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The Cumberland Islander Dec 20, 1919

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 .A & f
MI        I
Ui
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
iaw»*»
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1919.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
TWENTY-EIGHTH  YEAR—No.   51.
MACHINE GUN BATTERY
HAS BEEN AUTHORIZED
WITH BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS AT VICTORIA. A COMPANY WILL BE DISTRIBUTED OVER THE ISLAND
WITH BATTERIES AT DUNCAN, NANAIMO AND
COURTENAY—SUITABLE BUILDING TO BE SECURED
AND ACTIVE RECRUITING COMMENCED AT ONCE.
The definite announcement is made that the department of
militia and defence ia reorganizing the non-perhianent active
militia and one of the first steps to be taken affecting this district
is the formation of a machine gun brigade with headquarters at
Victoria. A company of this unit will be distributed over the
Island with batteries at Duncan, Nanaimo and Courtenay. Capt.
J. M. Cumming, adjutant of the brigade, was in Cumberland and
Courtenay last week-end, and it was decided to form a battery with
headquarters in the latter place, as being most centrally located
for the whole district.
The strength will be three officers and forty non-commissioned
officers and men. The battery will be-equipped with eight guns of
' the Vickers-Maxim type, as used in the Great War.
Temporary quarters will be rented in Courtenay for the battery, but it is the intention of the militia department to eventually
build an armory there for the use of the battery.
Anyone interested in machine gunnery can obtain further
details from Mr. E. J. Greig at the customs office. Membership is
not confined to ex-machine gunners or even to returned men, although the services of anyone with a knowledge of modern machine
gunnery will help in the efficiency of the battery. It is hoped that
many of the young men of the district will become interested in
the project.
In conversation with one of the officers connected with the
new unit the information was elicited that the selection of Courtenay as the headquarters of this district was because that place is
the most central of any in the district to be served. It is understood that many of the senior officers were partial to Cumberland,
and some suggested that a separate unit be formed at Merville
with another at Cumberland, but this plan did not meet with official
favor.
Extracts from the official communication regarding the organization of the machine gun brigades throughout the Dominion
state:
"As a first step in the reorganization of the non-permanent
active militia, authority under a general order is given to organize
a machine gun brigade in each military district, in addition a motor
machine gun brigade in military district No. 4, and another motor
machine gun brigade in military district No. 11, and a machine gun
squadron in military district No. 10.
"All these units are to be .city corps. In order to perpetuate
the identity and the splendid traditions of the machine gun service
of the Canadian corps and the Canadian cavalry brigade, the 1st
Machine Gun Squadron of the Canadian Cavalry Brigade will be
perpetuated in the Canadian militia as the 1st Canadian Machine
Gun Squadron, with its headquarters at Winnipeg in military district No. 10.
"The 2nd Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade of the Canadian Corps troops will be perpetuated in the Canadian militia as
the 2nd Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade, with its headquarters at Vancouver in military disti'ict No. 11.  *
"The 11th Canadian Machine Gun Brigade in military district
No. 11, with headquarters at Vancouver.
Changes Contemplated in Simon
Leiser Company's Local Business
We are Informed on reliable authority that there are changes ln contemplation In the Simon Leiser & Compnny business. For some considerable time
this has been receiving the consideration of the head office, and now they have
arrived at a decision to retire from thc dry goods, boots and shoes and hardware end of the business, and to devote all their energies In extending their
grocery department.
While this decision has been arrived nt, especially regarding the dry
goods, the department will be continued under their nnmc for some considerable time, and when the stock has been considerably reduced, we understand
it will be taken over from the Simon Leiser Company and run as n separate
department.
The only departments to go nt present are the boots nnd shots and hardware, which are to be cleared out Immediately.
The grocery department will be given some very much needed room Immediately the hardware Is cleared out, and the whole energies of thc staff
wlll be concentrated in enlarging and extending that department, and as a
consequence It ls the hope of tbe firm that greater service and attention will
be given to the grocery department.
THERE WILL BE DANCING
ON CHRISTMAS EVE
Tho management of the llo-Ilo
Dance Hall have completed arrangements for the dance to he given by
them nn Christmas eve. Thc hall will
be decorated for the occasion and the
floor will be placed In the best possible shape. The usual splendid orchestra will also be augmented so
that devotees of this fascinating pastime will be assured of a pleasant evening.
which will commence at tbe conclusion of the pictures.
(aril nf Thanks.
Mrs. 13, Williams and family wish
(o express their appreciation of   the
many kindnesses and tokens of sytn-
I pathy extended to them in tholr rc-
i cent bereavement; also to the Cum-
j berlaud City Band for their kindness
j in attending the funeral   of her late
husband, who wus a member of Hint
n'gnnlzation.
One Shew Tonight.
There will bo only one continuous
show at thc llo-Ilo Theatre thla ovo-
nlng,"from 6:30 to 9 o'clock. This alteration in the usual programme is
made necessary by tho boxing bouts
DIsCOUIll Term lixlellilcd.
For this mouth only the Cumberland Electric Lighting Company has
extended tbe time during which discounts may be secured by patrons
from tbe 18th to the 28tb. This concession will be appreciated,
Borden to Remain at Helm
Ottawa, Dec. 19.—It is officially announced that Sir
Robert Borden will retain the premiership but that he
will take a long rest. This decision is the result of
pressure brought to bear by the friends of the Premier
and the desire of the Unionist party. Several eastern
papers say it was the inability of the cabinet to agree
upon a leader that largely influenced the Premier's colleagues to insist upon his remaining in offlce. Sir
Robert will be absent all next session, commencing in
February, and a temporary leader is to be selected.
This will likely delay cabinet reconstruction, the establishment of a permanent Unionist party and the formation of a platform.
Great Aviator
Loses His Life
Flying in France
Special Despatch to The Islander.
Rouen, Dec. 19.—Capt. Sir John Al-
cock, the first aviator to make a nonstop airplane flight across the Atlantic, died on Friday as a result of Injuries received when his plane
crashed on Thursday near Cottovrard,
department of the Seine, Inferieure,
Normandy. Capt. Alcock, who was flying in a waterplane, was following the
Seine at the time of the accident, intending to alight on the river opposite the Grand Palace for an aviation
exhibition.
DR. CHRISTIE SURPRISES
HIS MANY FRIENDS
Popular Local Dentist and Well-known
Cumberland Lady Have Been
Joined for Life.
The many friends of Dr. R. P. Christie and Miss Mabel Michell wlll he
surprised to learn that while on a vocation at Shawnigan Lake last August they were married, since which
time the secret has been.well guarded.
Dr. Christie is the only son of Mr. and
MrB. Elbridge Christie ot Victoria and
his bride ls tbe youngest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Michell of Cumberland.
Dr. Christie left for Victoria and on
his return will be accompanied by
Mrs. Christie. Their Cumberland
friends are planning a warm welcome
for them.
CANADA'S SHARE IN THE
BRITISH CANTTEN FUND
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Ottawa, Dec. 19.—There Is issued
unqualified ollicial denial of the story
to the effect that the sum of $35,000,-
000 had been brought to Canada as the
country's share of the profits of the
British expeditionary force canteen
system. The denial is given by high
officials of both the militia and department of overseas military forces of
Canada. Although no definite statement is forthcoming as to what Canada
will receive ai her proportion of the
profits, It is understood that the sum
will be but a small fraction of that
mentioned In the story. It Is believed
no allotment has been made of these
funds and they are still under the control of the army and navy canteen
funds.
RESULTS OF ELECTIONS
IN NEW ZEALAND
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Auckland, N.Z.,   Dec. 19.—The results of the general elections are as
follows: Reformists   48, Liberals 18,
Laborltes 10, Independents 4.
PREMIER HUHGES WINS
OUT IN THE ELECTIONS
(Spcclul Dispnlrh tn The Islander.)
Sidney, N.S.W., Dec. 19.—Premier
Hughes Is certain to have a working
majority In thc new House. There were
elected 36 Nationalists, 7 farmers and
,12 Laborltes. The farmers are supporting Hughes.
BRITISH STEAMER LOST
WITH MANY LIVES
Special Despatch to The Islander.
London, Dec. 19.—The British steamer Leinshlng, 2000 tons, bound from
Hong Kong to Siagon, Indo-Chlna, has
been lost at sea, according to advices
to Lloyds from Saigon. The despatch
received here said SOO natives and one
European were lost and 37 natives
were saved.
Fierce Winter
Gales Sweep
Atlantic Ocean
Special Despatch to The Islander.
Halifax, Dec. 19.—Fierce winter
storms are ragnlnig on the Atlantic
coast and many vessels are endangered, but up to Friday night only one
vessel is reported as lost. This is the
British Bteamer Manxman, which
foundered on Thursday morning. Tbe
captain, the flrBt mate, tbe fourth engineer and also thirty-nine of the
crew perished in mid-Atlantic. The
Manxman sailed from Portland, Me.,
on Noverber 30 for England.
a^SSa^SSINS ATTEMPT LIFE
OF VISCOUNT FRENCH
SHOTS FIRED FROM A FIELD WHILE VICEREGAL PARTY
WAS DRIVING THROUGH HISTORIC PHOENIX PARK-
TWO BULLETS INTENDED FOR GREAT SOLDIER HIT
HIS CAR BUT NONE OF THE OCCUPANTS WERE INJURED—SENSATIONAL ARRESTS EXPECTED.
The best Investment for a young man
or woman is a business education at
the Sprott-Shaw Business College of
Nanaimo.
PERSONAL MENTION.
;,..». x. C. Liynn left tor Victoria on
Friday for the Christmas holidays.
MIsb C. Tourigny left for Victoria
on Friday morning.
MIsb C. Percival left for Alberni on
Friday.
Mr. Earl Fletcher returned to Nanaimo on Friday.
Mrs. James M. Savage arrived on
Thursday on a visit to Beaufort House.
A. B. Jones ot Portland, Ore., arrived on Wednesday on a two weeks'
vacation.
Mrs. J. H. McMillan, who recently
underwent an operation In the Vancouver General Hospital, arrived on
Wednesday.
Mr. William Rogers returned from
a visit to Vancouver on Wednesday
evening.
Mr. John Piper, commonly known as
"Shots," underwent an operation in
the Vancouver General Hospital last
Monday and Is doing as well as may be
expected. Mr. Piper was ln the local
hospital for five wcekB previous to his
leaving for Vancouver.
Mr. D. C. Macfarlane of Victoria,
purchasing agent of the Canadian Collieries, arrived on Thursday's train.
Mr. James W. Savage, general manager of the Canadian Collieries, arrived on Thursday.
Mr. Robert Thomson left for Nanaimo on Thursday and returned on
Friday.
Mr. Earl Fletcher   of the Geo. A.
Fletcher Music Company, is here on
business.
Mr. Henry Devlin, inspector of
mines, Is here on his usual tour of inspection.
Mr. Thomas Graham, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries,
accompanied by Mrs. Graham and Miss
Miss Janet Graham, left for Victoria
on Monday and; returned on Thursday.
The Sprott-Shaw Business College
of Nanaimo trains young men and women for success-In business.
FOR SALE—STUMP PULLER, EVIN-
rude engine; also quantity of household furniture. Enquire A. H.
Peacey, Cumberland.
Dublin, Dec. 19.—An attempt was made on Friday afternoon
to assassinate Viscount French, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Lord
French escaped the fate evidently intended for him. He was driving between Ashton gate of Phoenix Park and the Vicarage Lodge
when several shots were fired at his car. A civilian near by was
struck and instantly killed by one of the bullets and a policeman!
was wounded at the same time. The military present promptly1
returned the firing and one of the assailants was shot dead, his
body lying by the roadside.  An ambulance was rushed to the spot.
Marks discovered after the shooting indicate the assassins
fired from a field while the vice-regal party was passing along the
road. The first shot fell in front of the vice-regal car, but the second entered the side of the car and another pierced the back.
No arrests have yet been reported, but it is understood the
authorities have obtained definite clues to the perpetrators of the
crime and sensational arrests are anticipated.
Government Faces Impossible Task
of Policing Rural Districts of Ireland
Special Despatch to The Islander.
London, Dec. 19—The government faces the almost impossible task today of policing the rural Irish districts, says a Dublin
special, owing to a systematic campaign of assassination and terrorism aimed at the Royal Irish Constabulary. The government
is withdrawing these officers from many of the interior districts.
It has closed the isolated police stations, leaving wide districts
without police protection, and this has resulted in a virtual reign
of anarchy. The available police are being concentrated in the
more populous districts and they refuse to travel except in groups.
UNION BAY SCHOOL CHILDREN
REGRET LOSS OF TEACHER
Pupils of the Public School Show
Their Appreciation of Miss
Ayrd, Who Is Leaving-
People of Thriving Little Town
Delighted at Prospect of
Having Street Lights.
(Special Correspondence.)
Union Bay, Dec. 19.—A charming
little entertainment was given Thursday afternoon by the pupils ot Union
Bay School. There was a large number ln attendance. Tbe hall was tastefully decorated with large Christmas
tree and decorations. Songs, choruses
and recitations were rendered by the
children. During the afternoon Miss
Ayrd, wh6 ls leaving Union Bay,
was presented with a beautiful cut
glass bowl as a token of the esteem In
which she is held by her pupils. Great
sorrow 1b felt at the departure of Miss
Ayrd and she takes wilh her the good
wishes of all her pupils ln conjunction
with that of the parents. The afternoon passed very haplly for the young
people. Miss Ayrd loft for Victoria on
Friday morning's train.
It has been decided to havo street
lights In Union Bay. Needless to say
everyone Is happy os they have been
badly needed for some time.
Mr.- and Mrs. A. Auchlnvole re
turned on Tuesday from Victoria. Mr.
Auchlnvole Is recovering from his recent Illness as quickly as can be expected.
The construction of Union Bay
Oarage Is now well under way. Wiion
completed this will be a great business asset to Union Bay.
Mr. John Clark, inspector of boilers,
arrived In Union Bay on Tuesday on a
business trip.
Mr. Samuel Fraser left on Thursday
morning's boat for Vancouver to
spend the Christmas holidays, after
which he will go south for thc good ot
his health.
Mr. F. L. Nichol left on Friday morning's train for Regina, where he wlll
spend his Christmas holidays with his
parents.
The following vessels, with their
destinations coaled at the wharf of
the Canadian Collieries during (he
past week:
Lornet, coastwise.
Cheerful, coastwise.
Wairuna, San Francisco.
Defiance, coastwise.
Queen City, coastwise.
Princess Royal. Prince Unpen.
Achates, coastwise.
Charmer. Nanaimo.
Stadacona, Victoria,
Pratectlvc scows. Seattle.
Hope, coastwise.
Clcevc, coastwise.
Vancouver, coastwise.
Oregon scows, Seattle,   .
Glcnlmro, coastwise.
Berqucst. Vancouver,
Clayburn scows, Vancouver,
Oroy. Victoria.
Beatrice, coastwise.
Faultless, coastwtBO.
Shamrock, coastwise.
Gleeful, coastwise.
Earl, coastwise.
Comox Lodge, Headquarters.
Dola, coastwise.
Beatrice, coastwise.
Protcsllaus, Seattle.
AT THE CITY CHURCHES.
Holy Trinity, Anglican—Services
will be held tomorrow as follows: At
Royston school, 3:30 p.m.; Cumberland, 7:00 p.m. Christmas, Holy Communion, 8:30 a.m.; morning prayoi
and Hermon, 11 o'clock.
Grace Methodist—The services both
morning and evening tomorrow wlll
be appropriate to the season. There
will be special music.
St. George's Presbyterian—Service i
will be held at the usual hours tomorrow.
COMPRESSOR HEAD BLEW
OFF, KILLING TWO MEN
Dryden. Ont., Dec. 19. -An accident
occurred at Kognon mine. Contact
Bay, when the head of Ihe compressed
air receiver, weighing two hundred
pounds, was blown with grent force
entirely through and beyond three
walls nf an adjacent building, striking two employees. James Barclay nnd
and William Shenrclnn, and killing
them instantly. Reginald Ollbanks,
standing near by, was missed hy a few
feet, but was blown out of the building. Page Two
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DecemLer 20,1919.
CROWN OF THE YEAR
ON CHRISTMAS NIGHT
United Sunday School Children
Will Give Cantata in Grace
Methodist Church.
Cast of Characters Includes All
Well   Known   Youthful
Amateur Performers.
The children of thc United Presbyterian and Methodist Sunday schools
have been consistently rehearsing fin
the cantata which will be held In
Grace Methodist Church on Christmas
evening, and their tutor, Mr. Charles
O'Brien promises to have them as
near perfect ss possible before the
eventful night.
"The Crown of the Year" is the title
of tlie cantata, and the cast of char-
ih ifrs    includes    many    of the best
known of the youthful amateur performers of the city.   The programme ls
a varied and lengthy one and Includes
the following choruses:
"The Months Are We."
"We come! We Come!"
"We Are the Pays."
"Sunday Am I Called."
'Yes, All Are Here."
"Wc Scatter Gifts."
"Then Hall to the Days."
"We Are the Hours."
"Isn't It Funny."
"Now All Are Assembled."
"Who Can Say."
"Hall to the Year."
'The Year Now Comes."
"A Crown for the Month."
"What Tommy Decided."
"That's a Very Pretty Claim."
"When the Ground Has Ueen Bare."
"If April Claimed a Single Flower."
"We. the Flowers    of   Earth. Are
Here."
"Yes, June Is Beautiful and Fair."
"Wc Are tlie Sweetest."
"Glory to God."
"DecemberI December!"
"The Crown Is Yours."
"0. Blessed Night."
"Praise God. From Whom."
The following   are the   characters
and names of thuse taking part:
Tlle Year   Mr. Chas. O'Brien
January   C'live Banks
February   Dave Lockhart
March   Wm. Stanaway
April   Edith Horbury
May   Etta Hood
June   Ellen Clarke
July   Ernest .McDonald
August   Edith Hood
September Charlotte Carey
October   Florence Woods
November   Duglas Sutherland
December   Reg. O'Brien
Herald of the Year ...Wm. Whltehouse
Days-
Sunday  Edith O'Brien
.Monday   Helen Parnham
Tuesday   Maud Baird
Wednesday   Dorothy Llddell
Thursday Olive Richardson
Friday   Margaret Richardson
Saturday   Annie Tait
Children-
Tommy   Robert Richardson
Carrie   Hazen Mounce
Fanny  Mary Llddell
Eliza   Beatrice Mitchell
Mary Pearl Hunden
.lane   Madge Fouracre
Helen   C. McKinnon
Thc Hours-
One   Annie O'Brien
Two   Norma Parnham
Three  Margaret Halliday
Four Chrissle Sutherland
Five   Isabel Pryde
^ix   Evelyn Carey
Seven   Winnie Shouldice
Eight  Mildred Lockner
Nine  Eleanor Davles
Ten   Beth Horbury
Eleven      Alma  Canard
Twelve   Lillian Banks
The Fruits-
First   Edna Bennie
Second   Beatrice Bickle
Three  Mary Davles
Fourth   Grace Watson
Fifth   Jean Clarke
Sixth   Fanny Stracken
Seventh  Winnie Young
Eighth   Elsie Young
Ninth   Edna Marsh
Tenth  Nora Peacock
The Flowers—
First  Lilly Glen
Second   Winnie Calnan
Third   Mildred Calnan
Fourth   Priscilla Wilson
Fifth   Harriet Gomm
Sixth   Annie Swanson
Seventh   Nora Glen
Eighth   Amy Dallos
Ninth   Ada Small
Tenth   Bella Baird
Miscellaneous—
Organ Solo   Mr. C. Edwards
Indian   O. McLeod
Selections (2)  Mr. Chas. O'Briei:
There wlll be a balloon ascent before nnd after the cantata.
