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The Cumberland Islander Aug 24, 1928

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Array Charlie Chaplin
in "The Circus"
Cumberland Islander
i*
Ilo-Ilo Theatre
This Week-end
With which Is consolidated the Cumber lnnd News.
FORTY-SEVENTH   YEAR—No.   34
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 1982
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Local Cricketers
Defeat the Navy
Burns, Goodall and Idiens Play
Magnificently
LaBt week end was a regular cricket week end tor t he local eleven.
Saturday afternoon saw the strong
Durban team over when the locals
won hy 8 rune. The sailors had a
strong team oul, such well known
batsmen as Lt.-Com. Agnew and Midshipman Merrimau being included In
the eleven. Cumberland batted first
sending In Idiens ami Hassell to face
the bowling of Cant. Coleridge nnd
Lt.-Com. Agnew. Idiens was soon out
getting bis leg in front of one of Col-
erldges good ones. After making .1
Hassell was unfortunate in being run
out. Gough came tn and made a
useful eleven before playing one on
bis wicket. Hums came in and started very cnutiously in an endeavor to
stop the sailors. He batted beautifully for the highest score of the day
making 30 runs before being caught
out. Stewart managed to rattle up
10 before being bowled, the remaining 5 wickets only producing eleven
runs, tbe innings closing for 75.
After tea hour, the Durban sent in
Capt. Wills and A. B. Fogarty to face
the bowling of Goodall and Gough.
Willis was caught by Stewart after
making 4. Holland came in and wns
clean bowled by Goodall for a "duck".
Midshipman Merriman, who Is a magnificent batsman, came in, the Cumberland fielders immediately spreading out. Merriman batted very steadily but was beautifully taken by Idiens nfter making 14. Lt.-Com. Agnew was the next man up nnd tlie locals thought it would soon he all over. Burns relieved Gough after the
hitter's second over, but Agnew was
beginning to pile them up. He returned a hot one to Burns, the laf.er
failing to hold it. The Lt.-Com. began to hit out and after asking how
many runs the Durban had scored be
opened up in an effort to pull the
game out of tbe fire for the sailors.
Capt. Coleridge came to bat after
C. P. 0. Bater was out to Goodall and
his very first ball was nicked to the
slips Bums bringing off a magnificent
one hand catch. Agnew soon followed the Captain being out l.b.w. to
Burns. The last 5 wickets of the
visitors only produced 8 runs. Cumberland winning by tho narrow margin or 8 runs.
Cumberland versus
H.M.S. Despatch Sunday.
On Sunday afternoon tlie locals
took on the team from tlie Despatcn
and played Allan Nunns and Jack
Ledingham in place of E. O. Robathan and C. Dando. Botli men justified
their inclusion and it is to be regretted that business keeps these two
players off the team so much. As
at present constituted, the locals have
a very good team with Goodall and
Burns as bowlers. Sunday's game
with the Despatch proved to be a walk
over for the locals, two fine stands
by Idiens and Burns and Ledingham
and Nunns enabled the home team tn
carry the score to 129. Tbe sailors
went into bat and were soon all out
for Iti runs. Bums and Goodall again
being deadly with tlie ball, the former
took 6 wickets for 11 runs and the
latter four for (tve. Skipper Brown
put the sailors in again and changed
the bowlers, Vernon-Jones and Leil-
ingbnm trying their hand. Gough relieved Ledingham after two overs,
Vaughan relieved Vernon-Jones and
Stewart relieved Gough. The visitors
obtained 76 for 5 wickets, Vernon-
Jones taking two for 26, Ledingham 1
(Continued on Page Five)
E. W. E. Blackmore's Felix
Wins Bellingham Contest.
The third annual Bellingham race
I for the international model yacht
championship was won by the model
Felix, owned by E. W, E. Blackmore,
of Cumberland. The Felix took the
lead at the start and was never headed, being five minutes In front at the
finish. Jack MacLean of Cumberland
assisted In the salting of the craft.
A. Watson's rascal was second and
P, A. Crilly's model third. E. E.
