BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Apr 24, 1925

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068703.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068703.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068703-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068703-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068703-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068703-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068703-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068703-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068703-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068703.ris

Full Text

 4
Provincial^ Library     janl(23
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
v
Witb which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 17.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY. APRIL 24, 1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
United Team Provincial Soccer Champions
Huge Crowd Sees Local Eleven Humble St. Andrews,Pride Of The Mainland, At Vancouver
Date Of Hospital
Garden Party Is
Set For June 17
COURTENAY, April 21—Tho Ladles
Auxiliary of St. Joseph's Hospital at
Comox met this afternoon. There
was a very good attendance of members and among those present were
Mesdames C. E. Stephens, L. D. Piket.
F. Dack, Wm. Booth, T. Corfleld, J.
Carthew, H. Cooke, P. Downey, It.
Duncan, E. Cliffe, W. Evans, W. Eadie.
J.H. Meredith, J. Sutton, C. Smith, M.
8. Stephens, and O. Van Hemert. Thc
date of the hospital garden party was
set for June 17th and will he held In
tbe grounds ot the hospital at Comox.
The meeting was occupied with thc
arrangements for the various stall
holders for this occasion. There will
be a large number of different stalls.
some of which are candy stall iu
charge of Miss Sutton, underwear, ln
charge of Mrs. J. Sutton, aprons, .Mrs.
Wm. Eadle, baby wear, Mrs. Paul
Downey, linen, Mrs. Edgar Cliffe,
home cooking (Comox) Mrs. Cecil
Smith, home cooking (Courtenay) Mrs
Ben Hughes and Mrs. G. T. Corfleld.
flowers, Miss Winnie Ball, Ice cream,
Mrs. F. C. Brock, "Mother Goose" wlll
be In charge of the Girl Guides under
the direction of Mrs. T. H. Meredith.
Raffles, Mrs. F. G. Liddle. The general convener for Courtenay Is Mrs.
John Sutton and for Comox Mrs. Edgar Cliffe.
The proceeds of the hospital fete
will be used for the purpose of equipping the hospital with an up-to-date
laundry. Final arrangements were
also made for the hospital whist drive
to be held at the community hall at
Comox on Friday night.
After the meeting of the auxiliary
the members were the guests of the
Sisters of thc hospital at u charming
daffodil tea.
GIBSON FILM SHOWS
LIFE UNDER CANVAS
SCHOLARS WILL
PRESENT TABLEAUX
The scholars of Holy Trinity Sunday School will present a series of
tableaux, depleting tbe appearances
ot the Risen Christ, In the Parish
Hall on Thursday next, April 30th.
commencing at 7:30 p.m.
The tableaux will be followed by a
missionary play entitled "Coming
From Atar." Collection In aid or
Missionary funds. Everybody cordially invited.
SUPERIOR SPEED AND
AGGRESSIVENESS GIVES
LOCALS FINE  VICTORY
NO CELEBRATION
HERE ON MAY 24
I The local team journeyed to Vau-
| couver on Friday evening last to en-
: gage the formidable and much touted
| St. Andrews team and the result, a
four to one win for Cumberland, according to Vancouver sport writers
was a great surprise. It was no surprise to the followers of the Cumberland team as a win was confidently
expected, but to beat such an array
of reputed stars so easily was rather
surprising. Thc Cumberland team to
a man played magnificent football,
with Tom Blair being right at the top
of his form from the first minute of
the game; so ably was he backed by
British Columbia Football Association i his  tcam  mate8  that  ln  the closing
Only about five citizens of Cumber
land were sufficiently Interested In the
question of holding a celebration on
May 24 to be present at tiie Council
Chambers last Friday evening. Ow-
— . ..« "Zj*Z «« «.»« «n»~. «.««.. . «.~ ! i"g to the small attendance, the meet-
CUMBERLAND TEAM GAVE ONE OF THE! BEST'DISPLAYS w» not calle(i t0 orllcr all( „ „    lu
OF THE SEASON-BLAIRJTOLLIANT IN FIRST HALF     probable that the clt   ,,„„„,„ \m
WITH TEAM GIVING MAGNIFICENT SUPPORT lel the mattcr drop.    Cons,au9ntly,
if there Is to be a celebration ln Cum
ing Boyd for number three.      From ; berland on May 24 some other organ-
First Connaught
Cup Games Set
For 23rd May
With the Mount Pleasant Club withdrawing from the competition after
formally entering, eighteen applications for a place in the draw lu the
Connaught Cup series wore accepted
at Saturday night's meeting   of   the
The transfer date will be opened at 0
o'clock on Saturday, May 9, and the
first games will be staged Saturday.
May 23, when St. Saviours will entertain Davenports of Nanaimo and Cedar
Cottage will tackle the third division
stages of the game "Toots" Plump
came within an ace of making the
score read five Instead of four.
Cumberland's first two goals came
very rapidly, Hitchens from the left
dropped in a beauty, which Heyland
leaders, Vancouver Engineering I had "0 difficulty in converting. Less
Works. It was agreed that the first thal* lw0 mll>utes later, Hitchens
four teams out of the hat would com- j ***'ove one at Boyd from thlrty -"•rds
prise the first round. The venue of!out a"*- tlle en-Cumberland goalie had
the Vancouver games hns not yet been ! Breat -"'Bculty ln saving, giving a cor-
decided on. | '"''*•    Hitchens dropped the ball trom
Following Is the draw for the sec-!the corner kick rl6ht lnt0 lb« «*-"•> for
ond round, the first named team be-1Fowler t0 a*">*8t '■ *nt0 the net ms*k-
the scoring of the third goal  until ilzatlon wl" "ave ,0 fo8ter " and wl"
,.-,.,.,..,     , .        .   . ,. i have to act quickly in the matter,
the final whistle, the local team had lt
all their own way. ■ g      A      J '    T
Bannerman tried a run on the right.  Dtt/MlQrCW S  1 £3.111
He left  Robertson standing still and
put   over   a   dandy   centre,   Fowler
could easily have scored, but tipped :
the ball to Hitchens who made no mis-1
lake scoring the fourth and last goal. J
A couple of raids into Cumberland |
Of Powell River
Play Here Sunday
territory by the St. Andrews' forwards
were unproductive, the Cumberland
forwards going down again almost resulting in Plump scoring number five.
Tlie whistle sounded with the Cumberland   team  easily   the   better  one
The soccer fans of the Paper Town
hav,, for some considerable time been
quite anxious to have a first class
soccer team and during the past sea
sou have played several exhibitio:,
games with well-known mainland
teams.     According to  reports these
Hoot Gibson in a Wild West show—
thla ls the latest exploit of the famous Universal star, who. In "The Sawdust Trail," his latest Universal feature, stages one of the liveliest stories
ln his strenuous career. The new
picture, which comes to the Ilo-llo on
April 29 and 30, depicts the redoubtable Hoot In the part of a college boy,
who, after various pranks and difficulties, joins a western show, like the
famous old Buffalo Bill aggregation,
and experiences Western adventures
mingled with ultra modern thrills on
motorcycle and automobile.
The play, adapted from William
Dudley Pelley's noted Saturday Evening Post story, adapted by Raymond
L. Schrock, is a collection of wild
adventures interspersed with laugh'*
such as Gibson's fhlmsical brand of
humor always injects Into his thril-
ers. It centres about the amateur
cowboy's love affair with the "hard-
boiled" cowgirl star of the tent show,
and his deperate expedient of winning her by frightening her half out
of her wits with a wild ride in a racing auto.
The cast supporting Glbso,, is one
of special note. Josie Sedgwick, slitter of Edward Sedgwick, the director,
and remembered as "the girl" in "Jubilo," plays "Calamity June," the cowgirl. Charles K. French Is seen as
the tough showman directing the destinies of the tent aggregation; David
Torrenco ,of "Tess of the Storm
Country," plays the millionaire father of the college scrapegrace, and
Harry Todd, 0. Raymond Nye and
other well-known artists are also seen
In the picture. The chase between
W. T. McCulley as the speed cop antl
Gibson in the racer is one of the most
spectacular scenes ever screened for
Gibson.
ing the home club:
St. Andrews vs. North Shore United
Nanaimo City vs, Sapperton.
Creamo vs. Shellys.
Cumberland vs. Nanaimo G.W.V.A.
Victoria Veterans vs. Vancouver
City.
Westminster United vs. Cedar Cottage or Vancouver Engineering Works
St. Saviours or Davenport vs. South
Hill.
Grand Chancellor
Visits Local Knights
Grand Chancellor Jones was a visitor on Saturday evening last to the
local order of the Knights of Pyto-
las. an entertainment in his honor being held In the K. of P. Hall.
Former Missionary Speaks
Mrs. Campbell Brown, who was a
missionary in South China for fifteen
years, gave a moBt Interesting lecture :
on Tuesday evening last In the base-!
ment of the Prebyterian Church, her
subject being a  recount  of her ex- j
perlences while In the Orient.     Mrs.
Brown also had many articles of apparel used by the   Chinese   women,
these latter being viewed with great,
Canada's National
Game Will Be
Boosted Locally
....One of the greatest movements that
has ever been undertaken in the sport
ing world In the West has beeu organized recently by a number of people Interested In Canada's national
pastime, lacrosse. The organization
ls known as the Greater Vancouver
Better Lacrosse Association, and
while the main idea is to develop lacrosse ln the terminal city and lower
mainland, encouragement and if possible, assistance will be given any
other town or district In the province
whose young Canadians feel thnt they
would like to take an active part iu
bringing back to life their national
game.
Lacrosse Is, without question, the
most strenuous of the summer past-
times, and every community should
give it the encouragement it deserves j
Old-time lacrosse players are nt thu |
head of the movement to re-establish
the game. Some of these men are
William Clark, A. Qulglcy, 1). II. Elliott, Harry Pearsall, William West
and a host of others whose names ln
other days were household words In
the sport world.
An endeavor wlll he made to get tlle
game started in this district, some
of the men Interested advocating
school teams at Cumberland and
Courtenay, the public subscribing the
necessary funds tor the purchase of
equipment. We have in this district,
a number of former plnyers with reputations earned on the lacrosse field,
who arc eager and willing to lend all
assistance possible In organizing Cun-
adft'a National game In Comox District. It Is probable that within tht
next ipw days an announcement will
lug number two for Cumberland. This
second goal put the Cumberland team
on good terms with themselves and
very confident of the ultimate result,
consequently their football from thts
stage on was just about perfect, with
the haifs and backs keeping the much
vaunted St. Andrews' forward Hue
well in check. George Wilson, however, obtained a corner which was admirably placed, Sheldon heading s
swift one which Blair cleared magnificently. Graham and Turner both
tried a hand at beating Blair but the
Cumberland goalie was handling all
that came his way in masterl. style.
t'rolinm Misses Penalty
Monohan at,this stage handled in
the dreaded area, just after Sheldon
had tested Blair with the best shot
of the day. Graham was entrusted
with the penalty kick, striking the
upright, the ball bounding into play
and was easily cleared. The Saints
at this stage began to press, but the
Cumberland defence was absolutely
safe, both Mortimer and Stewart giving a finished display, Stewart, on one
occasion picking one from under the
bar with Blair down nursing a slight
Injury. The half ended with St.
Andrews pressing.
Second Half Starts Strongly
The second half started strongly lu
favor of St. Andrews, which however
was short lived, the ball being carried to the opposite end. Back came
the St. Andrews' forwards and while
Mortimer and Blair hesitated, Graham
rusiied in and scored a lucky goal, a
practical gift. This mistake "n the
part of the Cumberland defence was
thc only Incident which marked a perfect display.
Tho Saints' forwards tried every
trick they knew of to obtain
the equalizer, but the Cumberland defence tightened and being ably
backed by a magnificent half back
line, were easily masters of the situation. Fred Wilson took a corner
kick which he placed In the bleachers.
In all Fred took four corner kicks
and placed each one behind the goal.
Hitchens next tried a run up the field
nnd almost scored, Linn deflecting
the ball as Boyd came out In an effort
lo save. Back again came the whole
of the forward line of Cumberland,
Fowler getting ln very fast, passed to
Heyland who had no difficulty In beat.
and well deserving their victory. Jim | friendly games with organized club
Haslett presented the cup to Conti
but as far as speech making was concerned Sacki was not having some,
he had far too much mud sticking
around his mouth and was hardly able
to talk, one of the Cumberland officials responding for the club. Later
both teams were "dined" at the home
of George McKay, manager of the
Saints.
