BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Aug 14, 1925

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068655.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068655.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068655-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068655-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068655-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068655-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068655-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068655-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068655-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068655.ris

Full Text

 Provincial Library
janl)23
;■'.■
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Witt which k MiMlUaM the Camberlaad News.
J
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA        FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1925.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Vancouver Motilities Raid
Cumberland Chinatown
Eleven Chinamen, residents of Cumberland's Chinatown, were arraigned
before Magistrate T. H. Carey last
Monday morning at 11:00 o'clock,
charged with smoking opium. Ten
■were found guilty of this charge and
paid fines of $23.50 each, while the
other was remanded until this coming
Monday at 4:00 p.m. He Is charged
with being In possession of the drug
when caught.
The raid on Chinatown was carried out last Sunday morning at about
3:00 o'clock by six members of the
R. C. M. P., of Vancouver, Sgt. L. J.
Black, and Constables F. Healey. W.
F. Foster, J. Frlpp, C. A. London, and
S. Floyd. Two dens were raided, five
smokers being found ln one and six in
the other. All were lodged in the
Provincial jail where they remained
until their friends bailed nine of them
out Sunday afternoon.
The Chinaman, charged with having
possession of the drug, ls at present
lodged in Okalla, his friends being unable to raise the three thousand dollars set by the Magistrate as ball.
He will be brought here Monday for
trial.
ELKS TO WELCOME
CUMBERLAND KIDDIES
WEDNESDAY NEXT
The Elks Kiddles' Day to be held at
Courtenay on Wednesday next, the
19th, promises to be the best ever
held in the history ot the district. The
Brother Bills extend a cordial Invitation to all Cumberland Kiddles to be
present at their monster celebration.
Everything for the comfort and safety of the children is being undertaken by competent members of the Elks'
Order. Parents are requested to send
the children to the school grounds
at Courtenay on Wednesday next at
1 o'clock.
Brother Bills will do the rest.
TICKET 181 WAS
WINNER OF CAMERA
COMMERCIAL SCHOOL
PUPIL IS AWARDED
BRONZE MEDAL
COURTENAY,—Miss Catherine Singleton, of the Courtenay Commercial
School, has succeeded ln obtaining a
bronze medal awarded by the Underwood Typewriter Co., for typing at
the rate of 46 words per minute for
15 minutes. * Miss Christine Millard
also sneceeded in obtaining a proficiency certificate trom the Underwood Typewriter Co.. for typing at
the rate ot 31 words per minute for
fifteen minutes. The Courtenay Commercial School will be closed for
holidays the last two weeks in August, school recommencing on September 1st.
Local Band
Competing In
Vancouver
The Cumberland City Band, under
the leadership of Mr. William Jackson, left for Vancouver Thursday
morning where they will take part in
the contest for the championship of
B.C., now held by the Silver Cornet
Band, of Nanaimo. The local musicians have been practicing for this
event for some months past and hope
to make a very fine showing in the
terminal city tomorrow. Their last
practice, Wednesday >venlng, revealed the fact Cumberland has a band of
fine musicians, and as the majority of
them are still ln their teens, some not
even that old, it is expected that their
playing will make a deep impression
on the judges.
IS THIRD TEACHER
TO BE APPOINTED?
At the last meeting of the Cumberland School Board the question ot appointing an additional teacher to
High School staff was discussed,
with the aim in mind of establishing a class In senior metric, or, whlcn
Is the same thing, first year of university. It was the concensus of opinion
among the trustees that the proposal
was an admirable one, tnd accordingly the secretary was Instructed to
advertise for applications for the position, the new teacher to be appointed
only on condition that high school
pupils this coming term number not
less than fifty. In order lo ascertain
the number that actually will attend,
all pupils were asked to register as
soon as possible with the secretary,
but up to noon yesterday, only thirty-
nine had done so—14 for first year,
12 for second year, 7 for third year.
and 6 for fourth year. Pupils wno
have not already registered should
do so Immediately, or their parents
should register for them, for lt does
not take a great deal of thinking to
realize the benefits that will be derived from having a staff of three
(Continued on  Page Six)
Charley's Aunt at the llo-Ilo Tin-
aire, Cumberland this Frlduv and Sat-
nrdat*. Matinee Saturday at 2:811.
Evening Shows 7:00 and Siill.
Ticket number 181, held by L. Peterson, of Union Bay, was the winner
of the camera raffled recently in aid
of the Cumberland City Band. The
raffle took place in the Ilo-llo Theatre Wednesday evening and it is
stated that a goodly sum of money
was realized from the sale of Itckets
in this connection. The proceeds
wlll be used to defray expenses of the
band, which Is now ln Vancouver talking part in the annual band contest
held there.
Rain Postpones
Final Match For
Stevens' Shield
Yesterday's downpour of rain put a
damper on the aspirations ot Cumberland tennis enthusiasts and as a
result the final outcome of the Stevens' Shield competition is still in
doubt Play reached tbe seml-flnal
stages last week, with the four Oraham brothers still in the running, but
on Tuesday of this week, it was narrowed down to two when M. Oraham
and C. C. Oraham emerged victorious
from their respective brotherly fueds.
Mort eliminated his brother Tom, 6-2,
8-6; and "Bud" romped through
".Chick" to the tune of 4-3, 6-1. Tbls
leaves M. and C. C. Oraham to fight it
out for possession Qf the coveted
trophy. The game will be played as
soon as weather permits.
CUMBERLAND GIRL'S
MARRIAGE SURPRISES
Residents of Cumberland will be
surprised to learn of the marriage of
a native daughter, Miss Agnes Potter,
who last evening became the bride of
Mr. John Newton Hennlng of Union
Bay. The young couple have been
keeping their Intentions secret, no one
knowing of the Impending union until
the ceremony actually took place.
The wedding was quietly solemnized at nine o'clock in the home of
Mr. and Mrs. James Potter, the bride's
parents, Allan Avenue, Rev. James
Hood, pastor of St. Oeorge United
Church, officiating. The groom was
assisted by Mr. Frank Potter and the
bride by her sister Mrs. C. DeCouer.
The young couple left Immediately
after the wedding on a honeymoon
holiday, and, on returning, will spend
a few weeks at the bride's summer
residence at Royston before taking a
permanent home.
BEAUTIFUL HOME TO
BE OFFERED FOR SALE
Belvolr Villa, the beautiful residence of Mrs. John Bruce, situated on
four full-size building lots Immediately adjoining the city ot Cumberland,
wlll be offered for sale In the near
future. The grounds contain an
orchard with every kind of fruit,
flowers, shrubs, barn, stable and other
buildings.
Mrs. Bruce we understand, will hold
a private sale within the next three
or four weeks and dispose of her wonderful assortment of cut-glass, painted china, and other articles. It Is
also mentioned that an auction sale
may be held.
Mrs. Bruce Is fast failing In health,
the reason, probably, for her decision
lo dispose of her beautiful home.
New Serial Story Starts This Week
With this issue, The Islander begins the first Instalment of the story
"A Cowboy Abroad," by Tom Mix, released for publication in this paper,
and hope that it will be of interest to dur many readers. No synopsis
wlll be published; therefore it wlll be necessary for those wishing to follow the story to receive a copy every week. A few extra papers will
be printed ln case anyone may desire back numbers and may be had by
calling at this ofllce.    Next week—the Mix family start their sea voyage.
FOREWORD
If lt seems to you that through these memoirs, so to speak, I have
dwelt overmuch on the receptions I was accorded In Europe; If It
seems to you that Tom Mix has been anxious to let you know how well
he was received each place, no matter of how little Interest It all may
be to read, please bear with me. I am not trying to Impress you with
a torturing account of my travels; I sin simply putting down my Impressions, and you might easily guess that I, nothing more than a cowboy mistaken tor a motion picture actor, was certainly • impressed by
the receptions accorded me..
I am not being boastful. It Is true as the day is long thut the
greetings I received were as I have written of them. If you had made
the trip with me you, too, would never have got over it. From the
perspective I now have, I cannot help but believe Europeans a t.lfle
crazy. Else they couldn't hare turned out in thousands upon thousands to welcome me. —Tom Mix.
Comox Lake Is Scene
Of Drowning Fatality
BERRY GROWERS
THANK RETAILERS
Cumberland's second drowning fatality of the year occurred at noon
last Tuesday when Hoy Davis, 17-
months-old son of .Mr. and Mrs. Al-
Camp Three Of The
Comox Logging Co..