Blackmore took fourth place with his
Hot Springs, while E. E. Brethour's
Nymph was fifth. C. G. Tegenfeldt assisted Watson, while H. Frank assisted E. E. Brethour. Fred Carson withdrew his model when tlie automatic
rudder broke. P. A. Grllly, who won
the race last year, sailed C. E. Wilson's model.,his own new craft being
unfinished.
The race was three times around
a triangular course ou Lake Whatcom.
Mr. Blackmore is tiie manual training instructor at the Cumberland and
Courtenay Schools.
Eagles' Auxiliary
Receive Visit From
Nanaimo Lodge
At the last regular meeting of the
Ladies' Auxiliary tov the F.O.E. of
this city held ou August 21st. sonic
dozen or more members of Nanaimo
Auxiliary were present. After the
business meeting a nice bouquet of
flowers was presented to Mrs. Hickman, President of Nanaimo Ladies'
Auxiliary, by Mrs. Frelone, president
who accepted it with a pleasing little
speech, after which an enjoyable social evening was held.
A delicious repast was served by
the efficient social committee and
then musical chairs was played. Nanaimo proved winners there, for the
first and second prizes went to Mrs.
Aitken and Mrs. Allen respectively.
Annie McKay won the box of homemade candies that was raffled, this
had been donated by .Mrs .Frelone.
The guessing contest was won by
Mrs. Aitken, Mrs. K. Marocchi receiving the consolation prize. Tho
musical program was most enjoyable
and consisted of a piano solo by Mrs.
Haggart, community singing, song by
Mrs. Bradley, song by Mrs. Frelone,
song by Mrs. Haggart, recitation by
Mrs. Richardson.
A few words of thanks for the entertainment provided by Mrs. Hickman who expressed the wish that
Nanaimo would soon have the opportunity to show what they could do
in the way of entertaining. The evening was brought to a close by the
singing of "Auld Lang Syne".
Game Regulations
WESTERN DISTRICT
(OPEN SEASON)
Big Game
Mountain-goat, throughout the
Westom DlBtrict, except on Vancouver Island, open Henson Horn September lfitll. 1928 to November 30th, 192S.
both dntes inclusive.
Bear (excel;! White or Kermodei
Bear), throughout the Western District, open season trom September 15
1928 to June 311th. »!!!>, both dates
inclusive.
Provided that no bear shall be
trapped In the Western District.
Deer (Mule. White-tall, aud Coast)
bucks only, throughout the Western
DlBtrict (except Queen Charlotte Is-
lands, Hornby Island, and those portions of Vancouver Island known as
North and South Saanich and Highland Districts), open season from
September 15th, 1928. to November
30th, 1928 both dntes inclusive.
In those portions of Vancouver Island known as the Highland, Norm
and South Saanich Districts (bucks
only), open season from September
15th 1928, to October 31st, 1928, both
dates Inclusive.
Further for the purpose of descrlb-
(Continued on Page Klve)
Liquor Profits
Are Distributed
The largest sum distributed from
the liquor profits earned hy the province is now being distributed among
the different municipalities. This is
the half-yearly division for the term
ending March  31st,  1928.
Cumberland will receive J3.246.28
and Courtenay will be richer bv
{2.246.78.
The distribution is made among the
municipalities of the province on the
basis of the school attendance for the
half year and totals $559,479.69.
I This Is the part that is set aside for
the purpose hy the department of finance from the total profits for the
half year of $1,964,077.04, Tho division Is made among seventy-one
municipalities.
For the previous six months ending September. 1927, the share divided among the municipalities was
J492.323.24, while the nearest approach to tlie present division was
Tor the half year twelve months ago,
when out of the profits of $1,913-
872.86, there was divided among tho
corporations the sum of $684,500.07.