Last Saturday's display by the local
team was really magnificent and It
would Indeed be hard to pick out any
outstanding playoiB—the whole team
was good, but there is not the slightest doubt that the display of Tom
Blair tn (he opening half was a great
incentive to the rest of the team.
The backs were perfect, while the
half back line lived up to their reputation—the best half line In B.C.—thc
real surprise however was the magni-
cent work of thc whole of the forwards, there was not a weak man
among the five and If this same form
can be maintained In the Dominion
Championship scries, thc Cumberland
United stand a good chance to travel
east in quest of the premier soccer
honors of Canada.
CHARLES W. HARRIS
IS CALLED BY DEATH
COURTENAY. April 23—After a
very short illness, Mr. Charles \V.
Harris, a resident of Courtenay for
the past eleven years, passed away at
his home on the Lake Trail Rood last
night. Since coming to Courtenay
most of .Mr. Harris' time has been
spent In connection with the lumber-
milling business. About six years
ago he was in partnership in the Economy Lumber Co., but sold the mill
to Messrs Douglas. Amni and Hagarty and since that time he has held
a posltlon wllh the Gwilt Lumber Co.
as book keeper. The late Mr. Harris was a native of London, England
and to mourn his loss he leaves a
widow and one daughter. Mrs. Alfred
Horn of Union Hay. besides a large
number of friends In the district, interment will take place at the Sandwick Anglican cemetery on Saturday
at two o'clock.
have done much to boost the game in
Powell Itlver. A few weeks ago a
request was received by the management of the Cumberland United from
the St. Andrews team of the Paper
Town, begging for a game on the first
open Sunday of the local team. The
necessary permission haB been granted by the B.C.F.A. to play such a
game and the best team from Powell
River, the Saint Andrews, will be
here In force on Sunday morning, tc
play the Cumberland United, champions of- British Columbia, holders ol
the Brackman-Ker Cup and Davenport Shield.
The game is billed to start at two
o'clock sharp with Referee A. .-*
Jones, of Union Bay in charge. The
local team will be at full strength and
lt is hoped that a large crowd will
be present to greet the new Powell
Hiver team and their opponents, tlie
champions of British Columbia. Latest information from Papermakers in
a v.*ire received by Secretary Strachan
congratulated the locals on achieving
the championship of the province and
Ihat, given fine weather, about one
hundred supporters will be accompanying the team across the gulf.
NEW CHEMICAL TRUCK
ANSWERS FIRE CALL
Both fire trucks answered the cull
on Tuesday afternoon to a small roof-
ftrc at the home of Postmaster J. C.
Brown, Maryport Ave., the fire being
probably caused by sparks from thc j
chimney alighting on thc dry shingles
the flames wcre quickly quenched hy
the new Chemical truck without any I
assistance from tho Hose truck.
69 Schools To Be
Represented In
Sports, June 3
TIDE TABLE, APRIL 2*1—MAY 1 INCLUSIVE
Date Time
Interest by the audience.
The time used
Is Pacific Standard, for the 1211
Meridian West. It
Is counted from 0
to 24 hours, from
be made that tennis have been organ- j midnight to mld-
Ized at Courtenay and Cumberland,     I *••""•
14...
25....I
20....I
27....;'
28....!
29....I
30..J
0:19
1:03
1:48
2:36
3:31
4:41
6:06
0:38
H't.
7-0
7-7
8-2
9-1
8-8
12-1
Time
5:44
6:14
6:4.1
7:10
7:34
7:56
9:16
7:58
H't
12-1
11-7
11-3
10-8
10-2
9-6
9-0
8-3
Time
12:41
13:17
13:54
14:32
15:11
15:51
16:44
11:119
H't.
1-8
1-7
1-7
2-0
2-4
3-0
3-6
8-4
Time
19:2S
2U:1S
21:07
21:57
22:49
28:48
A meeting of thc committee In connection with the Interscholastlc Field
Day. which Is to be held in Cumberland ou June 3rd. was held last Wednesday evening In Hie local Council
Chambers with a fair attendance. II
was reported that 69 schools will be
represented In thc sports, all these
schools being iu the district between
South t'idar aud Campbell Hiver.
Those  present  were    gratified    tu
learn that the following contributions
have   been  added   to  the  prize   list.
Elks Lodge, of Courtenay. flO.uii;  P.
T.A.. of Nanaimo. $2.511; Wm. McLellan   Sr.,   $5.00;   Wm.   Whyte.   Sliver
Medal;  A. II.  Webb,    Silver    Medal
Donations already acknowledged iirv
R. C. Lang. Cup; R. Kuplansky. OU.
Cup nnd  4  medals;   Native Sons of
Courtenay. Cup;  and a Silver Medal
from  each  of  the   following:   Mayor
Parnham. A. J. Taylor. A. T. Heyland.
F. It. Shenstone, G. E. Apps. Inspector
Patterson. G. W. Stubbs. H. E. Murray, T, II. Carey and J. W. Tremlett
Another meeting  will be called at
the earliest possible date  to discuss
ways and means for raising tlie balance of $300.00 required to guarantee
j the purchase of thc remaining medals
** [ and cups of which the totnl Is: 4 Cups
i for First Aid;   4 Cups for the relay
[teanis;  5 Cups for the schools  win-
H't, , ning most points; 2 Cups for tlic Tug-
12-2 of-Wari 1 Cup for the Physical Drill;
13-8 ! 53 Sliver Medals and 12 Bronze Med-
A"** ! als.      Several   organizations   in   Na-
,rt"n ! nalmo aud Courtonay and other places
12-1 j have Informed   thc   committee   that
I they will consider the event ut their
,|"1 j earliest opportunity.
St. George's and
Shakespeare's Day
Was Celebrated
COURTENAY, April 24.—The celebration held in the Agricultural Hull
last night in honor of Ht. George's
day and Shakespeare's birthday watt
a successful affair. After a splendid
BUppor that did honor to the ladles
of the auxiliary of the Agricultural
Association, who served it, there was
a toast list which included speeches
by .Mr. Ben Hughes, the chairman;
"The Empire" proposed by .Mr. A. Embleton, was replied to by Mr. Theed
Pearse. "Canada" was proposed by
Wm. Duncan and responded to by Mr.,
Wilfred Smith. The toast of St.
George's and Merry England and Wm.
Shakespeare was proposed by Mr. G.
W. Stubbs und responded to by Mr.
Hugh Savage, editor of the Cowlchan
Leader, Capt. G. H. Hates proposed
a toast to thc ladies.
A capitol musical program which In
eluded a scene from a midsummer
night dream sung by pupils of the
Courtenay school was very good.
Other artists were Mrs. Hornby, Mr.
B. Harvey, Mr. H. F. Baker, Mrs. B.
Hughes, Mrs. B. Harvey. The rendering of the male chorus was greatly
enjoyed Over inn people attended
the celebration.
Duncan Watson of the Nanaimo
Team has been transferred to the
Winnipeg Irish for the Connaught
Cup series and a strong rumor is going the rounds that George Graham,
late of Cumberland United and Vancouver St. Andrews is likely to be
seen playing with Nanaimo in the Dominion Championship series.
"NORTH OF 36" A
TRUE S( REEN PLAY
OF PIONEER DAYS
"North of 3fi," hy Emerson Hough,
depicting all the thrills and hardships of pioneer days on the Texas
cattle ranges, lias heen filmed for
Paramount by Irvin Willat, who made
the natural-color picture, "Wanderer
of the Wasteland" and other classics.
"North of :i(!" is a tale of the Texas
cattle trail, picturing a country wild,
lmost  lawless, at tbe period of the
story, roughened and disheartened by
tho recent Civil War.
Lois Wilson, as Taisic Lockhart
manager of ber own vast ranch fn
Texas, finds herself penniless, with
no means of disposing of her herd*.
her chief asset being the true spirit
of the pioneers.
Word comes thai way up "north
of 36", a market beckons. With her
4,500 cows, 16 cow hands, 1!» kinds
of lilies and six shooters and 115
cow ponies. Talsle makes the start
witli all the thrills that the "tart of
the wagon train In Emerson Hough's
"Tbe Covered Wagon" envolved.
Through this great panaruma one
see groups of ragged sinewy men,
tlie glorious Kirl ai their head, the
oxcarts and the sea of long horned
cattle, accomplishing one of the great
est deeds of pioneer bravery and daring-
Paramount has furnished a notable
cast to visualize the story, lt includes
Jack Holt. Ernest Torrenco, Lois Wilson ainl Noah Beery in featured roles.
Thc picture will he shown at the
Gaiety Theatre. Courlenay. Thursday,
Friday ami Saturday, April :in and
May 1 and 2. It's a colorful page
from the history of the United States
— a second "Covered Wagon."
Commemorates
Lacrosse Victory
Mr. H. E. .Murray, of the Cumberland Public School Teaching staff, re-
teived this week a sterling silver Clg-
irette Case, suitably inscribed, commemorating the holding of the Shaw
Cup for the season 1934, a trophy the
Armstrong Club has held for a number of yours. Mr. Murray played for
ton years for his native town, being a
member of the team which held four
cups during the period 11)12-24. We
Understand that an effort is to be
made to Introduce the game of lacrosse among the scliool children of
I Cumberland and already Mr. Murray,
t Mr. H. Plump und J. H. Cameron
I have promised their support. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1925.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District_n
PLANS ARE ALL
ARRANGED FOU
BIG BANQUE']
MANY IMPORTANT
MATTERS DISCUSSED AT
COUNCIL MEETING
saint Of England the 23rd of April is
tlle  anlversary  of  the  greatest poet
I (William Shakespear and the the occasion  will be observed in honor ot*
  1 the pott a.A well as of St. George.
COURTENAY,  April  21.   On  Mon- 	
day afternoon the Comox Creamery's
olllce  In Courtenay  was the meeting
place  for  the  last  gathering  of  the i
members of the Hi. George's Day com-'
mlttee   prior   to   the  holding  ol'   the —
banquet on Thursday next (8t. COURTENAY, April 21.—Mayorl
George's Day). Those presenl on William Duncan and all the aldermen
this occasion to make the final ar- were in attendance at the regulur',
rangements were Mesdames A. Bell- council meeting last night. An of-
Irvlng, W. Brown, P. Q. Field, J. H. [er tor tour city lots ou Mill Street
Meredith, M. McPhee, Rlngrose and from .Mr. F. It. Ulscoe. for the total
Sutherland und Messrs A. S. Hall, G.! sum of $226 was the subject of much
R. Bates. H. S. linker. .1. Carey. .1. 11. dlscusBlon. The assessed value of
Flinton, Ii. Hughes, It. r. Hurford, C. the property was a good deal In e-t-
W. BUlence and G. W. Stubbs. cess of the price offered.     Alderman
The repust is lo he served in the Pearse was of the opinion that the
Agricultural Hall ami the catering city of Courtenay would naver es-
is In the hands of the Ladies' Auxtl- j talilisli any value while property was
iary of the Comox Agricultural and I aold at give-away prices. Alderman
Industrial Association. Tlie decor- Cooke thought that the city had a
ating committee will spend a portion groat deal too much property on Its
ot Wednesday afternoon In preparing ' hands and should get rid of the lots,
the hall for the entertainment. Be- Tlie pried was set at $150 for the
sides  being  the day of tlie patron | corner lot and $100 each for the other
I three lots.     Some discussion ensued
 j among  the  aldermen  as  to  the  ad-
, vlsablllty of selling city owned prop-
i pcrty to Orientals and Indians.
A letter from  Mr. David Roy ask-1
j ing  permission  to errect    an    office
building on  his property in the city
, was filed for further reference.
j    Mr. Bateman of the I'nlon Bay Uoad
I conpluined that Ills property was now
hooded and  was  in danger of being
washed away since    the    Provincial
* Publlc  Works has ditched the . highway in Ibis vicinity.     Instead of referring tiie matter to the city board
| of  works.  Alderman   Pearse  thought
that the council should deal very care-
; fully with the matter as it was really
a question for tlie Provincial author-
lilies to settle.     Alderman Macdonald
1 a member of the hoard of works, explained that provision had been marie
BILL^^BER
1 Stt BY THE
1 PAPERS THAT
Ifootball players!
■arl to be. trained|
iby-iancing a
■good many of
(them dance
IAS If THEY
JWERE PLAYING
§? FOOTBALL.
tiki
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
whereby the surplus water will lu future be taken care of.