Wiped Out By Fire
FOR CO-OPERATION l,c" •)av's' ot ,',,s c">', '°9' n*' '"'3
In the waters of Comox Lake. In
company with several other children,
the youngster wus playing on one of
COURTENAY, Aug. 11.—At a meeting  of  the  Comox   Valley   berrymen
held In the Creamery olllce on Friday I lhe numeroiw floats jutting Into the
evening It was decided that final set-1 mttn "< **'*- Lak<!* •"•*• ••* 8ome ">■"•■
tleinent tor the 1925 crop should be i "*■•' he te" '»• The other children
held over until the general meeting •••*• 110t miss ••■•■• for Perhaps two or
of the berry growers' association ; tnree minutes, At the end of which his
which was set for the 20th of this , bo(*>' was soen *•*"■ dragged out of the
month. .Mr. D. Pattison, the large I wl*ter ■■>' >'°uhb* Harr-** Westfield. Dr.
Merville grower was In the chair, ] MacNaughton waa immediately sent
and those present included Messrs j for* as well " Mr- A. J. Taylor, who
N. Pritchard. secretary, Ed. Clark. H. I """• "■ work ln nearby No. 4 mine.
P. Allberry, Mulr Bros., H. S. Baker,': Bo"* attempted resuscitation for near-
F. G. Liddle, A. W. Smith, E. B. Grant | *>' an hour a**d a **a*f but their aland R. U. Hurford I tempts to restore life were fruitless.
An offer for the Ford truck which   whe*-   >'<»"**   Westfield   carried   the
had heen purchased for the association by Mr. H. S. Baker at the beginning of the season was made by
Mr. Ed. Clark und was accepted. It
was decided that all personal accounts
be turned in to Mr. Baker at once.
Much appreciation was expressed for
the whole-hearted manner in whicn
the retailers of the district had sup
body from the  water the child was
still living hut unconscious.
Little Hoy always seemed.to have
a desire to be ln the water, and Tuesday was not the first time that he
had fallen iii only to be dragged out
again hy various people who happened
to be close by.      It Is said that he
COURTENAY, Aug. ll.-Remlnlsceat
of the great Merville conflagration of
three years ago was the fire which
wiped out Camp No. 3 of the Comox
Logging Co., on Saturday tnd which
has since seriously threatened the
town of Headquarters. Besides tbe
destruction of private and company
owned houses, standing timber and'
equipment at Camp No. 3, which la
estimated at over one hundred thousand dollars, several houses have
since been demolished tn the on-
sweeping path of the fire. Messrs
Colvert and Roberts lost their house
on Sunday but have so far saved their
barn and other buildings. Mr. Geo.
Bndall and Mr. Te* Sock-till* both hod
the misfortune to lose their houses
close to Norther's Lake.
Cable Friction Cause of Blaze
The fire originated ln a very unusual way at about 10:30 a.m. on Saturday morning. In stretching a steel
cable used ln "high lead" rigging between two trees, the cable broke and
one end recoiling with terrific force
lashed Itself round a dead cedar tree.
The friction Immediately set lire to
the tree which was bone dry. In a
moment the blaze Jumped up the tree
and spread In all directions. The
spot was a particularly bad one and
although Mr. Filberg and the loading
crews worked frantically to prevent
tbe spread, their efforts were absolutely futile and within a few minutes the fire was Jumping from tree
to tree and the forest a roaring furnace with sparks and fire brands being whirled high In the air, only to
spread fiery destruction still further.
All available 'men were turned out to
endeavor to check the fire In Its
spread towards camp.     Some of the
men who went into the woods to warn
anyone who might be in the neighborhood misjudged the speed at which
the me was travelling and when coming out again had narrow escapes
from the flames which were pursuing
close behind them.
families Ordered to Vacate Homes
There was a northerly breeze blowing at the time and the heat of the
burning forest created Its own wind
and no efforts on the part of the fire
fighters could prevent the flames
reaching the camp, which was soon
enveloped In dense smoke, sparks and
fire, Having had a tew minutes
warning the occupants of the houses
in camp were able to save most of
their clothing and articles easily carried away. Some of the families
there have been burnt out on two
previous occasions, this making the
third time that Camp 3 has been razed
Who said three was a lucky number?
By Sunday night the Are had got within a short distance of Headquarters
and the smoke and heat was almost
unbearable. Every woman and child
was taken away from the town, which
seemed doomed and there ls * little
doubt, but for the lack of wind, Headquarters, B.C., would by now be a
name only. The company's buildings have been kept saturated with
water, of which the town has a good
supply, and with the continued absence of wind, until rain comes, the
town may yet survive. Several families in the Dove Creek area have vacated their dwellings which are directly ln the present path of the fire.
Some of the fire refugees are making
use of the auto park here, while the
hotels and friends are taking care of
others.
would sometimes sit in the water up
ported the local growers during the jtn his walst* an**' •" ,lli8 Position,
season just closed, and members pres- j would 8° to sleep,
ent expressed the hope that this sup-1 The tancnl Of the tiny tot was held
port would continue during the fu- yesterday afternoon from the home
ture. A hearty vote of thanks was ! of Ml** w* Keenan. Derwent Ave., who
also extended to Mr. H. S. Baker and | ls Mrs* Davls' fi,tller* 0n|y relatives
Mr. R. U. Hurford for their work and j **"'■ immediate friends of the family
assistance during tlie season ot 1925.1 were Present.     Rev. James Hood, of
| St.  George's  United,  conducted  services ut tlie home und at the grave-
$4,000 Damage
At Drug Store Fire
The sympathy ot the entire town
of Port Alberni was extended to Mr.
E. B. Coulthsrd on Saturday afternoon last, when fire visited his drug
store, lately acquired from Robert C.
Lang, of Cumberland.
The Are, which'started In the dispensary, soon made rapid headway,
destroying a portion of the stock and
seriously damaging the building. Tho
Port Alberni Volunteer Fire Department at the time of the alarm, were on
their way to fight bush fires on the
outskirts ot the town, but on hearing
the fire bell, Immediately returned.
The loss, which Is estimated at
34,000.00 was covered by Insurance.
It is Mr. Coulthard's Intention to
carry on as usual Just as soon as the
necessary repairs to the building have
been completed.
Miss Chrissle Sutherland returned
to Royston Beach Tuesday after having spent a prolonged holiday with
friends ln Vancouver.
Charley'** Aunt at the Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland this Friday and Sat-
unlay. Matinee Saturday at tiMH.
Evening Shows ?t00 aad 8:4*.
Liquor Profit
Cheque Received
Cumberland's share ofthe'1925 liquor profits arrived during Ihe week hy
cheque from the Provincial Government. Nothing official has been announced by the city council, nor will
be until after next Monday's meeting,
but It Is generally known around town
that the amount la ln excess of last
year's cheque. The share of the
larger cities throughout the province
has been considerably decreased this
year, Nanaimo's being almost cut in
half.    . . .
CAMPBELL RIVER
SALMON FISHING
WAS NEVER BETTER
Royston Quoiters
Take Measure Of
Gartley Players
Throwing quoits and horseshoes is
the popular sport at Royston and
Gartley's Beach for the moment, especially among the "dads" of the summer resorts. So keen has been tlie
competition in the past few days that
the Roystonltes promptly Issued a
challenge for a series of games to the
star throwers from the other beach
and were Just as promptly accepted.
The first game, In which horseshoes were used, was played "Wednesday afternoon at Royston Beach, the
home team currying the day with u
total of 142 points to their opponents
130, Many spectators from both resorts watched the matches with keen
interest, Judging from the shouts, both
encouraging and otherwise, whlcn
wcre heard from one end of the beach
to the other. On completion of play
the ladles from Royston served both
players and spectators with cake, Band
wiches, tea, and ice-cream, the latter
being generously given by "Dud"
Henderson, captain of the winning
team.
ln the scores, given below, names
of Royston players arc given first:
W. Henderson and A. MacKinnon defeated Rev. Hood and T. Banks. 61-12:
F. Dalby and T. Mordy defeated C.
Tarbell and T. Mumford, 54-46; J.
Sutherland and F. MacKinnon lost to
Dr. MacNaughton and G. Tarbell,
27-42.
The second match will be played nl
Gartley's Beach this coming Wednesday afternoon. Quoits. Instead Of
horse-shoes, will be used and this will
considerably handicap the Royston |
players, only one ot them hnving had N~w W(,atmln ,,.,
any previous experience with the i
rings. Their opponents have prnc-1
tlced with both.
side.
Following is the list of floral tributes: Cross from Duddy and Mamma;
Globe from Aunts Mary and Hilda,
Vancouver; Wreath from Grandpa
and grandma and Gordon Keenan;
Wreath from Uncle Bob and Aunt
Annie; Sprays from l.'ncle Jack and
Aunt Maggie; Uncle Dick and Aunt
Danetta; his Utile brothers, Talbcrt
and Alvin; Lilian und Margaret; Mr.
and .Mrs. Jeff Davis, Chase River;
Barbara, .Margaret and Buddy; Mrs.