The distribution for the whole of
British Columbia for ihe six months
ending March 31st, 1928. Is ns follows:
Alberni     $      941.39
Armstrong         1,209.36
Chilliwack  ■      3,044.80
Courtenay         2.246.7S
Oranibrook        5,696.03
Cumberland      3,246.28
Duncan         1,725.82
Enderby           858.25
Fernie          5.262.80
Grand Forks       2,511.93
Greenwood           541.80
Kamloops         6.334.21
Klaslo            748.56
Kelowna         4,379.14
Ladysmlth         2,688.76
Merltt        2.400.41
Nanaimo    '.      8,873.54
Nelson          6.S89.96
New Westminster     21.S94.S2
North   Vancouver      13.259.53
Port Alborni      2,207.21
Port Coqultlnm        1.773.88
Port Moody       1.403.53
Prince George        2,742.68
Prince Rupert        6,887.32
(Continued on Page Two)
Victoria Are
Champions
Beautiful Cup Presented Local
Nine as North Island
Champions
Playing practically errorless ball, the
Victoria Capitals killed all hopes of the
local baseball nine to the Island championship in an exciting game nt the
Lewis Park diamond on Sunday afternoon before the biggest crowd yet to
be seen at a ball game here. On the
other hand, one or two bonehead plays
on the part of the locals contributed to
their defeat. McKee, for Courtenay,
and Dangerfield, for Victoria, both
pitched good ball with the honors
about even. Each struck out nine and
each allowed six hits, with McKee
having a slight advantage in fielding
his position, but Big Bill walked four
men to Dangerfield's one. On the receiving end of the batteries there was
little to choose between Downey anc
More, both men playing their position
perfectly.
The star performer in the field for
the visitors was Herb Cummins, who
never missed a chance, and he had
| lots of them. Smokey Harris had the
fans on their feet when he pulled a
neat double in the seventh. Batting
honors go to McKay, who scored three
hits for four times up.
Prior to the game, Mr. P. MafTeo,
president of the Island League, in a
neat speech, presented to the Courtenay team the Ryan Cup, emblematic
of the North Island championship.
This is a beautiful piece of silverware
representing a baseball player standing upon a column.
The game by innings follows:
1st Innings—Oatman walked and
was put out trying to steal second,
Downey to Bobba. Minnis singled.
Webster connected to Bobba who
threw Minnis out at second, Cummins
covering. H. Cummins went out at
first on an assist by Harris. One hit,
no runs, no errors.
Cummins walked and stole second.
Millard fanned, Downey flied out to
Oatman and Dixon went out on a
liner down to first. No hits, no runs,
no errors.
2nd Innings—Forbes flied out to
Dixon on a foul. McKenzie singled
and Dunn made first on an error by
McKee. More singled, scoring McKenzie and Dangerfield- fanned. Two
hits, one run, one error.
Robinson went out at first on an
assist by H. Cummins and McKay flied
out to Cummins. McKee made first
on an error by Minnis, and stole second. Bobba fanned. No hits, no runs,
one error.
3rd Innings—Minnis fanned and
Webster flied out to McKee on a high
one. Cummins made first on an error
by Harris. Forbes singled and McKenzie went out at first on an assist
by McKee. One hit, no runs, one error.
Harris went out at first on an assist
by Forbes. Cummins drew a two-
bagger. Millard went out at first on
an assist by Dangerfield and Downey
fanned.   One hit, no runs, no errors.
4th Innings—Dunn went out at first
on an assist by Bobba. More went out
at first on an assist by McKee and
Dangerfield fanned. No hits, no runs,
no errors.
Dixon went out at first on an assist
by H. Cummins, Robinson singled and
McKay singled. McKee drove a long
one out to centre, but Oatman got it
1 under for an out. Andy Robinson
j pulled a boner when he left second on
i the clout although the coach tried to
j hold him.   Andy kept on running and
the ball was thrown to second for the
j third out. Two hits, no runs, no errors.