Mr.   P.   L.   Anderton   attended   the
meeting  and  addressed   the  council
with rogard to water services to his
property   On  thc  Cumberland   Road.
He  had  put up a  proposition  every
year for the last three years, he said,
i At the last meeting of the 1924 OOUU-
1 ell  he had  repeated his  request for
I water  connection,  and  the  outgoing
council had passed a recommendation
i to the new council that the matter of
i water supply to this area of the city
'be given further consideration.     Mr. I
Anderton said lie had obtained a house
under the better housing scheme from
the city.      He  wanted  to  make his |
home where he w*as and to meet his
obligations to the city;  but unless a.
supply of water was made available
he  would  he compelled  to leave the
house.     The cost of making water extensions was then gone into at length,
Many   suggestions   were   made   for
which the city clerk, Mr. C. S. Wood
, gave    rough    estimates.      Alderman
| Field    thought   the    better    housing
homes   should  certainly   be   supplied
with   water.      Finally  on   motion  of
Alderman  Cooke, it was  resolved to
refer  the matter to  the  water committee w*ho is to lake up the question
with   those   who   require   the   water
service and to ascertain how far these
proposed consumers will go to meet
the city in a scheme to pipe the water
as far as the city limits in this direction.
Alderman Field, as chairman o"
the Tarks committee, reported that
the matter of advertising tlie automobile park had been taken up and that
advertising matter had been sent to
Nanaimo In connection with giving
the North End of Vancouver Island
publicity. It Is the intention ot tlie
parks committee to make an Inspection of the tourist auto park during
the present week regarding the recommendations as to the amount oi
motley that should be spent on the
camp. Alderman Pearse reported OH
relief matters and the better houses.
Alderman McKenzie. chairman of
the board of works, reported as to the
! situation of those who require roads
into their properties In tlle city. In
company with Alderman Macdonald
he had visited several places Including that of Mr. D. Cudmore. The
public works chairman will endeavor
to make mutual satisfactory arrangements with Mr. Cudmore for the improvement of the road in question.
By-law No. 127 covering the VJiii
rates received Its third and final reading and was passed on motion of Al-
\ riermnn Cooke.
I    Alderman Pearse again brought up
the matter of deductions from Liquor
profits and  the clerk ls to write  to
, the Provincial Attorney General pro-
j testing   against  any   attention   being
■ given by  Ihe Attorney General's do-
', partment to the acts of irresponsible
' persons who take it upon themselves
lo make complaints  in  tills  connection.     After a busy session that lasted until close on midnight the council adjourned.
the latest thing iu motor passenger
comfort.- The car ls equipped witli
steam heat for cold weather and
should meet the requirements of the
most fastidious of the travelling puhlic.
TWO INTERESTING
LECTURES'ARE GIVEN IN
CHURCH BASEMENT
MR. CARRICK WILL
ENTERTAIN AND LECTURE
IN BOOTH'S HALL
COURTENAY, April 21.—As a result ot a recent meeting of the entertainment committee (Messrs I.
Thompson. H. Davidson and J. Praia)
of the St. Andrews Society, it was decided to hold a social evening at
Booths Hall on Friday next. The
services of Mr. Carrick, the well
known entertainer, of Vancouver have
: been secured for this occasion and tin
program is to include a lecture by
, Mr. Carrick entitled "Why we should
j honor Robert Burn's Birthday. The
i local branch of St. Andrews Society
i which was formed her0 a few months
| ago continues to add to its member-
1 ship.
COURTENAY, April 22.—The basement of the Presbyterian Church wus
the scene of two very interesting lectures during the enrly part of the
week. Mrs. Campbell Brown who i'or
llfteen years was engaged In missionary work in South China was the ice-
turer. On Monday night she addressed fifty members of thc C.G.I.T., ten
of whom walked from Cumberland
with Mrs. James Hood. On Tuesday
the speaker adressed forty ladles on
missionary work tn the Chinese Held.
Mrs. Campbell Brown is a wonderful
speaker and a very energetic and en'
thUBiasttc worker. Her duties at Wellington sometimes necessitate tlie covering of eighteen miles a day on foot.
for a prize of a load of fire wood donated by Mr. Isaac Pickering. A
large chunk of wood was placed on
the floor hut it was not permissable
to handle or touch the wood. There
were two successful competitors,
Messrs T. Anderson and Walter "Wider
The winners cut the cards for the
loud of wood and Mr. Anderson wa1*
the lucky man. Dancing followed
and was much enjoyed. There were
some eighty persons present and a
very useful sum of $35 was cleared
for the Grantham church.
SANDWICK LOCALS
MrB. R. T. Cooper has been spending Ihe past week with friends In Van
couver.
Mrs. 11. Bearsey who recently underwent an operation for appendicitis
at the St. Josephs Hospital, returned
home on Sunday.
Miss Florence Cliffe returned on
Sunday's boat, after spending the
Faster vacation with friends and relatives in Vancouver.
NOVELTY CONCERT
AT GRANTHAM IS
WELL ATTENDED
Loaf of
White
Bread
GET IT AT
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store The White Bakery
Courtenay
HUDSON SUPER SIX
COl'KTENAY, April 21.—The new
Hudson super six Limousine taxi service which in now being operated hy
Robinson Bros., of Courtenay. is ahout
COURTENAY, April 22.—Tlie Novelty concert held at Grantham last
night under tlie auspices of the Ang-
lic.ui Church was well attended and
proved very successful. A short pro
gram which included the sale hy auction of a number of "spinsters" or
tea cosys, by the Rev. J. \V. Flinton
was followed hy cards and other
games. Refreshments were served
and partaken of with relish.
A ruffle for a bo: of c'uocolatoa was
won hy Mr. P. Murphy. The prizes
winners for five hundred were .Mrs. I>.
Marsh, Hrst ; Lloyd Swan second. Mr.
Murphysen was awarded the goii'le-
man's booby prize and Miss VioUt
Currie the ladies'. There was an interesting weight guessing competition
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
April 30, May 1 and 2
Why  Talk   Of   Unusual
VALUES IN
USED CARS
WE CAN SUPPLY
USED CARS
HUT THEY WILL BE
GOOD VALUE
REASONABLE PRICES   &   REASONABLE TERMS
AM) SATISFACTION
Corfield Motors, Limited
Jack Holt in
"North of 36"
SUPPORTED BY ERNEST TORRENCE,
LOIS WILSON and NOAH BERRY
OVER A TRAIL OF 1,000 THRILLS—THE GREAT
TEXAS CATTLE DRIVE WAS ON. CONQUERING
RIVERS, INDIANS AND STAMPEDES. THE
COMPANION PICTURE OF "COVERED WAGON"
FORI) DEALER
Phone 46
Higher
Class
of
Pictures
Come
and see
foryour
selves
J4CKHOIT    WBTIOHOa
(CIS WILSON    NOAHKERY"
b?Mqrthof3(y
Adults, 50c. Children, 25c.
NEW MANAGEMENT BETTER LIGHTING
MSMSIS'jiragji^^
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE 7:00—10.30 P.M.
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M.
ADULTS 35<>
CHILDREN  15o
Gaiety Theatre
Courtenay
Jick Holt
in the Pirajnount KctUll
'North of 36'
AT THE GAIETY THEATRE
Courtenay, B.C.
Thursday Friday, & Saturday
April 30, May 1 and 2
TKMU'iSS FOB DREDGING
SEA! I'D Tenders addressed to the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for
dredging Courtenay River, B.C.." will
be received until 12 o'clock noon
(daylight Baying), TucKda.*, May »,
1925, I'or dredging required at Courtenay itlver, B.C.
Teadcra will not bo considered unless made on tbe forms supplied by
thc Department and according to the
condition set forth therein.
Combined specification and form of
tender can be obtained on application
to tbe undersigned, also at the ofiice
of Ihe District Engineer. Post Olllce
Building, Victoria, B.C.
Tenders must Include the towing ot
the plant to and from the work.
The dredges and other plant which
are Intended lo be used on the work
shall have been duly registered in Can
ada at tlie time of the filing ot the
tender '.villi the Department, or shall
have been built In Canada after tho
filing of tbe tender.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of tho Minister of Puhlic Works, for D per cent
of tlie contract price, but no cheque to
be for less than fifteen hundred dollars. Bonds of the Dominion of Canada and bonds of the Canadian Nation
al Railway Company will also be accepted as security, or bonda and a
cheque If required to make up an odd
amount.
By Order.
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, April 11, 1925. 17-13
Do not wait for the hot
. weather before making a
|. trip to the beach—
Come NOW To
Glenroy
Royston
Beach
The roads are good, and the
Countryside perfect. Tea is
served in the Garden or
Tearoom, as you prefer;
In either case the lovely
views of sea and snowcapped mountains are obtained
Was 25c.     Refreshments FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
,tf
THE B. C. MINING GAZETTE ■
Through our connection with tha
publishers of ihis up-to-date mining journal, we c«n offer, to a
limited number only.
THREE MONTHS' FREE
SUBSCRIPTION
without obligation   on  your part.
Call or write
GRANT MAHOOD & CO. LTD.
Members Vancouver Stock
Exchange
S22-52S Rocera Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
_ Active in All .Mining Stocks
■  We Buy and Sell All Shares
Priscilla Dean, Popular Movie Actress,
"' Assumes Role of Locomotive Engineer
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAHENDMENTS
l'ltE-KUl'TlONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown landH may be pre-empted by j
British subjects over 18 years of ago, |
and by aliens on declaring Intension
to become British subjects, coudl- •
tlonal upon residence, occupation,!
and Improvement for agricultural i
purposes. j
Full  Information  concerning  regu-1
latlous    regarding    Pre-emptions    Is ;
given in Bulletin No. 1, Laud Series, j
'How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by   addressing   the   Department   ol
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Qor-
erniuent Agent
Records will be granted covering
only land BUltable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e, carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west of tbe Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that'
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to oe addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the laud applied for
ls situated, and are made on primed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
'Pre-emptions must be occupied I'or
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before a Crown Grant can bt
received.
For more detailed infoimation see
tha Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land." '
I'UUCHASE
Applications are received for pur-
cnase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being Umberlaiid,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land ia $5
par acre, and second-class (grazing)
land 12.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
•tumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveycd areas, not exceeding 10
acres, may be leased as Komesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For graiing and Industrial purpose! areas not exceeding 640 acrea
may be leased by one person or a
company.
CRAZING
Under the Grazing Act tbe Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially tree,
permits art available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
Mo; Priscilla Dean, movie actress,
is not to be the engineer of the
Trans-Canada Limited, the only
limited, ail-sleeper train across
Canada, even though she donned
un engineer's garb, ran a real
Trans-Canada locomotive, and acted also as station master for one
hour in Yonge Street Station, Toronto. Priscilla is interested in
railroading, and was much intrigued with a Canadian Pacific Railway ticket around the world, thc
first coupon of which called for a"
journey on this train which, beginning May 17, is scheduled to
better its !)0-hour run between
Montreal and Vancouver, two . I-
ies nearly 3,000 miles apart.
Priscilla's bright eyes opened
even wider with astonishment when
riie was told that this wonderful
train was in reality ten fully equipped trains, four of which arc mov-
OME TWAIN THAT IS GEALLV Te*4TGAtW^
ing westward and four eastward
at the same time, while two additional trains are being cleaned, refitted and turned around, one at
Vancouver and the other at Montreal and Toronto. The equipment
of each train is limited to one baggage car, one dining car, four
standard sleepers, one 10-compart-
ment car, Vancouver and Montreal,
and one 10-compartment car Toronto and Winnipeg, with a drawing room-3-compartment observation sleeper Montreal and Vancouver. Sleeping ear passengers only
are carried, and last year there was
a one-nig*ht use of approximately
100,000 berths for the 119 days the
train was in service. The east and
west bound trains together covered
i,2i)2 miles every day. The season's
nileage for the 238 trips was
758,748 miles, or three times the
distance from the earth to the
moon.
I here are 18 engine runs daily.
Including these engine stops, the
trains make only 26 stops on their
cross-continent run. Owing to the
necessity of changing train crews
on such a long run, ahout 14
crews, or about 84 men, are required for one trip on each train,
while 48 sleeping and dining car
employees are at work each trip
on a single train, or nearly 400
men for this branch of the Trans-
Canada service.
