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The Cumberland Islander May 14, 1926

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
jt
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
•'ovine
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 20.
"' M,,*«~
Jani'
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1926
•gM53jgjBjj*& SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Visit Cumberland, May 24th
C.P.R. Angling
For Big Island
Power Lease?
Among thc "nibbles" which Hon.
T. D. Pattullo announced that he has
received for the Campbell River
power lease, extension of whicli to
the company thnt has held it for 16
years was refused the other day, is
said to be one from the C.P.R., presumably for the use of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway.
With the rapid development of
motor bus and motor truck competition along the Island Highway,
the operation ot this railway has
become a problem of some Importance to the C.P.R. and during his
recent visit to tho coast D. C. Coleman, president of the E. & N.. spent
several weeks at Victoria studying i
the situation closely.
Several possibilities are understood to be receiving consideration. I
One is the electrification of the |
line, and another is the use of gas- j
electric cars or gas-electric locomo-
lives capable of hauling short trains.
This ls not the only "nibble" that
the government has received, it is
authoritatively  stated.
Automobiles Collide $1^000 IN PRIZE MONEY      .Empire Day Fund  ICollecting Of
Occupants Injured      pQjj   g|Q   CELEBRATION Continu^JoGrow!    Ashes Is Being
Much Abused
A nasty accident occurred on Friday night last about 11:30 at the foot
of Boulder Hill, on the Royston Road,
when a Gray-Dort car, driven by Mr.
Dttnslre, and a McLaughlin six, driven hy Mr. Shaw, of Minto, collided.
Mr. Dunsire, along with Messrs. D.
Logan and Hannay, were returning
from work at No. 4 mine and on
reaching thc Dunsire homestead the
driver made the turn into the road
leading to the residence when the
McLaughlin crashed into them. It is
a miracle how anyone escaped deat.i.
as the Gray-Dort was completely
wrecked, whilst the car driven by
Mr. Shaw was also badly smashed.
The occupants ot both cars were badly cut and bruised, but we are given
to understand, were able to proceed
to their homes.
ACCIDENT HAS
The Beauty Shop
What promises to be the most pretentious theatrical offering yet attempted ln this district is the forthcoming production of "The Beauty
Shop," a New York musical comedy
hit which Is being produced under
tiie auspices of Courtenay Lodge of
Elks, with members throughout this
P.-T. Meet Monday'
The regular monthly meeting otj
the Cumberland P. T. A. will he held I
ln the School on Monday evening. ■
May  17th,  at  7:30,  when  n  special |
E. O. Rolratlian, who will take for hi
subject "Character Building in tli
School and Home."
Tf \ f A |      UMT^IKI/^' 'e"(,re territory.   More than sixty of,
fnl AL   atallL/lflVa I the most promising and most talented i nel<*  at "><>  Ho-Uo Theatre and  the
Preparations for the monster 24th
of May Celebration to be held In this
city are going on apace and the various committees report tlie fact that
more enthusiasm has been shown this
year than ever before. In another
column will be found the list of
events to be run oil and in addition
to the excellent programme of sports
magnificent prizes are being offered
for the various classes in the parade
which will leave the School grounds
at 9:00 a.m. and proceed through the
city. The prizes for the parade wlll
be $2S.00 for the best decorated float,
$*>5.ni) for the best advertising float,
$15.00 for the best decorated automobile, $7.50 for the best comic group,
$5.00 for the best decorated bicycle.
$S.OO for tlie best character representation, $5.00 for the best advertising
character, $5.00 for the best comic
individual.
One of the main attractions will be
the Grass Hockey game between the | won in the recent Badminton tou
Cumberland nnd Courtenay High
School girts for a magnificent prize.
Boy Scout nnd Cub events. Children's
aud Adults' sports, Coronation of the
May Queen, May pole dancing and
Folk Songs will round out a memorable day.   Special shows are being
The collectors for the 24th. of May
celebration are meeting with a great
deal of success, and given flue
weather, the celebration this year
Mill surpass anything ever attempted
lu Cumberland. Following is a list
ot* donations up to date:
No. ■! Mine Employees     284.50
I Machine  tiun   Fund   balance..   117.or,
addresB will be delivered by the Rev. I Corporation  of the City of
Cumberland  $ ioo.Oi*
j Canadian  Collieries   (D)  Ltd.
■■ Canadian  Collieries  Railway
! Employees and Miscellaneous
No. 5 .Mine Employees 	
j Union  Bay Employees 	
I Ilo-llo  Theatre  	
] Sliver Spring Brewery 	
i Union  Brewery 	
Balance  from  1U24  sports	
! Thomas Graham 	
DOPCITaMTFrV ''u"'1)e,'lilntl Electric Light Co.
BADMINTON
CUPS WERE
Cumberland  Water Works
Mr. G. —
  | amateurs of Courtenay and Cumber-
CAMPBELL RIVER, May 11.—The! land are hard at work both day and
many friends of .Mr. Stewart Nell, of \ night In  preparation  for the affair,
Bloedel, will be sorry to learn of his
death. He was employed by Bloedel.
Stewart and   Welsch,   Ltd.   when   he
and we are assured a performance
will be given which will be a credit
to the two cities and to all concerned.
met with his fatal accident. While | The rehearsals are being conducted
at his work a snag fell and fractured ; by a professional director who has
his back. He was brought lmmedi- * produced this same comedy In prac-
atcly to the Campbell River Hospital j tically every city in Canada and the
but only lived a few hours.
Western   States.   In  Winnipeg,  Cnl-
The Inquest wns held here by Cor- gary. Vancouver, Victoria and else-
oner Dr. R. Zelgler and the verdict j where It met with tremendous suc-
was "accidental death." Mr. Stewart cess, and the press and public have
Neil was a well known citizen of this | been lavish with praise of tho manner
district and   will  be  missed   by   his! in   which   the  piece  is  dressed   and
many friends. The iuteremnt took
place at the Sandwick Cemetery, at
Courtenay.
TENNIS CLUE TEA
WAS SUCCESSFUL
The third of a series ot afternoon
teas ln aid of the Cumberland Tennis
Club was given by Mrs. G. W. Clinton
last Wednesday afternoon at the
home of Dr. and Mrs. G. K. Mnc-
Naughton, adjacent to the courts. An
unusually large number were ln attendance and many availed themselves of the opportunity of playing
a few sets before tea was served, as
the weather was all that could be
desired. These weekly events are becoming more popular as each one
comes around and are doing much in
the way of introducing new members
into the Club.
Next Wednesday's tea will be served on the lawn at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. C. II. Tarbell. corner of
Windermere and Second, whilst the
following week, Wednesday, May 26,
the event will be held on the lawn
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Graham, First  Street.
staged. .More tben tyo hundred ant)
fifty beautiful costumes are carried,
along with special scenery and properties. "The Beauty Shop" was written by Channlng Pollock, author of
"The Fool," and other notable successes, and was produced In New
York by Geo. M, Cohan where It ran
for over two years. It abounds with
bright, clever comedy and boasts of
twenty-five wonderful singing and
dancing hits all presented by bevies
of pretty girls beautifully costumed.
Two performances will be given In
Courtenay on May 25th and 26th, and
one night only in the Ilo-llo Theatre,
Cumberland, Friday, May 28th. The
production promises something out ot
thc ordinary for this district ond wc
feel sure it will meet with the hearty
approval of our amusement loving
people.
patrons of the silver screen can be
assured of the latest and best In
motion pictures at the popular play
house. There wlll also be a dance
In the Ilo-llo Ball Room, commencing
at 9:30 p.m.
A very pleasant social evening waa
held at thc Community Hall. Comox.
on Friday evening last on the occasion of tlie presentation of tlie trophies
mnet. About seventy live people were
present and the early part of the
evening was devoted to progressive
whist, the following being successful
in gaining prizes:  Ladles' first
Mrs. O,
Ringrose; second, Miss Bourne; consolation
BOARD OF TRADE
ELECTS OFFICERS
FISHING CONTEST
AT COMOX LAKE
ON SUNDAY
The annual meeting of the Cumberland Board of Trade was held lu the
| Council Cahmbers on Thursday evening with an average attendance.   The
1 oflicers  elected   for  the  year   1926-7
I were:   Hon.   President,  Lieut.-Col. C.
! W.  Villiers;   Hon. Vice President. T.
Graham; President, D. R. .MacDonald;
Secretary, H. G.  MacKinnon;  Treasurer,  G.  Curwen;   Executive—T.  II.
.Mumford, chairman; Geo. W. Clinton,
John   Sutherland,   Dr.   Geo.   K.   Mao-
Nnughtoti,   Alex   MacKinnon.   W.   P.
A most enthusiastic meeting of the I Symons, and R  C. Lang.