, 5th Innings—Oatman was out at first
on an  assist by McKee and  Minnis
j (Continued  on  page  (We)
Local Cricketers
To Play Nanaimo
Saturday at 2,30
First Away Game of Bat Weild-
ers; Good Game Anticipated
Tbe Cumberland Cricket club iy
Bending down an eleven to play tlie
strong Nanaimo team on Saturday al-
teriMiou ut 2:3U. Tbe locals will not
be ut full strength, two or three of
the members being unable to make
the journey. However, from all accounts Nanaimo will not be at full
strength, so in that respect It is an
even break, Form pickers say Nanaimo will easily account for the Cumberland eleven, but in cricket, one
never knows. The team from H.M.S.
Durban easily defeated Nanaimo,
! whilst tbe Cumberland boys have a
win to their credit over tbe Durban*
Ites. The actual team to travel lias
not been decided upon but it will bu
picked from the following J. I... Brown
(Captain), W. Burns, il. Hassell, J.
Vaughan. c. Dando. J. Vernon-Jones,
S. Gough. J. Stewart. R. Goodall, Joe
Idiens, T. H. I" .idforu, and L. H.
Finch and A. J. Taylor.
Correspondence
To the Editor
Cumberland Islander.
Dear Sir:-
The undernoted letter explains the
situation as to the experiment promised by the Govt, to test the use of
pulverized coal on steamers.
Yours faithfully,
A. W. NEILL.
Dept. of .Mines,
Ottawa, July 28.
To A. W. Neill, M.P.
Dear Sir:-
Your letter of 17tb inst. re use of
pulverized fuel for Marino boilers bus
been referred to me.
Our engineers have been in closs
touch with officers of the British Empire Steel Corporation with respect
to tho equipment of that Company of
Its S. S. Liiigau for tbe use of pulverized fuel under its boilers.
The installation of this equlpmeii;
began quite early in the year at the
Company's shipyards at Halifax and
was completed and trial runs made
in the harbour at Halifnx ami at Sydney towards the end of May. An engineer of this department was present at these trials.
Subsequently, the S.S. Lingan made
a trip carrying a cargo of coal from
Sydney to Montreal, and after some
alterations, made a second trip, 1
believe to Three Rivers. As a result
of all the experience gained on these
runs a number of important changes
are being made in the equipment originally  installed.
In view of the very large amount of
money   being   spent   by   the   British
Empire Steel Corporation on this experiment  and   the  value  of the  information   that  must  eventually accrue therefrom, I would not feel justified in recommending any immediate
expenditure by the Government for the
equipment of a Government boat for
the use of pulverized fuel  until the
above    vessel's    experiments    have
reached   a   fairly  definite  conclusion.
Yours very truly,
(Signed)  C. GAMSELL.
Deputy Minister.
Departing Resident
Is Honored 0#i
Eve of Departure
On Friday evening last tlie home of
.Mr. and Mrs. R. Strachan was the
scene of two very interesting gatherings when the ladies of the Cumberland Cronies' Burns' Club met to honor one of their members Mrs. J. Home
who left Cumberland the early part
of this week to make her future homo
in Vancouver. Mrs. Horne, during
her residence in this city has been a
great worker for the Burns' Club and
her feliow members will miss her
very much. Mrs. Elsie Johnston, on
behalf of the ladies of the club, presented the departing member with a
handsome handbag. Mrs. Home made
fitting reply thanking all her friends
for their kind gift.    *
Just as Mrs. Johnston finished her
neat speech a number of well-wishers
of Mrs. Horne arrived, Mrs. Strachan acting ns hostess to the two parties which combined and enjoyed a
very pleasant evening iu music, cards,
contests,  etc.
Later n delicious buffet supper was
served. Card winners were 1st, Mrs.
Horne, 2nd. Mrs. H, Jackson, con-
solatidn, T. Hates. Contests wore
won by, 1st Mrs. Morgan, consolation
Mrs. Strachan, Guessing, Mrs. Freeburn. consolation. Mrs. Derbyshire.
During the evening Mrs. Horne was
presented with a handsome wet of Ivory toilet articles, Mrs. S. Miller milking the presentation, expressing regret a* the departure of the guest of
honor ami best wishes for her future.
Friends on whose behalf the gift was
presented, were: Mrs. it. Straoban.