Music and Photoplays
Corlnne Griffith is a series of plates
of exquisite beauty snatched from a
fashion book, as she appears ln "The
Girl Prohem," her latest Vitagraph
Star Series release, whicn will be seen
in the llo-Ilo Theatre tonight. Sbe
makes her bow in this delightful fea-
moblle and proceeds to manufacture
a joy wagon and enters it ln a big
auto race. "Greased Lightning," the
name he has given his speedster, balks
at the scratch and just as he gets It
In working order, word comes that the
banker has been assaulted and robbed
and the villains are disappearing over
turc as a model in a fashionable shop | tne hm in a powerful car. Andy Jumps
and is seen In a score of gowns of
wondrous beauty and daring cut. And
then when she conies into her own In
society, =-i!*' is to tie admired In other
creations. Miss Griffith Is the Ideal
society type of girl and her role in this
picture brings out her rare charm and
beauty, but also her rare artistic talent, lor the story Is colorful and
strong In theme.
■"riie Girl Problem was written by
Joseph Franklin Poland and directed
by Konneth Webb, and Is declared to
le one of .Miss Griffith's biggest and
mo: i artistic achievements. She ls
supported by a strong cast of Vita-
grapb favorites, including Walter Mc-
Orall, Agnes Ayres, .lulln Swayne
Gordon, Eulallo Jensen, William David,
I   unit Kinsley and Harold Forshay.
Miss Griffith has the role of the
model iu a fashionable shop, who also
Is oi' literary bent.
•     .     a
. ne of tho best comedy dramas In
which Charles Hay has appeared for
si me time is "Greased Lightning," his
latest picture which will be shown at
the llo-Ilo Theatre on Monday night.
Tlie photoplay nffordB Mr. Ray abundant opportunities for the display of
his exceptional talents and thnt It will
please the patrons of tlie llo-Ilo Is a
foregone conclusion.
The story deals with the trials and
tribulations of a small town Inventor
struggling for fame and the heart of
the skinflint banker's charming young
daughter. Andy Fletcher, tho character assumed by Mr. Ray, has capped a
series of Inventions with a ponderous
"Little Giant Potato Pooler." He wants
to raise capital to promote It and arranges a big demonstration at which
be proudly notes ls the banker.
The exhibition starts well but the
blamed machine explodes and bombards tlie entire company with potatoes. Andy trades his potato peeler
for the remnants of a smashed auto-
In "Greased Lightning," passes all the
racers on the track, dashes over the
field to the open road and hits a pace
that wins.
Monday evening's bill will also contain a Flagg comedy, "Welcome Little
Stranger."
.   .   .
The most celebrated criminal action of modern times is without question "The Calllaux Cose" of France.
Affecting tho politics not only of Europe, but also the welfare of America,
the sinister group who made up the
Calllaux ring" has been the source
of sensation after sensation In the pubic press.
And now "The Calllaux Case" hns
been filmed by William Fox and will
:ie featured on the screen at the llo-
ilo Theatre next Tuesday evening.
Every person who reads the newspapers remembers the furore caused
a few years ago when Mme. Henrlette
Calllaux, beautiful wife of the power-
ul Frenoh minister of finance, shot to
death Gaston Calmctte, editor of the
Paris Figaro, for exposing alleged
dishonorable acts of her husband.
This Is only one of the mony thrilling
climaxes that Adrian Johnson hns Included ln the scenario of this absorbing drama.
It in, only through the trial and condemnation to death of Bolo Pasha for
IiIb pro-German activities In France
that the Calllauxs are finally balked
In their unscrupulous careers. Evidence found by the United States Gov-
(U*.nment In the papers of Count von
Bernstorff, the dismissed German ambassador, involves Calllaux with Bolo
In treasonable acts, sends to a prison
cell this man who was once Premier
of the French Republic, and drives
Into disgrace the ambitious woman
who Inspired his schemes.
These are only the hare outlines of
this stirring  international drama.  It
is all history and its details are accurate. So great are the emotional requirements of the various famous
scenes, that Richard Stanton tho director of "The Calllaux Case," has
given the picture an all-star cast, Including Hadaline Traverse, Henry
Warwick, Eugene Ormonde, Philip
Van Loan, Emile LaCroix and othc
eminent screen players. Stage sets ln
the play are duplicates of scenes In
the original story.
There will also be shown on Tues
day night a Flagg comedy, "Love's
False Faces."
a    a    a
The attractions at the llo-Ilo Theatre on Christmas Day and Friday will
be John Barrymore In a Paramount
picture, "The Test of Honor," and a
Fox Sunshine comedy, "A Milk Fed
Vamp."
.   .   .
Absolutely apart from thc usual run
of Margarita Fisher's features is her
latest picture, "Molly of the Follies,"
which will bo screened at thc llo-Ilo
Theatre on Wednesday next.
Peter Clark MacFarlane ls the author of this story and It was produced
by the American Film Company. It Is
a clever and gay satire ou sideshow
life ln general.
As a ballyhoo dancer, Miss Fisher,
who plays the title role, has a part
which provides her with many excellent opportunities. She Is one of the
most clever little actresses on the
screen today, and is gaining In popularity with each successive release.
She has been given a story that permits of her displaying all those distinctive characteristics that won for
her thousands of admirers.
In the support of Margarita Fisher
are Jack Mower, as her leading man;
J. Farrell MacDonald, one of the best
heavy and character men; Lule War-
renton, Mary Lee Wise and Millard
Webb—an all star cast.
All classes will find thorough enjoyment during the run of "Molly of the
Follies."
EMERGENCY SEED SUPPLY
Dominion Seed Commission Has Dope
Splendid Work (or I'una-
ilinii Formers.
The   consolidated   balance   sheet,
covering the operations of the Canadian    Government   seed    purchasing
commission for the past three years,
has been audited and found correct.
The total sunm advanced by the de-
111
partment of finance for the purchase
if seed supplies, on requisition from
thc Dominion seed commission, totaled
$11,896,540.96; and the total of refunds to the receiver-general from the
proceeds of sales was $11,903,437.76.
Net assets including seed grain In
storage are valued at $37,888.85. The
salaries and expenses of the experienced seed branch officers comprising
the staff of the commission were not
charged against the cost of the seed.
The order-ln-councll which established the seed purchasing commission
directed that the seed supplies should
be purchased, stored, cleaned, sacked
where necessary, and sold at the net
cost as nearly as might be determined.
The business of the commission covers the period beginning October,
1916, and ending September, 1919. In
Includes the purchase and sale of seed
wheat, oats, barley, rye, corn, peas
and beans, subject always to inspection as to the established grades for
seed grain which were provided undo;
the Seed Control Act, Inspection was
administered by the seed Inspection
division of the seed branch. Every car
lot of seed purchased or sold was examined by seed Inspectors, and samples were submitted for tests as to
purity and germination by the Dominion seed laboratories at Ottawa, Winnipeg or Calgary. Delivery consisted
of bill of lading, licensed Welshman's
certificate, and certificate and sight
draft.
This system of meeting emergency
seed situations was adopted on the
recommendation of the seed commissioner. It Is based.on the establishment of ollicial seed grades for grain,
and on the principle that municipal
governing bodies supported by their
provincial government nre in the best
position to deal with the extension of
credits to needy farmers.
Mr. Bonar Law's cook at No. 11,
Downing street, London, was found
drowned ln the Thames, at Westminster, a few days ago.
LEARN—These are tne big paying
lines of the future. Skilled men
and women are always in demand
In the after war re-adjuntment
only trained persons will he wanted.
Start now to learn. Send for catalogue today. WHAT DO YOU
WANT TO BE? We train you ln
electrical, mechanical, mining and
steam engineering. Ship and mechanical drafting. Also courses in
Navigation, Agriculture, Stenography, automobile, languages, chemistry, telephone and other subjects.
International Corres p o n d o n c e
Schools. P.O. Box 1121, Nanaimo,
B.C., J. H. Mllsora, Manager.
The WHOLE FAMILY WILL BE
TICKLED WITH THESE GIFTS
FATHER, MOTHER, SISTER, BROTHER AND CHILDREN would all appreciate a musical gift. Think of the pleasure a beautiful phonograph and a bunch of records would give your
family. There is nothing that could give so much real happiness and cost so little. On Christmas Day you can pull up the carpets and in a moment's notice hold a real dance with your
phonograph and some happy records. Also remember it is a gift that you can use all the
year round for many years to come.   Look over a few of our Special Christmas Offers and
make up your mind quickly.
NO. 1.
Type A Grafonola complete with
six 10-inch double-sided records
of your own choosing, $117,111.
12 SELECTIONS
$5.40
CASH—$5 per mouth.
NO. 2.
A Beautiful Type C Grafonola
complete with six 10-lnch double
sided records, isVi.lO.
12 SELECTIONS
$8.40
CASH—$6 per month.
NO. 8.
Type X Cabinet Grafonola with
record compartment and three-
spring motor, complete with six
double-sided 10-Inch records of
your own choosing, *l:)0.lll.
12 SELECTION'S
$10.40
CASH—$10 per month.
The Supreme Gift!
Of all the gifts you might choose this Christmas, surely here is the greatest of all—A PIANO. Remember
that to all, from youngest to oldest, this great gift will
give delight not only this Christmas, not only through
these long winter evenings, but for years and years to
come. Suggest that you unite all the family gifts into
one big lifetime purchase and your home will echo to
Music's joy this very Christmas.
We hande all the leading makes, including Gerhard-
Heintzman, Mendlessohn, Nordheimer, Cecilian and
Haines, and would place a piano in your home for a
small cash payment and arrange terms to suit your
convenience.
LEATHER   BOUND
RECORD ALBUMS
$2.75    '.
Beautiful leather bound books to
hold records, with an index on
inside cover to show records
contained therein. An Ideal gift
lo your friends with a phonograph. Will hold 12 Records.
MUSIC CASES AND
ROLLS
We have now In stock a large
assortment of Music Cases and
Rolls from
85c
Some of these are duplex cases
that is you can fold them into
half size to carry sheet music
and full size if you wish to carry
books without bending them
Real Leather.
KAZOOS ONLY
25c
What is a Kazoo?
Have
you
never heard one?
It is an in-
strument that anyone can
play
without the aid of
a teacher or
instruction book.
Jet one
and
vou will enjoy It.
Watch
your
friends blow.
25c
SEE OUR WINDOWS!
MOUTH ORGANS FROM
-60c
up
While they last But they are
disappearing very quickly. Made
In Japan and Switzerland, not
Germany.
Some Gift for a Boy.
VIOLINS AND VIOLIN
OUTFITS
In our small goods department
we have a large assortment of
violins and can make up complete outfits, including violin,
bow, case, strings, rosin and
instruction book.
A Wonderful Gift.
MANDOLINS, GUITARS,
UKULELES AND SMALL
MUSICAL  INSTRUMENTS
We have just received a large
stock of the above and can make
up a very cheap outfit with any
of the above instruments.
A Good Musical (lift.
ALL THE LATEST POPULAR SONGS WILL BE PLAYED DAILY IN OUR STORE
DURING THE CHRISTMAS SEASON.
SHEET MUSIC
MUSIC BOOKS
If your friend ls musical why not
give a parcel of sheet music or
some music books?
All the Latest lilts, Large Shipment Just Arrived.
SONG FOLIOS
DANCE FOLIOS
PIANO FOLIOS
AND TEACHING BOOKS.
1   f
FOR TIIE CHILDREN
The famous Bubble Books. Introducing the nursery rhymes un
little records with a full descrlp-
tion of each record; a beautiful
art colored picture of each story.
Wilh each miniature record there
Is a game aud the book tells you
how to play It.
r
$1.50
Also  tlie  famous  talking  dolls
and animals with miniature records on them that will play on
any phonograph.
Real records ffom QAp
RECORD GIFT BOXES
These boxes are very beautifully finished with an artistic cover
to hold one or more records.
They are made In ten or twelve
Inch sizes und will take Columbia or Edison Disc records, it is
nn Ideal way to give a record
and takes off the bare effect of a
record presented In a paper parcel, also It keeps the lucky party
guessing as to what Is ln the
little square box. At this season
we are selling these beautiful
Christmas Boxes at cost price.
10c
each
GIVE RECORDS I
THIS CHRISTMAS I
Your friends with phonographs I
will surely appreciate a record j
as a gift. We list a few [
popular titles from
THE  COMPLIMENTS  OF  THE  SEASON
We take this opportunity to thank you for your
patronage, and wish you a Merry Christmas and a
Jazzy New Year.
The Geo. A. Fletcher Music Company
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
3S $
December 20, 1919.
THE  ISLANDER.  CUMBERLAND, B. (J.
Page Three
VETERANS
APPRECIATE
GENEROSITY
Secretary of Great War Veterans
Tells How Citizens Helped
the Returned Men.
City Council and Canadian Collieries Contributed Liberally
to New Memorial Hall.
Editor Islander.- -It Is a rather well-
known fact In this city that th,e 0. W.
V. A. have been taking stops towards
procuring a memorial hall, tu he held
us u meeting and recreation hall for
tho Cumberland branch of the above
order. Some of our members and the
public might well wonder nt thc apparent delay In thc matter, and we
would like to take this opportunity of
letting our friends know the reason.
In the first place the City Council
very kindly expressed their wish to
donate us a lot to build on, but we
found two obstacles to overcome. First,
the Municipal Act does not allow municipalities to donate city property for
private purposes. They could lease us
the lot, but that would prevent us obtaining a mortgage should wc lind It
necessary to do so to meet expenses
of building. However, this point was
got around by the city making us a
cash donation which we used to purchase the lot. This necessitated the
passing of a by-law, which in Itself is
a matter requiring some time.
In the second place, to secure thc
lot to the Cumborland local of the G.
W. V. A. absolutely und not lu trust lo
the Dominion command, It was necessary for us to not. only obUtti our Dominion charter, but to organize and
register ourselves as a separate body,
with all rights of property invested in
us alone. All this again takes time.
and we have to thank Mr. P. P. Harrison for giving us his time and legal
advice.
Then we realized that to build a memorial hall that would be a credit to
the city and the G.W.V.A. we would
need considerable financial help so wc
approached Mr. Thomas Graham and
asked him if the Canadian Collieries
would assist us in the matter. Mr.
Owen very kindly drew up plans and
estimates of the proposed building and
submitted them to Mr. Graham, who, j
after consulting with Mr. Savage, Informed us that the company would
bear tlie cost of the building materials.
lumber, hardware, etc. This was far
beyond our expectations and wc feel
we owe the company a debt of gratitude. Indeed, we would like to take |
this opportunity of extending our
hearty thanks to the City Council, thc
Canadian Collieries and others who
have shown their good-will towards
the returned citizen and trust that in
the near future we shall be able to
show the public a memorial hall that
will be a credit to the city and a memorial, not only of our fallen comrades
but also of the kindness and good-will
shown towards us by the citizens of
Cumberland and adjoining district.
C. J. BUNBURY,
Secretary  Cumberland   G.W.V.A.
A business education pays dividends
for life. The Sprott-Shaw Business
College of Nanaimo gives a complete
and practical training.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
TO HOLD SOCIAL
Ladles of the   Greut   War Veterans'
Association Wlll Entertain Returned Citizens und Friends.
The tenth regular meeting of the
Woman's Auxiliary lo the Groat War
Veterans' Association was held on the
evening of December IS und It wus decided to hold a soclay evening at the
Anglican Church Hall on December
30 ut 8 p.m. for the purpose of enter-
tulnlng returned citizens and their
friends. A small admission fee of 25
cents for ladles and fill cents for gentlemen wlll be charged with a view of
helping out. the Memorial Hall fund.
A splendid programme of music, singing, cards and dancing Is being prepared, and the ladles of the Auxiliary
turst to see a goodly number of their
friends present on this occasion.
The basketball meeting last Wednesday night did not come off, but will
be held in the Waverly Hotel next
Wednesday night. All teams are asked
to have delegates present.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKIllilFlEI.I),    Propri-tor
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Uunsniuir Ave,,      Cumberland, B.C.
Canada Food Board License  No. 10-I(J86
FORD GARAGE emde & wain
DISTRIBUTORS  FOR FORD AND McLAUGIILIN
CARS and Parts, FORDSON TRACTORS and PLOWS.
CCAiSSf,      WE REMOVE
"MttttoJ THE CARBON
from your cylinders,
carburetor, etc. We
clean out all the carbon
from your engine thoroughly, so that It will
run smoother and give
you no trouble. Bring
your car in and have us
burn out the carbon and
there take the knock
out of your motor, und
Incidentally get more
power on hills.
We boast the best equipped garage machine shop in
British Columbia.   We invite inspection.
Wc have the most complete stock of accessories—
Tires in Nobby, Goodyear, Dunlop and Maltese, in all
sizes. We have in stock parts for all magnetos and distributers. We have the Tunger Rightfler, the very
latest in storage battery; charging outfits in charge of
a practical electrician who also looks after our starting
and lighting troubles. Absolutely no tinkering and
guesswork, as we have the great Ambu electrical instrument which is mechanically correct.
We have a small arber press for removing small
bushings, etc.; also a 20-ton screw press which will remove any gear without the aid of a crowbar or sledge
hammer.       '
We have the reamers to fit all pins and bushings. A
bushing properly reamed to fit will last twenty times
as long as if filed to fit only where it touches and is soon
as loose as ever.
Our lathe and machine room is in charge of a first-
class mechanic. With our shop equipment and stock of
parts we can make a thorough repair which no other
shop in the district can begin to do.
We have now come to the size where we can specialize
in work. We have a lathe man, an electrician, an oxy
welder and spring maker, a Ford man; also another for
large cars and trucks, with good helpers. We are now
thoroughly organized and can take care of any repair
job as cheap and as well as any auto shop in B.C.
L*
All work guaranteed. We are here to stay. We will
treat you right.
Mobile, Polarine, Veedol and Wolf's Head Oils from
pints to barrels.   We buy in carload lots.
Vulcanizing, etc.
FORD GARAGE, EMDE & WAIN, Courtenay, B.C.
Home, Sweet Home
A wanderer itood In the darkened street, looking through the
window at a happy family within. The icene pictured the longing
in his soul for the home he did not have.   .
The man slipped r.vay unseen, and one day wrote a song—the
song ol his soul. And this long became immortal j the most
beautiful and pathetic heart-song that the world has ever known.
The man was John Howard Payne, and the song is "Home,
Sweet Home."
Vou may Re-Criati In your own home thii immortal tong
if you own
T'ie NEW EDISON
"The Phonograph with a Soul"
"Home, Sweet Home," "Swanee River," "Kathleen
Mavourneen," "Silver Threads Among the Gold" and hundrcdi
of other heart-songi are at your command; waiting to be
Re-Createo for you by the magic of this greatest ot al! instruments, with all the richness of melody and depth of fi-prcvion thit
you have longed for in the phonograph—just like the living artist.