„.,.„,       , „      ,„ , I     lt was decided to make a drive for
Cumberland Rod und Gun Club was mcmber9 wlth , membership fee of
held In the G.W.V.A. Hall oil Wed-1 $2,50 for thc year 1926. H. O. Mac-
nosday evening last. There are now j Kinnon and E. W. Bickle were elect-
70 members In the .oca, club, mos, * VML'Sm!bo's"! ,"v
of whom were present at the meet- llu, mller hn|f ,„ a„ a.,em„t ,„ niake
Ing Wednesday. ' the   roll   of   members   100   In   good
The monthlr report of the secretary  standing,
of the B. C. Flsh and Game ^\n™$^^
ation was read und action taken on ; (lay of evcrv raonl|,.   The next mcet-
mnny  suggestions   which   will  he  of  Ing will be held In the City Council
Interest nnd  to  the benelit  of local i Chambers on Tuesday, June 8th, at
8:00 p.m.
DEPARTMENT ASKS
INFORMATION ON THE
ORIENTAL QUESTION
Hon. E."D. Barrow, MinlBter of Agriculture ln the Provincial Government, had a communication before
the Council at Its regular meeting
last Monday evening. In which he requested Information on the number
of Orientals (Chinese, Japanese or
Hindus) holding licences or lands
within the Municipality. The letter
went on to say that a survey of thc
whole Oriental question will be made
soon and he would like the Information as soon as possible in order that
the whole subject might be intelligently placed before the members of
the House.
The Minister's request was acceded
to, although only a very few Orientals hold licences or land within the
corporate limits of Cumberland.
Mrs. Bayly; Gent's Arts, Mr.
J. A, Carthew; second, Mr. G. Apps;
consolation, Mr. C. R. Wilcock.
On the conclusion of the whist. Mr.
T. H. Mumford. ns chairman of the
tournament committee, presented tlie
Badminton trophies to the following:
j ladles' singles, Mrs. F. It. Shenstone;
ladies' doubles, Mrs. Ash and Mrs.
Cokely; mixed doubles, Captain and
Mra. Ash; men's singles, Mr. Max
Blunt (LiBle Fraser trophy); men's
doubles, H. Idlens and Captain Ash.
Dancing was then Indulged In, a
most pleasant evening having been
spent by all.
The. Badminton players present at
the social were Very entlihStfiistlc
about next season's activities and it
is almost a foregone conclusion that
the popular winter indoor game will
enjoy a long term of prosperity. Professional footballers and other athletes ln England and Scotland are
taking up the game with vim as they
have realized that it is one of the
very finest games, enabling them lo
keep fit and ln good condition for tlie
more strenuous soccer and rugby
games. _
MAKING HEADWAY
.... WITH SCHOOL SPORTS
FOOTBALL GAME HERE
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Courtenay   Intermediates   wlll   return thc compliment on Sunday when
I they will  meet the  local  Intermedin
,„ , | ates in  a  friendly soccer  fixture at
sports will be held at Qualicum this'   .„„ „„ (he nc(.rontlon G,,nm,lK,
year, on June 3rd, and already the „ „m be remembe,.e„ tha, ,„„ (,ml.
various committees are making prep- • berlam, ,)ovs tmvelled ,0 „K, 1„.n|iMl,
--big   sports   which | center somc Um agu „ „etdefeat
to the tune of two goals to nil. but
they are. out for blood on Sunday,
and. with a few changes In the lineup, arc confident thut tlie farmers
nre going to taste their lirst defeat
of the year. The local hoys will lineup ns follows: Boffey; II. Stewart
und E. Dickie; Strachan. Farmer and
The   annual   Upper-Island   school!
arations  for the
proved  such  an  unqualified  success
when held for the first time at Cum-1
| Mr. a. K. Clinton
Dr. O. K. MacNaughton ....
J. Sutherland   (Goods) 	
Comox  Creamery  	
Campbell  Bios.   (Goods)  ...
A.  MacKinnon   (Goods)  	
K. Nakanishi   (Goods)  	
Frank   Dallos   	
W.   Hutton   	
It.   Yates   	
James Dick 	
W. P. Symons 	
C. H. Tarbell   (Goods)  .
W. Merrifield  ...
W.  Wain   	
'. Cavin  (Goods) 	
Bruce  Gordon  	
L. It. Stevens  (Goods) 	
C. W. Spooner 	
Matt,   llrown   	
King George Hotei   A
Wilcock Bros	
J. Mann 	
Vendome  Motel  	
Blunt and  Ewart 	
Joe   ldiens   	
Frelone's  Grocery  Store ....
W.   Douglas   	
Marocchi   Bros AA.
Hoi.t. C. Lang (Goods) 	
F. li. Pickard 	
T. II. Mumford 	
Eaidn M. Shiozaki 	
I B. &. K. Courtenay, value
! G.   Curwen   	
| Henderson's  Garage  	
J.   l.cdiiiKhnni   	
. Wm.   Henderson   	
! E. L, Saunders 	
Union  Tailor  	
'-tVrl'lf..: lniiit   P*..,*)ply
John J. Potior 	
C.  Newman    	
J. (onway 	
Walker's D,;tu*rv Shop .
IC. E. Bete Icy 	
Jos.  Aspesi   	
C.  Dalton  	
Chow  Leo 	
Kam Sun Low 	
bal   Fung   	
Wong Why    .
Quong Mc Lung 	
Foo  Yuan    	
II.  E.  .Murray  	
Mrs.   Francescini   	
Albert  Evans  	
J.  Ninattl  	
W, A. Owen  	
J.  Larrigan  	
San   Kee   	
Kee   Fung   	
Yee Yuen Sheng  Kee ....
Lai Yuen  	
Ho  Ilee
Quon Mon  	
Yen   (in   Tong     	
Wing  Kee   	
Young San   	
Mah  Wing  Duck  	
lloyston Mill  no cornel
Qwllt'a  Mill   no come)
sportsmen. Tlie B. C. Fish and Game
Association is compiling a most up- j
to-date guide hook, wherein the vnri- i
ous cities thot can offer to the sports-: Inst Sunday will bo held this Sunday
man good fishing and shooting nre at Comox Lnke from 9 a.m. to B p.m.
given a decided boost. The attrac- for members only. Fish will be
tions of Comox Lake aiid Puntledge j weighed at 5 p.m. at Reece's Landing.
River are given pionilnence, together i Contestants must stnte. in entering
with the fact that merchants of Cum- the competition, whether they intend
berland cater tn fishing and hunting to fly fish or halt fish (the latter In-
parties. I eludes   trolling)   and   tlle   contestant
At the meeting on Wednesday plans   must stay with  his original  deelara-
were also formulated for trap shool-  linn, I.e.—If a contestant starts halt
local teachers, this year's event wlll
probably  be  even  grcnter  than  the
Inst as Qualicum Is more central, so
that on  the  whole  there  will be a'
greater number of schools represent-1
ed, us  well as a greater number of
parent* and friends in attendance.
Tliis   year's   programme,   wliieh   Is:
now In the hands of the printers, wlll
be not unlike that of last year's, and
the various winners wlll receive cups
or silver medals as the case may be.
For  the   High   School   securing   tlie
grentest   number  of  points   there  Is
the Colonist Cup. a beautiful trophy
presented by thc Victoria Dully Col- j Man "at' ttie"gate
onist.   It  Is  for  annual  competition
nnd  was  won  Inst  year by Cumberland.     Similarly,  for  the  champion
i Publlc Scliool of flvo    divisions   or
| more there is the Eagles' Cup, and
the Malkln-Peaivo'i Cup for the best
Weir;   Little,  M. Stewart,  Gibson, J.
Stevenson   und   Walker.     IV    Lockhart and J. Wllcock ure reserves.
j    Courtenay has never hail  a   really
good   fotbull  team   but   thinks   those
| days  are  gone  forever.     Thoy    are
[ also   confident   that    Sunday's   game
wlll be another victory to their credit,   It ls hoped that o  large  crowd
will  turn  out.   A collection   will   lie
The  fishing competition  postponed j Public  Scliool  with  four  and  three
ing, and the dues of the Rod and Gun •
Club placed at $1.00 per year Instead
of 25c. per month, as previously.
fishing he must continue to tlo so
for the rest of the day. No salmon
roe allowed.
rooms. Efforts aro also being made
to secure similar trophies for tho
two-roomed and one-roomed school
securing the greatest number of
points during the day. The points
will be awarded as follows: each
event entered counts one points for
the school, winning nf first place in
each event counts three points, second pince counts two points, and
third place counts one point.
Arrangements are being made   to
serve refresments at moderate prices
j On account of the absence of the
[ pastor. Rev. James Hood, who is in
; Vancouver, there will be no morning
service at the St. George's United
Church. Evening tliero will lie a
song service Instead of the usual
Sunday night service.
to the general public, while the Qualicum committee will endeavor to
serve tea or milk free of charge to
the  pupils  competing.
Each school district is required to
supply n certain number of silver
medals and ns these coat $8.50 each,
donations of thin sum will lie gratefully received by the teachers of the
local school.