Mrs. Wm. McLellnn, Sr.. Mrs. Clark,
Mrs. R, McNeil. Mrs. P. Watson. Mrs,
Glbb. Mrs. Boffey, Mrs. Morgan, Mrs.
II. Jackson, Mrs. C. McDonald, Mrs.
S. Miller. Mrs. Bell, Mrs. Tobacco.
Mrs. Kates. Mrs. Young. Mrs. Devoy,
Mrs. Saunders. Mrs. Coe. Mrs. S. Da-
| vis, Mrs. Lockhart, Mrs. White house,
Mrs. G. Shearer, Mrs. It. D. Hrown,
Mrs. K. Marocchi, Mrs. W. Whyte.
Mrs. J. D. Davis. The party broke up
I to the singing of "Aubl Lung Syne",
' and "Por She's a .lolly Good Fellow"
with three cheers for tbe hostess and
the guest of honor.
Welsh Picnic
Big Success
Good Programme of Sports Entered Into With Zest by
"Young and Old
One of the jolliest outings of the
season was held at Millard's beach
on Sunday last, the occasion being
the annual basket picnic or the Cumberland and District Welsh Society,
a very large number of members and
their friends attending. A very Interesting programme of sports and
novel events bad been arranged Into
which old und young entered with
Vim—especailly exciting were the
boys* pillow fight ant] ladies' quolnt-
Ing mutch. Mr. Harry Jackson ret-
ereed these events in his usual inimitable .style adding to the fun of the
occasion. As in former years, ice
cream for all while each child received a treat of peanuts. Following
Is a list of winners lu the various
events:
Girls' Race, two years and under.
1st Winuifred Williams; 2nd Alfrel
Somervllle.
Girls' Race, four years and under,
1st Gwen William:;; 2nd Evelyn Davies.
1st Lawrence Davies; 2nd Tom Boag.
Boys'   Race,  six   years  and   under.
Girls' Race, seven years ami under,
1st Beatrice Brace; 2nd Dorothy
Smith;   3rd   Leone   Shrader.
Girls' Race, eight years and under.
1st Jennie Williams; 2nd Lily Water-
field.
Boys' Race, eight years and under,
1st Jimmy Jackson; 2nd Willie Calnan.
Girls' Race, ten years and under.
1st Annie Williams; 2nd Edith Morgan.
Boys' Race, ten years and under,
1st Horace Calnan; 2nd Bud Hunden;
3rd Gilbert Davis.
Girls' Race, twelve years and under, 1st B. Martin; 2nd Alice Jack-
sou;   3rd  Celia  Richardson.
Boys' Race, twelve years aud under,
1st David Davis; 2nd Leland Bannerman.
Girls Race, fourteen years and under, 1st Katberine Brown; 2nd .Mary
Williams.
Boys' Race, fourteen years uml under, 1st Cyril Davis; 2nd Edmund
Carriga.n.
Boys' Race, fourteen years and un-
(relay), K. Brown, B. .Martin, S. Williams, F. .Morgan.
Boys' Race, fourteen years and under, (relay), C. Davis, J. Bannerman,
D. Davis and L. Bannerman,
Ladies' Quoiting, 1st Mrs. J. D. Davis; 2nd Mrs. J. Bond.
Ladies' Race, 1st Mrs. Pilling; 2nd
Mrs.  Murray.
Ladles' Football Kick, 1st Mrs, Calnan; 2nd Mrs. Murray.
Ladles' Race, 1st Mrs, Calnan; 2nd
Mrs.   S.  Davis.
Men's Quointing, 1st R. McNeil and
S. Miller; 2nd Jas. Brown aud J. D.
Davis; consolation, Watt Williams.
Boys' Race, seven years and under,
1st Jack Williams; 2nd Bert Williams.
Girls' Race, eight years and under,
1st Peggy Roberts; 2nd Irene Morgan.
Boys' Race, six years and under,
(handicap), 1st Albert Monks; 2nd
Tom Boag.
Girls' Race, six years and under,
(handicap), Nita Filling.
Girls' Race, twelve years and under, (3-legged), Annie Williams and
Annie Hutton.