Francecini; .Mr. und .Mrs. John Bond
anil a Cross from Mrs. D. Bannerman.
Visitors From
World Over At
Campbell River
MEDICAL BOARD
OFFICERS ELECTED
COURTENAY. Aug. 11.—Tourists
still continue tu arrive In good numbers at Campboll lllver and they are
enjoying excellent sport with the
tyees. While the season is really
only just beginning, a number of fitly
pound, fish have already been caught
this year.
Among those participating In the
sport ul present nre: J. W. Heard* sr.,
Ilukersfleld, Calif.I John W. Heard,
jr.. Berkeley, Calif.; John H. Wood.
Chas. M. Wood. sr.. Charles M. Wood
jr..J. K. Juwers. Nunulnin; I. S. Math-
erson, French Creek, Parksvllle; Gus
Lyons. Victoria; Gerry Lyons. Victor-
iu; II M. Wright. Vuncouver; W.
Berkeley, Yorkshire, Kngland; A. M.
Archer, Shanghai; Dr, and Mrs. Gen.
II. Hi r. Los Angeles. Calif.; W. lt.
Veysey; E. W. Haskell nnd family.
s. Rhea Farncst
Hollywood. Los Angeles. Calif.; Wm.
L. Crowe. Portland. Ore.; Albert M.
Crowe, New York City; Mr. and Mrs.
S. Fletcher, Oakland. Calif.! George
Iirethour, Courtenay; J. K. McKenzie
Courtenay; Henry m. ESarle, New
York; J. N. Ilopkinson. New York;
J. S. ISenr. Vuncouver; Mrs. C. H.
Thomas, C. II. Thomas, Harold Dubois. Dallas, Texas; L. C. Carl, Van
couver; in-. Wyburn, Catallne isiund.
S. Calif.
since the Campbell River 'I'yec club
I hns been organized, amateur flsher-
Thc nnntinl meeting of the Canadian Collieries .Medical and Accident
Fund wns held In the lecture hall of
the Athletic Club last Saturday evening, president J. L. Brown presiding.
Election of oflicers for the coming
year resulted us follows:
President.   B,   Hughes;   Secretary-! men   are  showing  great   Interest   In
Treasurer, J. Dick; Members of Board   competing with each other for quail-
Salmon fishing (tyee), at Campbell
Blver, has never been better in tho
past ten years than It Is this season.
The latest "Big one" was caught yes-
terday by a tourist staying at the
Willows Hotel, who landed one weighing 58H pounds on a very light tackle
S. Hunt. (1. .1. Richardson and H.
Walker, representing No. 4 underground employees; II. Rates und II.
Brown,  representing  No.   4   surface;
Illations (or membership. Satisfaction is being expressed that the use
of nets has hern prohibited at tho
mouth of the Campbell River.     This
Charley's Aunt at Ihe Ilo-llo The-'
ati-a, Cumberland this Friday and Nut. j
urday. Matinee Saturday at 2.S0.'
Evening Shows "iOO and Sltta •
R, Brown, No, li underground; F. Cur- place Is now Included In some of the
ter. No. 5 surface.     There arc three English   lists of  the  world's famous
more members to be elected, one more fishing  grounds.
to represent No. f, underground, who 	
will be elected al a pithead meeting.
one from miscellaneous nnd one from Cliarlcj's Aunt al lhe Ilo-llo ThiC
Union  Buy.      A  vote of thanks win aire, Ciimherlund Mils Friday aud Sal-
tendered   the   retiring   president   for urday.      Mnllmi*   Natiirilny   ut  SlStl.
(Continued  on  Page Six) livening Shuns itlMI nnd **:l.">. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND BLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1925
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1925
DO NOT Never carry your business home with
TAKE IT you. Transact it at your store or
HOME ofiice, anil leave its cares, perplexities
antl trials there. Do not let its worries influence you at home to fret yourself ami
those around you. The mind at homo should he
drawn away from business cares and directed m
a channel to interest and instruct and freshen
and strengthen antl prepare it for duties of the
morrow. "All work and no play makes Jack a
dull boy," and all business and no recreation lessens the capacity, power and strength of the mind
to do the necessary thinking for conducting business successfully.
Life is too short to give up all to business and
nothing to pleasure and rest. Too many people-
defraud their stomach, head and heart until they
have made a competency. When they expect to
enjoy the pleasures of life they are generally too
old, or their greed for money dried up all the well
springs of their being and they are incapable of
enjoyment. Devote your business hours to innocent pleasure and wholesome amusement and
the cultivation of such things as will make life
pleasant.
granddaughters. And bobbed hair! Though
it may be gray and thin, as long as there is any
left they are never too old to have it bobbed.
Talk about chaperones for the young folks.
What we need today is keepers and guards for
the grandpas and grandmas. Don't blame it all |
on the youngsters, and remember there is no fool
like an old fool.
LET'S
TAKE
TIME
NO FOOL The winning ways of grandma's
LIKE AN days are very nice to read about as
OLD FOOL one sits in the comfort of steam-
heated, electric-lighted apartments
on a stormy winter's night. But in these days
of dancing grandmothers, the dear old ladies are
stepping out and life is not supposed to be closed
with the fifties. So much has been written and
said about the young person that perhaps we
might pause to sound a warning against our modern old people. "In my youth, young folks did
not behave as you do," is the the constant rebuke
heard on all sides. We have been waiting to hear
precocious kid reply: "And in your youth, old
folks did not behave as you do."
Today the elderly men and women are often
bigger fools than the high school youth. Did
you ever watch the grey-haired man talking to
pretty girls and women ? Their age allows them
a freedom of touch and speech denied those of a
more recent generation. That the flapper frowns
at senile terms of endearment, at lingering handclasp, at shoulder-patting and cheek-pinching
does not deter old men from persisting in such attentions.
Beauty shops are springing up at a rate never
known before. Once only girls and young women
patronized them. Now elderly women have
"facials" and "steams" and "packs." Thoy are
more particular about the exact shade of their
Let us take time for the good-bye kiss.
We shall go to the day's work with a
sweeter spirit for it.
Let us take time for the evening prayer.
Our sleep will be more restful if we have claimed
the guardianship of God.
Let us take time to speak sweet, foolish
words to those we love. By and bye, when they
can no longer" hear us, our foolishness will seem
more wise than our best wisdom.
Let us take time to read our Bible. Its
treasures will last when we shall have ceased to
care for the war political parties, and rise and fall
of stock, or the petty happenings of the day.
Let us take time to be pleasant. The small
courtesies, which we often omit because they are
small, will some day look larger to us than the
wealth which we covet, or the fame for which we
struggled.
Let us take time to get acquainted with our
families. The wealth you are accumulating,
burdened father, may be a doubtful blessing to
the son who is a stranger to you. Your beautifully-kept house, busy, busy mother, can never be
a home to the daughter whom you have no time
to caress.
AIN'T IT THE What makes a town anyway":
TRUTH, PARD? Is it the wealth evidenced by
the homes and splendid store
windows? These may attest the stability and
thrift of certain people, but they offer no great
inducements to commercial and moral progress.
Is it the spirit of good order and law observance ?
That is a factor only. The sleepiest old hamlets
that dot the map have this spirit in rank abundance. Is it the schools and churches? May
their number ever increase, but they don't make
a town—they only culture it. Is it the geographical location, the characfer of the country surrounding, the shipping facilities, the naural advantages?
None of these are essentials. Well, what is
it that makes a town, anyway? Just one thing
—the unity of the people, the existence of a common bond which causes business and social enemies to put aside all differences when it comes to
boosting the town. No town ever made real progress in the way to substantial success without
the get-together spirit unanimously adopted. It
has rejuvenated old hulks of towns that wcre
yawning their way into endless sleep. It has
infused new life blood into the heart of commercial life and made thriving cities out of paralytic,
villages.
Natural advantages account for much and
prosperity cannot be built upon shifting sand, but
any town with half a chance can be made to grow
and expand and thrive when its citizens join'tvith
one accord in the boosting program.
Britain Celebrates Hundred Years of Railroading
t'pper—Sli»pticn«nn's  tint *
(he Canadian   Pacific  Trnn*-Ci
iglm un the Stockton & Darlington  Railways.    In*rt—Tht Interior of tha olneiratlon car
mi:!n.     Lower—Tllc  Tran*.-Canada  leaving Montreal.
T'he old Stockton and Darlington Railway, in England, is a matter of history now Its board of
directors i3 no more; its inventor has passed to his
reward; its rolling ..tuck, or what .survives of it, rests
in peace In museums - having served its day and been
left behind in the march of progress.