50.00
41.50
41.50
40.50
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
13.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
7.B0
7.00
5.B0
5.00|
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.0U
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.0(1
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
3.00
2.511
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.5C
2.00
2.00
2.011
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.011
2.00
2.011
2.00
J.mi
2.00
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
LOU
1.00
l.oo
.B0
.so
.25
Alderman John J. Potter, chairman
of tlie Board of Works, lias asked
that steps be taken to restrain the
citizens ot* Cumberland from throwing their garden refuse in the aslt
boxes which city workmen empty at
regular intervals. As Aid. Potter
said, the city removes tlie ashes free
of charge Inn many were abusing
tills service by heaping their boxes
with all kinds of refuse, thereby making a great deal more labor, lie asked tliat notices be posted in the lanes
warning all and sundry that only
ashes would be removed and that the
service would be taken away from
those who in future persisted in lilling their boxes with any other material. The Clerk was instructed to
have notices printed to this effect and
post them in conspicuous places.
Bills and accounts for tlie precoed-
ing two weeks totalled $314.68, while
Aid. Parnham reported the following
bank balances: general account, $4,
124.87; school* account. $829.07; and
savings account. $100.81.
A communication will in- sent to
the Hoard of Management of tbe local
Hospital asking it to take charge of
the  Isolation Hospital  In  future.
TOTAL lo dale
$H'7:i.8n
MAKE REPAIRS
TO CITY FIRE
HYDRANTS
Ai   Monday's  meeting  of  the  City
Council,   Alderman   Ci   .1.   Parnham,
who is also Chief of the local Fire
Department, slated thut tlie secretary
of the Department had heen instructed to write the Council in connection with making of the bolts on top
of the lire hydrants all one size and
the repairing of a spindle, but had
neglected to do so. uh the City Clerk
informed him that no communication
had as yet heen received. .Seeing
that the secretary had overlooked this
matter. Aid, Parnham took leave to
personally lay the matter before the
council and asked tliat it receive
prompt attention. Tin: spindle will
be repaired nt once ami steps will
also hi' taken to have all boltfl made
the same size as this latter has been
the cause of much unnecessary wasting of time for suiue while past.
Corporation of the CItj of
Cumherlnud
N O T I C E
On ami after this date any organization wishing to use the City Hall
for tin- purpose of holding meetings
will please make application in writl-
Ing to the city Clerk.
W. II   COPE, City Clerk.
SATURDAY NIGHT
IN POWELL RIVER
Main Bntwblle Islander! Non Mnk<-
Tlielr Homo ut Paper Mill City.
hid HI trial   Spirit   Shown
POWELL RIVER, .May 12. Saturday night fn most small towns Is a
hig business night. In Powell Hiver
it is different, Just as everything else
Is differ en I than at any other point
in (lie district. Here Saturday night
comes on Friday for on that night
the mercantile houses remain open
until eight-thirty o'clock and at
twelve-thirty the following day all
business ceases for the weekend. It
was during one of the Saturdays
tliat come on Friday that I strolled
down the main street, This was not
an aimless stroll - because 1 wanted
to lind out if it were true, as had heen
said, that hundreds of former Comox
residents hnd migrated to the .Mainland and had found employment at
Powell Itlver. Perhaps there ore
hundreds here who come from Comox.
Nobody knows exactly how many
former residents of Comox Volley
are employed at the hig paper plant
for   nearly   every   one   met    knows
somebody else
couver Island,
piny  safe and
n let i am* from Vault is just as well to
■ay thai  there ate a
great many erstwhile Islanders now
making their homes here. Ou this
particular Saturday night that came
on Friday the only difference ln the
picture was the surroundings, because there were enough CotDOXlaus
encountered to make one nt least imagine that Courtenay or Merville hod
been   transferred   across   Hie   hay.
Al Powell River all Is bustle, all is
Industry ami the Industrial Bptrlt is
being shown nol only in the operation of the hig paper mill, tint in the
homes of the employees. Uuder ordinary circumstances the announcement that Mr. and Mrs William Carson, formerly of Merville, Iiad entertained o number of friends at their
home on the Highway three miles out
of Powell Hiver in the direction of
.Myrtle Point, would he read casually,
To residents of Merville and Courtonay It carries a significance, for this
social  event   was   held   to  mark  the
(Continued  on   Page Five) PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY  14, 1920.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
OPPORTUNITIES
made by Dr. Saxon T. Pope, at the convention of
the California Medical Association last week.
Dr. Pope recently returned from big game hunting in Africa, where there are no health departments and no specialists in medicine and surgery, and he says "the Australian bushmen and
African aborigines are just as prone to illness
as their bald-headed, smooth-shaven brothers of
the highest civilization." We often hear people
claiming that sickness comes with city dwelling
and the strenuous life of the period, that the
Indians were strong and healthy and that our
grandfathers were so much more rugged than the
men of today. Dr. Pope says not. The aver-
At a recent dinner given by age man of today is not dissimilar to the savages
a philanthropist to large, of darkest Africa in respect to physical ills and
not far removed from  the   unscientific  middle
FRIDAY. MAY 14, 1928.
number of newsboys in a big city, the dessert
was served out of its course, and a little lad, better posted in polite usages than his fellows, declined the delicacies, thinking that they would
reappear in due season. His companion, however, eagerly availed himself of the luxuries, and
from a knowledge born of an intimate acquaintance with "hope deferred," exclaimed: "Jimmie,
the time to take pie is 'when pie is passin.'"
To make the most of opportunity whenever
it presents itself, is the wisest policy. The recognition of opportunity is a faculty more strongly developed in some than in others. It comes
from a belief in the eventual triumph of rightly
directed energy—the energy which is based upon
earnest purpose—and the keen survey of conditions.
The greatest obstacle to achievement is the
prevalence of doubt regarding the outcome.
This is the outgrowth of a natural tendency to
disparage an undertaking before it has been
tested, and many fruitful projects have been
abandoned as useless, when the most meagre investigation would have revealed the coveted
treasure.
The discouraged miner returned to town,
while his patient co-laborer tried "once again"
where others had failed, and discovered the prize.
This is the oft-repeated lesson of experience.
Opportunity is the momentary gleam of the
star of hope. He whose gaze is habitually
downcast will catch no glimpse of it, while to the
confident, expectant believers in possibilities, its
brilliancy will illume the waste places of disappointment and reveal the hidden pathway, following which, he may enter the magic realm of great
and glorious achievement.
in his superstitions and dependence upon
fetishes to cure those ills. We know a man
who still carries a buck-eye in his pocket to keep
away rheumatism. Some folks take calomel at
intervals, while others look upin it as a rank
poison. One dear lady reads the Bible to stop
a toothache, while another hastens to the dentist
for relief. One man lives upon vegetables to
keep strong, while another feasts on rare roast
beef to give him strength. Some folks get pum-
meled about by an osteopath, while others rub
horse liniment on their tired muscles. The poor
old ancestral amoeba started a lot of trouble when
he dragged himself out of the ooze and began to
develop organs. But we would rather take our
chances with the conscientious doctors of today
than the hideous old medicine man of three
hundred years ago. At least they do try to
make their ministration painless.
OUT OF THE OOZE
"When our first ancestral amoeba dragged him
self out of the primordial ooze he   packed   his
parasites with him."     Which, translated into
simple language, means, "We began to be sick
when we began to live."     If you doubt this, try j
to eat a tainted oyster and you will have a prac-!
tical demonstration of the truth of this assertion. | supported by some members of your family who
All of which is brought about by a speech is willing to work.
WHITHER BOUND?   In this day of the automobile, golf courses, and
six nights a week bridge parties, it does seem |
that a little old-fashioned hard work might be of |
wonderful benefit.     It is not uncommon to see
thirty thousand people watching a baseball game
jon a midweek afternoon.     Call on twelve bus-
! iness men any day in the week and see how many
of them you will find in their office if the weather
is nice and the golf course near at hand.
We know that "all work and no play makes
Jack a dull boy," but what about all play and
no work? Work really is wonderful fun. It
is the most interesting game you play. The
man who enjoys his work soon works himself
up to a higher position. The man who would
rather play more and work less will work less
and will eventually pay the terrible price that a
failure must pay.
Your ultimate success and independence
largely depends on the way you look at work.
If you consider work as something to be shunned
as much as possicbe you will land in one of two
positions: an inmate of the poorhouse or a pauper
Cumberland
24th of May
Holiday Specials
New arrivals in Ladies' Spun
Silk, Rayon and Broadcloth
Dresses   in   the   newest   styles
from $3.50 to  $9.75
Special values in Ladies' House
Dresses, sizes 36 to d»-f H'J?
52, at $1.25 and .... tpl.l D
Ladies' and Misses' White Middies and Navy Serge Bloomers.
Misses' and Children's Whilte
Voile and Muslin Dresses, lace
and ribbon trimmed, suitable
for Holiday wear, sizes 8 to 14
years.
Misses' and Children's Socks,
Ladies' Venus Pure Silk and
Chiffon Silk Hose in all shades.
Newest Novelties in Ladies' Silk
and Crepe Ties and Scarfs.
Newest Styles in Ladies' Blonde
Kid Slippers in all sizes.
Misses' and Children's Crepe
Sole Sandals, Oxfords and Shoes.
Special values in Ladies', Misses
and Children's Summer Under-
Spun Silk in all Shades.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
PUT
\our Vacation Money
Into a
Real Trip
Educational
To
GREAT BRITAIN
HOLLAND
BELGIUM
SWITZERLAND
FRANCE I
THIS
SUMMER
$425.00
Leave Montreal Friday, July St.
on Ss. Athenla. Returning arrive Montreal August 21 on Ss.