Panff. Lake Louise and the
scenic wonders of the Canadian
toekies have proved irresistible to
lingers and musicians, actors and
ictresses. and movie stars. Among
he celebrated artists who have
•isited Banff are Dame Clara Butt.
ialli-Curci, Elsie Janis, Jaecha
Meifetz. Jack Holt and our own
Houg. and Mary who all I ravel on
Canada's finest flyer, tlie Trans-
Canada.
m
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   «  •    Proprietor
/ Will Call
at jour house In time to take you to
the train or boat.
Car  For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE 'iti Oil 84- ASK FOU
Geo.   Mason
I
"The Most of the Beit for the Lea.it"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
and Grocers
-BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOO!
 EAT MORE OF IT-
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
"FOREST PROTECTION
WEEK"—APRIL 19 - 25
The wepk of April 19th to 25th has
been set aside throughout the Dominion of Canada as "Forest Protection
Week."
We  have   had   "Prurte   Week"  and
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
"Raisin Week" and Soap Week" and
every other kind of week; weeks
which are designed primarily to boost
safes. The advertising which proclaims these weeks must fundamentally have an idea behind it, or they
would not continue. All of these,
however, are designed to sell an
article or a plt|*e of merchandise;
some product or other, so that some
company, firm or association of growers profit by bringing their merchandise before the public.
"Forest Protection Week" Is selling
to Canadians, Canadian wejalth. Every
citizen of Canada henllls If the Idea
of forest protection Is sold. The forest wealth of British Columbia, which
is estimated to be 50 per cent of the
total timber wealth of Canada, is ,i
crop which can be grown and replaced, providing fires are kept out.
In this way lt is unlike mining. When
the wealth of a mine Is taken out of
'.lie ground, nothing but a hole remains. If wc*, keep fires out, It Is
obvious to every citizen of the Province that timber which has been cut
will grow again, and will keep >;.
growing just so long as Its arch enemy is kept out of the woods. Eviri
In our day, operating companies lia *e
logged over timber which was considered too small twenty-five years
ago to log at a profit. This sort of
logging means continuity of employment to many thousands of families;
indirectly it is probably the life
stream of British Columbia's Industries; for without raw materials the
saw mills, shingle mills, and pulp
mills of this Province would have to
shut down and move to where the thu
ber Is growing, or is receiving better
protection.
In 1924 th«*<te were 2174 forest fires
set, 86 per cent of which were directly attributed to human agency, or
rather human carelessness. We do
not suppose that there are; many people ln this Province who- would deliberately set fire to the forests, hut
unfortunately, neglect to take the
necessary precautions has resulted
too often in terrific destruction, and
the timber is destroyed Just as completely whether the fire is set deliberately or accidentally.
Do you think it would be too much
for you to make a resolve to protect
your own property, because the people of the Province havejin interest in
every stick of timber that is cut, iu
the shapo of Royalty and other forms
of taxation?
Follow the simple rules and you
will always be safe in the woods;
1, Matches—Be sure your match
Is out before you throw it away.
Matches have heads, but they can't
think.     Do It for them.
2. Tobacco—Don't throw pipe-
ashes, cigar or cigarette stumps from
a car Into the inflammable material
by the roadside. If you simply
MUST get rid of thesa. It Is less dangerous to drop them in the'centre of
tlie road.
Making   Camp—Build   a   small
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
alter repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
SUCH  A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your laundry to us.  Our long experience safeguards your interests and guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove" it.
Free  Patches   —   Clean Work   —   Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry
Marcel Waver
Nine Reasons Why You Should Buy This Waver
Assures a beautiful  Marcel* Wave   in  five   (5)
minutes.
It will not burn or singe your hair.
It will save its cost many times in the first month.
A wave when you want it—No waiting for the hair
dresser.
After the swim, put a quick wave in.
Costs practically nothing to operate—Fits in any
socket.
A quicker and better wave than is possible with
any other appliance.
Your appearance depends  on   your   hair  dress.
Here is quick beauty.
Absolutely guaranteed.
PRICE $8.50
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PHONE 34
Quick Delivery
32
camp-fire. Build it In the open, not
against a tree or log. Scrape away
the debris from all around It.
4. Leaving Camp—Never leave a
camp-fire, even for a short time, without quenching it with water or earth.
5. Bonfires—Never build bonfires
In windy weather or where there is
the slightest danger of their escaping
from control. Don't make them
large'r than you need.
6. Fighting Fires—If you notice a
small fire starting, try to put it out.
Larger fires should be reported immediately.
7. Spread tlie gospel of Forest
Protection by your personal efxample.
SCHOOL GROUNDS
COMPETITION
A competition In the ornamental
planting of rural school grounds Is
lieing Inaugurated by the Canadian
Horticultural Council. The purpose
of tlie competition is to encourage tlie
planting of such ornamental and
hardy shrubs as will not suffer for
lack of attention during the vacation
period. Tlie abundance of native
shrubbery available locally in many
parts of the Dominion and the finer
things, equally as hardy, obtainable
from tlie nurserymen, give encouragement to the Council and the promise
of a charming transformation in the
scliool grounds of tlie country.
The competition, though Dominlou-
wlde, Is divided provlnclally. Nine
silver cups have been secured for
award one in each province to the
rural school accomplishing the greatest degree of beautilicatlon ln its
grounds during the year. The cup
will become the property ot the
school winning 1( three times, not
necessarily in succession. With
each cup the Couucil will also give
an award of merit certificate, which
mny be framed and kept by the
school as a permanent record.
To enter the competition the
schools are required to submit a
photograph of the building and
grounds and an application ot entry
to tlie chairman of the provincial
committee or to Mr. L. F. Burrows,
Secretary ot the Canadian Horticultural Council at Ottawa. Details
of tlie competition, which will be conducted under the immediate charge of
the provincial Department Of Education, are available from the Secretary
of the Canadian Horticultural Council
at Ottawa, or from any of the following chairmen of provincial committees: British Columbia, Prof. F. B.
Buck. University of British Columbia
Vancouver; Alberta. Prof. Geo. Har-
eourt. University of Alberta, Edmonton; Saskatchewan. Dr. F. C. Patterson. University of Saskatchewan,
Saskatoon; Manitoba. Prof. F. \V.
Broderlck. University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg; Ontario, Prof. A. H. Mae-
Lennan, Ontario Agricultural College.
Guelph; New Brunswick. A. C. Tumey
Provincial Hortlculturallst, Freder-
Icton; Nova Scotia. Prof. Shaw, College of Agriculture, Truro; Prince Edward Island. J. A. Clark, Dominion
Experimental Farm. Charlottetown.
MINERAL ACT
(FORM F.)
P.O. Box 391
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONK 150
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vi-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems"for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE
Teal Fractional. Robin, Red Bird, Canary, Black Bird, Blue Jay, Lark, Wren
Snow Bird, Birch No. 2, Hemlock No.
2, Cedar No. 2, Spruce No. 2, Tamarack No. 2, Swnn No. 2, Raven No. 2,
Pine No. 2. Fir No. 2, Maple No. 2,
Oak Fractional, Locust, Long Fractional, Loon, Hawk Fractional, Mink.
Martin, Eagle No. 11, Eagle No. 12 and
Eagle No. 13 Mineral Claims, situate
In the Quatslno Mining Division of
Rupert District.
Whore located:—Near Old Sport
Mine. Elk Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank C,
Green, acting as agent 'or Coast Copper Company, Limited. Free Miner's
Certificate Nn. 75.895C. Intend, sixty
days from the date hereof, to apply to
tlie .Mining Recorder for Certificates
of Improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining Crown Grants ot the above
claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must he commenced
before the issuance of such Certificates of  Improvements.
linted rtiis 28th day of October, A.D.,
1SI24.
F. C, GREEN,
221 I'tmbsrton Bldg.,
15-24 Victoria. B.C.
\m
■■ PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FltlBAY, APRIL 24, 1S25.
«~5SH**
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY I''R11'AY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1025.
TOO PROUD TO ORES:
An attempt is beinsr madi
SIMPLY
hi California to
prohibit Lucille.* from wearing orchid georgette at
the high school commencement while Mane wears
a flannel middy. The Miller bill is just one more
attempt to establish democracy in the public
schools. If passed, the school children of California will go into uniforms, whether they be toddlers in the primary grades or seniors in high
school. However, don't worry lest such pecedent
will prevent Marie from wearing her beaver cape
to school next term. That bill won't pass. Bills
like that don't.
And yet, why nut? Wouldn't it be a sane
and sensible thing to send all the children to
school in clean khaki? If Susie's papa is trying
to send five children to school on an income ot $3
a day, shouldn't his children have the same chance
as the one little girl whose father's income is $20
a day? But do they? Does Susie in faded gingham get the same attention as Marjorie in her
silken gown? Aren't we sowing seeds of snobbery
instead of democracy in our public schools?
Now and then we read of a graduating class
adopting a uniform of some simple material for
their commencement exercises, thus saving some
parents bitter heartache or needless extravagance
And the girl from the rich man's home looks more
beautiful in her simple gown than she would m
lace-trimmed crepe de chine. There is something to be said for California's school uniform
bill.
But it won't pass.
The light-keeper, upon a distant, lonely rock-
bound coast gazes at the same stars that twinkle
above your own roof-tree. The thoughtless
youth, joy-riding under the summer moon, beholds the same soft radiance that falls upon the
sailor standing at the wheel in a foreign sea.
The stars do not change, even as the ten
commandments have not changed. Man builds
and his work decays. The glory of today in
stone and concrete is a crumbling ruin tomorrow.
The teeming millions that litter the Surface of the
earth tonight will have become dust in a few
score years, yet the stars will gleam in the sky
as of yore.
ln this fitful period of tha scarred old world's
history, it is well to lie flat on your back in the
open some night and take a long and silent look
at the stars. Maybe then you will realize how
infinitely small and unimportant your poor little
soul is.
STAR GAZING
With the coming of spring, the heavens take
on new glory, even as the earth bursts forth into
verdure. There is a rare beauty about the twinkling stars upon a clear, cold winter's night, but
there is even rarer beauty upon a summer's night
when the soft moon casts shadows through the
foliage.
Look often upon the starry decked heavens
it' you would know peace and tranquility, for the
heavens alone remain unchanged in this period of
earthly turmoil. Did you ever stop to think
that the sky is the same tonight as it was when
Moses went up into Sinai ? The earth changes.
Dynasties crumble and fall. Ancient civilizations have disappeared. The reptiles that crawled upon the earth in ages gone have dried up and
blown away. The wild creatures of the stone
age have been buried for centuries. The Pharaohs have slept for thousands of years in their
jeweled tombs. Rivers have changed their
courses and mountains have slipped into the seas,
but the stars and the moon remain unchanged.
THE SEARCH FOR YOUTH
Professor James H. Breasted has come across
a manuscript in the medical papyrus of 1600 B.C.,
I which contains a chapter entitled "How to Change
: an Old Man Into a Young Man of Twenty.'
This is a rare echo from the corridors of
'time that shows the eternal protest against growling old, and that the idea of fighting wrinkles,
stiff joints and grey hair is a very ancient one.
I This protest is registered by both sexes, but the
[women folks seem to yell the loudest.
While the dear old girls of today have taken
to bobbing their hair, shortening their skirts and
enameling their faces in this grim effort to conceal the ravishes of time, the nice old boys have
taken up golf and cigarettes. But the Reaper
still whets his scythe and the weight of years
droops the shoulders and we march steadily on
toward the hour of accounting. No fakir has
yet been able to change old men into young men of
twenty, and no beauty parlor can bring back the
blushes of sweet sixteen.
The fact of the matter is we are just as old
as our hearts, our arteries and our kidneys. If
we have abused the house in which we live, the
decay sets in that much earlier. Our cemeteries
are filled with people who have dug their graves
with their teeth. Red meats, sweets and alcohol
have worn out the kidneys; excitement, wasted i
nervous force and lack of sleep have weakened
the internal engine that once took all hills on high
and the old heart thumps and misses like a cyl- j
inder full of carbon, and the old legs stumble like
a punctured tire.
You may exercise with a phonograph record,
you may take your daily dozen and wear a toupee,
but you are not fooling anybody but yourself. If
old people just throw into second, slow down a bit
and do not try to make believe they are ten years
younger than the old family Bible says they are,
they may stick around for quite a while and get
a lot of fun out of their carpet slippers and watching the rest of the world go by. But after fifty
years of age, it is dangerous to make a radical
change and try to fool others.
Old Ponce de Leon spent a lot of time and
covered a good many miles looking for the fountain of youth, but he never found it. Besides,
you had your fling, didn't you?