If you love real muiie, atk fir tt tepy ef the beautiful
back " Ediitnaiid Muiiti" tnd "What tie Critiei Say,"
11 the booklet that f revet Ediian lUpertlrity. 24?
dJ
(P G. A. Fletcher Music Co., Cumberland.  ||
For Results Advertise in
THE ISLANDER
Next Week
ILO-ILO THEATRE
TONIGHT, SATURDAY
CORINNE GRIFFITH
in
"The Girl Problem"
MONDAY, December 22nd.
CHARLES RAY
in
"Greased Lightning"
and a Flagg Comedy
"WELCOME LITTLE STRANGER"
TUESDAY, December 23rd.
ALL STAR CAST
in
"The Caillaux Case"
and a Flagg Gomedy
"LOVE'S FALSE FACES"
WEDNESDAY, December 24th.
MARGARITA FISHER
in
"Molly of the Follies"
CHRISTMAS DAY and FRIDAY
JOHN BARRYMORE
in a Paramount Picture
"The Test of Honor"
and a Fox Sunshine Comedy
"A MILK FED VAMP"
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday as usual Page Four
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. 0.
December 20, 1919.
Silt? Hulatttor
Published eveery Saturday morning at Cumberland, B.C.
W. H. YOUHILL,
Editor.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1919.
OUR   HOLIDAY   EDITION.
The Islander this week is published in enlarged form and is the largest paper ever issued
in Cumberland. We started out with the intention of devoting the extra pages to matters pertaining to Christmas, but the advertising public
have frustrated our designs. For this it is hard
to say whether we are pleased or otherwise. At
all events it is gratifyinig to know that the business people of this district appreciate The
Islander as a means of reaching their clientele,
and we wish to thank them for their generous
patronage. The advertisements contained in tlii.
is:;ue may not produce as many thrills as would
some gripping stories, but we can assure our
readers that they will be well repaid by perusing
them and taking advantage of the opportunities
presented of securing seasonable merchandise al
most reasonable prices.
The Islander takes this opportunity of thanking the people of the Cumberland district for
their generous support, and to wish them a
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.
PATRONIZING   HOME   INDUSTRY.
There are a great many people who seem to
have not yet realized their duty to their country
and their city, and it is at this season of the yea)
that they come more prominently into notice
The people we refer to are those who ignore the
presence in their home town of merchants and
business people and send abroad for their goods
Such people do not deserve to have the money to
send away to help support outsiders, because if
they were treated in the same way themselves
it would be impossible for them to make purchases either of the necessities of life or gifts for
their friends-
It has been brought to our notice that monthly
large sums leave Cumberland for points in the
east in payment for goods ordered through mailorder houses. Such practice is entirely wrong;
or at least it is manifestly selfish. Those same
people would be the first to enter a protest if
their existence in the community was ignored,
yet they are content to treat others in a manner
different from that in which they wish to be
treated.
The prosperity of a nation depends upon the
loyalty of its citizens, and the same thing applies to towns and cities. How can it be expected
that a community can prosper and afford a means
of support for its population if its citizens persist in sending to outside points the money that
is required to keep the wheels of industry in
the community turning?. No doubt people in
Cumberland are able to purchase goods for less
in the largo departmental stores in Winnipeg and
Vancouver, but we would suggest that if they
wish to patronize these concerns they should
go to those cities to earn their living. They are
satisfied to remain here and reap the benefit ot
the higher wages and salaries which obtain here,
but they are not content to do their share in supporting the town. They may continually be heard
to cry out against the high cost of everything in
town and at the same time demand that they be
paid the highest price for their work that the industry in which they are engaged can afford, and
they even go beyond that and demand something
which is beyond the power of the industry to
comply with and still keep in business.
Self preservation is the first law of nature,
but it is not the part of wisdom to carry the op-
oration of this law to the point where it will act
as a boomerang; and that is exactly what it being done by those people who, when doing their
purchasing, send to outsiders for their wares and
neglest to do their duty to those who have as
much right to enjoy life in Cumberland as have
they.
what you are going to give life; to close your
book of complaints against the management of
the universe, and look around you for a place
where you can sow a few seeds of happiness—
are you willing to do these things even for a day ?
Then you can keep Christmas.
Are you willing to believe that love is the
strongest thing in the world—stronger than
hate, stronger than evil, stronger than death—
and that the blessed life which began in Bethlehem nineteen hundred years ago is in the image
and brightness of the Eternal Love ? Then you
can keep Christmas.
And if you keep it for a day, why not always ?
But you can never keep it alone.
THE   SANTA   CLAUS   FICTION.
When the child ceases to have faith in the existence of Santa Claus—a real personage with
jolly countenance, flowing beard, sled, reindeers
and the rest of it—he ceases to enjoy Christmat.
as best it is enjoyed, and we older ones to that
extent lose our interest in Christmas. As we
»vatch the child and observe the first evidence
of skepticism we feel sorry for him. ' But he
treasures his earlier belief as long as he can, and
finally, when he makes bold to declare, "There is
no Santa Claus," we feel sorry for him, for we
know that for him Christmas has lost some if its
joys.
APPRECIATE   THEIR  SERVICES.
The people of Cumberland are showing in a
practical manner that they appreciate what the
Canadian soldiers, and more especially those
irom their home town, have done for the Empire and incidentally for them. And it is refreshing to realize that there is one community at
least that has not forgotten what is owes to the
men who voluntarily faced hardships and death
in order that humanity might rest in peace and
safety. The City Council is tb be congratulated
upon the splendid way in which it has recognized
the services of the returned soldier in its midst,
and the Canadian Collieries has shown magnificent generosity towards the veterans. That the
returned men appreciate such recognition may be
judged by a perusal of a letter from the secretary
of the Great War Veterans' Association, which
appears in another column.
In this respect the people of Cumberland have
set a precedent that the rest of Canada would do
well to follow, and it is hoped that their example
will prove an inspiration to others.
LET   EVERYONE   KEEP   CHRISTMAS.
It is a good thing to observe Christmas Day.
The mere marking of times and seasons, when
men agree to stop work and make merry together, is a wise and wholesome custom. It helps
one to feel the supremacy of the common life
over the individual life. It reminds a man to set
his own little watch, now and then, by the great
clock of humanity which runs on sun time.
But there is a better thing than the observance of Christmas Day, and that is keeping
Christmas.
Are you willing to forget what you have done
for other people, and to remember what other
people have done for you, to ignore what the
world owes you, and to think what you owe the
world; to put your rights in the background, and
your duties in the middle distance, and your
chances to do a little more than your duty in the
foreground; to see that your fellow men are just
as real as you are, and try to look behind their
faces to their hearts, hungry foj joy; to own that
probably the only good reason for your existence
is not what you are going to get out of life, but
RETIREMENT  OF   SIR   ROBERT BORDEN.
Reports have been persistently coming from
Ottawa that the Canadian Premier, Sir Robert
Borden, would soon retire from the leadership of
the government, and this week the definite statement was made that he would relinquish offlce
immediately after the new year. The cause given
for this step on the part of the Premier is given
as ill-health, and it may be accepted as the real
reason, because it has been well known that Sir
Robert has been far from well for some time-
There will be few Canadians who will not regret
to learn that the Premier has decided to retire,
for, although many of them may not agree with
his policies, all hold him in the highest personal
esteem. No Canadian premier has had such
a gigantic task to perform as has Sir Robert
Borden, and all will admit that on the whole he
has done well—as well, propably, as could be expected under the circumstances. There are
things which his government has done which did
not meet with the hearty approval of even hi3
own followers, and there were left undone many
things which a large number of people, including
many of his supporters, wished to have done;
but it must be admitted that the administration
of Canadian airairs during the trying times of
war has been fairly wise and just.
The retirement of Sir Robert naturally brings
up the question of his successor, and this is where
the present Government party will find its
greatest difficulty. There is no outstanding man
at present in the House who would command the
support of the whole Unionist party, either in
the House or (he country. Several names h,ave
been mentioned for the position, but none of
them have been received with acclaim.. Of those
mentioned, probably Mr. Meighan would be accepted by the greatest number of thc present
supporters of the government. But the financial
interests would not look with favor upon him as
premier, and the jealousy regarding the West
which exists in the East would take from him a
considerable amount of support that should
naturally go to the government.
One other man has been mentioned for the
position who would satisfy the monied classes,
but who could not command the slightest support
from the great niass^yHsadiaii workers; that
man is Sir Thomas Whit|^.-While his presence in
the Dominion cabinet drew to the government
the support of influential capitalists and financiers, from the day he was made minister of
finance the government continued to grow in disfavor with the majority of the people of Canada,
and it was only Sir Robert Borden's personality
that enabled it to weather the storm. It will be an
ill day for Canada when Sir Thomas White assumes the reins of power as premier.
When on your Christmas
Shopping Expedition call
at
Mumford's
Grocery
We Haye a Varied Stock
of Christmas Specialities
«
Bullens Famous Home-Made Christmas Pudding
Rich and Fruity
We are Importing the Following Lines to Arrive
in a Few Days
Imported Turkish Figs
Imported Malaga Layer Raisins
Imported Black Ford Dates
Christmas Bon Bons
Crystalized Fruits
Glace Cherries
Crystalized Cherries
Glace Assorted Fruits
Christmas Stockings
The above lines are difficult to obtain and the
quantity being limited we advise you to
SH©P EARLY
New Seasons Stock
Nuts
Walnuts, Brazils, Hazels, Almonds,
Chestnuts, Shelled Nuts, Walnuts
(halves), Walnuts (broken), Valencia
Almonds.
Fruits      Fruits
DRIED FRUITS—We carry the well-
known brands Griffin Seedless and Gold
Bar Seeded Raisins.
Nothing finer for desert than a tin of
Gold Bar Fruit, for which we are sole
agents and carry a full line.
A suitable Christmas Present for your
friends would be a package
of our Famous
Old Drury or Supreme
Tea
If you get it at Mumford's it's good
MUMFORD'S GROCERY
Mumford Walton
mm
xumwmam
mm YlA
December 20, 1919.
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Page Five
BOXING CONTEST
IS GREAT EVENT
Ross and Roberts Will Meet for the Second Time
Tonight and One of the Best Bouts
Seen Here Is Expected.
Local Boxer Will Also Be Given Opportunity of
Showing His Class in Speedy Company
in a Six-Round Go.
THE boxing fraternity will get their money's
worth tonight when Ross and Roberts tangle
over a twelve-round route- Competent officials and a good system of ushering arc'some of
the improvements over the last contest.
Many fans were not satisfied with the decision
in the last bout, some claiming that if the contest had been longer that the hardy Welsh .boy
from Merville would have been the winner, just
as much argument was raised for Ross, Tonight
there are twelve rounds and with both boys in
good shape and trying, all these arguments will
be settled.
Ross has been in town for a week -and has
worked out at the Union Hall every night except
Thursday, when he travelled to Bevan to let the
fans of the Siberian City have a peep at him.
Everybody who has seen George work went away
impressed with his nice clean work, and his skill
as a boxer. Several local boys worked out with
him this week and they are all great Ross boosters now.
Interest is running high on this contest, and
the seats are going fast. There are seat plans at
the Waverley, Union and Vendome hotels.
There are two good preliminaries, Joe Farrel
will box six rounds with Ben Reese. Ross' sparring partner, Farrel, is a nice, clean, shifty boxer,
Ui HOOD SHOi'E FOR TONIGHT.
George Boss,
who will box twelve rounds with
Jackie Roberts of Merville In their
attempt to settle the dispute as to
which is the better man.
1'
1
3
but he will have to travel to slip one over on
Benny, as the latter is as hard as nails, always in
good condition. Six rounds will be a flee-bite for
the Welsh-Canadian. This go will be a semi-wind-
up and should cause a lot of interest, as this is the
first time a local boy has had the chance to show
against a boxer of Farrel's class and ability.
Farrel is matched'with Sid Wood on Dec. 26 in
Vancouver. Wood is a hard man, an Imperial veteran, but Farrel will make him step.
The main bout starts tonight at 10:15 to give
the afternoon shift a chance to see the contest.
The doors will open at 8:30.
Wig
EZZY & HADDAD
Ladies' Wear Specialists
1
|    All Ready for the Christmas Shoppers
jj! ^HRISTMAS is drawing near and there is no time like the   present   for selecting your
St ^Christmas Gifts, and our showing of suitable gifts is complete, :;tich as Dainty Camisoles,
I Boudoir Caps, Silk Nightgowns, Kimonos, Blouses, Handbags, etc.   Why not select your
mi gift now?
1
&
Silk and Lace Camisoles
i
WIBBLIES GO DOWN
TO DEFEAT BY 27-21
Dallos' Wonders Spring Surprise on
Itowan's Heavyweight Contingent In Very Even Game.
Dallos' Wonders slipped one over on
the heavyweight Wobblles last Friday
night by the narrow   margin ot six
oolnts. The game was one ot the cleanest that has been seen here lately;
< there   was no rough   play,   and the
, referee, Mr. F. J. Dalby, had the play-
lers well ln control at all times. His
I work had more to do with the game
} being clean than anything else.
This was the first appearance of the
f'.Vobblles, and the first time the had
Jiplayed together, but with a little'prac-
Itice they will make all the teams travel
I before the league schedule ends.
■ Walker at fprward starred for the
IWobblles, while DeConnlck on the defence was hard to beat. H. Farmer, F.
loallos and Slaughter starred for the
1/Vonders. The teams were:
Wobblles—Dr. Christie, Ben Reese,
. Walker, Jack Williams, DeConnlck.
I Vonders—F. Dallos, H. Farmer, A.
Virmer, Mark Coe, Frank Slaughter.
CAMOUFLAGE BEATEN
AGAIN BY BEVAN
jmberlnnd Basketballcrs Once More
.fleet With Reverse at Hauls
of Men ot the North.
exhibition between the Wobblles and
ihe_Huskies and tho band gave a consort. Coupled with these were free refreshments and a fine dance, so that
altogether a fine evening was spent
All the boys hope Bevan does It
again and they promise to take a
bigger crowd next time.
Short Jabs
at Sport
By
OLD
SPORT
Bevan Huskies again demonstrated
|ielr ability to trim the Fareks on
Ihursday night at Bevan. A large
j'rowd was ln attendance and rooted
|ir the home team. Several changes
eer made In the Bevan team, Lap-  more and stopped   the   fancy work.
Dallos' Camouflagers travelled to
Bevan In a league fixture and came
out on the short end of a cricket score
of 42 to 30.
*   .   *
Joe Lapsansky's work as referee was
rotten. Bevan had nineteen foul goals;
brother Joey scored them. I don't like
to knock referees, I would rather
boost them: but when they deliberately go out to beat a team, pan them.
...
The Bevan Huskies don't need any
referee's help to win games, and I am
quite sure that all they want ls an
even break. They are too good sports
to ask for any more.
a    a     a
Lee turned out at guard for Bevan
and played a good game with West-
Held.
.   •   • '
Joe Lapsansky starred at the basket
under the best conditions, but Nunns
should have used his weight a little
bnsky playing forward and Lee at
j^fence with Westfield. Armstrong
fas brilliant on the forward line while
le Bevan defence was hard to beat,
[.lckson played forward for the
tikers and his work was a great deal
Liter than his last two games. Cam-
f.on Is getting Into better.shape, and
nt the referee's Ire when he checked
tie Lapsansky too hard. Nunns and
(alios both played well, but Nunns ls
I little toto clean for some of the forwards In the league.
I The boys were not satisfied with the
feree and the number of fouls given
■gainst Dallos' boys would seem to
live them some cause. Nineteen fouls
I ere awarded Bevan to six for the
lakers. The teams were:
| Bevan—Lee, Westfield, Armstrong,
lapsansky, Miller.
] Camouflage—Robertson,     Cameron,
[•alios, Rickson, Nunns.
I' Referee—Geo. Lapsansky.
JTY
BAND   TRAVELS
TO HUSTLING CITY
ly Musical Organinntlun Entertains
Bevan People at Interesting
Athletic Exhibition.
The Cumberland City Band travelled
Bevan Thursday night to tntertoin
ie residents of that hustling town.
special train with a large crowd
ft Cumberland at 7 O'olocy to lake In
concert, boxing, basketball and
ce.
Bevan Is some hustling town to be
ole to pull off a night like thoy did
hursday night. Oeorge Ross and
jirrell showed their wares to the box-
•K fans.
Then there was a little basketball
Rickson and Cameron showed big Improvement on their past few games.
Robertson wants to wake up. Some
day he will be playing where there Is
no grand stand. "Come on, Rab."
.     *      9
Bevan has won two in a row. They
are the league leaders. But when their
fancy shots start bouncing off Decon-
nick and Jack Williams things will be
different. Look out for the Wobblles.
...
Courtenay and Comox have not filled
any of their league dates. They will
find themselves hard pressed to get a
game before tbe winter ls over. Two
teams hare travelled there and played,
not league fixtures, but the valley
teams might have shown a little bit of
sportsmanship by playing their league
games. Wat's the mater, Dixon?
...
The air has been full of gloves this
week, four ounce, six ounce, two
pounds und everything but fists ln
them. There has been more knockouts,
knockdowns, Carpentler-Beckett and
Wllde-Sharkey arguments than would
fill a book.
...
Local Interest Is running high on the
Ross and Roberts bout tonight. Oeorge
has been working out every night ln
the Union Hall, taking all-comers, and
it shape has anything to do with victory, he will win tonight. Ross ls a
clean-living, hard-training boxer, and
if lots of young fellows looked after
their physical well-being as closely as
does Ross we would have athletes In
Cumberland to be proud of.
...
Roberts Is also ln the pink and the
returned men are bringing a lot of
dough to bet on their favorite. Jackie
has never trained harder for a contest
than this one.
...
I would like to see Benny Reese
make a good showing In the semt-
wind-up with Farrel. Farrel Is a pretty
boxer, but when you get a hard clout
ln the right place you lose an awful
lot of speed and science. Reese Is a
hard hitter and Is always in good
shape. His biggest opponent will be
Farrel's experience.