Aurania.
More than 45  tla a away from
home—motor  sight-seeing,  rail
antl   water  trips.
* Operated by Canadian National Railways in connection wilh
the Cunard, Anchor-Donaldson Steamship Line, thereby insuring a successful handling by responsible companies.
IT'S   THE   TRIP   OF   A   LIFETIME
Get full information and plan at once
See
£MlMHM*
pLON-M*
E. W. BICKLE
Agent
Cumberland
Telephone 35
PASSENGERS FROM
WESTERN CANADA
WILL LEAVE VANCOUVER 13Y THE
"fJONTINB N T A L
LIMITED," JULY 4.
ON THE RETURN
HAVE CHOICE OF
ROUTES FROM
MONTREAL.
ALL RAIL DIRECT
OR VIA (TORONTO
OR LAKE AND RAIL
(AT A SMALL ADDITIONAL   COST).
FINER THAN A SPLIT HAIR
Is the Accuracy Possible When
Measuring Steel Band Tapes
the earth's quadrant to the accuracy
desired. Others have attempted to
relate measures of length to time by
the determination of the length of a
pendulum vibrating seconds thus establishing a measurement of length
fundamentally related to the time ot
revolution of the earth.
But the fact remains that the
A surveyor's steel band tape 100'. standard of measure In Canada Ib a
feet in length can be measured with bronze bar similar to the Imperial
an error not exceeding one one- standard yard but two were lost In
thousandth of an Inch. This is an'the Ure which destroyed the Parlta-
interestliig tact mentioned in a recent ment Buildings at Ottawa   In   lOlti
from time to time. It is therefore
necessary in these days of very high
land values that his fundamental unit
of length be known with a high degree of accuracy and the testing of
tapes is therefore one of the important functions of the laboratory.
$1.50
$1.00
report of the Physical Testing Laboratory of the Topographical Survey,
Department of the Interior, at Ottawa.
How Ib this done and what is the
purpose   of  such  accurate  measure
ments,  the   layman   may   ask.   The unit   ot   measurement ^of ^length
question can   best   be   answered by ""
considering the origin of some of the
standards of length of the past and
The distance between two fine lines
on the surviving bar in the custody
of the Weights and Measures Standards Branch ot the Department of
Trades and Commerce, Is the  legal
In
Canada as established by the Weights
and Measures Act.
,   ,n  r  The  standard  rules of the  Topo-
miaginlng the 7tfflcuities~" that would ] graphical Survey for calibrating the
result were surveyors In Canada to measures of length are kept at the
survey valuable city lots with the | Physical Testing Laboratory. There
statutory units of length of earlier lis equipment here for determining
times i lengths to the finest limits of accur-
Perh^ps the moBt curious of these , acy. While under observation the
old standards was the inch In the | rules are kept In a bath of distilled
reign of Henry III of England. In | water to ensure uniform temperature
1224 the rule was laid down that I and measurements are made with the
three barleycorns equal one inch, j aid of special high power micro
The barleycorns were to be dry and 1 scopes. In order to avoid multlpli-
werc to be taken from the middle of | cation of error in extending the unit
the ear and laid end to end. The | measure over the length of 100 feet,
rule continued that 12 inches equal ] measurements of the single unit may
one foot; 3 feet equal one ell or ulna; ibe made to an accuracy of one fltty-
a'A ulna equal one perch; 40 perches I thousandth of an Inch,
long and 4 ln breadth equal one i Dominion Land Surveyors are re-
acre The measurement of land ! quired by statute to have a steel band
therefore   depended   on   the   funda- j tape, of which the length has been
mental unit of a barleycorn. One
can readily see the multiplication of
error which must result in the measurement of land and the trouble it
would cause In this nge where city
frontage often reaches a value of
several  thousand  dollars a foot.
Henry I established the yard as the
distance from the point of his nose
to tho end of his thumb. It Is not
recorded how often he was called
upon by the surveyors of that day
to render the necessary assistance
In graduating their measures with
the legal standard or what ambiguities may have resulted from this
peculiar method of measurement.
Equally curious was the deviation of
thc rood in Germany In the sixteenth
century. Koebcl's work on surveying relates that "to find the length
of a rood In the right and lawful
way, and according to scientific
usage, you shall do as follows:
Stand at the door of a church on
Sunday and bid sixteen men to stop,
tall ones and small ones, as they
happen to pass out when the service
is finished; then make them put their
left feet one behind the other, and
the length thus obtained shall be a
rlicht and lawful rood to survey the
land with, and the sixteenth part ot
it shall be a right and lawful foot.
We are not told what authority there
was to compel these men to stop and
line up or what the penalty would be
In case of refusal.
Standards of length have varied
throughout the ages, from country
to country, from county to county,
and even from one village to a neigh-
oorlng -village. Many attempt.i Un
heen made to select a standard no
a Pendent6 on a recognized phy.lca
measuring rod. French WgMgJ
,..„. .even years in determining tne
Jl" "he metre and even then
MtadI lo obtain th. millionth P»rt ot
determined. A certificate Is supplied
by thc Physical Testing Laboratory
for each tape tested. This tape must,
in each case, be handled with care
and on no account used for field work
for fear of altering Its length tjy getting bent or twisted. With this tape
the  surveyor  checks  his  field  tapes
Kill the Rats.    They prey on
you
CUNARD
I       ANCHOR
AN( HOH-DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM MONTREAL
To Plymouth-Cherbourg-London
Ascanla May 22.       Ausonla June 5.
To Liverpool
Auranla June 4, July 2, 30.
To Belfast and (Jlnsgow
Letttla May 28.        Athenla June 11.
FROM NEW  I'ORK
To Queenstown and Liverpool
Scythla May 22.     Franconia May 29.
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Aqultanla May 26, June 16, July 7.
Berengarla June 2, 23, July 14.
Mauretanta June 9, 30, July 21.
To Londonderry nnd Glasgow
Camcronia May 22.
Transylvania May 29.
To Plymouth-Cherbourg.llumhurg.
Andania May 22, June 30, July 31.
FROM BOSTON
To Queenstown and Liverpool
Franconia May 30. Camarla June 13
Money orders, drafts antl Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Full Information from local agents or Company's Offices, 622 Hastings St. W„
Vancouver, B. C.
Men's   Hatchway   Summer   Li-
wear in all sizes,
at per suit 	
Arrow  No-button  Summer  U-
wear in white Nainsook   Very
special value
at per suit   ...
Arrow Shirts in Striped and in
Plain Broadcloths, Canadian or
English make, $2.75 to $3.50
Men's Arrow Shirts in Plain
Cambric in white, cream and
Blue, with or without detachable
collars.
Men's Silk Lisle and Cashmere
Socks in Plain and Novelty Patterns at 50<>, 75-r), $1.00.
Men's Grey and Natural* Flannel Outing Pants, r-JJC fTA
at per pair   «DtKtW
Men's White Duck Pants in all
sizes, special at  i $3.25
Men's 2 and 4 point Coatless
Suspenders.
A complete stock of all lines in
Men's and Boys' Canvass Footwear. |
Men's Hats, Caps, Belts, Ties.'
Men's "Fashion Craft" made-to
measure Clothing; style and fit
guaranteed.
MANN'S BAKERY
The home of high class cakes and pastries.
Large and varied selection.
Freshly baked daily.
APPLE, RAISIN, and PINEAPPLE PIES.
BUNS, BISCUITS, COOKIES, SCONES, etc.
Try some "Golden Brown Doughnuts" for Saturday's
dinner.   The kiddies like them.
Cream Rolls, Cream Cakes, etc., dainty looking and
delicious tasting.
Mann's Bakery
nberland Phone 18     I
Cumberland
BABY'S
OWN
SOAP
'twu'tt Urih
I   Alba.lflo,pt bmii.a. Ml.,. Mm.ttaal ■
"PRITTlE'S
EXTERMINATOR"
Kills the rat and immediately
eats up all flesh and bone, leaving only the pelt, with no odor.
It will not poison human beings
or domestic animals.
Rats, Mice and Cockroaches eat
it in preference to human foods.
Ask your drugist or write for
further particulars to
J. S. TAIT & COMPANY, LTD.
500 Beatty Street
Vancouver, B. 0.
THE beautiful sheen and
silky smoothness of
Monarch Green Stripe stay
to the last washing, because
it is made of pure silk—reinforced with fibre silk, for
wear's sake. And no "run"
can pass below the Green
Stripe, nor the second "stop
run" a few inches below it.
All the most wanted colors.
fit a pair — an example of
the values Monarch-Knit
Hosiery offers at every price
from 75c to j!2.00.
MONARCH G™IPE
HOSIERY
^gJsffi^^ssi^s^
Head Offlce
Dunnville, Ont.
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
• Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
*wi imp \*w+****.m
Cumberland Supply   Co.