ARE you USING COMOX
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR?
TRY THE DIFFERENCE.     Substitute Whole Wheat Bread for White Bread and notice
how much better you feel.    If you want the best, get "COMOX" Whole Wheat Flour.
It's ground fresh each week from dry-belt wheat.     "Ask  those who have used it."
At your grocer's in 10-lb., 24-lb.,  and  49-lb.  sack3
"COMOX   WHOLE   WHEAT   FLOUR"
Comox Creamery Association
1   V
4
■anatagS
SS
•^E=
Interesting Tit-Bits
OF THE PROVINCIAL CUP VICTORY
BY ADEX. S. DENHOLME fnsm
Vonl—Vidi—Viol! That's the Latin
representation for the words. 1 came,
I saw, I conquered and is a true reflection of the spirit of every mon
on the Cumherland United before
their victorious soccer hattle with St
Andrews.
The players reserved their frolics
till after Ihe game and on lhe trip
across retired in most eases, quite
early and in most instances preceded
their retirement with a friendly game
of cardB Including bridge, five hundred and whist! runny, yes. but true.
Bill Walker did his best In "bull
the boys to sleep with a famous quar-a
telte Including himself, ably assisted
hy such prominent artists as Messrn
Strachan, JackBon and Quinn, Old-
time melodies ami sentimental songs
were of course (he feature of ihelr
"lullabies."
After leaving Powell Hiver a discussion took place among a few soccer fans as to tile relative merits of
the two teams. During the course
of discussion a thin individual r;*-
markeil. "and George Wilson? He was
a greal footballer, but he is ton d ■
Blow."
From behind a chair aiid a cloud of
smoke we heard. "That'll tnj bruiier.
Sure he is done. His football dnys
were over years ago." Thus dramatically entered Dave Wilson of Cumberland, Into the conversation. Dave
aald little more but the look of embarrassment on the face nf the strung
er who had been so authoratively expressing his opinion was very amusing.
After arriving at Vancouver and
making their way up Granville St. to
the St. Regis Hotel, their quarters for
the day, the team espied the Province
Cup on display ln Hie window of n.
B. Allan the jewelers.     But they near
Iiad their hopes upset by a stolid
supporter of the Saints for whom he
anticipated a sure victory.
It was about 7:30 a.m. and "Scotty"
we will call him, was on his way to
work. Tlie team chatted good latur-
edly about the cup. He listened sul-
enlly. but the last straw came when
as the boys were just resuming their
walk Dill Walker remarked something
to tlie effect the team would win it
later in thc day. "D sma' fear o'
it" Scotty fired hack "It'll no be thc
day."
Walker coaxed Scotty to back up
his opinion with a little money. "Make
it Jin," wagered Bill. Scotty wasn't
to be drawn out however. He can-
nily declined tlic offer, gnve the Cumberland manager a withering look
and replied "Am Just a workin' man
ye ken, no n miner!"
Dave Turner and Geo. Graham
dropped ln during the morning of the
game. The latter very confidently
volunteered the ollicial opinion of St.
Andrews ihat lt would be an easy
win for tlie striped Jerseys. This Is
no exaggeration. We were even Informed that Ihe name "Cumberland"
had heen printed on the ball—always
ihe losing team's souvenir i„ a champ
ionshlp game.
ually won. Tom has had it since and
as usual rolled his cap around it,
tucked it behind goal and the team
won. Tom says he is going to have
it gilded now.
After reading that modern appollo
stuff about big "Mort" we feel he
won't mind if we correct the Sun's
statement that Jack Monohan gave
that questionable penalty away. Mortimer and not Monohan was the "culprit."
Freddie Wilson, Saint's outside
right, failed to convert anyone of his
four corner kicks. On his last unsuccessful attempt Charlie Hitchens
hastened across the field to shake
hands and congratulate him. The
score was then 4-1 nnd Wilson look It
In good part.
Goofy after all," to the tune of John
Brown's body lies a moulding in the
dust. He also made the wise crack
*I don't get many goals you know, but
I'm always on the winning team!"
Nobody had to run to catch the boat
Those on the wharf at Vancouver
listened to the strains of the team's
song as did those who met the team
at Union Bay. Bob Brown led tho
noise makers at the Bay in leading the
reception. And by the way. It seemed to us as we stood there taking tho
scene in, that Sacki Conti, leading the
boys with whom we are so pleased,
took some pardonable pride as captain in packing home that big silver
mug we are now so proud of—The
Provincial Cup.
CORRESPONDENCE OF
APPRECIATION FROM
MADAME TUSSAUD'S!
There was little apparent excitement In tho hotel room ns the team
stripped. Charlie Graham was on
tlie scene by this time earnestly pouring advice to each man—to check
close. Trainers Taylor and Jackson
worked over their men. And lastly as
they all tiled out—"Have you got thc
horseshoe Tom?"
Where did Blair get it? In a re-
rent game with Ladysmith when that
learn led at half time Tom picked up
an old horse shoe at half time, lying
there In his goal.    Cumberland ovent-
DUve Turner accepted defeat in a
manner befitting that very gentlemanly sportsman. He showed it even as
the Saints were swallowing the last
few bitter dregs of defeat. He banged Into Bluir and offered apologies.
and the pair each smiling, assumed
their respective positions for an ensuing corner. Although Dave wore
a striped sweater he was Just as popular with the Cumberland hoys.
When Sacki was presented the cup
In front nf the stand after the game,
his face was spattered witb black mud
He declined to make any remarks aud
Jas. Quinn Jumped into tlie breach.
He concluded a few remarks by inviting the team and followers to sing
tho Cumberland United song "Cumberland on the ball, otc." It made a
hit with the crowd.
Thus when a bus rolled down Granville St lustily singing "Cumberland
on the ball, etc." horrified inhabitants
of that optimistic seaport city fearfully guessed that a lank team Iiad
once more stood hetween them and a
provlnclal soccer championship.
The boys "sung" their wny to tho
Jericho Beach Tennis Club where
the team and followers were guests
of honor at a banquet given by tho
Saints. Cheerful Alec Fowler, popularly called "Gloomy" now, made thc
hit of the night when ho sang an ex-
temporous   ditty   "Gloomy   ain't   so
Madame Tussaud's, the famous Wax
Work Exhibition In London, Eng..
known to thousands of the Canadian
Forces during the Great War has been
totally destroyed and the following
letter from Mr. John T. Tussaud has
been received by the Cumberland Islander:
April 6th, 1925.
The Editor, Cumberland Islander,
Dear Sir;—Will you permltt me
this opportunity of thanking you, and.
through you, the general public botli
at home and abroad, for the great
kindness and sympathy shown to me
and my family In the sad loss sustained through the disastrous fire at the
Exhibition. The messages received
from all quarters are far too numerous to- reply to Individually.
So far as the relics are concerned,
the loss Is, of course, irreparable, and
we mourn tlie destruction of so many
historic mementoes which It was the
pride of Madame Tussaud and her
descendants to acquire and exhibit to
the public.
One effect of the fire is that It has
revealed the great esteem ln whfcli
the old lady's memory is held through
out the world.
The kindly reference In the press
and from the public, several members of which have generously extended us offers of assistance, have
gone far to alleviate the effects of the
blow we received when the treasure**
of several generations of the family
which had taken a century and a half
to accumulate, vanished within tho
space of a single hour.
With much gratitude  believe me,
Yours faithfully,
John T- Tussaud.
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
Long Distance Is
Cheapest At Night
NEW NIGHT RATES ARE NOW IN
FORCE   FOR   LONG - DISTANCE
CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN 8:30
p.m. AND 7:00 a.m.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
USED
CARS
WE   HAVE   THE   FOLLOWING   GUARANTEED
GOOD USED CARS, AT LOWEST PRICES
CHEVROLET (Touring) 1923 Model
CHEVROLET (Delivery) 1922 Model
CHEVROLET (Touring) 1919 Model
CHEVROLET  (Touring)   1924 Model
FORD (Sedan)   1923 Model
FORD (Coupe)   1923 Model
FORD (Touring)  1922 Model
FORD (Touring   1921 Model
FORD (Ton Truck)  1919 Model
STUDEBAKER (Touring) 1921 Model
DODGE (Roadster)   1919 Model
SEVERAL OTHERS — EASY TERMS ARRANGED
j* (aWWHW^Bifff.V
s%
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
Mclaughlin and Chevrolet dealers
The Courtenay Garage
Phone   61 FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER.   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
WESTERN COAL j illation in  this  country and the  <lg-
„„..„....„.,..,„,.    .„.„..   „„,»„     Igravatiug situation in the older parts
CONSTITUTES  ATTRACTION i of the Cl)UlUl.y with respect t0 |nP?us.
FOR INDUSTRIES ! ',ia' operations  the  logical order of
Are the industrial areas 'of Canada
out of place? An article by Mr. 51.
J. Patton, appearing in Queen's Quarterly, dealing with the coal resources ,      , „    , . ,    -
'and Quebec are today dependent upon
of Canada,   lends  color  to  the  Idea '
that with tho westward trend of pop-
; things is  that  the industries should
transfer  to Alberta  and  British  Columbia in proximity, to the coal Bup-
Ply.
The  industrial   centres  of Ontario
&L .^Kbb, Bat yen cm Prouuft a
n <16WJr,Ckn, HtihbvCo^lIko
Till ID FVP\Un Marine Eve Ssmtstf
IUUK CJtJ "NliUudMoiiitai.*1
KMHrwrKmaMtlCfcafiinlHwItlg.
Write for Pre* Ere Care Book.
llBlMbill«HtiC<»tCMIUoStKl.Cliug«
the  United States  for the important
"; factor tn manufacturing of coal sup-
:: ply.     How long this supply will be
j forthcoming     without     interruption
arising from retaliatory measures by
; the forotgn nation is ver; difficult to
I figure out.
Factories for West
I    The   solution    of   the   proposition
, would  appear to  be  the transfer of
GOLF AT JASPER PARK LODGE
the manufacturing centres to points
in proximity to tfie coal supply. This
is all the more reasonable as a solution in view of the fact that the consuming population is increasing westward. Mr, Patton in his article has
the following to say with respect to
Lhe situation:
"It is a somewhat singular circum-
PAGE FIVE
(,\
AN OUTSTANDING
PICTURE COMING
APRIL 27 AND 28
PROSPECTS ARE BRIGHTER \ KNOCKS OUT
IN THE SHINGLE  MARKET '    WIFE'S TOOTH TO SAVE
DENTIST'S BILL
The  Ilo-llo Theatre next week offers one of the  outstanding cinema
attractions of the season in the screen
stance that the burden ol all discus- i adaptation  or the George  M. Cohan
don  on   Canada's   fuel   problem  has pstage production, "The Meanest Man
been the desirablity of bringing the
country's largo natural resources In
coal from the West and from the East
to the thickly populated central area,
kittle or no attention has apparently
been   given   to   the   reverse   process,
l„ the World."
Thousands and thousands of theatre patrons laughed and laughed
with Cohan during tlie year the play
was presented  in  New  York.     Now
Bert Lytell, enacting the title role
In the filming of Ceorge M. Cohan's
"The Meanest .Man in the World," re-
namely. the bringing of population to   countless thousands will have the op-
.he coal areas.     And yet, why not?      portucity oMenjoying the story In Its
tml ns ii Magnet nIm fl"'m*
"Economic hlstorj   teaches us that
«rge coal resources, especlaly when
HEN it was decided to add plete absence of paralleling in the
golf to the allurements of  ordinary  sense   of   the   term,   al
Jasper National Park it was
quite rightly conceded that the setting, as well ns thc importance of
the place in the Canadian National
tourist traffic plans, justified a
course built to the highest standards. The policy adopted from the
outset was tliat thc golf should be
good enough lo be appreciated for
itself, the beauty of tl.e sceneiy
being* merely an added attraction.
Since the course has been cleared
and is revealed to the visitor he
concludes that the railway wns
fortunate to have such a great extent of golfing terrain so immediately available to the Lodge. A
year ago, when most of it was
Rocky Mountain forest, the golfing
possibilities were not so apparent.
Work was commenced curly in the
summer of 192*1 and was rushed
forward with such success tliat
nine holes will he available for play
during thc summer of 1923.
Fortunately there is no clay at
Jasper. This should delight the
golfer's heart. Thc underlying
strata is generally gravel like all
the Athabaska River basin in which
Jasper is situated, so that the
fairways have under them thnt
gravelly subsoil essential to the
production of good golfing turf.