But this year—a century since the time when the
Stockton and Darlington Railway was regarded as a
marvellous engineering achievement and threatened
the supremacy of the stage coach as a means of longdistance transportation—the ancient engines have
been taken down from their pedestals, the wheels oiled,
the rust removed and once again high hatted gentlemen and bonnetted maidens have heen bumped along
from Stockton to Darlington behind the first real
locomotive England ever had
Thus the people of Great Britain celebrated its
railway centenary. Processions of defunct rolling
Clock, and rolling stock that is almost defunct illus-
trated the evolution of railway transportation and
l...c to the rising generation   an   insight   into   thc
agonies our grandparents had to endure if they wished
to go from one place to another by train. The Duke
and Duchess of York attended the celebrations and,
watching the parades, became thoroughly infected with
the spirit of the occasion. All those who took part
in the processions, and some of those who didn't,
dressed in the costumes of the period, giving to the
celebrations an atmosphere altogether In keeping with
the nature of the celebration.
By way of showing the wonderful development
that has taken place in railroading since the first
engine painfully puffed its way from Darlington to
Stockton there is shown above one of the engines
used in the centenary celebrations pulling a replica
of the original train contrasted with the ultra-modern
Trans-Canada, the all-steel Canadian Pacific Train,
which nowadays conveys its passengers from one part
of the Dominion to another, three thousand miles
away, at a speed considered unattainable by our
forefathers, and in greater comfort and security thun
many uf them enjoyed at home.
-
SEMI-ANNUAL
MEETING
Agricultural Hall, Courtenay,
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 AT 10 A.M.
Business:—To Consider Semi-Annual Statement and Other Business
Comox Creamery Association
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Tonight & Saturday
August 14th and 15th
The World's Funniest Motion Picture
mm
Syd Chaplin
EVERY MAN FOB HIMSELF!
The management of the Ilo-
llo Theatre takes this means of
warning the people of Cumberland that unless they are hysterics-proof, unless they can
stand the strain of laughing
continuously for an hour and a
half, and unless they are sure
there is no danger of swallowing
their false teeth, they should
under no circumstances see
"Charley's Aunt."
TWO SHOWS EVERY NIGHT
7:00 and 9:00
Children 25*p Adults 50<?
MATINEE
SATURDAY   AT 2:30 P.M.
Children 25<* Adults 500
"Funny enough to make the old
cat laugh." In
FRIDAYV AUGUST 14, 1925.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual Tuition in
SHORTHAND — TYPEWRITING — BOOK KEEPINS
BUSINESS METHODS
New Location Opposite Corfield's Garage.
A COWBOY ABROAD
BY TOM MIX
A record of the most notable reception ever accorded by
Europe to a private citizen
Released  for  Publication  In  The  Cumberland  It-lander
Jasper National Park
And Return—$35.85 From Vancouver
Edmonton and Calgary
And Return—145.00
(War Tax Additional)
$ 13.00 Extra for Routing via Prince Rupert to Cover
Meals and Berth on Steamer
Also to
Eastern Canada
CENTRAL AND EASTERN STATES
Particulars on Application
J Edward W. Bickle, Cumberland, B.C.
Canadian national Rauvvays
IIIIIIII!f!!III!l!l!IIIIlll!II!
Widening The Field
Doubtless at the present time you use the telephone for the purpose of having social conversations
with friends in your community. With the same ease
you can add to your telephone calling list those friends
who reside many miles away, for the long-distance
telephone is well suited to friendly talk-trips.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
iiiiiiiiiHmitimiimwHuiiiHnMHiiiiHmitiitiiJiEEHiiiuiiiiiiiuiimiifiiiifiniiiiiiiMiiiiiEiniiiiiiiiiifii
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
MANN'S BAKERY
Appetizing Fruit Pies for Summer Time
Apple .Pineapple, Raisin and Apricot
Our Famed Scotch Oat Cakes and Girdle Scones
Sure to Please.
WEEK END SPECIALS
Delicious Custards, Lemon Pies and the Real English
Bath Buns; Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls.
Need No Recommending
Wedding and Birthday Cakes Made to Order.
MANN'S CUMBERLAND, B.C.
All Orders Delivered - Phone 18
}Vdin IriU.and Ms v/owier horse.'Vony1
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHOSI IM
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
s
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
This Europe business started Innocently enough. There I was sitting
peacefully on my veranda at Mlxvllle,
with one eye cocked toward the corral where Tony, Buster and other
ponies were busy playing tiddledy-
wlnks witb files—ln short going nlong
natural and happy—when Mrs. Mix
turned suddenly to me and says she:
"Tom, you're a fine cowboy, a hard
worker, and a tolerable husband. In
fact I don't know any man I admire
more. You have many qualities In
your favor."
"That's awful good of you," I ai
wered, speaking slowly and carefully
for I had a hunch something was in
the air and I didn't want to commit
myself. "Yes, that's awful good of
you, and, seeing you're my wife, I
might say it's even awful darned good
of you!    When a man—"
"But," she cut in.
"Oh," I said, "there's a catch to it."
"No," she declared. "There's no
catch to It. I am only about to say
something I am certain you will agree
with me in."
"And that?" I asked.
She hesitated a minute and I could
see she was having a hard time getting around to it.
"Well," she went on, "as I was saying, you're a line man."
"I thanked you once for that, and
so far we're agreed. I certainly am
a fine man." But sbe wasn't paying
any attention to my admissions.
"The only thing you need," she continued slowly drawing out the words,
"yes, the only thing you are a hit
lacking in, is culture."
Tony out ln the corral must have
seen me Jump, for he turned away
from the fence and galloped across
the field. I was a full minute getting control of myself.
"Oh, so that's all I need," 1 finally
answered. "That's easy. All Wilhelm needs to be Kaiser again is a
country that'll have him and a couple
of million soldiers."
She acted exactly as If she hadn't
heard me.
"Not exactly culture," she continued
"After all, you do read a great deal
and have a good idea about many important things. Rather, you lack,
let us say, a polish, a background."
"Then," I. said, "everything's okay.
Your trouble is simply a matter of
misinformation. I'm the most polish
ed cowboy that ever got his riding
breeches shiny on saddle leathr; and
as for background, did you ever see
my shirt after Tony and I had fallen
down a mountain side, only to have
the director say, 'That's very good,
Tom, but you'll have to do it over
again. The cameraman missed it?'
No, you've just got me wrong. I'm
as polished as a buffalo nickel In a
miser's purse, and my back and the
ground are as familiar as Siamese
twins.
I    I thought that was a pretty snappy
comeback, but she didn't give a
tumble.
"Don't be funny," Bhe cautioned.
"Thla is serious business. I've made
up my mind."
. "In that case," I said, "what are we
arguing about? Just let me ln on
the idea and maybe we can get together."
"Well," she began—and I didn't like
the way she hesitated; lt looked as if
she was gathering steam—"Well, I've
been thinking we ought to go to Europe. Yuo've got a six weeks' vacation and we could spend it there, ln
the cradle of civilizalton."
"So it's a cradle, is it?" I asked, determined to keep on trying to be funny .as I've found you can laugh off a
lot ot things you can't lick any other
way. "Maybe, then, they'll rock me
to sleep. I can't stay ln bed more
than fourteen hours any more to save
my life. Perhaps It would be good'
for Thomasina, too. The way that'
child bas been keeping awake after1
ten in the morning has got me wor-'
ried.
But again my humor failed to impress. She had been to Europe the
year before and it was serious business. About all she would talk about
was Its charm, Its 'old world glory, its
historic qualities, its inspiring coun
tryside. I could tell now, by the
look ln her eyes, that the mention of
Europe was about to start her again,
and I tried my best to think of some
thing to say to head her off. But I
was too late.
"They do things differently In Eur
ope," ahe began.    "Each little or big
town has Its quaint personality, n
fleeted In Its buldlngs, Its customs, 1
people."
"That's all very well," I said, "but
bow about the bathrooms and the
trains.    I've heard—"
"That's just tt!" she exploded.
"You've heard. It's about time you
went over and found out these things
for yourself. For a man ln your position in the film Industry not to know
how the other half of the world lives
is shameful. And this European
polish I have been talking about has
not anything to do with silverware
or automobile bodies or riding breeches; it's a positive, charming quality
which gives distinction. At least li
is worth while observing."
"But what good ls that to a cowboy
actor? Now I'll tell you, Victoria,
I'm not laughing at your European
cradle, or is it rocking horse?—of
civilization, but It's not for me. Then,
too, you must think or the other fellow. My old friend William Fox la
showing a lot of my pictures over
there Just now and a lot of people
are seeing them. Maybe I couldn't
live up to 'em."