Rickson's Old Stand — Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland
"You get more goods here for Less Money"
SPECIAL FOR TODAY
Drookfield Butter, per pound  40
New Zealand Butter, 2 pounds tor  85
Canadian  Cheese, per pound   28
Canadian Cheese, '& tb boxes, 2 for  45
Bulk Dates, splendid condition, 3 pounds for  2.i
Large Size Oranges, 3 dozen for   1.00
Bananas, 2 pounds for  25
Almeriu Grapes, per pound  85
Cooking Apples, 4 pounds for  25
Good Sound Potatoes, per sack   1.96
Pure Cane Sugar, 20 pounds for   1.46
Small  White Beans, 4 pounds  for  25
Cooking Figs, 3 pounds for  25
Loose Raisins, per pound  15
Quick Quaker Oats, China Ware  45
Rowntrees Cocoa, per tin  24
H. P. Sauce, special at  31
Libby's  Stuffed  Olives,  per  bottle    25
White Swan Soap, 5 cakes for  25
Lux, 2 packages for  25
Quaker Tomatoes, 2% per tin  10
Quaker Corn, per tin  15
Quaker Peas, per tin  17
Horse Shoe Salmon, %'s, 2 for  45
"We will not sacrifice our Quality for Cheap Prices—Our goods
are all Standard Lines, and speak for themselves.
Have you Been our Samples for eGnt's Suits?   Come In ami
we will measure you for a real Suit at moderate price.
We have a full range of Master Mechanic Work Pnnts. Shirts
and Overalls. %
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY CO.
Phone 155 P. O. Box 205 FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
List of Events at Cumberland's
Monster 24th May Celebration
10:30—1.   Boys' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:30—2.   Girls' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:35—3.   Boys' Race, 7 to 8 years, 50 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:35—4.   Girls' Race, 7 to 8 years, 50 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:40—5.   Boys' Race, 8 to 9 years, 50 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:40—6.   Girls' Race, 8 to 9 years, 50 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:45—7.   Boys' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:45—8.   Girls' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yards
2nd prize, SOc; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:50—9.   Boys' Race, 10 to 11 years, 75 yards
2nd prize, SOc; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:50—10. Girls' Race, 10 to 11 years, 75 yards
2nd prize, 50e; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:55—11. Boys' Race, 11 to 12 years, 75 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
10:55—12. Girls' Race, 11 to 12 years, 75 yards
2nd prize, 50c; 3rd prize, 25c.
11:00—13. Boys' Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards
2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, SOc.
11:00—14. Girls' Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards
2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, 50c.
11:05—15. Boys' Race, 13 to 14 years, 100 yards
2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, SOc.
11:05—16. Girls' Race, 13 to 14 years, 100 yards
2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, SOc.
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $1;
1st prize, $2;
1st prize, $2;
1st prize, $2;
1st prize, $2;
11:10--17.
11:10—18.
11:15—19.
11:15—20.
11:20—21,
11:20—22,
11:30—23.
11:35—24.
11:45—25.
1:00—1:30
1:30—26.
1:30—27.
1:40—28.
1:40—29.
1:50—30.
2:00—31.
Boys' Race, 14 to 16 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, $3;
2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
. Girls' Race, 14 to 16 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, $3;
2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
. Boys' Race, 16 to 18 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, $o;
2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, jl.
. Girls' Race, 16 to 18 years, 100 yards; 1st prize, $o;
2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
Girls' Egg and Spoon Race, 14 to IS years; 1st prize.
$2; 2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, 50c.
Boys' Sack Race, 12 to 13 years; 1st prize, $2; 2nd
prize, $1; 3rd prize, 50c.
Girls' Shoe Scramble, 12 to 14 years; 1st prize, $2;
2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, 50c.
Boys' Relay Race, (Team of 4 Boys). Confined to
the four senior rooms of Cumberland Public School
and one each from Bevan and Union Bav. 1st prize,
$8.00; 2nd prize, 4:00.
Girls' Relay Race, (Team of 4 Girls). Confined to
the four senior rooms of Cumberland Public School
and one each from Bevan and Union Bay. 1st prize,
$8.00; 2nd. prize, $4.00
Boy Scouts and Cubs Rally, and Relay Races. Prize
of $12.00 to be divided.
Boys' Three-Legged Race, 12 to 15 years; 1st prize,
$3; 2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
Girls* Three-Legged Race, 12 to 15 years; 1st prize,
$3; 2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
Girls' Potato Race, 12 to 15 years; 1st prize, $2; 2nd
prize, $1; 3rd prize, SOc.
Boys' Wheel Barrow Race, 12 to 16 years; 1st prize,
$3; 2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
Girls' Skipping Race, 9 to 12 years; 1st prize, $1.50;
2nd prize, $1; 3rd prize, 50c.
Tug of War, (Best of three pulls; teams of 6 boys).
Confined to the four senior rooms of Cumberland
Public School and one each from Bevan and Union
Bay Schools.   1st prize, $12.00; 2nd prize, $6.00.
PAGE THREE
V>
m
$1,000  CUMBERLAND'S j $1,000
in prizes I MONSTER 1926 in prizes
^■aaasnilJiiiU^^
CELEBRATION
2:20—32.
2:30—33.
2:40—84.
2:50—35.
3:00—36.
3:05—37.
3:10—38.
3:15—39.
3:25—10.
3:30—11
4:10—-12
4:20—43
4:35—44
4:45—45
Boys' Pillow Fight,  13 to 16 years;  1st prize, $3;
2nd prize, $2; 3rd prize, $1.
Running High Jump, Open to Boys up to 18 years.
1st prize, value $7.50; 2nd prize, value $5.
Running Broad Jump, Open to Boys up to 18 years.
1st prize, value $7; 2nd prize, value $5.
100 Yards Dash, Open to Boys of all Schools.   1st
prize, $5; 2nd prize, $3.
Nail Driving Contest, Married Ladies only.   1st prize,
value $3; 2nd prize, value $2.
Nail Driving Contest, High Schools Girls only.    1st
prize, value $3; 2nd prize, value $2.
100 Yards Dash, Cumberland High School Hoys only.
1st prize, value $5; 2nd prize, value $2.50.
Boys' Slow Bicycle Race, 100 yards, open to Boys
up to 18 years.    1st prize, $3; 2nd prize, $2.
Old Men's Race, 50 yards, open to men 50 years or
over.    1st prize, value $5; 2nd prize, value $2.50.
Grass Hockey Game between Girls of Cumberland
and Courtenay High Schools; two periods of fifteen
minutes each; prize of $25.00.
Men's 100 yard Dash, open.    First prize, $10; second
prize, $5.00.
Men's High Jump, open.    First prize, $10.00; second
prize, $5.00.
Men's 220 yards, open.   First prize, $10.00; second
prize, $5.00.
Men's 1-mile Race, open.   First prize, $10.00; second
prize, $5.00.
SALES AGENTS FOR
Chevrolet & McLaughlin
Cars
WE   SPECIALIZE   IN
AUTO REPAIRS
HONING
A SPECIALTY
USED CARS—Fords, Chevrolet, McLaughlin
Sole Agents for
FIRESTONE and GOODRICH TIRES and TUBES
Harling & Ledlngham
Cumberland
OF
Victoria Day, 24th of May
Big Parade leaves School at 9:00 a.m., proceeding through City and
thence up Dunsmuir Avenue to Recreation Ground.
Anyone may compete in Parade. Wonderful Prizes!
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Adult Sports
Children's
Sports
Boy Scout and
Cub Events
PARADE PRIZE LIST—GENERAL
Best Decorated Float $25.00
Best Advertising Float   25.00
Best Decorated Automobile   15.00
Best Comic Group     7.50
Best Decorated Bicycle    5.00
Best Character Representation     5.00
Best Advertising Character    5.00
Best Comic Individual .:    5.00
Parade Prizes for Cumberland Schools
Class with highest percentage in
the parade     5.00
Best Decorated Group of 16, Grade
Five down   10.00
Best Decorated Group of 16, Grade
6 up   10.00
Coronation of
of May Queen
—*?* -*>.
May Pole
Dancing and
Folk Songs
HOCKEY GAME
Between Cumberland and Courtenay High School Girls.   It will be good!
Cumberland City Band will be in attendance
" *5Ii*'Hi*'yE'*Mi?^^
SPECIAL TRAIN
Special train leaves
Union Bay for Cumberland and Way Points at
8:30 a.m.
IBiSIBIBIM5ffflaEMtraSiaiSM3affi'B'3t
3
At the Recreation Grounds
CUMBERLAND
ALL DAY, MAY 24TH.
2EE/EKEIEJ
SPECIAL TRAIN
Special Train leaves |
Cumberland   for  Union ,„
Bay after the Sports at |
6:00 p.m.
Lumber
In every sorts ef building materials,
MOULDINGS.
WINDOWS, DOOM.
SHINHLBf,
KILN  DRIED FLOORINGS.
AND    FURNISHING:-!
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHAROBR
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
| Nl(kt «■!!•: 1I4X Courttmy
lOfflei: 1B» Cumbtrlind
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at thc Joy-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention. PAGE FOUR
TBI CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MAY  14, 1926.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE
This Friday and Saturday
Monday, May 17th
"The Radio Detective"
' CHAPTER VII
Wild Oats
jfTTEN!"
Jl.      It was Craig suddenly real-
**• lzlng    with   keen    deductive
mind the possibility ot peril to the
boy.
