blocks on Fifth Street, up to
Allen Avenue; and for One Block from
Fifth Street to Fourth Street on Derwent Avenue.
Alternative tenders are asked: 1st,
(or clearing 20 feet wide; 2nd, for
clearing full width.
Tenders to be in hands of City Clerk
by Monday, June 27th.
2-26 T. MORDY, City Clerk.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING „
WHARF, UNION BAY
June 15—Progressive and Scows,
Vancouver;  Esdud, coastwise.
June 17—Charmer, Vancouver; As-
tive, Moresby, Faultless and Beatrice,
coastwise.
June 19—Joyful, Comox; Sherlock,
Vancouver; Chemainus, coastwise.
June 20—Carmico and Scows, White
Rock, B. C.
June 21—Vancouver, Wireless and
Olive M., coastwise.

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