"Don't be silly," she said.
"I'm  not,"   I  answered.      "That's
why I'm going to stay at Mlxville."
Continued on page Four
Improved New
Model Eureka
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
S65.00 $«5.0»
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30-inch extension tubing, 7-inch aluminum noztle with detachable
upholstery brush, and radiator tool.
lie.00 $u.oe
FOR SALE BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, EC.
I
Red Top Relief Valves. $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vz-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection. .
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOW!, DOORS,
SHINtLU.
KILN DRIID l-LOORINQI,
AND    rURMIHINM
Wl DILIVM TO AMYWHUU IN SHORT
NOTIOI WITH R1AIONABL1 OHAIMMM.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES|
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
/Night calls: 1I4X Caurtenay
Oflee: lit Caalwrtait
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phonos 4 and 81
Cumberland, B.C.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
BUTTER HORNS    FANCY PASTRY
Lemon, Apple and Raisin Pies
Alio a largo •••ortmea* of Small Fancy Cake*
Cookie*, Fruit, Cherry and Sultana Cake
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND, B.C PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1925
	
 .	
 , . ; , , _.	
 . — _
PREVENT FOREST FIRES-IT PAYS
ROBERT W.
BULLER'S
TRAINED ANIMAL
CIRCUS
Will Exhibit At
ONE DAY
—ONLY—
ROYSTON
TWO PERFORMANCES—AFTERNOON AND NIGHT
ONE DAY
—ONLY—
Saturday. August 15th
Educated Ponies, Bears, Monkeys, Goats, Pigs, Dogs
Clowns Fun Galore Clowns
"A Glorious Galaxy of Glittering Attractions"
AFTERNOON NIGHT
Doors Open at 1:00 Doors Open at 7:00
Show Starts at 2:00 Show Starts at 8:00
POPULAR PRICES
ELKS'
KIDDIES' DAY
Wednesday, August 19th
AT COURTENAY
$10.00 in Prizes for Best Comic
in Street Parade, 3 prizes as follow*:
lit   -   $5.00 2nd   -   $3.00 3rd   -   $2.00
ELK'S RAMI FROM VANCOUVER Wilt LEAK PARAI1E ANI>
GIVE CONCERT ON GROUNDS
Send Your Kiddies to Courtenay.     Have them at the
School Ground at 1:00 O'clock
Brother Bills Will Do The Rest
V. C. T. Co. Ltd.
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
Commencing Wednesday, August 12th, the company freight   boat   will   leave   Vancouver  each
Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. t
DELIVERING COURTENAY FRIDAYS
Way Points—Baynes Sound, Thursdays
VANCOUVER-COURTENAY TRANSPORTATION
Phone 111 COMPANY Phone 144
Chas. Simms, Agent
Charley's  Aunt Is
At Ilo-llo Tonight
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACT AMENDMENTS
| When you ar* Id need of a
Plumbing * Renting Enflawr, Sm
R. RUSHTON
wm iii Urn
Q«i  .1 Lull
There's nothinjr puzzling
about the quality of tho
foodstuffs here — or the
prices. They help solve
the problem of high living
cost.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. .Illl and  lliinsmulr.
Phone 124
Courtenay
Vour   Midi
Phone 117
Cumberland
will   receive
attention.
Immediate
GOVERNMENT I.IQI OH ACT
Nolle*  of   Application   For  Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that.
Ion Ihe 24(h day of August 1925 the
undersigned Intinds to apply to the
; Liquor Control Board for a license ln
respect of lhe premises being part of
| lhe    luiil'liiH'.    known    ns    "Mullen's
Place" Hltuute upon the Innds de-
| BCrlbed ns lol IS In block "J" of Soc-
I tlon 6'A mnp 117S. situate near Roy-
| BtOD Beach In Nelson District In the
County of Nnnnlmo nnd Province of
iiriiish Columbia, Victoria Land iteg-
latration District, for thc sale of beer
by the glnss or hy tho open bottle for
! consumption on the promises.
!    Ilnteil  this 31st dny of Julv. A.D.,
j 1916,
PATRICK MULLBN,
83-36. Applicant.
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lauds may be pre-empted hy
British subjects over 18 yearB of age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can he obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west ot tbe Coast Range
and 8,000 teet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied tor
ls situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave yearB and Improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acrea, before a Crown Grant can he
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class 'nrablej lend Is (5
per acre, aud second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further information regnrdlng purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series. "Purchase nnd
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment rf
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres,  may  be  leased  as homesltes,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
erected in the first year, title being
obtained   after   residence   and    Improvement   conditions   are   fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   nnd   Industrial   purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased  by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under  the "Grazing Act the  Province ls divided Into grazing districts
and Ihe range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based ■>*>
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established ownerB. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
A COWBOY ABROAD
Continued from page Three
"You're going to do what?"
"I'm going to stay in Mixville."
"You are not. You're going to
Europe."
"I am not."
"You are."
"Very well, then," I said firmly.
"We'll compromise."
"How's that?" she asked suspiciously.
"I'll go," I said.
That was the beginning. I bad
known from the first I waB going. In
fact, 1 had been ready to give in right
off. But 1 put up a battle In order
to win some concessions.
First ot all I made up my mind
Tony, my horse, must come with me.
Then it was necessary to figure on
Pat Chrtsman, Tony's trainer tnd the
foreman of my ranch, making the
trip to help me take care of the horse
I knew that if European polish got
too slick Pat and Tony and I could
roughen off the smooth spots some.
When the word got rumored about
my trip. Immediately my friends
started to give me advice, and also
ask questions.
"Why take Tony?" they asked.
"This Is Europe you're going to see,
not Arizona. You can't go visiting
on a horse,"
"I know it," I said, "but maybe
some people over there who've seen
my pictures will want to see me in
person, and since Tony's always been
with me thoy may want to see him.
too. After all, they're the cash customers and if they didn't go to the
film houses I'v.ouldn't be able to make
this trip. They're paying for it, aud
I've got to give them what they might
happen to want."
"Besides," 1 went on, "I've been
reading about the fellow who said;
'A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a
gain, und his knlgdom Is a good oae,
perhaps we can get together."
Well, they couldn't laugh that off,
aud so we got ready. We asked Mrs.
Mix's mother, Mrs. Forde, if she
would go. Of course she disliked the
Idea—of, of course!—but finally she
agreed. ,
ln talking the matter over with
Tony he seemed quite ready to make
the trip, but I could tell there was
something on his mind. He pawed'
the turf, raised his head, snorted and
then ran over to several of tho horses
and (hen back again to me. I got
Pat and we tried to figure out Tony's
problem. But we didn't have anj
luck and after a time we left him,
still going through his peculiar antics.
The next day while I waa planning
how to clean up a few remaining
pieces of work, bo that I'd have nothing to worry me while acquiring a
European polish, it suddenly dawned
on me what Tony's trouble was.
"I've got it," I yelled, nnd tore out
of the library.
I found Tony in his stall acting
quite sad. When he saw he so happy, though, he suspected that finally
1 had caught on to what he had in
mind, and after I had talked to him
awhile, he knew I had got his idea
and everything was was fine.
Thus, several days before Ton;
left Mixville for New York, was held
the first horses' farewell banquet ol
which there is any record. Tony was
host, and from his place ill the center of a long banquet trough filled
with oa(s he welcomed each arriving
guest. The ranch took on a party
atmosphere. Tony was all dressed
up In his new going-away cloak and
thc other horses wore their best bibs
horse!      I'm  going to  look around, j and tucker.
and if he still wants to make a bar
New Car Service
CAR FOR HIRE DAT OR NIGHT
21 TEEEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
NOTARI PUBtIC
CUMBERLAND • - - B.C.
/ Will Call
at your house In time to take you lo
the train or boat.
Car   For Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE 26 OR 22 -ASK FOR
Geo.  Mason
1 had been right. That was the
matter that had bothered Tony. He
had wanted to say farewell of hb
frineds in style.
Because we thought lt might take
Tony longer to get to New York than
it would uo, we piled him into his
horsebox attached to a fast eastbound
train, on March 25, two days before
set out. But Tony moved faster than
Mrs. Mix, Mrs. Forde, Pat and nijSolf
we thought, thanks to Mr. Fox and
ollicials of the Pennsylvania Railroad
Company, who decided he wasn't ordinary animal and had him taken Into
Pennsylvania station, New York, as a
regular passenger. I later learned
Tony was the lirst horse ever to enter
New York by way of the Hudson tunnel and the big passenger station tu
33rd St. and 7th Ave.