"Keep away from that door, Ken!"
Ken heard just in time, dropping
his hand from fumbling with the
broken lock.
Hastily Kennedy looked about. He
seized a garden rake, took a position
well to one side of the door, got the
leverage on it and gave it a smarl
push.   The  door slid open.
Bang!    Bang!    Bang!    Bang!
Inside the set gun exploded its full
charge of the automatic, clipping the
leaves directly back of where Ken
had been standing. Had he moved
the door an Inch the boy would have
been blown  to  kingdom  come.
Now Kennedy could see the strings
and wires that actuated the gun-trap.
He gave them a yank with the rake,
and the entire contraption fell down.
Only then did the party venture to
enter the empty garage.
Kennedy was down on his knees
examining the tracks lett by the wires
aud waB making impressions on a
piece of sensitive paper. "Those
tire tracks will be like the fingerprints of a criminal," he remarked.
"Look!"
Ken had been examining the grease
spots on tlie iioor. The spots to
which he was. now pointing were
gray. Kennedy made a hasty examination of them too. "That's paint,"
he said, as he rose. "They've given
the yellow racer a coat of camoullage.
You'll find it a grey racer, a murky
battleship gray. We'll have to send
that out. It's no use looking for a
yellow  car."
"Oh, sir," interrupted Lenihan, "it
was a wonderful car. While 1 was
I looking in through that side window,
i tlle window through which they saw
I me. 1 saw one of them lift up tliat
extra rear seat. Under it they had
a  wireless!"
"Ail!" Kennedy was at once Interested. "A wireless field sel, I suppose. Everything I hear about them
: tells mc that they are clever. They
will be no easy birds to catch. By
the  way, you  did  good  worlt,  Leni-
I	
Low Fares
Summer Excursions to the East
On sale daily, May 22nd to September 15th.     Final
return limit, October 31st, 1926.
WINNIPEG     &nr nf\      ST. PAUL
DULUTH «P i D.OU     MINNEAPOLIS
Toronto $118.05 Chicago $90.30
Ottawa  $132.25    Montreal  $137.05
Moncton  $152.20   Saint John  $152.20
Charlottetown  $156.85    New York  $151.70
Quebec  $146.10
Halifax  $157.75
Boston  $157.76
(War Tax additional)
Fares to other destinations on application
Routing via
Prince  Rupert
SI 3.00
additional to
cover meals and
berth.
Routing via
Great Lakes
$10.00
additional to
cover meals and
berth.
Cumberland, B.C.      E. W. BICKLE      Telephone 35
TUESDAY—St. George's Church presents
"AUNT SUSAN'S VISIT"
Wednesday]
Buck Jones
BUCK JONES in "THE TRAIL RIDER"
Thursday, 20th
LOTS O' PEP
IMaaiEJBIElE/BJ^^
COURTENAY LODGE NO. 60, B. P. O. ELKS
presents
THE NEW YORK MUSICAL COMEDY SUCCESS
The Beauty Shop
ILO-ILO THEATRE
FRIDAY, MAY 28.
FRIDAY, MAY 28.
Cast and Chorus of 65 selected from the best Singers,
Dancers and Entertainers in Courtenay and
Cumberland.
gIJd1'E',*"''g!JE!3^^
Positively  the  Most   Pretentious  Theatrical  Affair
Ever Attempted in This District.
•'"BBraMii'MISIH^^
THREE HOURS OF MIRTH AND MELODY
■EISfSIEIBIHIBIiaiMSiaiaaJBI^^
"Whistly" Music, Clever Dancing,    Special  Scenery,
Concert Orchestra, Pretty Girls (Lots of 'Em)
Beautiful Costumes, (Over 250)
A Real Beauty Chorus
Prices—75c. and $1.00.   (Worth Double).
Curtain at 8:15.
NOTE—This same production was recently given in
the Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver, and the Royal Victoria, Victoria, where hundreds were turned away
each night and it was acclaimed the most finished
and most successful affair ever seen in those cities.
nan, considering what you were up
against.   Good by."
We climbed back in Kennedy's car
and started to return to Rockledge.
We had not gone far when both
Kennedy and Easton reverted to the
first sight they had of Ken coming
along the CHIT Road to the Radio
aback, with every evidence of a battle.
"Well, now, young Dempsey," began Easton. turning suddenly to Ken.
"Tell us what it was all about. Fighting ls a bad business. Vou didn't
have to do It."
"Not when Hank had them turn
the hose on me from the deck of the
'Scooter.'"
"What were you doing out there?"
Ken launched eagerly into a description of Hank's spying at Eagles'
Nest, the trailing of Hank and his
reason for a visit out at the submarine chaser.
Kennedy smiled. "And It was because of the hose incident?"
"Y-yes."
Kennedy had detected the hesitation.   "Is that all?"
"Well, not all."
"What was the real reason. Ken?"
Craig lowered his voice solemnly. He
knew that this was the way to get
the boy to come through with the
whole story.
Ken hesitated', fussed about a bit,
but his uncle's eyes never left his
face and finally, rather than submit
to being grilled any longer and made
uncomfortable, he decided to tell tlie
whole thing.
"Well. Uncle Craig, you see it was
about—about  Vira."
"Just Vira?  Only Vira?"
"Yes—Vira and Kuth. You sec I
don't care what he says about any
of the rest."
"About Ruth?" cut in Easton suddenly.   "What about Ruth?"
Ken felt he might now just as well
tell it all. "Hank says that his folks
told him they saw Vira. Ruth, Rae.
Glenn Buckley, Jack Curtis and Professor Vario at the races*»at Belmore
last week—and that they lost a lot
of money!"
"What!" Easton Evans was now
really worried. Could it be that Ruth
had fallen into gambling at horae
races?
"I don't believe it."
Kennedy, however, worried as he
was by lite accusation, was not disposed to let It pass with a mere denial. It was food for thought to him.
"Where there is smoke there may
not bc a lire—at least not in that
place precisely. But yet where docs
the smoke come from? It's up to us
to trace this thing out."
"I thing we'd better go back to the
Gerard house." suggested Evans.
"Don't you. Mr. Kennedy? Maybe
some of them will be there. We'll
face them."
As the car sped along we got thc
gist of it from Ken. Hank, without
mincing words, had sarcastically suggested that the robbery of last night
had b»en staged to order by Kuth,
Vira, Glenn and the rest, to reimburse their race-track losses, furthermore It was not the lirst time
Hank had made such  remarks.
Meanwhile us we were speeding toward the Gerard hou:je throe of those
accused by Hank of sowing wild oats
were in an earnest conversation on
a part of the ground away from the
newspaper reporters. Vira, Glenn
Buckley and Ruth. Ruth was in her
car and Vira and Glenn were in another.
"We've had no luck. Ruth," said
Vira. "We've tried to borrow the
money to meet those I. O. U s everywhere. We can't get a cent. You
simply must do it for ull of us."
"Well, then, if I must do It for you,
1 suppose I must," agreed Ru'.h. "I
toid you not to go in for it—but you
would go. And I was with you.
Somebody has got to get you out of
this scrape—I guess I'm elected. All
right. 1 know just one place where
I can go and maybe get it.    I'd rather
I do almost anything .than  go lo this
j man. Bul I can't see my friends in
trouble.   All right.   Bye-bye."
' Ruth drove off in great haste, and
Glenn and Vita sauntered down the
patli Just as we drove up.   Ken spied
| them lirst and Craig pulled up tho
car. hopped out, and went over alone
to them.
I "I've been hearing an unsavory bit
of gossip about you young folks
gambling at the races," he began,
then  added   quickly.     "Now   I   don't
i want you to misunderstand me. but
I am trying to help you out of it."
I    Vira and Glenn were both respect-
1 fill, but silent. "Now, I'll leave It to
you, both of you. Isn't it wrong to
gamble ou  the  races?"
Vira refused  to talk.     But  Glenn
was trying desperately to be funny.
"It is—if you lose!"
Kennedy controlled  his temper.
"Especially if you haven't got lt,"
added   Vira.   "There—now. that's  all
'.I'm going to say.   Come on. Glenn.
j You know we have lo meet Rae and
! Jack."
They turned toward Vlra's car.
Kennedy came hack to us.   "Didn't
you say Dick had heard of this thing
before, Ken'.'"
"Yes. sir."
"Where  is   Dick?"
meet him at our camp about  noon."
"Trailing   Hank.   I   told   him   I'd
"Well, it's noon  now.   We'll  leave
the  car  here.   Come  on.  let's  climb
to Eagles' Nest."
Next Week:  "Shanghaied!"
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
given ln Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies ot
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable tor agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west ot the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, In which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained trom the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied tor
live yearB and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant aud unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmherland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
prico of first-class (arable) land is |D
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land 12.60 por acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands In given in Bullet!.*]
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtnlned after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
mny form associations tor range
management. Free, or partially tree,
permits are available tor settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
IN MEMORIAM
In loving memory of J. J. Klrkbrlde,
who was accidentally killed at No. 5
Mine. Cumberland, on the 22nd. day
of May. 1924.