FRESH FISH
EVERY DAY
TODAY     TODAY
200 lbs. of Halibut
Rowan's Fish Market
Oppoiite the Poit Office
Are always welcome. They never fall to draw expressions of delight from those who are fortunate to receive them, and the best point of all Is the fact that
you can buy charming ones at prices from $1.95. You
will find them here In washing silk and lace, in pink,
maise and white at this price. We offer them from
$1.95,   $2.25,   $2.50
$2.95,    $3.50
GIVE A PAIR OF SILK HOSE
Ladles' Silk Boot Hose—Excellent quality fibre silk,
with fine lisle tops, reinforced heels and toes, In pearl
grey, black and white.   Price, per (p-J  A A
Ladles' Fine Seamless Hose, with silk lisle tops, deep
garter hem, reinforced heels and toes, In shades of
beaver, smoke, Russian calf, fawn, Saxe, <P*| I7C
black and white. Special to clear    u)l. I D
Fine Silk Clock Hose, with double sole, heels and toes,
rich lustrous quality, In shades of grey, with white,
beaver with black, fawn with black, black (PO ftZ
with white, and white with black. Pair....   Wtstm IO
A SWEATER COAT WOULD BE  APPBECIATED
Smart styles ln pull-on sweaters. A gay pull-on
sweater not only has the tendency to lighten one's
spirit but It has become a real necessity which no
smart wardrobe should be without. It gives genuine
comfort on winter's coldest days. We have them ln
the popular colorings and styles. Prices—
I $5.95,    $6.25,    $6.95
$7.95,    $8.95,    $9.95
Novelty Jersey Sweater Coat, regular
129.50. To clear at 	
$24.90 1
CHILDREN'S COTTON CREPE DRESSES
With self trimmings, buttons and pockets. In colors ait
of pluk, sky, rose, blue, navy and white, &-t   *K gjf
in sizes 2 to 4 years. Very special   uJA.'rtl raj*
offered   jjj
95c g
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HEAVY ROLLER TOWELING
A strong and heavy Turkish roller toweling,
with other bargains; width about 1*3 inches,
with neat white and brown stripes; 2 yards
ANOTHER TOWEL BARGAIN
Very strongly made from pure Turkish cotton. This
grade wlll give a very great amount of satis- QA_
faction. Very special, per pair OVC
FLANNELETTE SHEETS
In grey and white with colored borders. In large
sizes, 10x4 and 11x4.   Very special, per     CM Of
VALUES IN MEN'S RELIABLE UNDERWEAR
Men's Pure Wool Natural Underwear, the popular
weight. Natural wool underwear will give warmth
and service and will not Irritate the skin. <J**> (\(\
Shirts and drawers per garment    ioO.yfv
Men's Fleece Lined Underwear—The popular underwear for winter wear. Comes In a good serviceable
weight,  with  soft  velvet  fleece  lining and  closely
woven outer shell. Shirts and drawers,
sale price, per garment, only	
Men's Black Cashmere Socks—Very
per pair	
Men's Heavy Silk Handkerchiefs, iu white, fl»t   /JE   JJJ
size 25x23 Inches. Price, each    tBJL.OD jjb
t%
tbl.d5 Uf
8!e!lal: 60c I
1
^§e (§k>m;pfimmte
of t§e Reason
' E WISH to express to our many friends and customers in Cumber-
1 land and District our appreciation of their patronage during the
past year, and to sincerely extend to them the season's greetings,
wishing them a Merry Christmas and a Bright and Prosperous New Year.
1
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An Ideal Silk Christmas Gift
fBuy her a Silk Dress for Christmas and let our Silk Sale help you buy it for less. Some
- - wives, sweethearts, mothers will have' some other preference, but thousands will choose a
Silk Dress if given their choice. And what gives a woman so much satisfaction as something pretty to wear? And what carries as much significance as a silk dress? Today it can
not even be called extravagance, but on the contrary a wise choice, considering the present
price of wool materials. We are doing all we can to help you. A fresh programme of
bargains will greet you.
Crepe de Chine—36 Inches wide, in shades of Nile,        HEAVY QUALITY PAILETTE SILK (|>:i Qjr
purple, Russian green, prelate, Paddy, champagne, SPECIAL AT, PER YARD      Wit.&D
gold, hello, maise and rose. Very special, flfl  ACT     _       , ,,.,.,
" pd ' ■      *       Jbl.lfD     Few Dleces "h'y of thls Pretty pattern silk pallette;
*        for young girls' evening dresses; also skirts, etc, this
would be hard to beat, aud the price Is so reasonable.
Bebe Crepe Silk—This dainty new silk makes up Into Buy her a length for Christmas; In all eve- (JJO QC
perfect little evening gowns, and the color maise ls a    ning shades; 36 Inches wide. Per yard     Stsii.UO
•Jls real evening shade. A dress length of this splendid __. „„,.,„ ,,„,...,„, „.„ , ,, , .... *^ ~_
M material will make a welcome gift; 36-flJO BE Oood quality Habutai Silk, In all colors, 86 <g| QF
Ijis Inches wide. Per yard     JbZ./D    Inches wide. Per yard    dJl.tft)
j}j Rich Pile Velveteen, 21 inches wide. In pretty shades
w Silk Poplin—The best quality we have had for a long of black, brown, cardinal, green. Copenhagen, pluo
S time, ln all the wanted colors; 36 Inches OO 1 C and navy.   Very special, per (PI   OA
JR wide. Per yard     tOtittLO yard  s     Ol.^U
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ENGLISH  TWEED  SUITS
All Wool English Tweed Suits are
reduced from the regular selling price.
LADIES'   BLOOMERS
Ladies' Bloomers, with elastic on Ihe
knee and waist. Special, per pair, $1,1 j
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FURS GREATLY REDUCED
All Furs will be sold at 35c off the Dollar. Shop early and avoid the rush.
SILK   SKIRTS
Many andsome Models in Silk Skirts
Will be sold at  25c off  the  Dollar.
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COTTON DAMASK BEDSPREADS.
Pure Cotton Damask Bedspreads, in colors white,
pink and blue, will be on sale this week at 25c off the
dollar.  Secure this offer while you may.
I Ezzy & Haddad
VOnt DOLLAR GOES FARTIIKRT
nt Ihlfl ttitabUtfhtneiil First, because our pricos* nre right, nnd
Becond) because our merchandise is
of tho .anting, Berv.ce-glving quality which makes ft by tar tin*
cheapest in th
long run.
Ladies' Wear Specialists
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THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DecemLer 20,1919.
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CUMBERLAND TEACHERS
WANT INCREASE IN PAY
Pedagogues Tell Board of School
Trustees They Are Entitled
to Increases in Salaries.
Schedule Presented With a Request That It Be Put Into
Force Next Year.
The school teachers of Cumberland
have come to the conclusion thai they
are deserving of more consideration
when tho question of salaries is being
discussed, and according to the state-
niPiils made by representatives of the
trai-hlng staff of this city before the
Hoard of School Trustees on Monday
evening last, they Intend to prosecute
their claims until they are recognized
Thc teachers claim that, compared
with other occupations, theh- pay Is
away helow what It should be. and
much too low in view of tlie enormous
Increase In the cost of living.
The full    stnff   of teachers of the I
publlc and  high  schools  was  In  attendance ill the meeting of tlie school
board for the purpose of presenting u
request that a schedule of higher sal- |
arlcs should be adopted by that body. !
It was explained   by the teachers
that their request was part of a gen- i
oral movement for higher pay for
teachers throughout the province and
that what was being asked here was
very considerably 1 elow what was
being asked in sucli places as Vancouver, North Vancouver and Ladysmith, to mention only a few, and bo-
low what was actually being offered
lu at least one school now advertising
for teachers.
It was also urged that the schedule
requested was overdue and absolutely-
necessary to enable the teachers to
live decently, and in some cases even
to make ends meet, especially as their
salaries are now on the. ten-month
basis instead of a twelve-month basis.
The schedule asked for Is here outlined, together with present salaries
of the teachers, all of whom, It must
be borne ln mind, have spent at least
three years in high school and one in
normal school In preparation for their
work, which, In this city at least, yields
them hardly any greater returns than
the wages earned by young people in
other occupations which require no
money and no years of time spent on
preparation.
The schedule us presented to the
school board Is as follows:
High School-
Present
Salary
Division 1   11600
Division 2      1140*
Public Schools-
Division 1, Senior Grade    1190
Division 2, Senior tirade       900
Division 3, Intermediate Orade       760
Division 4, Intermediate Orade       800
Division 5, Junior Grade       720
Division 6. Junior Grado       750
Division 7, Junior Grade       720
Division S. Junior Grade       700
Division 9, Junior Grade       770
Division 10. Junior Orade      770
Division 11, intermediate Orade       750
Minimum Increase Maximum
Askod     Asked     .1 Years
$2UH0
1500
1050
1200
1000
1000
900
1000
900
1000
1000
1000
1000
$100
llll)
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
$25Uli
20HU
215n
1700
1500
1500
1400
1500
1400
1500
1500
1500
1600
ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE
HOLD ENJOYABLE DANCE
The St. John's Ambulance Association held an enjoyable Informal dance
Don't be a Failure
through lack of a business education. Enroll now for a
through business course al The Sprott-Shaw Business
College of Nanaimo and you will be on the road to
success.
We offer the most complete and practical training in
all the branches of a business education.
Modern Methods. Up-to-Date Equipment.
New Term Begins Jan. 5.
Write for full information to—
Sprott-Shaw Business
College
(Nanaimo Business School Limited.)
Free Press Block. NANAIMO, B.C.
In the Uo-Ilo Dance Hall on Wednesday evening. To bring home to the
public In a forcible manner the advantages of each person havllng a practical knowledge of first aid work, two
teams from the association demonstrated the manner tn which persons
lacking a knowledge of lirst aid work
would attempt to render aid to an injured man and also the correct method
as applied by those holding a practical knowledge of first aid work.
The first team, representing untrained men, was as follows: Messrs.
Stacey, Whltehouse, O. Brown, Ree-
land, Waddington.
The following men composed the
team of trained men: Messrs. W. Beverage, J. Williams, J. Taylor, R. Reed
and. L. Franceschinl.
At the close of the demonstration Dr.
McNaughton summed up, laying stress
on the difference In the methods employed by the two teams.
During the evening the following
members were presented with certificates for proficiency In first aid work,
the presentation being made by Mr.
Charles Graham: John Thomson, G.
Brown, W. Whltehouse, J. S. Williams,
R. Oraham, P. Mullen, E. Pickard.
The remainder of thc evening until
the "wee sma' hours" was devoted to
dancing. Refreshments were provided
by the ladles present.
WE SELL
FOR LESS
The Thrifty Housewife will just now be looking to where she can get the most value for
her money in preparing for the festive season. If she studies her interests she will not
overlook the opportunity of securing her supplies at such prices as we are quoting on all
lines of groceries. Prices for all such goods are constantly advancing, but we are quoting the
same prices as usual Our stock is complete and we are able to supply the following quoted
goods in almost any quantities.
You Practise Economy When You Deal Here.
Our Goods Are Fresh. Our Prices Are Right.
Read This List Before Buying Elsewhere
Quaker and Kellog's Corn Flakes 2 for 25c
Gold Dust 3 for $1.00
Old Dutch Cleanser 2 for 25c
Cream Sodas, Arrow brand, regular 25c each, 4 for 90c
Sweet Biscuits, all varieties, regular 20c, 6 for $1.00
Kellog's Rice Flakes, regular 15c each, per packet 10c
Malkin's Best Pancake Flour, regular 40c, now 3 for $1
B. & K. Wheat Flakes, regular 45c, now 40c
Magic Baking Powder, regular 35c, now 30c
Peanut Butter, Squirrel Brand, regular 40c, 3 for $1.00
Blue Point Oysters, regular 40c, now 3 for $1.00
Pickles, regular 40c per bottle, now 35c
Eggo Raking Powder, regular 35c, now 3 for $1.00
Vinola Lotus Toilet Soap, regular 35c, now 25c
Any Spice, regular 15c, now 2 for 25c
Tomato Catsup, 1 gallon „ $1.00
Master Mechanic's Soap, regular 15c, now 5 for 50c
Cocoantit, fine loose, per lb 35c
Van Camp's Pork and Beans, regular 20c, now 5 for 50c
Pink Salmon, regular 40c, now 3 for $1.00
Red Salmontfegjjlar 50c, now 40c
Anchor Brand Coffee, 10-lbtin, regular $5, now.... $4.00
Sunkist Orange Marmalade.'tegular 25c, now 2 for 45c
Yellow Corn Meal, 5-lb. sack, regular 45c, now 40c
No. 1 Japan Rice, 50-lb. sack, regular $10, now $8.50
Royal Standard Flour $2.75
Rolled Oats, 7 lb. sack  60c
20-lb. sack $1.55
Graham Flour, 10 lbs  80c
Yellow Cornmeal, 10 lbs  75c
XXX Brand Best Tea in bulk 55c
All tea prices advancing now.
Blue Ribbon Tea 65c
Malkin's Best Tea 70c
Shelled Walnuts, lb 80c
No. 1 Japan Rice, 3 lbs. for 50c
Japanese Oranges, box .... $1.25
Coffee Beans, baked, lb 40c
Apples, Rome Beauty, box $3.a5
Jonathan Apples, box $3.50
Best Cooking Apples, box $3.00
Brunswick Sardines, 5 for .... 50c
Horseshoe Salmon, tin  25c
Nice Cups and Saucers, gold
edge, per dozen $3,00
Men's, Ladles. Boys* and Children's BdtlK'and Shoes, Rubber
Shoes, -Rufcber Boots, we will
sell at the old price. All shoes
are due to advance in price*
K. ABE & CO.
An Electrical
Christmas
In Every Home
We offer a few suggestions for useful
Electrical Gifts that will be appreciated in every household.
Electrical Radiator"8 S chm ,chase'; h™ ym
"uumwui would have welcomed one during
the cold snap, and the winter is not over yet.
Electric Vacuum Cleaner gj^SSi
a drudgery.  The price goes up after the new year-
Electric Washing Machine-™7£S ^
o'clock in the morning.
Electric    Iron—There 8h°uUl be one in every
home.
Electric Toaster-Ma,kes«tof that is, DI™*T'
and makes it on your breakfast table.
The above are just a few of the ELECTRICAL LABOR
SAVING DEVICES that would be welcomed in every
home that is wired for ELECTRIC SERVICE.
We can obtain on short notice any article that we do
not regularly carry in stock.
CUMBERLAND   ELECTRIC   LIGHTING   CO    LIMITED.
*
We have obtained an apparatus whereby frozen
pipes may be thawed out in a few minutes;
when in difficulty call upon us.
Cumberland and Union
Waterworks Co., Ltd. December 20,1919
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Where Everybody Goes
The
Riverside
Hotel
Courtenay
The most up-to-date Hotel
in the District
THE RIVERSIDE HOTEL
COURTENAY
GARAGE
FRANK H. CUCKSEY, Prop.
Just Received a Car-
Load of Autos
Four Passenger Overland
Chevrolet : : :
Chevrolet Delivery Wagon
$1298.00
$1085.00
$1050.00
Sole Agent for eomox District
LONG
DISTANCE
PHONING
Can you use the Long Distance Telephone between
7 p.m. and 8 a.m.? If so, you can talk for three times
the day period for the same cost. Special rates obtain
during the evening hours, and besides you will get more
prompt service, because the lines are less congested.
Remember, appointments can be made for any particular time for Long Distance calls. We will have
your party ready at any hour you wish. .
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Limited.
Santa's
Wonderland
in
CHILDREN'S     FAIRYLAND
TOYS, DOLLS, GAMES, BOOKS, FANCY GOODS, etc.
T. E. Bate
Phone 31.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Page Seven
rxl
S. DAVIS,
Shoe Repairer, Dunsmuir Avenue
wish 10 Inform the public that I
am now In a position    to repair by
machinery.
Look like new, but wear longer.
A trial will convince.
Rubber Heels Willie lull  Halt.
9. DAVIS,    ■    ■    Cumberland, IU'.
J
Pavlo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Rppalrlug n Specialty.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Own   the    iiest
It your  piano   hears  tho
name anil trade murk ot*
*******    fc    *    *    *
*     HEINTZMAN   &   CO.     *
******     #     #     :;.     *     *
you luivc got the very
bent manufactured in the
Dominion of Canada. If
it doesn't beur the name
and you want the best,
call'or write to the nearest Helntzman branch
aud they will take your
other piano in exchange
for a Ye Olde BMrnie of
Helntzman & Co. piano,
allowing yuo a fair valuation on your used instrument.
HELP WANTED—MALE.
WANTED—MEN* TO FILL Positions as automobile repairmen and
drivers. The demand for skilled men
iu the automobile business; never
was as great as it ia at the present
time. We will train you in a short
time with the latest and most up-to-
date method, to qualify and earn big
money in one of the most profitable
and interesting businesses of tho
present day. We teach automobile
repairing and driving, oxy acetelyne
welding, storage battery repairing
and rebuilding, vulcanizing and re-
trolling on the latest and best
equipment. Thousands of our graduates are now holding splendid position.* and never regret the time
spent lu training themselves under
our system. If you arc luterestetd In
any of the above courses, write for
literature aud catalogue. Dept. 5...
Hemphill Trade Schools. Dlanchard
and Fiagard streets, Victoria, B.C'.
Established over fifteen years, with
branches nt Victoria, Edmonton,
Vancouver, Winnipeg, Regina. Calgary, Saskatoon, Tacoma, Wash.,
Portland, Ore. 50-tf
FOR SALE.
Rapid and Efficient Delivery
ABILITY to "fill rush orders is often
L the secret of  business  success.
Speed—service—reliability —are embodied in the Ford Motor Truck.
It brings the distant surburbs—the
adjoining rural districts—to your'door.
You may often arrange to haul return
loads at a profit.
Satisfies your customers and yourself..
One-Ton Truck (ChauU Only) r1
$750, f. o. b. Ford, Ontario
Buy only Genuine Ford Parts
700 Canadian dealera and over 2,000
Service garages supply them.        tso
EMDE & WAIN   DEALERS   COURTENAY
FOR SALE—SECOND-HAND 1'IANO
ln good condition. For further particulars apply at tlie Furniture
Store, Courtenay, B.C. 50-2
NOTICE.
Notice ls hereby  given  that I, the
undersigned, will  not he responsible
for any actions or debts  contracted
by my wife. Ilnttie O. Munro.
49-4 John Alexander .Munro.
FOR SALE HY TENDER -HALF LOT
4, block U, Dunsmuir avenue. Tenders may be addressed to Box 2118,
Cumberland, up to Ihe end of 19111.
Highest or any tender nut necessarily accepted. 47-4
Begin Your
Trip Right
^A by selecting the shell;, that
A    l.tmtcr3 from const to cori!,t
^£ have proved dependable
3 under nit conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
area double assurance ol
success for tlie man who
prefers balHstite powder.
WcalM c.irry a full line .,[
Ciniickiitid Sovcr»^n Shot*
ftun  .Shells   ami    Dominion
Mcmllic Cartrldftu — ctcti
backed by the bis MD**trat  •
mark Page Eight.
?HE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND. B. C.
December 26,1919.
M
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AT
eflMPBELLS
.IFTS that will be appreciated above everything else are the
practical gifts of things of every-day use. Everything displayed where you can readily inspect the different lines and
make your selections. You are cordially invited to inspect our
showing of Holiday Goods, whether you come to buy or not.
Ladies' Department
Men's Department
HOLIDAY NECKWEAR
The season's very newest creations.
Never was there so large a range to
choose from as you will find here.
Made of pure silk in the wide end
style. They come in all patterns, plain
effects, fancy stripes and two-tone
shades, put up in special gift boxes;
all prices. Extra special in rich heavy
silk, neat patterns; packed (J»Q AA
in presentation boxes...   «P*3.UU
FANCY SILK HOSIERY
As a present for a man you could not
find anything much more practical,
useful and pretty to give.   We have
these in silk combination
stripes at, pair	
$2.50
STYLISH NEW HATS
The latest shapes and shades. The right
styles and best qualities in brown,
navy, black and fawn, from
$4.00 , $7.50
Also a fine range of winter caps.
CLOVES!   GLOVES!
Gloves of all lkinds are here in vast assortment. They make a very popular
gift, Silk and fur-lined, from
$1.75 to $5.00
Silk Neck Scarfs and Woollen Mufflers.