We were a day behind Tony in
reaching New York, where, a week
later, on April 8. we were scheduled
(o set sail for Southampton, England,
I won't bother you with the details
of that week in New York, for after
nil, this is a story of a cowboy's impressions of Europe.
WATER NOTICE
I
Use And Storage
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   service.
26  rooms,  electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phene II.
R. TATII, Manager.
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WM.MKRRTFIELl),    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue. Cumberland
TAKE NOTICE that The CoiiboII-
! dated Mining and Smelting Co. of Can-
> adn Ltd., whose address Is Trail, B.C.,
] will apply for a licence (o take and
i use 8U00 eu. ft. per mln., and to slore
| 34500 acre feet in  Vi toria Lake of
water out  of   Amazon   Hiver,   also
I known us Mill Creek or Link River
1 which flows Ensterly and drains Into
i Alice  Lake about one quarter of n
| mile south of Echo Landing.
i    The storage-dam will be located at
North   end  of  Victoria  Lake.      The
capacity of tlie reservoir to be created
I Is about 34500 acre feet, and It will
. flood about 100 acres of land.     The
I water   wlll   be   diverted   from   the
! stream at a point about midway he-
j tween    Alice    and   Victoria   Lakes,
I known as  the  "Falls", and  wlll be
used  for  mining  and  concentrating
purposes upon the "Last Chance" M.
C located on L 202.
This notice was posted on the
ground on the 20th day of July, 1925.
A copy of this notice and an application thereto and to the "Water Act,
191V will be filed In the office ot the
Water Recorder at Victoria, B.C.
Objections to the application may
be filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after the
first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper.
The date of the first publication nf
this notice Is 7th day of August, 1925.
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting
Co. of Canada Ltd., Applicant.
32-35.
One day many thousands of young-.
sters came out to Central Park to
watch me ride Tony over the bridle
paths—and they nearly tore up the
park, I'm afraid. Then, on another
day, I went over to Newark to review a parade of the Boys' Saftey Patrol, at which ceremony another huge
crowd swarmed around me.
All this made me feel mlgbty good,
for, living out tn California all the
time as I do, I didn't know I had so
many friends in the East. Also It
gave me courage to carry on with my
trip to Europe, which, by this time,
I began to realize was really going to
lake place.
It's one of the peculiarities of a
person's mind, I've found, that, although their reason tells them something is going to happen, they just
can't believe lt will happen to them
until it actually has come about.
Oddly enough, all fun making by
Mrs. Mix and myself about acquiring
a European polish and background
put aside. 1 began to want to make
the trip. I loved my ranch, and my
happiest moments had been and would
he spent In my own West, but a feeling came over me. just aa Mrs. Mix
had pointed out, tha( I should know
something through my own observations of the way In which the other
half of the world lives.
All my life had been spent as a cowboy on the range, as a soldier with
knapsack and gun, as a law enforcement officer In tlie tough, merciless
southwestern border country, and as
a cowboy film actor. True, ln tho
Boxer rebellion 1 bad been in China;
in the Spanish-American war I bad
fought under Roosevelt, and the Boer
war had carried me to South Africa
I had been to these places and seen
a great deal more than most men,
but those trips had been made in the
flush of youth and under the spur of
battle.
I was about to see Europe from a
different viewpoint. I would be able
to weigh the problems which faced
these countries and their peoples.
And then, oerore 1 knew It, and while
thut peculiarly timid and incapable
feeling was sweeping over me—while
suddenly 1 wns conscious that my history lesson had been much neglected,
and that certain Important dates and
places wihch I thought I would never
forget had slipped my mind—we left
thc hotel in New York for the pier.
The Aqultania lay huge and impatient ln her berth, seeming almost
human, us she swayed slightly at her
moorings. Tony waB waiting for me
at the pier, fretfully pawing the hard
boards, as if he would like to feel
grass again beneath his feet.
"Cheer up, old boy," I said to him.
"We'll get back all right. Anyway,
we'll leave in grand style."
It was my plan to ride Tony up the
passenger gangway. After all, my
horse had been responsible for much
of my small success in the Alms and
I felt it only fitting thnt he be treated
not only as a human being, but also as
a first-class passenger. This I had
insisted upon, nnd Tony's quarters on
the great liner wcre arranged with
regard us much to their accessibility
to the llrst-class accommodations as
to their comfort.
A great many people who were skep
ticul that a horse could be ridden up
Ihe passenger gangway of the Aqultania were on the pier while the officers and crew of the liner were lined
up along the rail to see, as they put It,
the wild cowboy stunt.
Really It wasn't so much. Tony
had tackled lots of harder jobs In the
daily run of his work. But It was
unusual, I guess, and a great cheer
went up when I gently urged my horse
forward and he walked quietly and
gravely up the gangway, and then
sauntered calmly as you.
It was, I believe, the first time any
horse ever had done such a trick. And
you may be sure that Tony—as smart
as many humans you'll meet In travelling—realized he hnd been accorded
an honor, for he strutted about in his
stable trying to look as Important as
the chief work at a barbecue.
The liner waited some hours for the
tide and It was long after midnight
when she slid down the Hudson, and,
with n farewell toot to the perspiring
tug boats, crept on out to sea. Europe bound, the shadowy skyline of
giant New York slowly disappeared;
the Statue of Liberty became a ghost
behind us.    We wcre off.
Next week—The Voyage Out Brings
Novel Experiences to Both Tom and
Tony.
L FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
.il
PAGE FIVE*
WELCOME RAIN
LESSENS HAZARD
OF FOREST FIRES
COURTENAY, Aug. 13.—Following
a period of exceptionally dry weather
| with bush fires ln several parts of
the diatrlct, burning ls in a quiescent
state ready to leap forward with the
first rise of wind, much needed rain
fell here last night. It resulted ln
a steady downpour, which lasted all
night and ls still raining this morning
The welcome precipitation has relieved a large number of fire fighters and
haa brought a feeling of safety to all
residents of the Comox Valley. A
feature of the recent dry spell was
the marked lack of humidity during
the night hours. This condition obtained until the night preceding tbe
rain when a heavy mist covered the
grass and foliage with dew-like moisture. All danger of bush fires is
over, at least for tbe time being, and
lt is probable that no such hazardous
condition will recur again this year.
NOVELTY EVENTS
WILL FEATURE
COURTENAY FAIR
COURTENAY, Aug. 12.—The special
committee for the Fall Fair sports
with Mr. H. S. Baker in the chair, met
in Courtenay on Tuesday night for the
purpose ot outlining the program of
sports and amusements for fair day.
This year's fair will have a decided
sporting aspect and the events are to
Include horse-racing, aquatic sports,
land races etc., with a mammoth
dance and full orchestra to finish off
a big day.
The committee, Messrs H. S. Baker,
Geo. Thomas, Ben Hughes, Jack Peterson, Dave Robinson, J. H. Parkin
W. Cliffe, J. Casanav^ W. Woodhus,
W. Rockwell, J. McMurray and Matt.
Piercy have chosen some really good
events among which are costume
horse racing (costume to be donned
half way round the course), log rolling contest, duck race for boys and
girls in the water with a live duck,
old man's race, obstacle race, a greasy
pig chase and other events. The
prises for these contests will be collected ny the committee from voluntary donations -throughout the valley.
AT THE AUTO PARK
COURTENAY,—The auto park at
Courtenay continues to attract many
new visitors and numbers of tourists who have previously atayed In the
motor camp are returning to spend
another day or so ln the charming
spot.
The latest arrivals are: Mr. Chas
Prevost, Vancouver; Mr. H. A. Done.
Victoria; Mr. C. Padden. Mr. and Mrs
Angus and son, Mrs. Shannon and
aon, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Campbell and family, Victoria; Mr. S.
Clemence, Mr. J. Armstrong, Victoria;
and Mrs. Shannon and Mrs. Stringer
of Vancouver.
Mr. Geo. F. Roberts and Miss Sarah
L. Roberta, Ladysmith; Mr. and Mrs.
Geo. T. Kent and son, Ladysmith; Mr.
and Mrs. F. D. Whltmore, Prince
George; Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Dldrlck-
son, Tacoma, Wash.; Wm. F. Barnes,
Victoria; S. Fell, Victoria; R. Bowles,
Victoria; Mr. and MrB. Lamounturne
and child, Vancouver; Mr, and Mrs.
Welsh and family, Vnncou* er; S. Haw
thornwalte, H. Fox and N. Johnson.
Nanaimo; C. J. Duncan and wife, Pasadena, Calif.; G. S. Steeve and wife,
Loa Angeles; Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay,
Sidney; Mr. and MrB. J. Ollie and
daughter, Nanaimo; Mr. and MrB. H.