Boys' Race, twelve years and under, (3-lcgged), David Hunden und
Horace  Calnan.
Boys' Pllllow Fight, twelve yeais
and under, 1st Sammy Armstrong
and Horace Calnan; 2nd David Davis
and David Hunden; 3rd Dud Hunden
and  Austin   Davies.
Girls* Pillow Fight, twelve yoars
and under. 1st Gertie Davis und Leone
Shrader; 2nd Fanny .Morgan and
Dora   Davies.
Girls' Pillow Fight, thirteen and
under, 1st II. Martin aud D. Williams;
2nd Annie Hutton and Mary Hassell.
Girls' Pillow Fight, fourteen and
under, 1st Lily Waterlield and Edith
Morgan: 2nd Sis Williams ami K
Brown.
Investigation Is
Ordered.
According to a report from Victoria, dated August 22nd, the department of Railways has ordered an investigation into the accident which resulted in the death, at St. Joseph's
hospital, Comox. of the 4-year old
son of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. D. Fair-
bairn, of Victoria, who was badly,
crushed when u log fell off a Comox
Logging company train at the crossing in Courtenay, near the Rivershb
Hotel. A full report, is understood
will be submitted to the department
shortly, giving details or the accident
and the causes. Mr. Fairbairn Is the
secretary to Liout.-Gov. Randolph
Bruce.
Cumberland Minister
Takes Part In
Induction Service
A very impressive service was held
in I lie New Hnzelton Church oil Moil-
ilay evening when Rev. T. II. Wright,
;he new minister in charge, was in-
ilucteil Into the olrcult by Rev. J, R.
Hewitt, ot Cumberland and a former
minister at Ilazelton. Rev. J. R, Hewitt was assisted by Dr. H. C. Wrincb
who gave the address ot welcome
from the congregation to the new
minister . Tlie doctor spoke on behalf
of the congregations of both new and
old Ilazelton. Tbe welcome aLso Included Mrs. Wright. After thc ceremony there was a social gathering
during which refreshments were served and the young people sang songs.
The service was full of interest and
tiie Rev. T. H. Wright received a
cordial welcome from the many
friends who were present. Tlle Rev.
gentleman Is well and favorably
known throughout B.C. being grand
chaplain or tho I.O.O.R for the province during the past five years. He
was stationed at Howe Sound in the
Vancouver Presbytery for the past
four years and Is now transferred
lo the Presbytery of Prince Rupert.
THE NAVY BOYS
LIKED CUMBERLAND
The boys from the naval boats In
| Comox harbor liked Cumberland very
j much, at least a fe'v of thetu did.
i Some of the members of the Durban
cricket eleven spent every minute of
! their leave lu Cumberland. They
I stated that utter tlle game on Saturday
; last they were treated right royally
j and that Cumberland would see them
ugaln. Just as soon as they were
able they came back and looked up
some of the members of the local club
spending some very pleasant hours
with them. Before leaving this city
oil Tuesday midnight bhe boys in blue
extracted a promise from one or two
Cumherlanders who Intend to be in
Vancouver this week end, that they
would visit ihe ships in Vancouver
harbor. It is nice to know the boys
enjoyed their visit to this city and
our only regret Is that tlle city of
Cumberland did not see Its way to
fole them ns liberally as the city of
Courtenay,
Cumberland Man
Hurt at Parksville.
Mr. Joe Bartoldl Is a pntlont in the
' local  hospital suffering  from  severe
bruises and shock, following u paln-
: ful accident whilst following his occupation   in  the  woods  near  Parks-!
vlllo. The unfortunate man fell from
j a  load  of  logs nnd  bruised  himself I
very  badly, but fortunately received '
no serious  Injury.
Taxi-Driver Fined
fur Assault
Andy Robinson, of Courtenay. was
lined $20.01) and costs in tbe local
police court for an assailil ou Knocii
llellln, another taxi-driver. The offense was committed on Saturday
last, the caea being tried on Wedncs
day.