Sand was also found on tho property in sufficient quantity and
quality to fill all requirements. The
fairways nre clear of actual out-
croppings of rock, but these show
up around tees and greens, giving
a pleasing rpgged setting but never
interfering with thc play.
Tho route selected encloses a
great heart shaped area with thc
first hole starting nnd the last hole
finishing at the lower point of the
heart, and at the top there is a
double back nnd further along a
loop of three holes which are on a
peninsula running out into Lac
Beauvert. This route is quite an
exceptional one and there ia a com-
.though'the 10th has the 6th immediately to the right of it.
The ups and downs of holes and.
the undulations of fairways are
only those to be desired on a first
class course located in a good golfing country. With such magnificent surroundings it naturally
added much to the scenic attractions of tlie course to have such a
route selected Hint gives different
views at almost every hole.
A feature of the layout at Jasper is that there are no holes of
a length which is more than one
shot and yet not quite two.
Arrangements for play can be
made at Jasper Park Lodge. A
professional will he in attendance.
THE SCORE CARD
Lengths measured from centre of
back tee.
Hole Length
No.     Yards      Name Par
1*       420       First 4
2*       450       Old Man   6
.'I*       3S5       Signal     4
4'       2*10       Cavell  8
5*      '415       Miette    4
d*       .175      Whistlers 4
7 200       Colin  3
8 425       TeRarra   4
9 185      Cleopatra   8
1st 9-
10
11*
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
-3085
465
395
105
595
360
135
350
390
435
34
The Maze  6
Pyramid 4
Tete Jaune 3
The Long   5
Lac Beauvert .... 4
Le Bateau 3
La Baie  „ 4
The Climber 4
Home  4
36
ithor minerals are near by, have al-
.vays acted as a magnet for populu-
:ion. The coal areas of Nova Scotia,
Alberta and British Columbia, witli
valuable metallic mineral areas adjacent, are favored with a healthful
climate; whilst conditions exceedingly
uitable to agricultural pursuits prevail in tbe surrounding territory.
When such a movement of population
■vlll begin Is. of course, idle to prophesy', but to deny that It will take place
some day would be to Ignore the experiences of the past. When Canada's coal areas are industrialized,
ihe will have begun to realise on thc
tremedous national asset she pos-
lesBes in her one-sixth share of the
coal resources of the world."
In connection with this question il
.nust be borne In mind that the Pacific Coast has the timber facilities
required for manufacturing Industries. The coal is at hand and in thc
matter of raw iron, which plays such
an important part ia most lines of
manufacture, it Is said that this commodity can be laid down on the Coast
here at no greater cost than it ia
placed In Toronto at the present time.
Worthy of Consideration
In time there,Ib no reason why the
Iron supply for the Pacific should not
lie produced from the raw material
at hand, but pending that, there It-,
said to be nothing In the way of securing the pig iron in the world's
markets.
The Canadian  Mining Journal, re-
'erring to the remarks of Mr. Patton.
says:   "It contains an  Idea  that |JS I
not yet  gained  tho  currency  it dc- J
serves.     The chief Industrial area of |
Canada, along the St. Lawrence and I
Ihe Great Lakes in Quebec and On- I
tnrio. Is an appendage to the world's
greatest Industrial area ln thc adjacent United States.   Is there sufficient
reason for this?     Cannot our Industrial  operations  he  made   to depend
upon our own coal resources rather
than  upon those of our    neighbor?
Will  uot our   important   Industrial
operations of thc future centre round
the coal areas of Alberta, Nova Scotia alld British Columbia?   These are
questions   worthy   of   some   serious
study."
I The feature is one of the big releases of Associated First National
3nd was produced h..* Principal Pictures Corporation. Bert Lytell, one
of the most popular stars of the screen
enacts the tille role which Cohan play
ed In ihe footlight offering. Surrounded by an all-star cast. Lytell is said
to do some nf his finest work in this
production. Blanche Sweet ls the
"girl iu the case" and other players
or Importance include Bryant, Washburn. Forrest Hobinson. Warde Crane,
Maryon Aye, Frances Raymond, William Conklln, Victor Potcl and many
more of equal note.
"The Meanest Man in the World"
in a catch title, for instead of being
mean, he ls so soft-hearted that he
finds himself a failure as an attorney. He cannot say "no" to anybody.
How "the meanest man" finally succeeds In business and also how lie
succeeds in winning the hand 'of "the
girl in tlie case" provides one of the
most absorbing features presented at
this theatre in a long time.
The shingle market which sjx weeks
ago was threatened with a disastrous
break, since that time has shown a
rather remarkable revival.
The situation then was so bad and
the demand in all markets for shin- i ceived a letter, from a woman in Bos
gles so slack, that practically every ; t0|) a~8 follows. I
mill in tlie province cut production
50 per cent. It was agreed at tliat
time to make a complete shutdown
in order to get rid of stocks which
wore alarmingly large.
Before this decision went into ef-
feet, however, orders commenced to
come In, and lhe demand during the
past month lias been steadily increas
ing. Most of tlie mills have been pul
bnck to full production. Many of
them running day and night, and In
one or two cases mills have been unable to take care of all the orders
which ofi'ered.
The demand is largely In tlie East
for British Columbia shingles. The
Washington and California deninini
has also improved, but this market Is
chiefly taken care of by United States
Pacific Coast mills.
New Car Service
CAR FOR HIRE HAY OR MGHT
M TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
VVM.MElilllFIICLI)    Proprietor
COOIJ  ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue. Cumberland
2nd 9—3290
Total: 6375—Par 70.
•These holes wil] be ready for
play in 1925 with one temporary
hole 290 yards connecting the 11th
and 18th.
Knit
MacLtrtn
Chectc Co.
Limited, Montreal
Send me, Im.
dW.ja toS.rv.lt"
T. Malpass
GENERAL  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Storo
SERVICE 18 OUR MOTTO
OR PHONE IS UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
fSThe Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite   llo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practloal   Barber,  and   Hairdresser,  Shampooing,  Singeing.
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay
ton as follows:
Dear Bert:
I see you are the meanest man
in the lilms. My husband has lt
all over you. He gets $150 a
week and rides in a taxi to go a
block. I get nothing. Last week
he would not give mo enough
money to have a tooth pulled,
inn punched it out. Can you
heal that?
Bert can't beat tbat. but answered
the Boston lady, advising her to beat
It from ber better half.
This First National release will be
seen at tbe Ilo-llo Theatre on Monday
and Tuesday, April 27 and 28.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
=E
35 SS
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING   AND   PRESSINf.
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Ladies' & Gent's Tailoring
£. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue
!
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike  sarvls*.
20   rooms,   electrically   hMto-l.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Fb»ne II.
R. TATII, Hui|«
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   mid   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
 i
THE FOREST
SHALL WE CROP IT
AMI CONSERVE OCR FOREST CAPITAL
STABILIZE INDUSTRY
ENSURE FUTURE PROSPERITY or
SHALL WE MINE IT
AND DEPLETE Ol II FOREST CAPITAL
UNDERMINE  INDUSTRY
MENACE FUTURE PROSPERITY
National Interest and National Security demand the
Treatment of our Forest Resources as a Crop
THK OBSTACLE to proper Imiln I Is FIRE
THE CAUSE of tin* Is CARELESSNESS
THK CURE of carelessness Is AROUSED PUBLIC OPINION
WE JUST ALL PLAY OUR PART
HON, CHARLES STEWART, Minister of tin* Interior
UaN arc
jEtfft-C HOR
Chor-donaldson
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM MONTREAL
To Plymouth-) licrbeuru'-l.millon
Aritonla, May 9,   June   19,   July   IS;
Ausouia. May 211.   June   27.   Aug.   1;
Ascania. June li. July 11. Aug. 15.
To Liverpool
Aurniiia.  May   2.  29,  June  26;   Lan-
castrla, May IB.
To Glasgow
Saturnla, May 1, 29. June 26; Letltia,
May 8, Athenla; May 22,
FROM SEW YORK
To Queenstown and Liverpool
Laconla, Apr. 25; Carmania, May 2;
Samaria. .May 9; Caronla, May 16.
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Maurotanln, Apr. 22. May 13. June 3;
Aqultanla  Apr.  29,  May 2n, June 9;
Uorengarla. May 6, 27. June 17.
To Londonderry and Glasgow
Cameronla, Apr. 25, Tuscanla, May 2;
Assyria. May 9; Columbia, May 16.
To ri.inoiilli.( Inrlinnnr.London
Albania, Jun,. 18, July 18.
To I'lj inn ul !i-( hii Im org- llunihiiiY
I'lilanla. May 23 June 27. Aug. 1.
Money orders   and   drafts   nt   lowest
rates.     Full Information from Agents
or Company's OfBces, 622 Hastings St.
When you are In need of a
I'liiiiililng k Mealing Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phono 121
Courtenay
Phone UT
Cumberland
Your   needs   will   receive   Immediate
attention.
The       The Judge:¥ouId He Prove anALibi or Bring h. Character Witnesses
a
Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1925.
Camp Craft and Wood Lore
Last week, in Camp Craft and Wootl
Lore, dedicated by the Canadian National Railways to those who would
answer the call of the open, we dealt
with what to wear, duffle bags, tarpaulins and how to carry equipment.
This week we follow the camper on
his holiday spent In the open, enjoying nature's wonderful bigness, freshness and wholesomeness in the won-
derous ways of the wild.
LOCATION OF CAMP SITES
Water—The one thing of most Importance in locating a camp site is
a supply of water. This is absolutely
essential except at temporary camps
where a supply of water is provided
in barrels or canteens.
When camps urt. to be more or less
permanent in nature tbey should be
located at a point far enough away
from and above the source of water
supply to prevent its contamination
by contact wilh camp refuse if Ibis is
allowed to accumulate, Uofuse should,
however, either he burned or buried.
J/uel—This ls ihe next Important
Item to consider. Ordinarily, where
camps are established in wooded regions, there will he found sufficient
dead and down material to provide fin-
all fuel needed either for heating or
cooking purposes. Hut if no wood is
available and a camp is tn be made in
open country, dry stock manure will
prove an excellent substitute.
Accessibility—This also demands
close attention. If transportation ot
equipment and supplies is to be by
means of wagons, it is especially desirable to have the ramp located at a
point where wagons may reach it
without difficulty anil where they may
even have plenty of room in which lo
be backed or turned about. The camp
may be located in a much rougher
place, however, If pack animals are to
be used. In either event it should
be so located as to provide easy access
to whatever work is to be done.
Protection—After the question ol*
water, fuel and accessibility have been
satisfactorily settled, the one of protection should nexl be considered. For
example: Winter camps located on
north slope where little sunlight can
penetrate through possibly heavy timber prove very dreary and uncomfortable. On the other hand, summer
camps located on bare exposed BOUlb
slopes are equally uncomfortable,
In the heavy limber before you
make camp examine the trees that
could possibly fall across your camp.
If you find any dead stubs or dangerously leaning ones, look for another
site. Dont camp ton near water level
on mountain streams in freshen time.
Don't camp on or at the bottom of a
course of a snow or rock slide.
When camps must lie established in
country where stock grazes at large,
it is always advisable to construct
some sort of fence about tho tents or
other equipment.
WHAT TO EAT
In a later edition, we will publish
a general ration of simple foods a day
per man. some simple recipes, how to
cook meats, fish and vegetables, cooking utensils required aud the cook
lire.
HOW TO SLEEP WELL
Good bedding is important, because
nothing takes more from endurance
and enjoyment than lo9s of sleep.
Where weight is an object, nothing
surpasre:-, a sleeping bag. The best
ones have an outer bug of canvas,
tanalite or balloon sllk, with two inner bags of eiderdown or other good
blanket or quilling. According to the
weather the sleeper lias more of the
coverings over him to keep warm or
beneath bim for softness.
Any blankets or quills can be made
Into sleeping bags, linking tbe water
and wind-proof cover, by folding them
lengthwise and sewing or fastening
witli horse blanket safety pins.
Without any such device, and the
bidding Insufficient, the greatest
warmth can be had by lying dowp mil
drawing Hie blankets over you as a
coverlet; then lilting the legs without
bending al knee and tucking the covering smoothly beneath them from
either side, also folding far end under
the feet; then lifting hips and tucking in similarly; and finally same a'
the shoulders, so tliat the edges a**e
overlapped and bound smoothly for
the length beneath you.