F. Field, Seattle; Mr. and Mrs. Elmer
Price, Yakima, Washington.
FREE RECIPE HOOK
Write the Borden Co., Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
COMOX CREAMERY
SHOWS YEAR'S PROFIT
IS NEARLY $7,000.00
COURTENAY.—That the business
of the Comox Creamery Association is
being maintained in a very satisfactory state is manifest by the semiannual report which has just been
Issued by the association. In this
report to shareholders the directors
say:
We have pleasure in presenting
herewith the balance sheet and profit
and loss account tor the six months
ending June 30th, 1925, and are glad
to announce that the standing of the
association ls such that the accounts
receivable alone would pay off all existing liabilities, and would leave the
shareholders the complete plant and
stocks on hand clear as against their
shares.
The butter department has manufactured 151,614 pounds of butter during this period, although shipments of
cream have been made every month
except January to the equal of 10,727
pounds of butter. This is being far
exceeded at the present time owing
to demand of sweet cream at Victoria
and Vancouver, which is causing us
a shortage of cream for butter purposes, whereas during June we had a
surplus. The large Increase ln make
during the early summer months
when butter is generally plentiful, results in lower prices, and this problem
was seriously considered by your directors, and a good deal of attention
has been given to the Idea of making
cheese. The demand for ice cream
and sweet cream is taking care of
present surplus.
The teed department has had to
contend with very keen competition,
but has shown a steady increase in
turnover, and a small profit. The
department Is run ln conjunction with
the machinery, which shows a better margin.
Ice cream turnover has not been
large to June 30th, but has bad heavy
expenditure owing to rearrangement
of plant and the profit in this department, for that reason, ls quite pleasing.
Our milk deperatment shows quite u
good margin, the milk being shipped
out and sweet cream only sold locally.
Egg department Is outstanding for
WVtttWUUU!
pmes
■KKILLS *
m
■ICTUS
ierinkJ. ia •kUlMkfuwaad M,kkkw
"d <•»'*"« KILL LICE
^WWWaWV^^'a'^a^^M
The Right Way
to Boil Potatoes
Pat the potatoes ln an Bf&F
Enameled Potato Pot Corer
with water. Add wit to
taste. Boil until soft. When
Unbailed, drain off all the
boiling water through th*
■trainer spout No dancer
of steam scalding the hands
because the handle securely
locks the cover on. If jro-ar
family uses potatoes, yon
require one of these.
SMP
Enameled
Potato Pots
Sold by
MATT BROWN' GROCERY
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
the large Increase in business over
corresponding six months, and the
margin ls satisfactory.
The jam Ib practically all sold, and
the loss was inevitable. The balance
sheet shows total assets of $103,046.43
while the paid up share capital only
shows $39,820.46 and total general liabilities to $37,542.73. The not profit for the year waB $6,969.52 and th
total turnover $156,683. All departments show a profit with tho exception of the jam, a legacy of last year's
effort to do the small fruit growers
a good (urn. Butter still holds an
easy lead in the creamery's activities,
with total sales of $66,864 but tbe sale
of eggs—$11,300.60 is increasing rap-. Merchants convention In Vancouver*
M'F* I   Messrs   W.   Booth,   R.   U.   Hurford.
Charles Simms. Jock Macintyre and
A. R. England, who represented Mr.
J. N. McLeod.
BUSINESS MEN
ATTEND CONVENTION I
COURTENAY,—The following busi- j
ness  men  left  to attend  the  Retail I
i<Ml Ml CM affOeMMB
*nm*tmamCnmn\t*»sm ttst ■MJOjr.
„ ?   Writs fee PnelnCiM Book.
tbftaCnftartrC4.ltMeuoSkM.aiuw
Gaiety Theatre
MONDAY-TUESDAY, Aug. 17-18
A Gentleman
\ of Leisure*
ADULTS 35*?
CHILDREN 15c*
Wednesday -Thursday, Aug. 19-20
ADULTS 35* CHILDREN 15«>
(William Vex tnstntt
EVERYMAN'S,
WIFE
With
OAlNEHArlrlEflSTEIN-nrlERKRT MWllNSOlT
DOROTHY PHIIUP5 4 ROBERT CAIN
di Current of Poisonous Suspicion CFlows <=»,
Friday - Saturday, Aug. 21-22
May McAvoy in
"THE MAD WHIRL"
What drives a man into the Mad
Whirl? See this amazing picture
for the answer
ADULTS 501 CHILDREN 25l
A Simple Shampoo—
A simple am! inexpensive shampoo, find one which leaves Uie hair
soft, glossy and will] n delicate
aroinn, is to taken basin of warm
water mid make a free Iniher using
Daby'sOwn Snap. Rub well into
the scalp, rinse with warm ami
then foul water. Dry in tun and
wind if possible,
This simple shampoo is excellent
for hair and scalp and costs very
little as linhy's Own Soap Is sola
at 10c. a cake by most dealers.
4i -as
"Best lor you and Baby too"
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
I        This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Dry Cleaning
Did you ever stop to figure that when you send a
suit or dress to the cleaners, you pay for the cleaning,
not barely removing the spots or patches of dirt?
This practice might improve the appearance of
your suit, but does not get to the real injurious particles of dirt and grease imbedded in the material.
In our method your clothes are washed in pure,
clear gas until every spot of grease and dirt is removed, then they are turned over to experienced hands,
shaped and pressed on one of the latest steam garment
pressers.
Try Us Once, We Guarantee Satisfaction
The White Laundry & Dry
Cleaning Company, Ltd.
TELEPHONE 157 COURTENAY
Our delivery calls in Cumberland Mondays and Fridays
or leave parcels at Spooner's Barber Shop.
j giaKMSIS'E'^^
BUILDING
I MATERIAL  OF   ANY   DESCRIPTION
I Call and See Our Stocks Get Our Figures
| EDWARDS LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
i Mill Street, Courtenay
I Phone 17 P.O. Box 62
EK'SJE'iMilli!'^
m
3 ift —W-—■JkT^ » .'.
1
Buy McBryde's Bread
 Purest and Best
And Patronize our ICE CREAM PARLOR—
The Coolest Spot There is in Town.
OUR SODA FOUNTAIN
must please.     If for any reason you are not pleased
with a drink at our fountain do us the favor to ask
the dispenser to serve you with a second drink.     It
will be done without cost.
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND ICE CREAM PARLOR
COURTENAY, B.C.
ont HOMO IS:—
Fair to our Patrons; Fair to our Employees; Fair to      UjJ
ourselves.
Auction Sale
For the Reverend W. Leversedge, Penrith Street,
Cumberland, B.C.
WEDNESDAY, 2fith AUGUST
Further Particulars Later
E. Felix Thomas
Insurance AUCTIONEER        Notary Public
Telephones:    Courtenay 151 and 21L PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1925.
New Fall
MILLINERY
We take pleasure in announcing the arrival of a
very good assortment of the latest Fall Millinery.
The assortment comprises a choice embracing a
good many novelties, of the many new designs in vogue
Felts, Velours and Velvets are all good, and the
new colors are on view.
The values are best we have ever had, and we feel
confident that a visit will repay you and help you to
select your Fall Hat.
We have a wonderful selection of Felt Hats in a
good assortment of colors at $3.95.
SUTHERLAND'S
Personal Mention
Mr. anil Mrs. J. Ledlngham are In
Vancouver where they have been holidaying for lhe past week. They wlll
return tomorrow.
Mrs. T. Graham, Mrs. G. WIIbou. and
T. Graham jr., were a motor party to
Victoria Tuesday last. Mrs. W.llson
has been holidaying (or some time
with Mr. and Mrs. Graham and is now
reluming to her home in Great Falls.
Montana.
Mrs. Robert Hirst, of Nanaimo, accompanied by her two daughters,
Sadie anil Dorothy, are spending a
few days in the city the guests ot
Miss 15. Gear.
Mrs. D. Hunden and daughters
Pearl and Ellen, and Mr. George Hundon, relumed to the city Wednesday
after a two weeks' motor tour of the
State of Washington.
Mr. antl Mrs. John Thompson, Third
Street, left the city Sunday last to
holiday In Vancouver.
Mrs. H. II. Bernstein is spending a
short holiday in Vancouver, having
left Cumberland Wednesday morning.
FOR SALE—Dining room furniture,
kitchen furniture, and two bedrooms furniture. Apply T. Blair,
New Townsite, Cumberland.        33.