They come in a variety of colors with
or without fringe; also mufflers that
lay flat and fasten with a dome clasp
in front,
Price       tp A. I U   to ■
We are showing a most
complete stock of Scotch
Tweed Overcoats with
half belt and belt all
round styles, plain, stripe
and checks- Prices from
$25.00 to $35.00, also the
popular rubberized coat
$37.50
Men's Suits
Good serviceable suits for every day
wear. They come in brown and grey
mixtures, from $18.50 to $35.00, also
custom made clothing made by the
Campbell Manufacturing Co. and J.
W. Peck & Co., Montreal, guaranteed
fabrics and workmanship; colors
navy, brown and grey.
Shirts      Shirts
The fabrics in these are
good, the workmanship
is good and the designs
are neat and numerous.
Very special in the W„
G. & R. silk shirt, assorted patterns, made
with the popular double
wear cuff which is neatly finished on bo.th sides
and looks smart whichever way you wear it.
We are also well stocked
in the following lines:'
Pyjamas, Nightgowns,
Felt and Leather Slippers, air and Clothes
Brushes, Gillett Safety
Razors, Razor Blades,
Tooth Brushes, Brush
and Comb Sets, Collar
and Tie Boxes, Pipes, Tobacco Pouches,
Cigarette Cases, Match Boxes, Fancy
Garters, Silk Suspenders and Armbands
in fancy boxes, Combination Sets—suspenders, armbands and garters, Silk
handkerchiefs; a large assortment of
belts with initial buckle Pocket books,
Purses, Knives, Watch Fobs, Tie Clips,
Cuff Links, Stick Pins, Driving Gloves,
Umbrellas, Suit Cases and Club Rags.
'$1.75 to $4.75
LADIES' SUITS
Ladies' man-tailored suits in serges,
tweeds and gabardines in advance
styles.
SILK UNDERSKIRTS
Ladies' Silk Underskirts in shot effects
with sheared and pleated trimming,
flower design in fancy satin underskirts; also silkette underskirts with
black and white and novelty colored
flouncings i
from ...
LADIES' SKIRTS
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Skirts in serges
and tweeds, poplins and silks, trimmed with pockets and flat silk braid;
also pleated styles.
Ladies' Tweed and Velour Coats at
popular prices. Special orders taken
for ladies' velour coats in all shades;
guaranteed delivery in ten days.
Special Christmas price d» Q C AA
of, each    •JJOtl.UU
Ladies, Shoes
Ladies' Black Russian
Calf, high top, plain
toe, Louis heel at
$12 00
Ladies' High Top, plain
toe, Russian calf, Havana brown, Cuban heel
$13.50
Invictus Shoes for
ladies in Havana brown,
in vici kid with plain
toe and high top, Louis
heels. Special priced at
$13.50
Patent and vici kid pumps, felt and fur
trimmed house slippers.
The prices on all lines of Ladies'
Shoes are due to advance sharply before
long. We therefore advise purchasing
now before the increase takes place.
$1.75 , $4.50
SWEATER COATS
Fine all wool Sweater Coats, made by
the popular firm of "Pride of West"
Company, Vancouver; colors maroon,
navy, grey nnd brown
Price	
$13 50
Grocery Department
Our Grocery Department is well stocked with all Christmas Supplies and no matter what may be necessary to complete pre parations for the holiday season you will
get it here. Selections in holiday goods are ample and quality can be relied upon; and
as well, a service that ensures promptness of deliveries. When visiting the store
please inspect this department, where every courtesy will be extended to you. The
following are a few of the lines on display:
Also a fine range of novelty knit and
combination sweater coats from $9.50
to $11.50.
HATH ROBES AND SMOKING
JACKETS
Make excellent gifts, comfortable, handy
and useful—assorted patterns.
Christmas Cakes and Plum Pud- Pure Jams and Jellies
ding Stuffed and Plain Olives
Lemon, Orange und Citron Peel Heinz India Relish
Raisins, Currants and Sultanas Heinz Chill Sauce
Layer and Table Raisins
Layer and Package Figs
Evaporated Fruits, Peaches, Apples, Pears, Prunes and Figs
Shredded Wheat Biscuits
Pure Honey, Local aud California
Package Dates
Nuts, all kinds
Shelled and Ground Almonds
Shelled Walnuts
Mince Meat
Crystallized Fruits
Ripe Olives
French Peas
Mango Chutney
California Asparagus
Olive Oil
Horseradish
Essence of Anchovies
Salad Dressing
Curry
Maple Syrup
Prepared Mustard
Reindeer Condensed Cocoa nnd
Milk
Instant Postum
Jelly Powder
Icings
Extracts
Poultry Spice, etc.
Lemon Curd
McLaren's Cheese
Preserved Fruits
Liqueurs
Invalid Wine
Ginger Wine
Ginger Cordial
Cherry Brandy
Garnishing Tea Garden Cherries
Popping Corn
Christmas Stockings
Christmas Crackers
WAISTS
Crepe de Chine and Georgette Crepe
Waists in variety of styles and prices.
A few leading styles are tailored
blouses with convertible collar or
square neck, trimmed with pearl
buttons and pin tucks. Georgette
blouses trimmed with Val. lace on
neck ruffle and cuffs; also beaded and
silk embroidered fronts. Novelty lines
embroidered in delicate shades of fine
wool floss. Sizes from 36 to 44 in all
lines.
CAMISOLES AND BOUDOIR CAPS
The newest creations in silk and wash
satin Camisoles, in shades to match
waists; trimmed with filet and Irish
crochet lace; Boudoir Caps in newest
novelties of silk and lace combinations, trimmed with ribbons and silk
flowers.
LADIES' NECKWEAR
New assortment of Christmas Neckwear. Georgette Crepe and Silk Collars in long or short styles; tucked or
hemstitched and finished with Valen-
cienes lace; collar and cuff sets, white
silk poplin and wash satin.
HANDBAGS AND PURSES
Novelty designs in black and colored silk
velvet handbags, with sterling silver
frames, from $3,00 to $13.50; also
large variety of flat leather purses,
with numerous compartments and
top or side straps.
SILK SWEATER COATS
Silk Sweater Coats in sky, black, rose,
Paddy, Copenhagen and lavender;
trimmed with flat silk novelty braid,
also white detachable vestee.
ALL WOOL SWEATER COATS
Pure Wool Sweater Coats in plain self
colors, also in novelty combination
colors. Brushed wool scarfs and scarf
sets in ladies', misses' and children's.
FURS AND FUR SETS
Ladies' Black Fox Scarfs and Muffs to
match.
Ladies' Red Fox Scarfs   and Muffs to
match.
Black    Manchurian    Wolf Scarfs and
Muffs to match in variety of styles.
Misses' Fur Sets in badger and opossum,
scarfs and muffs to match.
Children's White Thibet Washable Fur
Sets."
Dress Goods
In our silk department we have all the
wanted lines in the leading shades in
Georgettes; fancy trimming silks,
messaline silks, crepe de chines, fancy
stripes and plaids, Japanese and Chinese silks.
Dress Goods in serges, all wool Bedford
cords, tweeds, cashmeres. Special lines
in light shades in silk and wool mixtures in stripes and novelty design,
suitable for evening wear.
Commence now to do
your Christmas shopping; the sooner you
come the better the assortment. Make selections now. We wlll deliver when you want us
to. We are showing tho
finest collection of desirable gifts ever
shown here.
We are showing a
very fine line of
Men's Chesterfields
in plain and twceci
cloths at popular
prices.
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iSET THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER   fsS
PAGES 9 TO 16.
CUMBERLAND,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA,   SATURDAY,   DECEMBER   20,   1919.
PAGES 9 TO 16.
I    The Gift of the Wise Men
ONE dollar and eighty-seven cents. That
was all. And sixty cents of it was in
pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a
time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable
man and the butcher until one's cheeks burned
with the silent imputation of parsimony that
such close dealing implied. Three times Delia
counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents.
And the next day would be Christmas.
There was clearly nothing to do but flop down
on the shabby little couch and howl. So Delia
did, it. Which instigates the moral reflection that
life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with
sniffles predominating.
While the mistress of the home is gradually
subsiding from the first stage to the second, take
a look at the home. A furnished flat at $8 per
week. It did not exactly beggar description, but
it certainly had that word on the lookout for the
mendicancy squad.
In the vestibule below was a letter-box into
which no letter would go, and an electric button
from which no mortal finger could coax a ring.
Also appertaining thereunto was a card bearing
the name "Mr. James Dillingham Young.">
The "Dillingham" had been flung to the breeze
during a former period of prosperity when its
possessor was being paid $30 per week. No*,
vvhen tl]e Income was shrunk to $20, the letter^
oi "Dillingham" looked blurred, as though iheji
were thinking seriously of fjonlPHutiiig- to a
modest and unassuming D. But whenever Mr.
James Dillingham Young came home and
reached his flat above he was called "Jim" and
greatly hugged by Mrs. James Dillingham
Young, alreadv intrndiif-et} tu ^ou us Delia.
Which is all very good.
Delia finished her cry and attended her cheeks
with the powder rag. She stood by the window
and looked out dully at a grey cat walking a grey
fence in a grey backyard. Tomorrow would b,a
Christmas Day, and she had only $L87 with
which to buy Jim a present. She had been sav-
-ing every penny she could for months, with this
result. Twenty dollars a week doesn't go far.
Expenses had been greater than she had calculated. They always are. Onjy $1.8? to buy a
present ior Jim. Her Jim. Many a happy hour
she had spent planning for something nice for
him. Something fine and rare and sterling—
spj-nethinja just a little bit near to being worthy,
yf the honor of being owned by Jim.
There was a pier-glass between the windows
of the room. Perhaps you have seen a pier-
glass in an $8 flat. A very thin and very agile
person may, by observing his reflection in a rapid
sequence of longitudinal strips, obtain, z faii'Jy
accurate cpnpejitiou of his (ooks. Deila, being
slender, had mastered the art.
Suddenly she whirled from the window and
stood before the glass. Her eyes were shining
brilliantly, but her face had lost lis color within
twenty seconds. Rapidly she pulled down her
hair and let it fall to its full length.
Now, there were two possessions of the James
Dillingham Youngs in which they both took a
mighty pride. One was Jim's gold ^atcti thai
had. been his father's and his grandfather's. The
other was Delia's hair. Had the Queen of Sheba
lived in the flat across the airshaft, Delia would
have let her hair hang out the window some day
to dry just to deppreciate her niRJc.stj.'t> jewels,,
and gifts. Had King Solomon been the janitor,
with all his treasures piled up in the basement,
Jim would have pulled out his watch every time
he passed, just to see him pluck at his beard
from envy.
So now Delia's beautiful hair fell about her,
rippling and shining like a cascade of brown
waters. It reached below her knee and made
itself almost a garment for her. And then she
did it up again nervously anil quickly, Once she
faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear
or"two splashed on the worn red carpet.
On went her brown jacket; on went her old
brown hat. W'th a whirl of skirts and with the
brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she fluttered
out the door and down the stairs to the street.
Where she   stopped   the   sign read: Mme.
Sofronie.  Hair Goods of All Kinds,"   One flight
up Delia ran, and   collected   herself, panting.
Madame, large, too white, chilly, hardly looked
the "Sofronie."
"Will you buy my hair?" asked Delia.
"I buy hair," said Madame.  "Take you hat off
and jet's have a sight at the looks of it."
Down rippled the brown cascade.
"Twenty dollars," said Madame, lifting the
mass with a practised hand.
"Give it to me quick," said Delia.
Oh, and the next two hours tripped by on rosy wings. Forget the
hashed metaphor.  She was ransacking the stores for Jim's present.
She found it at last. It surely had been made for Jim and no one else.
There was no other like it in any of the stores, and she had turned all of
them inside out. It was a platinum fob chain, simple and chased in design,
properly proclaiming its value by substance alone and not by meretricious
ornamentation—as all good things should do. It was even worthy of The
Watch. As soon as she saw it she knew that it must be Jim's. It was like
him. Quietness and value—the description applied to both. Twenty-one
dollars they took from her for it, and she hurried home with the 87 cents.
With that chain on his watch Jim might be properly anxious about the time
in any company. Grand as the watch was, he sometimes looked at it on
the sly on account of the old leather strap he used in place of a chain.
When Delia reached home her intoxication gave way a little to prudence and reason. She got out her curling irons and lighted the gas and
went to work repairing the ravages made by generosity added to love.
Which is always a tremendous task, dear friends—a mammoth task.
Within forty minutes her head was covered with tiny, close-lying curls
that made her look wonderfully like a truant school-boy. She looked at her
reflection in the mirror, long, carefully, and critically.
"If Jim don't kill me," she said to herself, "before he takes a second
look at me, he'll say I look like a Coney Island chorus girl. But what could
I do—oh! what could I do with a dollar and eighty-seven cents'?"
At 7 o'clock the coffee was made, and the frying-pan was on the back
of the stove hot and ready to cook the chop;,
Jim was never late. Delia doubled the fob chain in her hand and sat
on the corner of tlie tab|e near the door that he always entered.  Then she
The First Christmas Eve.
A Christinas Carol
c*
ISTEN, lordllngs, unto me, a tale i will you tell;
Which, its on this night of glee, in David's town
befell.
Joseph came from Nazareth, with Mary, that sweet maid:
Weary were they nigh to death, and for a lodging pray'd,
Sing high, sing low, sing to and fro.
Go tell It out with speed;
Cry out and spoilt, all round about,
That Christ Is born Indeed.
In the Inn they found no room; a scanty bed they made;
Soon a Babe from Mary's womb was In the manger laid.
f<ir(l| He came as light through glass; He came to save
us all,
In the stable ox and ass before their Maker fall.
Sing high, sing low, etc.
Shepherds lay afield that night, to keep the %\\\y sheep;
Hosts of angels In their Sight Mm« d"wn 'rom Heaven's
hlg^ ste^ty
."ridings! Tidings! unto you: to you a Child ls born,
Purer than the drops of dew, and brighter than the morn,"
Slug high, sing low, etc,
OniyarU then the angels sped, the shepherds onward went,
God was In His manger bed, in worship low they bent.
In the morning, see ye mind, my masters one and nil,
At the altar Him to find, who lay within the stall.
Sing high, sing low, etc,
heard his step on the stair away down on the first flight, and she turned
white for just a moment. She had a habit of saying little silent prayers
about the simplest everyday things, and now she whispered: "Please, God,
make him think I am still pretty."
The door opened and Jim stepped in and closed it. He looked thin and
very serious. Poor fellow, he was only twenty-one—and to be burdened
with a family!  He needed a new overcoat and he was without gloves.
Jim stopped inside the door, as immovable as a setter at the scent of quail.
His eyes were fixed upon Delia, and there was an expression in them that
she could not read, and it terrified her. It was not anger, nor surprise, nor -
disappointment, nor horror, no any of the sentiments that she had been
prepared for. He simply stared at her fixedly with that peculiar expression
on his face,
Delia wriggled off the table and went for him.
"Jim, darling,".she cried, "don't look at me that way. I had my hair
cut off and sold it because I couldn't live through Christmas without giving
you a present. It'll grow out again—you won't mind, will you ? I just had
to do it. My hair grows awfully fast. Say 'Merry Christmas,' Jim, and let's
be happy. You don't know what a nice—what a beautiful, nice gift I've got
for you."
"You've cut off your hair?" asked Jim, laboriously, as if he had not
ajTiyed at that patent fact yet even after the hardest mental labor.
"Cut if off and sold it," said Delia. "Don't you like me just as well,
any how? I'm me without my hair, ain't I?"
Jim looked about the room curiously.
"You needn't look for. it," said Delia. "It's sold, I tell you—sold and
gone, too.   It's Christmas Eve, boy.   Be good to me, for it went for you.
* (Continued on Page Ten.)
THAT narrow strip of land south of what
was before the Great War called Turkey, between the Syrian desert and Mediterranean
Sea was more than nineteen hundred and nineteen years ago a part of the great Roman Empire.
Unlike the countries that lay around it, it was
inhabited by a people who worshipped one God.
There were no images in all the land but there
was one very wonderful and beautiful church—
The Temple—as it was called.
The Jews or Israelites who lived in this country had once been a great nation but now they
were not only conquered by the Romans but
divided among themselves. There were three
provinces, Judea in the south, Galilee in the
north and Samaria lay between.
Perhaps if one of you were suddenly asked
who your great grandfather was and where he
lived you could not tell. In that you would be
very different from the Jewish children who
lived in any part of this country. They could
tell to what tribe each belonged and could trace
their families back for many generations.
The Romans knew this as they knew almost
everything about the people they ruled over.
So when the emperor wanted a census taken
of all the Jews in the empire he commanded them
all to go to their own cities.
This was how it happened that one day all the
roads leading to the little town of Bethlehem
were thronged with people who were descended
from David the great King of Israel. Among the
travellers were rich men and women and others
who were very poor. All had their children with
them. Many rode on donkeys, others were walking. But riding or walking, plainly or richly
clad, there was a likeness between them, something that told of their relationship to the great
poet whose songs we still sing in our churches,
Through the gates of the city one after another passed till every inn was filled and friends
and relations found shelter in hospitable homes.
But the town was small and there were many
who must stay up all night in the narrow streets
or the court yards around which the houses were
built.
Among the last to arrive were a man and his
young wife. They had come all the way from
Nazareth in Galilee, and the young wife was-very
weary.  How could they stay up all night?
Who was it that seeing the sweet, gentle face
of the wife and the distress of her loving husband led them to the stable cut out of the rock,
where they might rest safely ? We do not know.
But we are told that before morning a babe was
born and that when it was dressed it was laid in
a manger. For the travellers were Joseph and
Mary and the babe was Jesus, in memory of
whose birth we keep Christmas Day.
Outside the little city a wonderful thing was
happening of which no words can tell so well as
the old story told long and long ago.
"And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over
their flock by night. And lo, the angel of the
Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord
shone round about them, and they were sore
afraid; and the angel said unto them:
"Fear not, for behold, I bring yougood tidings
of great joy, which shall be to all people. For
unto you is born this day in thc City of David, a
Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. And this
shall be a sign unto you. Ye shall find the babe
wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.
"And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and
saying: Glory to God in the highest and on
earth peace, good-will toward men.
"And it came to pass, as the angels were gone
away from them into heaven, the shepherds said
one to another: Let us go even to Bethlehem, and
see this thing which is come to pass, which the
Lord hath made known unto us.
"And they came with haste, and found Mary
and JoBeph and the babe lying in the manger."
And ever since this story has been told. The
life which this babe lived, the words He spoke,
the death He died, and the power given to those
who are truly followers have made the world
happier and better.
He loved children and you cannot displease
Him by being glad and happy on this, His day.
Anger and jealousy and selfishness are never
so hateful as on the day we keep in memory of
Him who came tn show us what Love is.
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THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
December 20,1919.
I
Christmas Gifts For Young, Middle-Aged and Old at the
DRUG STORE
A Lovely Display of Cut Glass, China and Silverware, Perfumes, Powders and Toilet
Articles which make Suitable Gifts, and a Big Stock of Christmas Stationery, including
the favorites, Symphony Lawn and Lord Baltimore Linen. A Choice Greeting Card
will bring joy at Christmas.   Don't Forget Tags and Seals.   We have them.