Two light blankets are warmer than
one heavy one. Better than blankets
are quilts of eiderdown or wool wilh
extra coveringof denim or still mor.*
weather-proof material.
A 7x7 ten-oz. canvas, folded, makes
a good ground cloth and extra cover,
while also useful as a pack cover
when travelling, ol* for rain shelter.
For auto and packhorse- trips, although ton heavy for hiking, ara
practical folding cots and thc ever-
popular pneumatic mattress. Hrusb
beds are easily made from feathery
coniferous boughs. Other boughs
are useless. I'se none bigger at
butl I ban vour thumb, and these only
well-covered b/ smaller tips. Collect good supply lirst. If possible.
confine enlire bed by four to six inch
logs pegged iii place before brush lay
ing is begun and with foot log resting
o„ lhe side logs. Lay largest boughs
in course with "bow" up overlapping
so butts are towards foot of lied, and
except at very foot, covered hy tops
of other courses. Keep pushing in
smaller boughs same way; ajways
lengthwise of bed, "bowed" up. and
butts thrust down and covered by
tops. Finally, sift smallest evenly
over the whole. Try bed and build
up weak spots.
If you have to sleep directly on the
ground, choose a level place  (so you
won't   slide),   free   from    roots   and
' scoop hip and shoulder boles.
If the lire must be kept up all night
I for  warmth, have your bead toward
log or tree to reflect beat and stop
! wind   (for  you  should  be   windward
of Hie fire to avoid smoke and sparks)
and have the fire five or six feet from
'. your feet In an open place where you
I can   walk  around   it  and   where   no
log, tree or rotten wood can catch
from it. llefore dark drag up a good
supply of the biggest logs and chunks
you can get, also locate more that ..ou
can reach in fbe dark if necessary.
Sit up late burning your smallest
stuff. Save the biggest to keep fire
longest without replenishing during
the night. Keep your shoes away
from the lire, even If wet.
While permissible on horse and
auto trips, tents seldom pay for being
carried on man-bac'.t. If taken at all
ihey should 'ne small and of oiled
silk, They are unnecessary unless
it rains, and then shelter is provided
by lighter ponchos, tarpaulin's or like
covers elsewhere suggested as pari
of the bedding equipment and better
adapted for this in good weather. They
can be stretched, lean-to fashion, facing the lire, back to lhe wind.
Especially on slopes, always provide drainage around tents and shel-
ler. else floor and bedding may be
Hooded. Tent poles need not lie taken
iu tlie woods. For an A-tent have the
rope long enough to serve as ridgepole, knotted inside each cud grommel
of the tent, and passing out with al
least ten feet to spare at each end lo
hitch around an improvised pole anil
then guy to a ground peg. Often a
tree serves for the end away from Ihe
fire.
(To lie Continued Next Week)
J. HAWTHORNTHWAITE*
"~       SPEAKS "ON 'MINiNG
"As long us taxation In llritish Columbia continues so severe as is Hie
ease today, we need not expect, to find
capital floating into the country and
finding Investment in our mines," declared Mr. J. H, Hawthornthwaite in
addressing members of the Kiwanis
Club on "Mining" last week in the
Chamber of Commerce auditorium.
Mr. Hawthornthwaite spoke of tlie
succession   duties   assessed   against
foreign estate Interested in British
Columbia mines, Interested In British
Columbia mines, as asserted that the
geneial knowledge of these heavy imposts was responsible for foreign
money not coming into the Province
In  larger quantltes.
Value uf Hlnes
The speaker also contended that th*
Federal Government at Ottawa had no
right to impose an income tax In this
province, and suggested that if an
appeal to the court was taken, mining concerns and citizens in general
would be greatly relieved.
Emphasizing the great value of the
British Columbia minerals, Mr Hawthornthwaite pointed out that the
worth of gold in the Province was approximately $200,000,000; Bilver $00,-
,1110,1100; lead, $160,000,000; copper
$18,000,000; coal and coke $200,000,000
building" stones $30,000,000, and mis»
cellaneous, $800,000.
"Over 250,000 square miles of mineral land in British Columbia are unexplored and very little prospected.
Wealth Is lying right at our doors. Let
us grasp our opportunity and develop
this great natural resource, assist ln
bringing back good times and providing employment for many of our unemployed," said Mr. Hawthornthwaite.
The speaker observed that the reason why scores of mining companies
went Into liquidation was because the
public had been Invited to bet large
sums of real money that certain mere
claims would prove to be mines.
Properly organized mining corporation however, that operated on practical methods had made large profits, j
aid Mr. Hawthornthwaite.
WW
A few drops of Shiloh brings quick
relief to throat irritation, hoarseness and coughing. Sbiloh is economical—a favorite remedy for
over fifty years. At til druggists,
30c, 60c and $1.20.
SHILOK
r for
COUGHS
Wilh lhe crtan
Led In!
vfc/otttfeedtt
FREE RECIPE BOOK
Write the Borden Co., Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
Job
Printing
—of the
Better Kind
Obtainable at the office
of the
Cumberland
Islander
Phone 35
r
Job Printing that won't stick is
not worth any more than that
kind of a friend.
Use Celery King
a gentle laxative"Tea"
that purifies the blood
^Anm^rumgin^O^n^SOc;
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Every brash stroke
leaves beauty behind
A B-H English Paint can is literally tilled with
beauty. The very look of its contents as you pry
the lid off suggests quality and the beauty that
comes from quality.
This first impression is quickly confirmed once you
start to paint with it. Every brush-stroke is a
pleasure. Tlie dull, drab surface comes to life, fairly glowing in the smooth, immaculate coat of
B-H English Paint.
You cannot go wrong with B-H English Paint.
Time has proved its outstanding ability to beautify,
protect and preserve, It is the surest and in the
long run the cheapest form of protection against
time and the elements It ends thc need of frequent
re paintings.
For sale By
ALEX MihKINNON
-   W.M. If, MeLKNNAN, Jit,,
Painter A  Dftcorator
Cnml,crlnnd, IU'.
Vf-M
Ptttfrr
'.'minion
n •/-im*
) Oimti
M,'.r.i
*.:":»!:,',
S$i
:t3
SSS,"
hjtz
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KII.N DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 134X Courtenay
I Olllce: 169 Cumberland
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
Phones 1 and (il
■m
The Short Route Between Pacific Coast
and the
OLD COUNTRY
is
Continental Limited
9.50 P.M., Daily, From Vancouver
All Steel Equipment       Radio       Unexcelled Service
Bookings on Any Transatlantic Steamers
Reeemtlone and Full  Information  From
E. W. BICKLE
Dunsmuir Ave, — CUMBERLAND —    Telephone 85
MANN'S BAKERY
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Etc.
APPETIZING FRUIT PIES
Our Famed Scotch Oat Cakes Need no Recommending
and our
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls Are Sure to Please
WEDDING, CHRISTENING & BIRTHDAY CAKES
MADE TO ORDER
at
MANN'S — CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 18 Phone 18 FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1025.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
frf
Ilo=IIo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
presents the following
programme for the period
April 24 to May 2
agjiisiEigaira
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, APRIL 24th-25th
ADULTS 50<*
CHILDREN 25<
44
RICHARD BARTHELMESS, in
THE FIGHTING BLADE
55
"Glorious Days of Love and Adventure"
THE ROMANCE AGE—THE KNIGHT, BEAU GAL LANf OF  HIS  DAY,  WITH  BLADE  AT  SIDE,
READY TO BE DRAWN FOR GOD AND COUNTRY, FOR LADY FAIR OR OPPRESSED FOR FIGHT OR
FROLIC!
Also a 2-reel Comdey and the weekly News Reel
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2.30 P.M., Admission: 35c and  15c
Monday - Tuesday
APRIL 27 - 28
Br-r! I'm mean an  I meanit!
THE MEANEST MAN WHO EVER WORE SHOE
LEATHER—BR-R-R-R HOW MEAN THAT MAN
WAS, YES WAS, UNTIL OIL WELLS, AND BANKRUPTS AND LOVE LAUGHED OUT LOUD AT HIM
AND THEN—YOU'LL GO WILD OVER
CEORGE M. COHAN'S
Successful stage production now on the screen with a
wallop.
BERT LYTELL
BLANCHE SWEET
BRYANT WASHBURN
AND TWENTY OTHER STARS
in the cast
Presented by Principal Pictures Corp.,  Sol  Lesser,
President; by Augustin MacHugh; Suggested by the
the playlet of Everett S. Ruskay.
Bfa
Also A Good Comedy
ADULTS £5c CHILDREN 15c
■emif^*—r-.;-Jir--v     iffy-"-r.A.*..■■-*»* ■,« ■ aain •r^aavam±MrrMrj.-&z:-
l
Wed. and Thurs.
APRIL 29 - 30
HE'S BACK AGAIN IN THE FASTEST, FUNNIEST
ROMANCE OF HIS SCREEN CAREER. MORE
THRILLING THAN "RIDE FOR YOUR LIFE,"
MOSE "LOVE-MAKING" THAN IN "FORTY HORSE
HAWKINS."
HOOT
GIBSON
IN A ROMANCE OF THE TENT SHOWS
The SAWDUST
TRAIL
From the story, "Courtin* Calamity" by
WM. DUDLEY PELLEY
Presented by CARL LAEMMLE
Directed by EDWARD SEDGWICK
CLARENCE, THE LITTLE "TENDERFOOT" FROM
THE EAST, MEETS THE TOUGH COW-GIRL OF
THE WEST AND TAMES HER WITH THE WILDEST RIDE THAT YOU HAVE EVER SEEN ON THK
SCREEN. DOWN THE ROAD THEY GO, AROUNU
THE BEND AND OVER THE CLIFF FOR THE BIG-
GEST THRILL OK THE YEAR.
A UNIVERSAL-GIBSON PRODUCTION
AND COMEDY
ADULTS 35<> CHILDREN 15<-
 COMING SOON	
A NEW SERIAL EVERY WEEK
"The Fast Express"
DON'T MISS THE OPENING CHAPTER
WATCH FOR STARTING  DATE
Friday -- Saturday
MAY 1 - 2
EVERY WOMAN FACES THE TRAGEDY TO BE
LEFT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE LADDER
SEE WHAT THIS WIFE DID!
SEE
VIRGINIA
VALLI
IN
UP
THE LADDER
Also a good Comedy and the
International News Reel
ADULTS 50c
CHILDREN 35c
32 PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1926.
New
Spring
Goods
Ladles' House Dresses, aboul 30 !:
the lot, six different styles to cboo-io
from.     Thoy are mude from a goad ,
quality  Gingham,  two   pocketB  and
smart collar.     Price, each $'l>Vf
Smart Voile Dresses In assorted
stripes, very now. Price     $6,95
New Coats for the Spring, quite a
variety  of  styles,  mostly  made  from
Velours, real smart    Prices from $K*I
New Bells in Patent Leather, in col
ors Black, White, Red and Brown.
Price, each     iJ5c
Gingham Collar Sets, In an assortment of shades. Prices per set,
from  $1.00 i
Ladies' New Ties, made of Crepe da [
Chene in the latest colorings, a good
selection   to   choose   from.      Prices,
each _  76u and 06fl
White Voile Dresses, just received,
a splendid assortment of White Voile ;
Dresses for the little tots, ages to 2
years.      Prices 91,25, $1,75 ami $3,50
Children's Black Sateen Rompers,
trimmed with an assortment of harmonizing colors, ages 2 to G years.
Price  $1.75
Ladies' Flannel Dresses in some Of ■
the newest shades, smartly made and
priced  reasonable.      See them.
New Curtain Nets in a splendid var- ,
lety of designs just what you would
desire for Spring Cleaning.
New Cretonnes in a splendid array
Of colorings, adds attraction to your I
room and freshens things up.
New Linoleums, for the door. We .
also carry a 4 yard wide design suit- I
able for large rooms.
Sutherland's
Now, for Another Masterpiece
Social and Personal
C<iiimi\  Electoral District
Notice is hereby given that I shall,
on Monday, the ISth day May. 1925,
at the hour of in o'clock In the forenoon, at ihe Court-house Cumberland,
B.C., hold a sitting of the Court ot
Revision for the purpose of revising
the list of voters for said electoral
district, and hearing and determining
any and all objections lo the retention
of any name on tlie said list, or to the
registration as a voteor of any applicant for registration, and for the
other purposes set forth in the "Provincial Elections Act.''
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 17th
day of April, l*^;,.