FOR SALE OR RENT—Six roomed,
H4 storey house, plastered wall,
large pantry, bathroom with washbowl and bath. Two open-flre-
places, large sleeping verandah (2
sides), modern electric fittings, new
up-to-date plumbing, septic tank
and flush toilet. Cement-floored
wash house (hot and cold water),
large, well-built wood and coal
shed, fruit trees and grape vine
(bearing), large chicken run with
three garages attached (2 rented),
and large loft. Apply P.O. Box
105, Cumberland, B.C.    ' 32.
FOR QUICK SALE—Two very large
lots In Royston fronting on the seaport and also Island Highway.
Apply Fraser Biscoe, Courtenav.
B.C. 32-33.
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
OF CONFLICT
AND ENV)
WILLIAM FQX presents
w   Mon. &
J^E£JSs6N Tues.
is'     ixv
•SMI \ CURLYTOP Aug. 17and 18
«"*»&   by THOMAS BURKE
^mZM' author of "UMEHOUSE NIGHTS"
Wtt-mL                                      .... ADULTS 35*^
m^t'/m
Directed by MUMCEEIVEV
Ttefe
\„
C*>*ZXbiiLL'jlUL-;
--Oil-,
CHILDREN 15<*
Wednesday and
Thursday
August 19 and 20
A Carnival of Youth
Beauty   and Gaiety
It will amaze you!
It will thrill you!!
It will entertain you!!!
PHUB1N
NORMAN
KERRy
il£
ADULTS 35-t?
CHILDREN 15<-
Fri. &
Sat.
August 21 and 22
ADULTS 50.***
CHILDREN 25<*
Lieut.-Col. Charles W. Villiers. general manager of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, arrived a'.
Beaufort House on Thursday evennlg.
Edward Wilson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
T. Wilson, West Cumberland, left
Tuesday for Calgary where he will
reside in future.
Mrs. J. A. McLennan and children
of Cumberland, left Tuesday, for Port
Alberni where they will holiday for
a short while.
Thomas Graham, general superintendent of tho Canadian Collieries (D)
Limited, and son Pierce, attended the
employees picnic held in Ladysmith
last Saturday.
Mrs. T. H. Western, of Port Alberni. was a visitor to Cumberland
Monday, returning to her home the
following afternoon.
Mrs. William Merrifield and son
Billy left Wednesday morning for
Vancouver where they will holiday
for a few days.
The Misses Audrey and Edna Gear
left the city Saturday morning to
spend the remainder of their holidays
with relatives in Vancouver.
Capt. S. C. Gaw, Rlverton, Wash ,
late of the Puget-Sound Navigation
Company, Is on a brief visit to his
cousin, Mrs. Sarah Brown, Maryport
Avenue.
Mr. George Shead, of Port Alberni,
was a visitor to this city last Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wilson, of
Portland, are in the city on a short
visit to Mr. and Mrs. T. D. McLean.
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bond loft Wednesday morning on a week's vacation
to be spent in Vancouver.
Miss Bessie Bailey, who has been
holidaying for tlie past week with Mr.
and Mrs. A. Lockhart, Allan Avenue
returned to her home ln Vancouver
Thursday morning.
Mr. John Sutherland made a business trip lo Vancouver Monday last,
returning Wednesday afternoon.
Miss A. Loggie, of Vancouver, Is
holidaying at Gartley's Beach, the
guest of Dr. nnd Mrs. 0. K. MacNaughton.
Miss Beth Horbury, who recently
underwent an optical operation at thc
Vancouver General Hospital, ls making a favorable recovery, her friends
will be pleased to learn.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Sharpies returned
to Cumberland Thursday after spending a few days visiting friends at
Seattle and I'ellfnghani.
■II
■■111
I IT CLINGS
g Women who are at all particular, those who recog-
gf nize a real good powder, will at once favor the exquisite
| Cara Nome Face
| Powder
H because it combines just those qualities that make it
|g easy to keep the skin free from gloss and yet it is not
II readily detected.
| Lang's Drug Store
jf -THE REXALL KODAK STORE-
H "It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S'
111
OFFICERS ELECTED
(Continued From Page One)
Aew Shoe*
r .Xope   -*-
lift
ShoePolisK
, Make* ol
Shoes loo
like   Ne
the conscientious manner ln which he
had carried out the duties of president
for the past seven years.
Mr. R. Robertson was then asked to
address the meeting with reference
to a delegation from the Hospital
Board which attended the last meeting
of the Medical Board. Mr. Robertson
explained that a violet ray machine
was installed in the hospital about
two years ago and until recently has
heen very Utile used.
During the past few weeks the machine has been placed ln a special
room for the use of Mr. Taylor and
his patients. Mr. Taylor had recently
passed examinations in Therapeutics,
etc., and was now qualified to practice. He had during the last five
weeks given over 100 treatments
which were very successful. Aa this
conies llnder Ihe heading of special
treatment thc men had to pay this
themselves.   *■
Mr. Taylor addressed the meeting
und stated that Therapeutic treatments hnd lhe endorsntlon and recommendation of tho doctors and
many of the patients he had been
treating had been sent to him by th**
| doctors and in many of the hospitals
throughout Canada doctors of this
profession were engaged, therefore he
made a  proposition  to the  Medical
' Hoard that If they would remunerate
him to the extent of $tiil or $70 per
month he would give treatments a*.
the hospital each evening. After
considerable discussion it was decided to call a general meeting nnd discuss the matter fully.
Mr. and Mrs. John Robertson are
hack In the city again, having broken
summer camp at Royston Beach.
SETTLERLOSES LIFE
IN ESCAPING-FIRE
COURTENAY. Aug. 11.—In making
his getaway from his house which was
subsequently destroyed by lire ai
Gowlland Harbor, near Quathiaski
Cove, Valdez Island, Henry Thomas,
aged eighty live years and one of the
old timers of this district lost his life
today.
Deceased was taken to the Camp-
hell River hospital, when everything
possible was done for him but did not
regain consciousness. From Injuries
to thc hack of his head It was assumed
that thc old man had fallen when
hurrying away from the burning forest area. He was a native son of
England and as far aa is known he
has nn relatives In this country. The
funeral, from Mr. Sutton's undertaking parlors in Courtenay, Is to take
place at the Anglican Cemetery, Sandwick on Wednesday.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS |
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO |
* *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   ■ •    Proprietor
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
IS THIRD TEACHER
TO BE APPOINTED? I
(Continued From Page One) j
teachers Instead of the former two.'
The time Is getting short and unless j
the  necessary  number register very
soon it will be too late.
The Nanaimo and Duncan High
Schools are following the same course
as that outlined above, ull thc trust
ees being of the opinion that pupils
living In those cities could take the
lirst year of the University course at
home and at much less expense than
would be the case If they went direct
to tlle University. It will depend,
however, on the number enrolling
whether or not the course will be instituted.
A staff of three al the Cumberland
High will doubtless accomplish more
than a staff of two. Then, parents.
If you have children who will attend
High School this coming term, nnd If
you wish thrni to enjoy the benefits
which an Increase In the staff wlll
bring, hnve them register as soon as
possible with the- secretary of the
School Board, Mr. A. MacKinnon.
COURTENAY PERSONALS
III   connection   with   tha   Aontriu.ti,,,,
of property by lire at Camp No. 3 of
the Comox Logging Co.. fire loss adjuster W. B. Crumble of Victoria was
In town today. Mr. Crombie left for
Cumberland and Alberni this evening
to adjust (Ire losses at these points.
Mr. John T. McKay, supervisor of
thc Dominion Life Assurance Co., waa
in town for the week end. He leaves
for Victoria In the morning. Mr.
Gould, the Courtenny agent, Is establishing satisfactory connection for the
company In this district.
Mr. and Mrs. Magglorl, who havo
been residents of Courtenay for several years are leaving for California,
when* they will spend a holiday before proceeding to Europe. They expect lo return to Canada after a few
years ln Spain and Italy.
(Aim OF THANKS
The Cumberland City Band take
this opportunity of thanking all those
who. by their ready help and patronage, did so mucli to make the recent
homc-cnoklng sale such a splendid
success. Special thanks are also
extended tn all who donated food
stuffs, flowers, money, etc.
Cyril Newman, Sec.
('AHI» OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Davis tender
their sincere thanks to Dr. MacNaughton and Mr. A. J. Taylor for their
valiant efforts In attempting to save
the life of their young son, Roy, who
wus drowned at Comox Lake laat
Tuesday. Thanks are also extended
to the many friends for their kind expressions ot sympathy and for the
beautiful  floral tributes.
B. P. O. E.
ANNUAL   DANCE
IMPERIAL PAVILION, ROYSTON
Wednesday, August 19th
Music provided by orchestra selected from   40 piece B. P. O. E. Band, Vancouver
Come and dance to the best music ever heard in the Comox District.
GENTS $1.00
LADIES 501

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068655/manifest

Comment

Related Items