A   FEW   SUGGESTIONS
For Father
SHAVING SET
SAFETY RAZOR
PIPE
BOX CIGARS
THERMOS BOTTLE
POCKETBOOK
FOUNTAIN PEN
INK STAND
For Little Brother
CHRISTMAS ANNUAL
DOMINOES
CHECKERS
COIN PURSES
For Mother
HAIR BRUSH
MIRROR
CHINA
CUT GLASS
BOOK
PURSE
BOTTLE PERFUME
SILVER CUTLERY
HANDBAG
SMELLING SALTS
BOX OF TOILET SOAP
For Big Sister
BOX STATIONERY
FOUNTAIN PEN
CUTEX SET
PHOTO ALBUM
IVORY SET
FACE POWDER
PURSE
TOILET SET
PHOTO FRAME
CAMERA
BOTTLE PERFUME
For Big Brother
MILITARY BRUSHES
SAFETY RAZOR
SHAVING BRUSH
FOUNTAIN PEN
CHECKERS
CARD CASES
CAMERA
THERMOS BOTTLE
BOOK
PHOTO ALBUM
SET OF TOOTH BRUSHES
SHAVING MUG
For Little Sister
PAINTING BOOK
STORY BOOK
BROWNIE CAMERA
PURSE
BOX OF CHOCOLATES
MANICURE SET
HAIR BRUSH
For Baby
BABY SETS
RATTLES
BALLS
SWANS
PEACEY'S -
And for Your Best Girl, a Christmas Box of
MOIR'S CHOCOLATES, at
~ PEACEY'S
Today the Prince of Peace
Is Born.
"What moans this glory round our feet,"
The magi mused, "more bright than morn?'
And voices chanted, clear and sweet,
"Today, the Prince ot Peace is born."
"What means that Btar," the shepherds said,
"That brightens through the rocky glen?"
And angels, answering overhead,
Sang "Peace on earth, good-will to men."
'Tis nineteen hundred years and more,
Since those sweet oracles were dumb;
Wc wait lor Him, like them ot yore;
Alas, He Heems so slow to come!
Hut it was said, ln words of gold,
No time or sorrow e'er shall dim,
That little children might be bold,
In perfect trust, to come to Him.
All round about our feet shall shine
A light like that the wise men saw,
If wc our living wills incline
To that sweet life which ls the Law.
Ho shall we learn to understand
The simple faith of shepherds then,
Ami, clasping kindly hand ln hand,
Sing, "Peace on earth, good-will to men!"
Anil they who do their souls no wrong,
Hut keep at eve tlie faith of morn,
Khali dally hear the angel song,
"Today the Prince ot Peace ls horn!"
CHRISTMAS AT SEA.
•The sheets wero frozen hard and they cut the naked
hand;
Tlie decks wero like a slide, where    a seaman scarce
could stand;
The wind was a nor'western, blowing squally off tho sea,
And clllTs and spouting breakers were the only things
a-lce.
They heard the surf a-roarlng before the break of day,
Hut 'twas only with the pegs of light we saw how 111 we
lay.
We tumbled every hand on deck Instanter with a shout,
And we gave her tho malntops'l and stood by to go about.
All day we tacked and tacked between the South Head
and the North;
All day wo hauled the frozen sheets, and got no further
forth;
All day ns cold as charity, in bitter pain and dread,
For very life and nature we backed from head to head.
We gave the south n wider berth, for there the tide race
roared;
But every tack we made we brought thc North Head close
aboard.
So's we saw the cliffs and   houses,   and the breakers
running high,
And the coast guard in his garden, with his glass against
his eye.
The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam;
| And good red fires wore burning bright in every 'longshore home;
The windows sparkled clear, and thc chimneys volleyed
out, i <
And I vow we sniffed the victuals as tho vessel went
about.
The bells upon the church were rung with mighty jovial
i
cheer;
For it's just that I should tell you how (of all days ln
the year)
This day of our adversity was blessed Christmas morn,
And the bouse above the coast-guard's was the house
where I was born.
Oh! well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces
there,
My mother's silver spectacles, my father's silver hair;
And well 1 saw the ftrellgllt, like a Might of homely elves,
Oo dancing round the china plates that stand upon the
shelves.
Alld well I knew the talk they had, tho talk that was
of me.
Of the shadow on the household, and the son that went
to sea: -
And oh! the wicked fool I seemed, In every kind of way,
To be here and hauling frozen ropes on blessed Christmas
Day.
They lit the high sea-light, and the dark began to fall,
"All hands to loose topgallant sails!" I heard the captain
call.
"By the Lord! she'll never stand   It!"   our lirst mate,
Jackson, cried.
"It's the one way or the other, Mr. Jackson," be replied.
She staggered to her bearings, but the sails were new
and good,
And the ship smelt up to windward, just as though she
understood.
As the winter's day was ending, ln the entry ot the night,
We cleared the weary headland, and passed below the
light.
Alld they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board
but me,
As they saw ber nose again pointing out to sea;
But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold,
Was just that I was leaving home, and my folks were
growing old.
THE GIFT OF THE WISE MEN.
(Continued from Page Eight.)
Maybe the hairs of my head were numbered."
she went on with a sudden serious sweetness,
"but nobody could ever count my love for you.
Shall I put the chops on, Jim ?"
Out of his trance Jim seemed quickly to wake.
He enfolded his Delia. For ten seconds let us
regard with discreet scrutiny some inconsequential object in the other direction. Eight dollars
a week or a million a year—what is the difference? A mathematician or a wit would give
you the wrong answer. The magi brought valuable gifts, but that was not among them. This
dark assertion will be illuminated later on.
Jim drew a package from his overcoat pocket
and threw it upon the table.
"Don't make any mistake, Dell," he said,
"about me. I don't think there's anything in the
way of a haircut or a shave or a shampoo that
could make me like my girl any less. But if
you'll unwrap that package you may see why you
had me going a while at first."
White fingers and nimble tore at the string
and paper. And then an estatic scream of joy;
and then, alas! a quick feminine change to
hysterical tears and wails, necessitating the immediate employment of all the comforting
powers of the lord of the fiat,
For there lay The Combs—the set of combs,
side and back, that Delia had worshipped for long
in a Broadway window. Beautiful combs, pure
tortoise shell with jewelled rims—just the shade
to wear in the beautiful vanished hair. They
were expensive combs, she knew, and her heart
had simply craved and yearned over them without the least hope of possession. And now, they
wcr hers, but the tresses that should have
held the coveted adornments were gone.
But she hugged them to her bosom, and at
length she was able to look up with dim eyes and
a smile and say;   "My hair grows so fast, Jim!"
And then Delia leaped up like a little singed
cat and cried, "Oh, oh!"
Jim had not yet seen his beautiful present. She
held it out to him eagerly upon her open palm.
The dull, precious metal seemed to flash with a
reflection of her bright and ardent spirit.
"Isn't it a dandy, Jim ? I hunted all over town
to find it.   You'll have to look at the time a hun
dred times a day now. Give me your watch. I
want to see how it looks on it."
Instead of obeying, Jim tumbled down on the
couch and put his hands under the back of his
head and smiled.
"Dell," said he, "let's put our Christmas presents away and keep 'em a while. They're too
nice to use just at present. I sold the watch to
get the money to buy your combs. And now
suppose you put the chops on."
The magi as you know, were wise men—wonderfully wise men—who brought gifts to the
Babe in the manger. They invented the art of
giving Christmas presents. Being wise, their
gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing
the privilege of exchange in case of duplication.
And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a
fiat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other
the greatest treasures of their house. But in a
last word to the wise of these days let it be said
that of all who give gifts these two were the
wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such
as they are wisest. Everywhere they are the
wisest.  They are the magi.
WHEN I VIEW THE MOTHER HOLDING
When I view the Mother holding
In her arms the Heavenly Boy,
Thousand blissful thoughts unfolding
Melt my heart with sweetest joy.
With her Babe the hours beguiling,
Mary's soul in transport lives;
God her Son, upon her smiling,
Thousand kisses fondly gives.
As the sun his radiance flinging,
Shines upon the bright expanse,
So the child to Mary clinging,
Doth her gentle heart entrance.
See the Virgin Mother beaming!
Jesus by her arms embraced,
Dew on softest roses gleaming,
Violet with lily chaste.
Each round other fondly twining,
Pours the shafts of mutual love,
Thick as flow'rs in meadows shining,
Countless as the stars above.
Oh, may one such arrow glowing,
Sweetest Child, which Thou dost dart,,
Through Thy Mother's bosom going,
Blessed Jesu, pierce my heart.
HMMHM ■■■ rtf
December 20, 1919.
THE  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Page Eleven
PUBLIC   ANNOUNCEMENT
TO OUR MANY PATRONS AND FRIENDS OF CUMBERLAND AND COURTENAY,—
We wish you all a Happy Christinas and a Prosperous New Year for 1920.
Our Store at Courtenay is now Open for Business.
We carry a Full Line of Hardware, Sporting Goods,   Stoves,   Ranges  and Kitchen Ware,
Paints, Oils and Building Supplies.   Also Toys for the Children*.
A new departure in house heating.   Call and see the new Pipeless Caloric Furnace.
It is Our Aim to Give Our Customers Good Service.
Cumberland, Q R JARBELL & SON     *&«•
The Story of the Christmas
Tree
THE merriest among us today will undoubtedly be those who have made, as a centrepiece
of the Christmas festivities, the fragrant,
gift-laden Christmas tree. Perhaps some of us
would like to learn a few facts in regard to the
origin of the Tree and its ornaments. When we
find that a present day custom has its beginning
in the faraway picturesque times of the past, it
endows it with that much greater pleasure and
interest.
In the first place, the Christmas tree itself is
a survival of the old times when men worshipped
the trees as gods, and the evergreen has been introduced into the ritual of Christmas as a reconciliation between old paganism and modern religion. The fashion of hanging gifts upon the
branches is a custom that may also be traced to
that long-ago time, when worshippers brought
their sacrifices to the gods of thrforest.
The star which we place at the top of the tree
to represent that shining light that guided the
wise men to the cradle of our Saviour, does not
figure only in the beautiful story of the Nativity.
Modern discoveries show that the records of ancient Chaldea go back four or five thousand years
before the Christian era; and as far back a3 they
have been traced, we find the wise men of the
East worshipping this same star and being guided by it in their spiritual wanderings as they
searched for the incarnation of the Divine. They
worshipped it as the star of peace, and goodness
and purity. Many a pious Wolfram in those dim
centuries no doubt sang his evening hymn to
the same star, for love of some Chaldean Elizabeth.
The candles upon the tree lead us back to the
Persian fireworshippers, though we may havo
only thought of them as symbolical of the candles
upon the altars in our chapels and cathedrals.
When the worship of tho Sun was introduced,
the forest worshippers combined it with the older
worship, and hung their lights upon the tree, as
upon an altar. Even in comparatively modern
times, oak groves were the temples of the old
Prussians, where the ordained priests kept perpetual fires alight at the foot of the sacred tree.
The cross with which many decorate the
Christmas tree is not only significant of Calvary
and the tragedy of the Crucifixion. In the days
when Jesus of Nazareth walked the earth, the
cross was not a Christian symbol, nor did it be
come so until three centuries later, when the
bishops assembled at Nice pronounced it such.
Ancient Egypt, however, long before dated history, used the cross as a sacred emblem. To
primitive man it stood for that sacred light and
fire of life which was himself. For he himself is
a cross—the first cross he has ever known. The
faithful may truly think of the Son of Man as
crucified in the image of humanity. And thus,
ages before Christ, cross-worship and forest-
worship were brought together; for instance,
among the Druids who hunted for an oak, two
boughs of which made the trunk of a tree the
figure of a cross; and on this tree they cut the
names of three of their gods, and this was holy-
cross wood.
To the Christian the dove on the tree represents the dove in the New Testament which
descended upon Christ. So in Parsifal, the white
dove descending overshadows the Grail. But
centuries before Jesus was born in Bethlehem,
the white dove of Syria was symbolic of reproductive Nature, and as such was worshipped
throughout the Orient. Even today the prevalent
belief in that part of the world is that the Almighty manifests Himself under this form. The
divine mother of nature in ancient Mesopotamia
is often represented with this dove upon her
shoulders, or in her open hand, and sixteen hundred years before Christ the dove, the presence
of which was considered as a happy augury, was
nurtured in the oak grove at Dodona.
The Christmas bells found an origin in the
days when these tinkling ornaments were hung
in the sacred oak groves, and when in ancient
Greece the priests of Bacchus used them in the
worship of their god.
The drum which the small boy beats with so
much avidity when he has taken it from the tree,
was used in old times in the worship of Confucius, when it was almost the only sort of music
the Chinese knew.
The cornucopia may be traced back to the
ram's horn, for this formed the drinking cup in
primitive times.
The fruits and flowers were the first offerings
of the early forest worshippers, before they had
learnqd to fa.shion gifts.
We will conclude this description of the tree
and its ornaments by a quotation from Mr.
| Allen's book, from which the information contained in this article is taken:
"The glittering tinsel was of no value, but in
the cotir.se of ages it had taken the place of the
■offering of actual gold in forest worship; a more
(Continued on Page Fourteen.)
mi RHEUMATISM
B.C Man Says LLC's Freed
Him from Rheumatism
and Asthma
Kamloops, 8.0. "Last year I hid 'Fin*
In Vancoiifer. Recovery left me with bid
rheumatism," writes Mr. Charles Vanhear.
"finally I wns taken to the General Hos*
pltal, I was there four weeks. A second
ttneb soon put me ln hospital again. This
iiuu I was practically helpless. While lying
n bed I remembered seeing a lot of letters
ibuut a rheumatic cure hanging In a Toronto
rug store window. I wrote, stating my
ise. I received a large box of T.R.C.'s by
return mail, and though still In hoi-
pital began using them. In three weeks I
-:n up.   When Z had finished them I felt
■solutely  well.
"A few weeks liter I sent for two small
boxes as the pains were coming bick. When
the T.R.C.'s came I was in bad shape with
Asthma. Hadn't slept for nights without
inhaling herb-smoke. One day's treatment
this time stopped my pains, and to my sur-
prise completely rid me of asthma, and I
have not been troubled since." If T.R.C.'s
are not sold where you live, write Templeton's Western Branch, Box 152, Victoria.
Mniled anywhere for $1.04. Booklet on
request.
Sole agent for Cumberland, A.  II.
Peacey.
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Homemade Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
Tea
Our Contract not having yet expired we can still offer
"Old Drury Tea"
at
65 cents per lb.
Mumford's Grocery
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
■ Pies, etc.
Wedding Cake* a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 5-1172
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
FOR RESULTS ADVERTISE IN
THE ISLANDER Page Twelve
THE  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DecemLer 20, 1919.
I
Having Enlarged Our Premises We Are Now Displaying
STMAS GIFT
What is more satisfactory as a gift than something that is useful
as well as ornamental, giving pleasure every day in the year.?
For the Girls
We. have Talking Dolls, Dolls with beautiful
real curls, kid body jointed Dolls.     Prices,
each,
from	
DINING   SUITES
in quartered oak, leather upholstered box
seat diners, $200 and $225 per suite. Cheaper
suites in maple, glass doors in buffet, pad-
$1.00 to $20.00 \°$^*:.±^. $115.00
For the Boys
Guns, Pistols, Wagons, Mechanical Toys,
Tool Sets, Games of Magic, Trains, etc., etc.
For the Home
Christmas Furniture Buying is in full swing.
We have anticipated your needs and can supply you with Morris Chairs, Living Room and
Parlor Suites, Easy   Chairs   and Rockers,
CROCKERY
A new stock of Dinner Sets just to hand. See
these and get our prices before buying.
Tea Set—Neat, attractive <J»0        fl»-| /\
patterns at, a set  «PO and tpAU
Fancy Hand-painted China—For gifts, in the
newest shapes and colorings. Fancy Cups and
Saucers in good quality china.
Cups and Saucers for home use at, per dozen,
$2.75, $3.00 ^ $4 00
RANGES AND HEATERS
We handle the "Fawcett Line," which   are
guaranteed by the makers, and can supply
7*".  $90,   $70 and $65
and the big new Imperial High Oven Range,
double oven, two glass        d» i O C AA
doors, at, each  tpl.wu.UU
Heaters, Hot Blast, Brick Lined Heaters, the
best on the market, in fl?OA        (CO PC
two sizes, each «D*wU and tytiid
Fairy Oak Heaters for coal or wood at, each
$17.25 and $20 00
BLANKETS AND COMFORTERS
White Blankets—Good value at, per pair—
$16.00 and $18.00
Grey Blankets $9.00 to $12.00 a pair.
Comforters—A large range and good values
S $4.50 to $28 00
Couches, Chester Bed Couches, etc., etc.
You are invited to inspect our stock before making your purchases.  Thanking our customers for past favors, we extend
BEDS, SPRINGS AND MATTRESSES
Steel Beds, continuous posts, in white enamel
and Verne Martin finish, ranging in price
5$11.00 to $30.00
Springs, wooden and steel frame springs and
S1.^ng!:.Pri!e8$6.50to$16
Mattresses all kinds, from the cheap ones up
to the famous "Restmore" and "Ostermore"
quality in stock,
FLOOR COVERINGS
Linoleums—In well assorted colorings and
patterns.
Rugs—A new stock just to hand prices from
$1.501. $15.00
Tapestry Squares—Good designs, 9x9, 9x10.6
and 9x12. Prices, each fl»OC 42/1A
from   *$tU\3 to tPtU
to you the season's greetings.
■     -: ■■ ■. " '.:•■■,-.-. \
Furniture Store
Phone 14
A. MacKINNON
Robert the Bruce
ROBERT BRUCE is not only the most remarkable figure in Scottish history, but one of
the most extraordinary men of whom we
have any record. His field of operations was comparatively restricted; but it is easy to believe
that if his powers had been put forth in the
greater arena offered by Continental Europe or
Asia, he would have been one of the World's
greatest empire builders. But wherever his lot
might have been, cast, he could not have exhibited higher qualities of manhood, greater skill in
the formation of his plans or more resolute determination in carrying them out, than he did in
Scotland. Like his contemporaries, Bruce was
in many things governed by principles we do
not recognize today as laudable. He was at times
absolutely merciless; his personal animosities
wore bitter; he was not always scrupulous; but
taken on the whole he may be said to be as fine
a type of man as his age produced, and many of
his qualities are worthy of emulation at all times
and in all countries. In Edward I. and Robert
'Bruce, England and Scotland produced men who
were the very flower of chivalry, and yet the
honest biographer of each of them cannot deny
that these kings, the greatest that ever sat upon
their respective thrones, were not free from the
harsher characteristics of their times.
The family of Bruce, originally de Bruis, was
nf Norman origin, but one of the name having
married a daughter of David I. of Scotland, his
descendants were claimants for the crown.