Some may think that  wc forget yon
When they sometimes see us smile;
But  they know not of the sorrow
That the smile hides all the while.
Ever   remembered    by   a    loving
mother,  sister  and  brother.
P.P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay             Phone  258
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings.
Telephone   115R   or   24
FRESH MILK
Delivered to all parts of
the  District   twice   daily.
PHONE ORDERS
receive prompt attention.
Phone 127-M
HUNT and STEWART
FARMERS & MILK DEALERS
UNION   HOTEL
CVMBERLAN*. I. C.
■uollont eulslne-
Far reservations Pboae lt.
Comfort  ani   Homelike   servlee.
il   rooms,   electrleallr   kaatet
M, TATIft, ttaa-agtr.
LAND   ACT
Land Recording District »i Jlanalme
TAKE NOTICE that I, Samuel
McLeod of Royston. B. C, Sawmill
Operator, Intend to apply for a lease
of the following described foreshore
of Lots A and B Map 2243 and Lot A
Map 3261, subdivisions ot Section 7
situate ln Comox District in the Land
Recording District of Nanaimo, British Columbia, described as Commencing at a post set at high tide
mark at the most North Easterly
corner of said Lot A Map 3261;
them*o at right angles a distance of
300 feet to low water mark; thence
in a westerly direction following the
shore line at low tide mark (and a
uniform distance therefrom) of said
Lots to a point at low tide mark
directly opposite the south westerly
corner of said Lot A Map 2243; thence
In a straight line to said south westerly co.rner at high tide mark, and
containing 20 acres more or less.
SAMUEL McLEOD
Dated the 24th day of March, 1926.
13-20 FRIDAY,  MAY  7,  1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
\i
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
DEVELOPMENT OF
CAMPBELL RIVER
FALLS EXPECTED
VICTORIA, May 11—Early development of Campbell River Falls for
commercial purposes Is indicated by
the large number of Inquiries for
water rights there received at the
Provincial Lands Department. Since
the  former  reserve on    this    water
24 TELEPHONE 101)
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE  DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets   boat at  Union   Bay.
power was removed many well-established concerns have displayed a
marked interest in acquiring it for
industrial purposes, Hon. T. D. Pattullo, Minister of Lands, states. The
water power is so near to large
stands of timber.that It Is considered
an ideal site for a large pulp and
paper mill.
As announced some time ago, the
Government cancelled the former water right held at Campbell River by
an Island syndicate. This right had
been ln existence for many years, nnd
had been renewed from time to time.
Finally Mr. Pattullo and his colleagues decided that the renewals could
not be continued, although strong
pressure was brought to bear upon
thc Government to allow the old
agreement to remain.
Now that the Reserve has been a-
bollshed any organization may apply
llllilllllllllillllllllllllllll
Phone Your Friends by   I
Long Distance 1
There is a thrill of pleasure to be had when a distant fj|
friend calls up for a brief chat over the wires.   Please §§
someone tonight by a long-distance visit.   The night §§
rates in force after 8:30 p.m. are low. g
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY |
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
for a new water right if it proposes
to use the natural water resources
for actual commercial purposes.
There is nothing to prevent the former holding company from securing a
new right when it Is ready to use
It. Mr. Pattullo says. He holds, however, that the Government could not
properly prevent the utilization of so
valuable a resource by leaving in thc
hands of a company which was not
developing It.
CAMPBELL RIVER
PERSONAL NOTES
Mr. George Hamilton, of Vancouver, was a guest at Campbell River
during  the  week.
Mr. J. II. Stephens, of North Van- j
couver, paid a Bhort visit to Campbell River the latter part of the week.
.Mrs. J. Glanville, of Campbelton,
returned recently from a month's vis-
It to Vancouver, visiting with friends.
Mr. Wm. K. Stewart, of Vancouver.
is visiting at Campbell River.
Mr. John Evanson, of Port Alberni,
and Mr. A. Lund, of Balnbrldge, were
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladies' hair cut, any style 50c
Children's hair cut any style 35:
guests  at Campbell  River  over   the
week-end.
Mrs. A. Bay, and daughter, of
Port Alberni, were guests of Mr. and
Mrs. W. Crawford, of Campbelton,
during the week.
The dance held in the Community
Hall on Saturday night last, given by
the Parent-Teachers Association, was
most successful. The hall was well
filled, and the music was supplied by
the Jazz Joy Boys  from  Courtenay.
The launch "Pride of the West"
colled early In the week on her south
bound trip.
Mr. A. Itussel, of Bloedel, employed
by "Bloedel, Stewart and Welscli, Ltd.
met with a very severe accident on
Monday last, having hud his leg badly fractured. He was admitted to
the Campbell River Hospital a lew
hours after the accident.
Mr. Geo. Moore and party, nl' Theo-
dosia Arm, paid a short visit to
Campbell River and Lake on Sunday.
Mr. A. Simmons and son returned
to their home at Valdez Island on
Monday last.
Mr. George Higgins met with a
severe accident at the workings ol
the International Timber Co. the latter part of the week. He is at present convalescing at his home and is
progressing favorably.
Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Low. of San
Francisco, are at present guests of
Dr. and Mrs. R. Zelgler, the former
having motored up the Pacific Highway.
I .Mr. Lome Higgins paid a short visit tu Campbell River over the weekend.
The speed boat "Doe" was launched al Campbell River recently. Mr.
Oscar Timlin was sponsor. Mr. E.
Anderson, of Lund, is receiving congratulations un his neat and speedy
little craft.
The following aro names of those
registered al tlie Willows Hotel over
the week-end: Capt, and Mrs. Hillman. Hong Kong; .Mr. and .Mrs. J. B.
Wood. Port Alberni; .Mr. T. J. Stephens, Vancouver; .Mr. O. W. Day, Port
Alberni; W. U. Scott, Vancouver; Mr.
anil Mrs. Phiilipson, Chllllwack; Capl
.1. M. Reece, Chllllwack; T. S. Par-
Bon, Victoria; Air. J. Kelly, Victoria;
Dr. nun .\lr,, McCallum, Geo. A. Hamilton, .in.-. Adams, Thos. Rellly, G. W.
Muddlman, It. .McLennan. W. K. Stewart. Vancouver; L. A. West, F. Top-
liffc ami II. s. Benjamin, Port Alberni.
M. I.. Adams, ,of San Francisco,
paid a short visit to Campbell River
dining the week.
SATURDAY NIGHT
IN POWELL RIVER
(Continued from  l'uge One)
tr'Oll  SALE—Cheap for  Cash,  Four-
, ouined House and Pantry and Four
.mil a  Hall' acres of Land.   Apply
Herd,   Royston   Road,   Cumberland,
20
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
131R —PHONE— 131R
COURTENAY, B. C.
1
A REPUTATION
FROM
1858 to 1926
/«T T>=fc W|
Whisky
moving Into their new home at West-
view of these former Islanders whose
guests on that occasion were largely
from Courtenay. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wald-
ron, Mr. Thomas Waldron, Air. and
Mrs. Treheme, Mr. and .Mrs. Joseph
Parker, Air. Thomas Rickson nnd Air.
Dick Treheme. -Mr. Parker has opened a mmlernly equipped business
garage at Westview. .Mr. nnd Airs.
Parker have moved into their new
home adjoining the garage. Ale.
Thomas Hlckson hns under construction a business block in the same
neighborhood and everything Joints
io a season of continued prosperity
lu the district. Air. Robert Surgenor
has a gang of men building the road
to Lund und it is hoped to have the
thoroughfare completed this year.
Good headway has been made to date
and without unl'orseen difficulties
appearing, thc object of the engineering department should lie reached
this season, it is hoped to have the
road completed to .Myrtle Point this
year also. When these two pieces of
work are finished Powell River will
certainly be a busy place on Saturday nights that come on Friday and
on regularly scheduled Saturdays,
for these roads will give several hundred industrialists access to the busiest town on the coast, where their
earning power will he reflected in the
increased volume of business tliat
will be transacted by local stores.
The summer schedule of the Union
Steamship Company lias been put into operation and now there Is daily
connection with Vancouver, the two
steamers, Lady Cynthia and Lady
Evelyn, alternating tn maintain the
schedule.
The new high school is well under
way and will be read.. I'or occupation
next term. It is being built on a
slope overlooking the harbor with a
beautiful outlook towards Comox and
Savary' Island.
The Indian sign was hung on a
piece of work that had been under
way for the Powell River Company
for several weeks. The second big
stack lias been completed with the
except ion nf some Interior work, lc
is a twin In the lirst chimney built
three years ago and stands two hundred and fifty feet high.
Fishing lias been good in the big
lake and several other smaller bodies
of fresh water. Some great catches
have been made nnd there are some
anglers here about as keen as Fred
Pickard, Tom Mumford nr Hilly
Douglas, and that is going some,
you'll   nay.
TENDERS  FOR  COAL
SEALED tenders addressed to the
Purchasing Agent, Department of
Public Works, Ottawa, will be received nt bis olllce until 12 o'clock
noon (dnylljfhl saving), Wednesday,
June *!, 1926, for the supply of coal
for the Dominion ISuildiligs and Ex
peridental Farms and Stations.
throughout the Provinces of .Manitoba.