CHAS. II. GRANT,
Deputy  Registrar of Voters,
16-19. Comox Electoral District
Don't fall to attend the Scotch Concert in the St. George's Presbyterian
Church. Cumberland, on \Vednesda\,
April 29th, An excellent program
has been arranged.
bARTHELMESS, SCREEN'S
ROMANTIC ACTOR IN
"THE FIGHTING BLADE"
Our suspicions tliat Richard Barth-
eltness would some day burst upon
the lllm firmament as the bright particular star oi' romance roles has, wo
believe, been confirmed. To ih. at
least, he occupies a niche of his own.
This reflection is prompted by our
immense satisfaction in his performance In his latest production, "The
Fighting Blade," a Klrst National picture which will be at the ilo-llo The-j
aire this Friday and Saturday, produced by John S. Rohertson who, by
the way, was likewise producer of
"The Bright Shawl," recent starring
of Barthelmess. Recollections of
this young star's homespun masterpiece, "Tol'ahle David," his portrayal
in tlie sea classic "Fury," and his:
more recent triumph in "The Bright
Shawl,' will flash through memory as
you visit Thu Ilo-llo Theatre in
pleasurable anticipation to witness
"The Fighting Blade." And though
expecting mucli from the star in his
portrayal of the valiant Kersten-
broock. the celebrated Flemish duelist, who proved an invaluable ally to
Cromwell in overthrowing Charles 1
and establishing popular government
in England in 1649, you will be do-
lightt'ully surprised, for Barthelmess
did not act tliis Roundhead youth, he
lived it. Lived It even to the extent of wearing his own hair in a
fashion which was called close-crop-
pcl in the Cromwellian era buj which
Is mighty long for a man today. And
as we ponder the love of art which
would iniluence a young man to let
his hair grow and wear it bobbed-
fur it is bobbed in present-day flapper style—Wfl inwardly applaud Bar-
thelmeiss1 courage and sit at ease in
our chair, confident that such a courageous youth of today will perform
skillfully the role of a courageou*;
youth of tbe 17th century. Trulv,
Barthelmess carries us back to the
hectic days of conflict between Round
head and Cavalier and makes us oblivious for the nonce of the present
day, but the utter realism of his mai-
velous performance.
Of course, credit must he spoken
for tiios0 who support him. for thos-i
who invented the production with that
Cromwellian atmosphere which framed the illusion. The Thomislne of
Dorothy Mackaill is a splendid foil
in tlie romance sequences. Miss
MacKaill's performance pulses with
youthful ardor, ingenuously piquant,
naive. Tlie Cromwell of Frederick
Burton is an intelligent study, whlcn
is uot suprising to those conversant
with his past performances. Three
sterling actors, Lee Baker. Morgan
Wallace and Bradley Barker, in the
roles furnishing the dramatic opposition—the Karl of Staversham, Lord
Krisey and "Roaring Watt" Musgrove
and we might add a fourth, Stuart
Sage as Viscount Carlsford, are admirable in their villainy. What
greater tribute could be paid?
Beat the High
Cost of Living—
WHILE EGGS ARE CHEAP
WATERGLASS
FOR PRESERVING EGGS
35 cents per tin
ONE  TIN   IS  SUFFICIENT   FOR
PRESERVING 2 GROSS OF EGGS
Lang's Drug Store
-THE REXALL KODAK STORE-
"It PAYS tn DEAL at LANG'S'
Wus Vi'iliiiu* Drotiiei*.
.Mr. and Mrs. R, Keeler returned to
Victoria on Tuesday after spending
the week-end in ' Cumberland the
guests ol' Mr. und Mrs. H. Keeler.
Don't lull to attend the Scotch Concert in the St. George's Presbyterian
eh in cli. Cumberland, on Wednesday,
April 2Dth, An excellent program
lias been arranged,
i'riini  Winnipeg.
.Mr. U. Levi, of Winnipeg, was ill
the city on Monday and Tuesday in
company with Mr. It. Kaplansky wliu
'.vas pa., lug his regular business visit,
is Business Visitor.
Mr. Oeorge Uarton, of Victoria, la
a business visitor to Cumberland.
Returns to Vancouver.
Miss Agnes Potter returned to tlie
Terminal City on Saturday last after
a  week's  vacation   with   relatives  In
this city.
Returns From Visit.
Mr. Dave Wilson returned on Tuesday  from  Vancouver,  where he had
been spending a short visit with his
brother.
Are Hack in City.
Alderman nnd Mrs. John J, Potter
are back to the city after a short visit to Vancouver.
From Ciiiirlenaj
Mrs. T.  Hickson and son Billy, oi
Courtenay,   were    Wednesday   aftei-
noon  visitors  to  Cumberland.
ltetums From .Nunalnio.
Master John Richardson returned
on Saturday last from Nanaimo where
he had been vacationing with relative:.
From Lad) smith.
Mrs. inu llickertoii and daughter
Doreen, who spent the Easter vacation with friends in Ladysmith, returned to this city on last Saturday's
train.
Returns From Vuc'itlon.
Mr. H. E. Murray returned on Sunday evening last from a week's vacation spent in Vancouver and Victoria.
School Teacher Returns.
Miss Pearl Hunden, ot the staff ot
the   Cumberland   Public   School,   returned  to  the    city    on    Saturday's
train.
From Vancouver.
Miss T. Gallivan returned from Van
couver on  Saturday,  where she had
been spending tlie Easter week.
To School In Victoria.
Mr. P. I). Graham, who lias been
spending tlie holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Graham, returned to Victoria on Saturday last
in order to resume his school studies
l.eit For Home Monday.
Mrs. T. H. Western, after spending
the Easter vacation with relatives in
Cumberland, returned to ber home on
.Monday last.
Return to Normal School
Miss Mildred Calnan, Miss Margaret
MacNaughton, and Mr. Clifford Horwood, of Minto, and Miss Florence
Jones of Union Bay, left on Saturday's train to resume their studios at
the Victoria Normal School.
From Nunuimo.
Miss Olive Richardson, Miss Beth
Horbury and Miss Harriet Horbury
returned on Sunday last from Nanaimo
whore they had been visiting during
the vacation week.
To Nanaimo.
Mr. Cyril Michell, who had been
spending the Easter vacation in Cumberland with bis sister, Miss Marjorie
returned to N'anaimo last Sunday.
ave
on your
Groceries
One way to save on your
groceries without reducing
your menu Is to order them
from Frelone's. We guarantee our qualltyaR well as
price.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. iith and llunsniiilr.
Returns to lit).
Miss C. Uichardson ,who has been
visiting her sister in Vancouver, returnee, home on Saturday, bhe wus
accompanied from Nanaimo by Miss
Madge ur.,an.
Co I'ort Alherni.
Mr. it. C. Lang and Mr. Malcolm
Stewart letl by motor on Monday last
ior Port Alberni ln order to open thu
new Drug Store which Mr. Lang has
had buiil in thut city.
t'oiivnlesclng In City.
Miss Charlotte Dallos arrived in
the city on 1 uesUuy last iu order to
convalesce from her recent operation
in V Ictorla. her sister, Mrs. Gordon
accompanied her from the Capital
City.
Paid Visit to Sister.
Mrs. II. bpittall, of Vancouver, was
in the city during the week on a visit
to hor sister, Mrs. S. Boothman.
Mr. and Mrs. J. X. Willemar le£t
last Thursday morning for a three
weeks' vacation with friends and relatives on the mainland. While th*y
are away they Intend to pay a visit
io their son Mr. Austin Willemar who
is at present undergoing treatment tit
Tranqullle, B.C.
Goalie Returns From Vancouver
Tom Blair, goal-tender for the Cumberland United Soccer team, returned
from Vancouver on Thursday evening
lhe popular elongated goalie stopped over in Vancouver after last Saturday's game and visited a well-
known mainland specialist, having his
injured  knee  thoroughly overhauled.
Ear Phone for Deaf People. Free
Demonstration, for short time only at
L. It. Stevens, Jcwelery Store, Ilo-llo
Itldg.. Cumberland.
Held Daffodil Tea
A Daffodil Tea was held on Wednesday afternoon at the home of Mrs.
Harling, 303 Wluerniere Avenue, under the auspices of the Ladles Aid ot
St. George's Presbyterian Church.
Many attended the event which was
highly successful.
"SNOOKS vs. FOOZLE"
ABLY PRESENTED
Much latent talent was brought out
on Wednesday evening when the play
"Snooks versus Foozle" was presented in tlie Methodist Church under the
auspices of the Canadian Girls In
Training. As advertised, the play
was indeed one of continuous and explosive fun. It appears that Mr.
Snooks, wishing to obtain a wife,
made application at a marrlagj
agency, run by Mr. Foozle, and paid
his fee of five dollars for which the
agency gave him the names of five
ladies who were desirous of securing
n husband. Mr. Snooks found fault
with all five and consequently demanded back his five dollars, and as
Mr. Foozle would not comply with the
demand Snooks took the matter to
court where he lost the case and was
advised by the Judge to select one of
the live for his wife as soon as possible. Thc curtain went down on nn
hilarious scene In which the five damsels were hearing down on Snooks
with cries of "Take me! Take mo!"
The priclpal parts were taken by
the following: Snooks, Dave Robert
son; Foozle, Norman Frelone j Counsel for the plaintiff, Miss Jean Smith;
Counsel for the accused, Miss Edna
Gear; Judge Mr. Alex Henderson;
Clerk. Jack Hill; Police Officer, Ernie
MacDonald; Foreman of the Jury,
Miss Toshlo Iwasa. While the Jury
was deliberating Ihe case, the audience was entertained by Rev. J. R. But
ler, who recited, and Miss Vivian As-
peBy and Mr. James Walker who entertained wilh piano and violin selections.
FOR SALE—House suitable for two
families or for boarding house. For
particulars apply 207 Derwent Ave.,
Cumberland, or write Box 502, Cumberland. 17.
FOR SALE—4 acres land, good fencing, 4 room modern house with
pantry and wash house, 2 large up-
to-date chicken coops, 125 laying
pullets, 300 Leghorn chicks, outbuildings. This place is making a
return of about $40.00 per month.
Cash payment with balance as rent
Snap. For particulars apply Alex
Brown, Trent Road, near Cumberland. 16.
Extra Specials for the
Week-End
3 to 1 Milk, 2 for 25c.
Davies Corned Beef. 2 tins for 55c.
Davies Potted Meats, 3 tins for 25c.
Quaker Pork and Beans, 3 tins for ..._  25c.
Shaker Salt, per pkt 15c. 7 tins for $1.00
Canned Pears, 2-lb. tin 35c 3 tins for $1.00
Kippered Herring in Tomato Sauce, 2 for 35c.
and 3 for 25c.
Kippered Snacks, 3 for 25c.
New Brunswick Sardines, 3 for 25c.
Fancy Orange Marmalade, 1-lb tins 30c.
or 2 for 55c.
Full Stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in Season,
always on hand.
Matt Brown's Grocery
PHONE 38
Mercantile Store Co.
Telephone 133    READ & OSBORNE       Cumberland
PAY!
CASH
AND
SAVE
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Mercantile Special Wend Tea, I lb  050
Malklns Best Tea, 1 lb  750
i King Oscar Sardines
151
Malklns Best Marmalade, 4's   700
Quaker Pears, 2's   800
Ilordens St. Chillies Milk, tails  120
llolsum   Pickles,   Various    400
| Malkin's Best Baking Powder, 12-oz. tin .... 15*p j
okiiungau Tomatoes, mi's, 2 for  850
Comox Butter, 2 lbs  050
Libby's and Del Monte pineapple, 2 for  350
Palm Olive Soup, 3 for   250
Libby's Potted Meat, %'s, 3 for 250
| Clark's Beef Steak and Onions, l's 30<£ j
Stclna Corn Beef, 12 oz -  200
Clark's Cambridge Sausage, 15 oz  800
Macaroni, l's pkts, 3 for  850
I Empress Jam, Gr'gage, Prune & Plum, 4*s 70tJ |
Dates, new ,3 lbs  250
Cooking Figs, per lb _  IOc
Potatoes, best grade, per 100-lb. sack  $2.10
Kraft Cheese, 5-lb. box  $2.00
Quick Quaker Oats    32c
Quaker Cornflakes, 2 for   25p
LETTUCE, RADISH, CABBAGE. SPINACH, GREEN  ONIONS,
ETC., FRESH IN.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068703/manifest

Comment

Related Items