Robert Bruce, grandfather of the great Scottish
king, was a competitor with John Baliol for the
throne of Scotland, and he hoped to have received
it at the hands of Edward L, but when his ambition was disappointed, he retired to his English
estates, leaving his Scottish possessions to his
son, from whom they passed to his grandson,
Robert, whose fame won for him the distinguishing title of The Bruce. It has also been stated
that the Scottish nobles, who held estates in
England, considered themselves bound by no absolute tie of allegience to the king of either country, but served each as their interests or ambitions led them to choose. Bruce was like the
others in this respect, and, unless we understand
the nature of feudal allegiance, we will find it
very difficult to justify the course pursued by
Bruce in the earlier part of his career. He
changed his allegiance on more than one occasion,
but that by doing so he acted strictly in accord
ance with the recognized usage of the time is
shown by the fact that what we would today regard as utterly unjustifiable, did hot in the least
affect him in the estimation of those whom he at
times supported and at times opposed. It must
be admitted that, however much Bruce was in
after life influenced by a desire to. establish Scotland as a free and independent kingdom, in his
yomger days the chief incentive of his conduct
was a desire to destroy those who were enemies
•of his family. Sir Walter Scott, whose appreciation of his character is of the highest, is forced
to admit that between Bruce the adventurer and
Bruce the king there is a Wide and almost unbridgeable gulf.
Robert the Bruce was born about the year
1274. While the exact date of his birth is uncertain, chroniclers differ only within a very
small margin. He was Lord of Annandale and
Earl of Carrick. He was born in Ayrshire, but
spent his youth at the court of Edward L, with
whom he sided in his opposition to Baliol. In revenge for this, Baliol declared the estate of Annandale forfeited, and gave the same to Sir John
,Comyn, Earl of Buchan. Robert immediately
thereafter swore fealty to Edward, but very
shortly afterwards went to the suport of Sir
William Wallace, who had declared for the independence of Scotland in the name of Baliol, although that pusilanimous king was then a prisoner in the hands of Edward. Bruce was among
the nobles who capitulated to Earl Percy at Irvine, after which he gave his daughter to Edward as a hostage for his loyalty. Shortly after
he was in arms against English ruule, and later
when Baliol, then in exile, appointed guardians
for Scotland, he and Comyn, almost deadly enemies, were named for the office. Still later we
find Bruce in arms in support of Edward. Shortly
after this his father died, and then for the first
time the ambition to become king of Scotland
seems to have become the inspiration of his action.
There were at this time three persons whose
claim to the Scottish throne were almost of equal
validity, John Baliol, John Comyn and Robert
Bruce. Baliol was out of the kingdom, and between Bruce and Comyn there was a bitter feud.
Both were men of great estates, and each feared
the strength and influence of the other. Bruce
made the proposition to Comyn that he should
give up his estates to Comyn in exchange for the
latter's claim to the crown, and there seemed to
be some prospect of an agreement being reached.
The two claimants   met   by appointment at a
church, their followers remaining outside. A dispute arose between them, and the account given
by Bruce, which is the only one that could be
given, was that Comyn give him the lie, where-
uon he stabbed him with a dagger. Shocked at
what he had done, he rushed out of the church
and exclaimed: "I doubt I have killed the Red
Comyn!" whereupon one of his followers shouted : "It would be a pity to leave such a thing in
doubt!" and rushing into the church, completed
the work which his master had begun. Bruce
rallied his followers and prepared to make good
his claim to the throne. He was crowned at
Scone, a coronet of gold having been made for the
occasion, the royal crown having been carried
away by Edward, when he took the Coronation
Stone to Westminster. But as yet Bruce was
king only in name. Of friends he had many, but
there was no part of Scotland in which his power
was recognized. Earl Pembroke led a powerful
army against him, and meeting him at Methven,
administered a crushing defeat. Bruce fled to
the mountains, taking his wife and other women
with him, where they subsisted solely by the
proceeds of the chase, harassed daily by John of
Lorn and his followers. He was driven from
refuge to refuge, and finally made his escape
with hardly a follower to the Island of Rathlin,
which lies off the coast of Ireland, and was held
by the Macdonald sept, who remained faithful to
the defeated king.
Meanwhile Edward advanced from England
with a formidable army and crushed all opposition. Nigel, Thomas and Alexander Bruce,
brothers of the king, were taken prisoners and
executed. Among the prisoners also was the
Earl of Athole. He claimed the mercy of Edward
because of kinship, but the English king replied
that the only way in which he would recognize
his royal blood was by hanging him higher than
the others, and so he met his death on a gallows
fifty feet high. Bruce's wife, daughter and sister
were sent as prisoners to London, and the Countess of Buchan, who had placed the crown upon
the head of Bruce, was kept as a prisoner in a
cage, where all the populace could see her. On
June 7, Edward died, while engaged in his work
of exterminating all opposition to his power. On
his deathbed he enjoined upon his son and successor to continue the work he had begun, but
that prince was too fond of pleasure and hastened
to London to celebrate his marriage with Isabella
of France. Bruce saw that his opportunity had
come, and was prompt to seize it.
Cumberland, B. C.
The King of all Seasons
I care not for Spring; on his fickle wing
Let the blossoms and buds be borne:
He woos them amain with his treacherous rain,
And he scatters them ere the morn.
An inconstant elf, he knows not himself,
Nor his own changing mind or hour;
He'll smile In your face, and, with wry grimace,
He'll wither your youngest flower.
Let thc Summer sun to his bright home run,
He shall never be sought by me;
When he's dimmed by a cloud I can laugh aloud,
And care not how sulky he be.
For his dialing child Is the madness wild
Thai sports In Ilerco fever's train;
And when love Is too strong, it don't last long,
As many have found to their pain.
A mild harvest night, by the tranquil light
nf the modest and gentle moon,
Has a far sweeter sheen, for me, I ween,
Than the broad and unblushing noon.
But every leaf awakens my grief.
As It dleth beneath the tree;
So let Autumn air be never so fair,
It by no means agrees with me.
But my song I troll out for Christmas stout,
The hearty, the true, and the hold;
A bumper I drain, and with might and main,
dive throe cheers for this Christmas old.
We'll usher him ln with a merry din,
Thai shall gladden his Joyous heart,
And we'll keep him up, while there's bite or sup,
Aud In fellowship good we'll part.
In his fine honest pride, he scorns to hide
One jot of his hard-weather scars;
They're no disgrace, for   there's   much the same
trace
On the cheeks of our bravest tars.
Then again I sing, 'till the roof doth ring,
And It echoes from wall to wall-
To the stout old wight, fair welcome tonight,
As the king of the seasons all!
TWO   CHRISTMAS   MORNINGS
My baby, on this day, long, long ago,
A little Child first opened wide His eyes
Upon the world—not knowing then the woe
I   He came to ease, but just the faint surprise
Of babyhood at feeling life's first glow;
And He was Mary's as you're my heart's prize.
And this my longing soul's great wish for you:
That love like His may bide within your heart;
That though the world-temptations shall ensue,
You may in some wise be His counterpart;
That grace of His may your dear life imbue,
And give you strength to do, and not to do.
Ah, baby mine, with lifetime just begun,
May you be true as Mary's little Son! \Vf
December 20,1919
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Page Thirteen
A Sensible Present
to give an auto owner is something that will still be useful
long after Christmas has passed.
Our big stock of things useful
about a car offers you a range
of choice at prices that prove
that real useful gifts cost no
more than unappreciated presents.
t
Repairs of all
kinds
Briing us that cracked water
jacket and let us fix It in
the LATEST and most up-to-
date way. Guaranteed not to
warp and for half the price of
welding.
We Will Tell the World
That we have just as many suitable Christmas Gifts
as you can buy anywhere. A few suggestions may help.
A NEW McLAUGHLIN SIX FOR THE FAMILY.
A FORD COUPE OR FIVE-PASSENGER FOR THE DEAR WIFE.
A NICE TROUBLE LAMP OR FLASHLIGHT FOR FATHER.
A PAIR HEADLIGHT DIMMERS.
Robes
from ..
SsQ 00   $27 00 ivaA the thin*you would wish for a Chri9tmas
gift.
EMDE & WAIN
FORD GARAGE
Phone 46
Courtenay, B.C.
THANKING YOU FOR YOUR PAST YEAR'S PATRONAGE AND WISHING ONE AND ALL
A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR.
^
*• ■ It ..iitJAii
How About That Auto Trip
you promised yourself for
Christmas? Is your machine in
perfect trim for it? Suppose you
let us overhaul it and put it in
first-class shape. We have every
facility for repairing of all kinds
and a reputation for doing first-
class work always.
r
Vulcanizing
Oxo-Acetylene
Welding
Lathe work and general auto or
mill repairs done to satisfy the
little man or the biggest man.
No job too small or too large.
1
A
Merry
Christmas
Try Our
Bread.
It's Great
WE WISH ALL OUR CUSTOMERS THE
COMPLIMENTS    OF    THE    SEASON
HALLIDAY'S   BAKERY
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY
OF CREAM GOODS
OFTEN COPIED BUT
NEVER EQUALLED
CAKES   AND   PASTRY
FINEST ON THE ISLAND
Halliday's Bread Is the Bread that Made
Mamma Stop Baking
A   MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO EVERYONE
Our
Short Bread
Is Delicious Page Fourteen
THE  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
December 20, 1919.
m
m
i
'M
***•
I
it
M
1
m
RIDEOUT'S
The Ladies' Wear Store
| We welcome your inspection of our display of Christmas
Gift Suggestions.   Gifts that are pleasing and practical
Camisoles
A large range of Camisoles in navy, blue, taupe, pale
pink and white satin, trimmed with Dresden ribbon.
Pink and White Crepe de Chine, trimmed with filet
lace and embroidered in pale blue and white.
Pink and White Satin, trimmed with Georgette crepe.
Boudoir Caps
Boudoir Caps in Georgette Crepe and Pink and White
•Satin, trimmed with dainty edgings of laci; with ribbon
and rose buds.
Dainty Cap in Georgette Crepe in Old Rose and
White, Blue and White, Maize and Pink, and White and
Peach, finished with edgings of lace and fancy bows of
ribbon.
Silk Hosiery are Ideal Gifts
for Women
Every woman delights in the possession of a pair of
good quality Silk Hose.
Wa were fortunate in obtaining 140 pairs of good
quality Silk Hose at a reduction and offer these, QKp
which sell regularly at $1.50 per pair, for  VOX/
BERRIED HOLLY AND MISTLETOE
We have a large quantity of Fresh Picked
Holly and Mistletoe.
I mimmimwMiw&wwHii
Every Woman
appreciates a Fashionable Waist as a Christmas Gift.
Waists Waists
In our Waist Section we have on display all the latest
Fashions.
Georgette Crepe Waists
at	
$6.95
Charming styles in maize, flesh, peach, old rose and
white, with round, square and V-shaped necks, tucked
and hemstitched. Extraordinary values at only $6.95
Crepe de Chene Waists at
Special Christmas Prices
Pretty styles in Flesh, Maize, Old Rose, Purple, etc.,
in round, square and V-shaped necks with and without
collars.
Underskirts
$6.75 to $9.75
Messaline and Taffeta
Silk, pleated, from	
Christmas Greetings
We extend to all our customers our very sincere,
wishes for a Joyful Christmas.
RIDEOUT'S
The Ladies' Wear Store
DOLL SECTION
Large Baby Dolls to clear at', $3.25
Kid Body Bolls, with real hair, to clear at $4.15
Large Jointed Dolls to clear at a $6.50
Cupies in all sizes at reduced prices.
Chop early as these dolls will sell fast at above prices.
infants' Section
Infants' All Wool Sweater Coats and Jackets; good
value at d»1   WC       d»Q fft
from *P 1. I D to «P«5» I D
Infants' Gaiters, Wool Mitts and Pullovers at Special
Christmas Prices.
Semi-Evening Dresses
Semi-eveniing Dresses in pale green satin, trimmed
with silver braid and cream nett.
Crepe de Chine with silver trimmings and purple
flowers.
Dresses Dresses
Crepe de Chine in pretty Alice blue, trimmed with
Georgette crepe, shadow lace and but- d*/| 1 OC
tons. Splendid value at  tp41ta£0
Black Taffeta Silk, trimmed with pleating and
shadow lace collar. *
Striped Grey Silk Voile in the most charming styles.
Skirts Skirts
Fashion's latest creation in Taffeta Silk, Silk Jersey
Cloth, Silk Poplin, Wool Serges, Tweeds and Panama
Cloth.
These skirts are marked at special Christmas prices
frZng $6.50 to $12.50
i
1
I
i
1
1
1
1
aft
I
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I
THE STORY OF THE CHRISTMAS TREE.
(Continued from Page Eleven,)
universal custom of adorning the tree with everything most precious to the giver in token of his
sacrifice and self-sacrifice. Even in Jeremiah is an
account of the lading of the sacred tree with gold
and ornaments. Herodotus relates that when
Xerxes was invading Lydia, on the march he saw
a divine tree and had it honored with golden
robes and gifts. Livy relates that when Romulus
slew his enemy on the site of the Eternal City,
he hung rich spoils on the oak of the Capitaline
Hill. And this custom of decorating the tree with
actual gold goes back in history until we can
moot it coming down to us in the story of Jason
and tho Golden Fleece, and in that of the Golden
Apples of the Hesperides. Now this custom has
dwindled to this tinsel flung over the Christmas
Tree—the mock sacrifice for the real.
"He touched the masks and unfolded the grim
i tory that lay behind their mockery. It led back
t*. th^ common custom in antiquity of sacrificing
prisoners of war or condemned criminals or inno-
C3r,t victims in forest-worship, and of hanging
their leads on the branches; we know this to
havo been the practice among Gallic and Teuton
tril es, in the course of time, when such bar-
1 aj'ity could lie tolerated no longer, the mock
countenance replaced the real.
"He touched the dolls and revealed their sad
story. Like the others, the long path led to antiquity, and to the custom of sacrificing children
in forest-worship, How common this custom
waa the early literature of the human race too
abundantly testifies. We encounter the trace of
it in Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac, arrested by the
command of Jehovah. But Abraham would never
have thought of slaying his son to propitiate his
God, had not the custom been well established.
In the case of Jephthah's daughter, the case was
actually allowed. We come upon the same custom in the fate of Iphigenia—at a critical turning point in the world's mercy; in her stead the
life of a lesser animal, as in Isaac's case, was accepted. When the protective charity of mankind
turned against the inhumanity of the old faiths,
then the substitution of the mock for the real
sacrifice became complete.
"The Christmas Tree is all that is left of a
forest memory. The forest-worshippers could
hot worship without giving, because to worship
is to give; therefore he brought his gifts to the
forest—his first altar. These gifts . . were
never, as with us, decorations. They were his sac-
1 rifices and self-sacrifices. In all the religions he
has had since, that same law lives. In his lower
religions he has sacrificed the better to the
worst; in the highest ones he has sacrificed the
worst to the best. If the race should ever outgrow all religion whatsoever, it would still have
to worship what is highest iri human nature, and
so worshipipng, it would still be ruled by the ancient law of sacrifice because the law of self-sacrifice ; it would still be necessary to offer up what
is low in us to what is higher. Only one portion of
mankinid has ever believed in Jerusalem; but
every religion has known its own Calvary."
WE  ARE  MERRY.
The following Christmas Carol is one of the
oldest that has been handed down from the dim
and distant past.
a       So now lu come our joyful'at feast,
Let every man be Jolly;
Each room with Ivy leaves la drest,
And every post with holly.
Though some churls at our mirth repine.
Hound your foreheads garlands twine;
Drown sorrow lu a cup of wine,
And let us all be merry.
Now every lad ls wondrous trim,
And no man minds his labor;
Our lasses have provided them
A bagpipe and a tabor.
Young We'll and maids and girls and boys,
(live life to one another's joys,
And you unon shall lay their noise;
Perceive that they are merry.
Rank misers now do sparing shun
Their hall of music soundeth;
And dogs thence with whole shoulders run,
So all things here aboundeth.
The country folk themselves advance,
And Jack ahall pipe, and Jill shall dance,
While lads and lasses aklp and prance,
And all the town is merry.
Tho wenches with their wassall-bowls
About the street are singing;
The boys are come to catch the owls
The wild marr In is bringing.
Our kitchen boy hath brol^Mjljibox;
And to the dealing of the ox
Our honest neighbors cdmeby* flocks,
And true they wlll be merry.
Then wherefor ln theae merry days
Should we, I say, be duller?
No, let us sing our roundelays,
. To make our mirth the fuller;
And whilst thus Inspired we sing,
Let all the streets with echoes ring;
Woods and hills and everything
Bear witness we are merry.
UNION HOTEL L
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.     O1JT
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM   JONES
Cumberland, B. C.
License No. 10-160C
I»K.   K.   P.  CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office:    KINO BLOCK,
Cumberland, B.C.
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE BING CHONG, Cumberland
HO.VG CHONG & CO.. Bevan.
Marocchi Bros.
Christmas and New Year's
Stock is Complete
Consisting of Watches,
Jewellery, Cut Glass and
Silverware.
Watches from $2.75 up.
Rings from $1.25 and up.
Brooches $1.00 and up.
All the latest Books and Magazines in
stock and arriving.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller,
DUNSMUIR AVE., CUMBERLAND
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and'Courtenay, B.C.
License No. 8-25489
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$4.00
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, R.C.
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water j& ]ZJ Pure
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer,   '
UNION BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
Mi December 20, 1919.
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. 0.
Buy a home in Courtenay now
while homes are cheap. We have
a number on very easy terms.
*
4
Good Reasons Why
COURTENAY SHOULD GROW
in the Year 1920
$50 will give you a deed for a
good building lot in Courtenay.
1st. The Agricultural Area in the District Will Be Doubled by
the end of 1920.
2nd.   The Milling Industry Will Be More Than Doubled.
3rd. The City of Courtenay will be putting in a Sixty Thousand
Dollar Water Plant.
4th. The Government Has Advanced Twenty Thousand Dollars
to the City of Courtenay for Building Houses under the Dominion
Government Housing Scheme.
Why not buy a good business
lot on the Main Street of Courtenay? There are only a few left
that can be bought.
For Further Particulars of Houses. Lots and Acreage, Write or See
SET   P. LEO ANDERTON <*$$*.
*
R6AL
Call and see our list of Farms
and Acreage throughout the
Comox district.
A Christmas Gift.
TWO children were sitting in front of the
bright fire one evening the week before
Christmas not long ago. They were tired
of play, and mother and father and the big sisters
and brothers hai, gone to town. Jennie and Bob
were left with Grandma, whose knitting had
dropped on her lap as if she, too, were tired.
Golden haired Jennie looked around the pretty
room, but not even Alice in Wonderland or
Grimm's Fairy Tales, which lay on a table near
could tempt her to read tonight.
All at once Bob's dark eyes sparkled and nestling close to Grandma's side he said:
"Tell us a story, Granny, 'bout the time when
you were a little girl."
The light shone on Grandma's sweet face and
silver hair and the dim eyes grew soft and bright
as she patted the curly head and putting her arm
round Jennie's slender form, drew her close to
her.
"Would you like a story about Christmas?"
she said.
"Yes! yes, indeed," said   both   in the same
breath.
Well, a great many years ago, near the Gulf of
St. Lawrence, five children lived in a little house
on a hill not far from the sea. On fine summer
days they could go down to bathe and watch the
boats come in with their loads of fish and gather
pretty shells and stones.
In the early spring they hunted for the sweet
pink mayfiowers hidden under the moss and
knew when the time came to find the blue violets
in the fence corners.