Saskatchewan, Alberta and Britisli
Columbia,  ami  at  Kenora,  Ontario.
Forms of tenders with specifications and conditions attached can be
obtained from G. W. Da won, Purchasing Agent, Department of Public
Works, Ottawa; J. E. Cyr. Supt. of
Dominion Buildings, Winnipeg. Alan.;
H. E. .Matthews, District Resident
Architect, Winnipeg. Alan.; G. J.
Stephenson. District Resident Architect, Regina. Sask.; J. AI. Stevenson.
District Resident Architect. Calgary,
Alta.; J. C. Wright, Supt. of Dominion
Buildings, Vuncouver. B.C.. und J. G.
lii.-.vn. Distrlcl Resident Architect
Victoria, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the above mentioned
forms.
Thc rlghl to demand from the successful tenderer a deposit, not exceeding 10 per cent of the nmoum
ni* the tender, to secure the proper
fulfilment of ihe contract. Is Reserved.
Hy order,
S.  E. 0*BRIEN. NOTE—This is the first of a series
* Secretary.    J of news  articles from  Powell  River.
Department  ot Public Works. More  will   appear  in   these   columns
Ottawa. .May 6, 10211. 20-21  from   week   lo   week.—Ed.
Comox Creamery
Jersey
Ice Cream
Your favorite Comox Creamery Jersey Ice Cream can now be had at all Ice Cream
Parlors and Soda Fountains.   Ask for It! !   Because it is PURE! !
Manufactured by
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
FIRE!    FIRE!    FIRE!
•^s.     *-*'■;■.;   ... "A     i?SL?§^****,j
To be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre for the
benefit of Cumberland Volunteer Fire Dept.
May 31, June 1 and 2 PAGE SIX
THI CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B- C.
FRIDAY, MAY  14, 1926.
1
Wear a Pair and
Compare the Wear
Four-ply strength is woven Into
lota and heeli. Double strength
into soles. Extra strength in the
elastic knit tops to avoid garter
runs. And the "Tapering Toe"
gives just enough extra "big toe*
room to prevent "stretched
the main cause of big
stitch
toe wear.
Made tot men, ivomen and children in
Pare Thread Silk. Silk end Want Com.
oinolioni, Golan; ll'oel, Mercerized
Lisle and Cashmere,
This week we received a ship
ment of Circle Bar Hosiery in
silk, with the celebrated point
heel, all the new shades.
Priced at  $1.50
Sutherland's
nanlmt
ST. CHARLES
EVAPORATED
MILK
The
choice 	
of &od
coors -for they
want -good
milk and can
always
defend
jnx it.
UseH
wherever the~
recipe calls for milk
GliEQberlaqd
.Hotel
Rites
Rssisnssle
Commercis
Headquarters
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Booms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
"AUNT SUSAN'S VISIT"
TO BE PRESENTED
At the Ilo-llo Theatre, May 18th,
under auspices ot the Managing
Board of St George's Church, the 4
act play "Aunt Susan's Visit," will
be staged. A special concert ls also
arranged at which Mr. Qomer Harding, noted Welsh tenor, will sing.
Also other special features that will
go to make an enjoyable evening
Remember the date, Tuesday, May 18
Doors open at 7:30, play starts at
8:15. Admission—Adults 50c, and
25c. for children.
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzle with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Personal Mention
MIsb Evelyn MacFarlane. who has
been the guest of Miss Marjorie
Grant since last Friday, returned to
her home In Victoria yesterday morning.
The teachers and pupils of the
Cumberland Public Schools are holding a dance this evening in the Hollo Hall. It is hoped that there will
be a good attendance as the proceeds
are to be used for the purpose of defraying the expenses of the local
school sports, which are to be held
on the third ot next month at Qualicum.
Mr. Thomas (Sacki) Contl, formerly
star center-half on the local football
team and who has lately been playing football In California, returned
to Cumberland last evening.
T. W. Scott, formerly of Cumberland and now of Cadomin, Alberto,
arrived on Wednesday evening and is
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Nunns.
Pat    Dunne,    formerly    merchant
tailor   of   Cumberland,   was   in   the
cit>    on    Tuseday  and   returned
Vancouver on Friday.
Mrs. John J. Potter returned from
a   business   visit   lo   Vancouver
Wednesday.
"Aunt Susan's Visit" to the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Tuesday wlll be greeted
by a special dancing act put on by
the daughters ot Mr. W. Jackson
Better make a point of seeing Aunt
Susan.
Mrs. J. Smith and daughter, Dorothy, lett for Vancouver on Thursday
for a few days vacation.
Mr. "Teddy" Jackson and Mr. A.
Clarke, of Newcastle, Wash., were
visitors to Cumberland during the
past week and enjoyed some excellent
fishing In the district.
The Ancient Order of Foresters
Juvenile Branch Court Freedom, are
holding an organization night on Saturday, tlie 16th of May, in the Fraternal  Hall,  Cumberland.
Mr. Frank Potter, member of the
1926 graduating class ot the University of B. C, arrived In Cumberland
last evening.
COAST LEAGUE STANDINGS
Goals
P. W. L. D. F. A. Pt
Cumberland     15 11
Ladysmith     14 10
Nanaimo     14
Westminster    .... 14
Varsity     16
St. Andrews   15
St. Saviours   12
North  Shore  .... 13
Victoria Vets .... 12
(il 25 2*
37 16 2!
38 23 lias 26 II
26 43 12
24 30 11
20 34 11
1 21 26 7
0 21 64 1
$1,000,000 RANSOM
30
DAYS
Guarantee on
USED
CARS
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
CABS ON DISPLAY IN USED CAR
DEPARTMENT
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a l^-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS 00.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Dirotor.
Inspection Invited
Corf ield Motors
Limited
Ford Healers
I Phones 40 and 482 Courtenaj
Van Cleef Fortune Not Enough
to Pay Kidnappers
Chapter eight of the Pathe Police
serial, "Into the Net," written by It.
E. Enright, Commissioner of Police
of New Yorq City, and featuring Edna
Murphy and Jack Mulhall, discloses
that the house" of mystery is a house
within a house, sound-proof and
without windows.
In this eighth chapter, which is
showing next Monday at the Ilo-llo
Theatre, Natalie Van Cleef is taken
before the Emperor, who is disappointed in her because her fortune
is not as great as he expected. A
million dollars he demands for ransom on each girls abducted at his
direction. A wealthy South American Is willing to pay the ransom on
this beautiful girl. While Natalie is
learning her fate, Bob Clayton and
Bert Moore are having narrow escapes.
fuurftat
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cared Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
Week End
CANDY
SPECIALS
GUM DROPS, per V-> lb  18<>
JELLY BEANS, per lb  35t>
SCOTCH MINTS, per lb  35«?
MIXED CREAMS, per lb  300
MIXED CHOCOLATES, per tb  50(*
BROKEN CHOCOLATE, per lb  55?
 SUNDAY HOURS	
Morning—10.30 to 12.30 noon. Evening—li.30 to !>.rm.
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Mrs. H. McDonald
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER
All Work neatly and promptly
executed.
For terms, apply
Residence of Mrs. F. J. Dalby,
New   Townsite,  Dunsmuir   Avenue,
CUMBERLAND
PHONE  160
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Olllce Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ARTIFICIAL TEETH WANTEO (old)
25c. each tooth on Vulcanite. 50c.
on Silver. 100c. on Gold. No misleading prices. Cash by return.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Business
confidential. —Dental Works, "58
Haverstock Hill. London. England.
Bankers—Midland. 20-21
FOR SALE or RENT—5 Room House
on Trent Road. Garage and Barn.
Apply Saunders' Shoe Store, Cumberland. 21
FOR SALE—3-roomed Summer House
situated at Comox Lake. For price
and full particulars apply A. Lobley, Comox Lake.
TO LEASE OR FOR SALE—87 Acres
of Land near Royston. For further
particulars apply P. O. Box 502,
Cumberland . t.f.n.
BARRELS    FOR    SALE—Apply    at
McBryde's Bakery, Courtenay, B.C.
tfn
WANTED—We want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1062 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.     tt.n.
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food.
good  service,   reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cur. ,>tli und Dunsmuir.
Phone 122 Cumberland
FOR SALE—Laige 7-passenger Touring car, suitable for jitney work.
Apply Blunt & Ewitrt, Ltd., Courtenay. 2"
Used Cars
Sold under our pledge to the PUBLIC through the
STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
DODGE TOURING, 1924 model, balloon tire equipped,
Glass enclosed, Bumper, automatic windshield cleaner,
Spot light, etc, small mileage, $ft$0 00
STAR COUPE, 1923 model, Balloon tires (new), perfect condition throughout, Ssd^O 00
CHEVROLET Special 1922 model,     <j»Oftrt Art
reconditioned, a bargain at     ipuVWtVU
OVERLAND 4, 1921 model, -$99^ ftft
A bargain at     iP^^J.VU
Pidcock and McKenzie
Courtenay, B. C.
Phone 25 Agents for Phone 25
STUDEBAKER, DODGE BROS. & STAR CARS

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