They picked berries, too, among the long grass
of the meadows or in the woods. The older ones,
Martha, Hugh and Janet, with little Elsie went
to school, but delicate little Ernest stayed home
with his mother.
But there was no sign of green grass or blue
waves, much less of flowers or berries this
Christmas morning. The whole world was covered with snow. For two days the feathery flakes
had fallen from the grey sky, silent and thick
and fast. Then the wind had risen and for a day
and a night it had howled and whistled till the
roads were blocked and the little house was covered on one side of the eaves with a great hard
white bank that blocked door and windows. It
had grown very cold and although the fire in the
big stove had burned nearly all night the win
dows were covered so thick with frost that the
pretty patterns of ferns and trees and all sorts
of graceful figures had disappeared and hardy
Hugh could scarcely, with his hot tongue and
warm breath, make a hole large enough to see
through.
And now, perhaps, you had better hear something of the people who lived in this home, which
humble though it was, was a very happy one.
Mr. Morton was the district school teacher. He
had come to the settlement seven years before
and was loved and honored both by the parents
and children. He was not, however, well paid and
even sober Martha little knew what a hard
struggle it was to get plenty of wholesome food
and warm clothing for the family. But Mrs. Morton was a rare manager, and if the family was
poor the children at least never felt it.
They loved their tall fair mother very dearly
and thought there was no one so beautiful as
she in her Sunday dress of soft grey alpaca with
its broad white collar.
But father was the playmate of the little folks.
All sorts of nursery rhymes and stories seemed
to be hidden in his head and many a noisy romp
and merry game the little folks had with him in
the winter evenings. And this was Christmas
morning, the happiest day in the year. Dim as
the fire was, it was bright enough to show the
stockings hung close to the stove. With laugh
and shout the children drew out their treasures.
A scalloped cake, a .bunch of raisins, a handful
of nuts, sticks of home made candy (cookinning
they called it), a big apple and some doughnuts
do not perhaps seem great riches to you who
have books and dolls and toys. But not one of
you will be happier on Christmas day than were
these girls and boys that morning.
The little ones hurried to show and share with
father their treasures, and mother and Martha
began to get the breakfast. But when did children
ever want breakfast on Christmas morning?
And now the little ones must be dressed. The
girls put on the pretty pink pinafores that cov-.
ered their warm frocks. Hugh wore the suit
mother made last week from an old one of
father's, and little Ernest, the pretty plaid-frock
with its bright yellow buttons that grandmother
had sent from town.     *
And now, from outside, voices could be heard.
Mr. Jackson, the farmer, whose big house was
only a stone's throw distant, and his two big boys
were busy shovelling a tunnel to the door and
before the children had grown tired of their play
it opened letting in a flood of Christmas light and
showing the jolly face of the farmer, as he shouted "A merry Christmas 1"
Very soon Mrs. Jackson followed him, bringing in her cheery face, a host of good wishes and
under her clean print apron, a bowl of steaming
broth which Mrs. Morton must, perforce, sit
down and take. The day had worn on and it was
now within an hour of noon. That the quiet
mother had been less busy and active than usual,
the children had not noticed, but they had felt,
somehow, that as father moved about, his voice
was very soft and tender and as leaving the little
ones he put his arm round his oldest daughter
and gave her his Christmas kiss; she remembered
afterwards that his voice trembled.
And then the most wonderful thing happened.
Bustling Mrs. Jackson carried off every one of
the little troop to her own house for their
Christmas dinner. As mother hastily kissed them
good-bye she told them all to be good. Father
had gone out and the bewildered children were
inside the big house before they had time to question even if children in those days dreamed of
asking why.
There they were with playmates of their own
age. There were more sweeties and nuts to eat.
The older children helped to set the long table.
The snowy cloth, the pretty dishes, the brightly
polished steel knives and forks were soon in their
proper places on the long table. The big dining-
room with the roaring fire in the great Franklin
stove, the warm carpet and the gay rugs, was
very comfortable. The children were shy at first,
for a farmer and his daughter from a distant settlement had come to spend Christmas with their
friends and good Mrs. Jackson had not yet come
• back.
But by the time the big roast goose was
cooked, she was ready to sit at the table and help
her double family to all the good things she and
her clever daughters had provided. It would
take too long to tell the big plum pudding, the
pumpkin pies and the doughnuts which disappeared that day. Very merry were the two big
farmers and many a story they told of trips
made in their schooner to the town where goods
were to be bought cheap.
After dinner, great dishes of russet apples
were handed round and as the old friends sat
apart at a table their arose an odor, strange to
the Morton children, filled the room. It came
from a steaming bowl of punch made from the
cask of rum that had formed part of the cargo of
the schooner. And then the stories grew jollier
and now and again a song from the old English
vales where they had spent their boyhood was
sung.
But now the short winter day was over. The
sun was going down behind the snowy world,
leaving a sky lighted with gold and green and
purple.
Then the children were taken home by their
kind hostess who bade them be very quiet. As
the door closed upon them, shutting out the cold
wind, .their father came softly towards them
bearing in his arms a tiny white bundle. To the
wondering children he showed his Chrimtmas
gift, a tiny, white bundle, with a crown of golden
hair, that had come to brighten the home on that
day of love.
Then he led the children to the bed where,
tendered by a motherly old lady, mother lay
white a^d quiet, but with a smiling, happy face,
and put the baby in her bosom.
Yes, Jennie, the story is true. And as Grandma
spoke a lady entered. Her face was sweet and
bright and as she stooped to kiss her children
her hair glowed in the firelight, showing here and
there a strand of silver. Then Jennie remembered that mother's birthday was Christmas Day
but she did not speak as she held her close in her
soft little arms.
SUCCESSFUL DANCE AT COURTENAY.
Courtenay, Dec 10,- A very largely-attended and successful dance, both from a financial and amouul nr amusement afforded participants polnl or view, was hold in tha
Maple Leaf Theatre Inst Friday evening by Ihe Lowls
Jazz Hand. Hndi the band and management aro in bo
congratulated on the smooth and businesslike manner
in which the dance was conducted.
Cumberland was strongly represented and raptured
a fair amount of the honors. The prize winners were as
follows:
Oue-step—First, Lieut Clover and wife of Courtenay;
second. Miss Stuart and Mr. De fonnick of Cumberland.
BcnotUsche—First, Mr. and Mrs. MoKenzle of Courtenay; second. Miss Cray and Mr. DeConnlck of Happy
Valley and Cumberland, respectively.
Waltz—Klrst. Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie of Courtenay;
second, Miss Josa Botcnn and Mr. I'. Shearer of Cumberland.
Both Courtenay and Cumberland can pride themselves on possessing first-class dancers, as Friday evening,
last proved beyond a shadow of doubt.
The judges are deserving of greal praise for the very
fair manner in which they awarded the prizes. No one
envied them their difficult task and especially in the
waltz their knowledge of the technique of dancing was
severely taxed.
The hall wus very tastefully decorated. The evergreens and streamers giving It a voir festive apgearauce,
which harmonized, in fact was symbolic, of the spirits of
the dancers In general.
A little less originality, however, as regards the ways
and means ot preparing the lloor would certainly be
greatly appreciated.
During the evening a fairly large-sized model of an
airplane was rallied, the winning number being 2.10. At
the close of the dance tho plane was still unclaimed. Page Sixteen.
THE  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
December 20,1919.
#
A PACE OF EXTRA FULL VALUES
UR STOCK has never been so large and our assortment of goods has never been so complete, notwithstanding the great difficulty experienced in trying to get delivery of new lines for Fall. The Xmas season
is very near, with all it's old-time memories and we extend an invitation to you to pay us a visit, so that we
may help you to make your purchases.
0
Ladies' House Dresses
.Sizes ;!G to 44. Made of a good heavy qulity gingham, very atatractive; all round
belt; two patch pockets. Price
$2.50
Out size House Dresses for extra stout ladies,
up to size 46. Made of good wear- (J»0 PA
ing gingham. Price *PaaJa,l)U
Ladies' House Dresses in extra good quality
gingham; all sizes up to 44. d»Q  rTP
Price   *pQ» I D
Ladies' Coats
For Christmas week we are offering a special price on every
Lady's Coat in stock.
Brown Tweed Coat, special comfy, size .°.8. Price       <J*OQ QC
$27.50, for  WtUOfUO
Heather Mixture Tweed Coat, size 44, Price $07 P»fl
$33.00, for $£ i .OU
Heavy Dark Winter Coat, size 18. Price tiJOQ QK
$27.50,.for  <PtUO,iJo
Wino Color Velour, very nifty, size 18. Price (UOQ OK
$27.50, for ... ,.„„„ :.. •$LO< VO
Ladies' Waists
The Big Store has always led With its assorts
ment of choice Waists anil what more suitable
gift for a lady than one of our chic Waists?
Crepe de Chine, Georgette Crepe and Voile, in
shades of pink, maise, also white.
Our prices are moderate compared to the
value you get.
An Array of Suitable Gifts for
CHRISTMAS REMEMBRANCES
Ladies Camisoles, made of good quality pink
Bilk, trimmed lace. Special value, Oi) CA
each     iDsit.OV
Pink and White Camisoles, daintily <PO Or
trimmed with good lace, each    Utii.uO
Extra Special Quality Pink Silk Camisoles,
trimmed with a very fine lace.       OO *"7fX
Price, each   «PO. I O
Gossard Satin Brazleries, made of pink satin,
'finished becoming lace. OO OfX
Price    WM.uu
Silk Underskirts, in pale blue, blue Of* QC
and maise. Price   tDUat/v
Pink and White Silk Combinations, made ip
2 qualities. Prices  OC\ QJ? Or? fff
each     WsU.UU and VV) I O
Pink Silk Nightgowns. The quality is good, the
style is very smart, and the price (PQ "»A
is right. Each    «DO.UU
GEORGETTE CREPE
A most desirable fabric and one which
has a great sale at the present time,
owing to its suitability for making
dresses, waists, etc. This also we only
carry one grade in, and advise our customers to buy it ratheft than the cheaper
makes which are flimsy and do not give
that service which one ex- fl»Q r7P
pects, Our price, per yard.... tytU   i U
FLANNELETTE   NIGHTGOWNS
Ladies' Flannelette Nightgowns, made
of good serviceable quality flannelette; good sizes; nothing skimpy
about these. Each—-
$1.95 $2.50 $2.95
EMBROIDERED GOODS
DEPARTMENT
Pink  Mull Nightgowns, stamped      ^Jrt t\f?
ready for embroidery  tSO.uD
Fine Quality Nainsook, ready for      (PQ (jr
emt),i,h!.»rv       wOat/O
•Pink and White Voile Dressing        d»0 Of?
Sacques, stamped  Wsmt.uO
Ladies' Crepe Combinations, ready   fl»1   CH
for embroidery       utlaUv
Ladles' Corset Covers, ready for        djl   Qf»
embroidery       (PXaaaiD
Hucliaburk Towels, ready for em-     (P*|   Of?
bro'ilery    ..      . «MaOD
Runner Scarfs, ready ror embroidery  rtl.u.'i
Huiined Scarfs, ready for embroidery  $2,511
Collar Bags, ready for embroidery   G5c
Shirt Cases, ready for embroidery 75c
Rubber Cases, ready for embroidery ode
Bojplolr Caps, ready for embroidery 43c
Tie* Backs, reuil.v tor enbrnlderv 73c
TABLE CENTRES
Blue Bird Table Centres, scalloped edges, made
in three sizes. Prices, each—
$1.25, $1.50 and $2.25
Embroidered Scnrf Runners, always useful and
acceptable as a gift. Q*C«        flJO OK
Price, eucl.    ¥H\ »"d ?*J*ST?J
Afternoon Tea Cloths, hemstitched d»Q QJT
and embroidered; very dainty....    wd.tasU
Embroidered Tray Cloths. fl»1   Qf»
Each     tDl.a&U
Linen Table Pspjres, beautifully. ,.inbrpIc|or,-'I.
each    wlaauOand wl.DU
Chilton Table Centres, nicely embroid- CAn
ered, each    DUC
Hosiery     Hosiery
VENUS   SILK   HOSE
This particular brand of hose is known all
over Canada as a first-class grade. Venus
Silk Hose in black, navy, sand, pearl
grey, dark grey and white, fl» 1 f| ET
all at  tPl.yD
per pair, which is practically   today's
cost price.
Monarch Knit Ladies' Silk Hose, in tan,
white and black, per d*»-|   /»p»
Radium Silk Hose—In shades of grey,
beaver, cordovan and smoke. d»-| f7p?
Special price, per pair  «J)i-- 4 D
Ladies' Cashmere Hose—The best value
on the market, and most suitable as a
Christmas gift. Today's price AfT*,
only, per pair    i/DC
Secure a few pairs while they last.
Boys' Buster Brown Hose—The make we
can guarantee to wear   well   and give
- full satisfaction; all sizes, per   /?A„
Ladies' Cashmerette Hose—This line is a
very special one and the value is the
best. The price, per pair, is CO./*
only     DUC
Boys' All-Wool Avon Hosiery—If you have
had difficulty in getting a pair of hose
lu stand hard wear, try a pair or two of
this line and we feel you will be more
than satisfied. To size 10.    fr-i   PA
SILK   CREPE   DE   CHINE    -
We carry a choice assortment of shades in
the following colors: blue (three shades),
pink, Paddy, maroon, navy, grey, purple
and white and black.
The above line we carry only in the best
grade, as we have found it gives the satisfaction one desires. Price d*'rt A{?
per yard  *p«£.t/Q
TEA   APRONS
A very appropriate gift, easily sent per
post. Some very dainty designs, in embroidery and lace. Prices—
95C, $1.25 and $1.50
Each
%$e §oxnptixnmt$
of f()e Reason
'HE BIG STORE takes this opportunity of
thanking their many customers for their
business during 1919 and assures them that the
same service, or better if possible, the same
courtesy and consideration will be given them
during the New Year.
DINNER   SETS—97 PIECES
12 sets, four different patterns of English
■ware, the kind that give satisfaction.
Price, per set oi i)'i flJQC (U\
pieces       tpOO.UU
Glassware—Sugar and- Cream, d» I   S\ K
per set  tpLnUO
Toilet Sets—4 Sets only, purchased a long
time ago; good value today for $17.50;
our price, per d»Q PA
PYREX   OVENWARE
Casseroles, Pie Plates, Bread Pans, Cake
Dishes.
EVER WEAR—ALUMINUM
Take no substitute.
Lipped Saucepans Berlin Saucepans
Shallow Stew Pans Preserving Kettles
Windsor Kettles Double Boilers
Pudding Pans Covers
BerJJu Saiine Pots Stetlmor Pots
k-y Pans " "Waffle (folds
Deep Pudding Pans Seamless Bread Pans
Deep Bread Pans Square Jelly Cake
Turban Cake Moulds Molds
Cgrji Cake Pans Muffin Pans
Wash Basins [tippers
Pie Plates Trays
Children's Cups Seamless Baking Pans
Meashuring Cups Soup Strainers
Pint Bowls Shallow Bowls
Hot Water Bottles Seamless Palls
Coffee and Tea " Salt and Peppers
Strainers Tea Bails
We have just received a very large shipment of above anil our prices are moderate.
Xmas Suggestions from Our Grocery Department, as well as Money Savers.
run CHKIST.HA8 CAKES
New Season's Shelled Wnlnuts
New Season's Almonds
New Season's Seeded Haislns
New Season's Seedless Raisins
Now Season's Oil Blanche Sultanas
New Seasons  Wagstaff'a Cut Peel  iu
Lemon, Orbnge and Citron
New Season's Dromedary Dates
New Season's Excollsior Dates
New Season's Table Figs
New Season's White Cooking Figs
New Season's    Lyons    1-lb. Assorted
Glace Fruits
California Glace Cherries
California   Crystalized   Cherries   ln
quarter and halt-pounds.
Crystalized Ginger, assorted
Caraway Seeds and Candle Caraway
Seeds
Pure Lemon and Gold Extracts
Shellle's Fruit Colors
UlltlSTJIAS IHIIMtS
Loganberry Juice lu half-pints.
Marsh Grape Juice in pints
Invalid Port in quarts.
Raspberry Vinegar In pints
Something Good and Hot, O. T., 00c
per bottle
EMITS FOIt CJUUSTMAS
Baldwin Apples
Jonathan Apples
Spitsbergen Apples
Newton Plppen Apples
Cranberries
Kings Apples
Grimes Golden Apples
Mackintosh Apples
Japanese Oranges
Lemons
EMPRESS MIME MEATS
In quart mason jars and two and four-
pound tins
Libby's Mincemeat In bulk
Wet hoy's  Condensed    Mincemeat    ln
packages
BIO STOKE  SPECIALS
King's  Quality  Flour,  the  best,  our
price, per sack  $2.05
Oraham Flour, 7 lb, sack, regular 00c,
for   50e
Quaker Oats, regular 40c, special 8
for $1,110
Robbie Burns Pancake Flour, regular
30c, for 25c
Pacilic Milk, IG-oz. tins, regular 20c
each, special, 7 for $1.00
Pacilic Milk, baby size, regular 10c,
per doz $1,00
Canned Tomatoes, Royal Cltv brand,
regular 25c, special. 5 for $1.00
Apricots, 1-lb. tin, regular 30c, for 25c
Peaches. 1-lb. tin, regular 30c, for 25c
Pride of Canada Maple Syrup, quarts,
for   $1.25
Lowney's Cocoa, regular 35c
Lowney's Cocoa, half-lb. tin, regular
.'Ijf, for ,'|iic
Lowney's Cocoa, 1-lb. tin, regulur 65c,
for   Illlc
We have Cowan's In same sizes at the
same prices.
Libby's Olives, 4 oz. plain, regular 25c,
for  15c
Libby's Olives, 8 oz. plain, for 25c
Queen Olives, quart musun Jars.... 80c
Stuffed Olives, 4 oz 25c
Stuffed Olives, 9 oz. ,„ 50c
Grapelnde, made from Concord grapes
1-lb. tins 25e
2-lb. tins 50c
3-lb. tins 75c
Libby's Appple Butter 25c and 60c
You can save sugar by buying both of
above lines.
Quaker Pork and Beans, uach  10c
Van Camp's Pork and Beans, regular
20c, now 3 for  50c
Van Camp's Pork and Beans, large,
regular 3f>o, now  (Of
Pilchard's   "Snow  Cup.  lialf.ll),  tins.
regular lfic, now 2 foi' .',. .'25c*
Ditto, 1-lb. tins. reg. 25c, now 20c
Notwithstanding the grent advance In
teas wc are now making a special
effort to give good value. Here Is a
leader. About    100 lbs.    tea to be
cleared at, per lb Klic
To lovers ot Coffee there Is nothing
like fresh ground coffee. Try our
two leaders:
No. 1 grade, per lb 75c
No. 2 grade, per lb «5c
Everyone uses soap, or should use it.
Note the'unrementioued:
Clirystal White Soap, regular 2 for 2he,
special, 5 for   50c
Royal Crown Naptha, 3 for 25c
Gobelin Soap, 3 for 25c
Magic Washing Tablets, 6 in pkg. 25c
Witch Soot pestroyer  15c
Witch Wallpaper Cleaner, per tin 25c
SIMON LEISER & CO. Ltd.  "the
STORE
If

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