■ Edwin Barker was lined $12.0(1 and
cosls on Tuesday for allowing bis car
to lie parked on the Island highway
at  Royston.
Sailors Disappoint
Local Soccerites
Thomas   Graham,  genoral   superln-
tpnd.illt   of   the   Canadian   Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited, lert for Ladysmlth on Wednesday morning.
*   •    •
Miss Blanche Dando returned from
a visit to Vancouver on  Wednesday.
Ou the conclusion of the cricket
game Sunday between the Cumberland eleven and the team from 11.M.S.
Despatch, the latler made a request
for a game of soccer, to be played In
Cumberland on Tuesday afternoon,
.lames L. Brown together with a few
of the members ot the cricket club
enlisted tbe services of Harry Jackson ami Tom Carney with the result
thai a leani was got together. It wns
a different slory, however when a
search was mnde for strlpn for the
I cam Mm' or i wo were located In
the old dressing rooms, but not » p:dr
of boots were to be found The amount ol football strips that have been
bought in this town during the past
few years amounts to a considerable
sum. ami most of It bought In public
subscription, yet when a game is
arranged a lot of time is used hunting up material,    it  would be much
belter If the strips were turned III by
all players to some central point, so
that in the event of a game taking
place at a few hours notice, one would
know where to look for equipment,
However. Ihe few energetic soccer
fans were doomed to disappointment
There wan no game. Transportation
was at the Wharf ready to bring
the boys over, but after waiting for
three-quarters of an hour no sailors
appeared and tt was deemed advisable
[to make tracks for Cumberland. Somo-
I one must have erred somewhere for
it is not very often that the boys In
blue disappoint anyone. Wo are will-
ling to stake our last dollar that If
arrangements for the game bad been
made through the regular channels
U-tbc sports officer of the Despatch,
;a game would have been played In
I Cumberland.
Nanaimo Golfers
At Comox Course
Arrangements   Made   By   Mr.
Graham Said to Be of
the Best
About twenty members of the Nanaimo golf club Journeyed to Comox
on Sunday where they were met and
entertained by rrlends and members of
the Courtenay Golf Club. It waa quite
an informal affair, and waa arranged
more than anything else to make tbe
local players neiiualntod with the new
nine-hole course laid out and operated by the Elk Hotel, under the direction and management of Mr. and Mm.
Osier. The new course has without
a doubt the prettiest setting and most
beautiful background of any on tho
Island. Looking south there is an Interrupted view of the gulf and adjacent Islands, and to the west and
north there is tlrst of all the valley
tt Courtenay, with the road to Cumberland ribboning through the trees
from Royston. and further afield towering mountains and glittering gla-
iers giving their touch of grandeur
to the beautiful valley of Courtenay.
The course itself is new and there Is
till a lot of work to be done on the
fairways; but the greens .everything
considered, have made wonderful
progress and are In really excellent
shape for this time of tbe year. Thers
was some good golf played during
the day, but more important than that
nil the N'anaimo players had a good
time, thanks to the kindness and hospitality of the Courtenay men. Luncheon was served at the Elk Hotel and,
with the roads as they are, the Elk
Hotel makes an ideal rendezvous foil
a day of golf and motoring. Mr. Thos.
Graham had charge of the arrangements at the Comox end, and. as he
s a member or the Nanaimo as well
as of tbe Cuortenay Club, he suceed-
ed admirably in turning the day into
ii very pleasant and sociable event.
B.C. Forest Fire
Losses Are Light
Cost to Government Estimated
at Only About* $40,500.
Victoria. August 23.—British Columbia has rounded tbe peak of the
easiest forest fire season in recent
years, officials of the forestry Hervice
believe, the cost of fighting fire outbreaks to date indicates that the total
expense for the season will be onlv
about HO,500, as against $500,000 In
the bad fire year of 1926.
Rainy weather without lightning in
the Southern interior, combined with
good fire fighting weather on the coast
has kept the total damage this season
down to a low aggregate. While tho
weather is still warm, humidity Is
so high all over the province, and
the heavy dews at night make It unlikely that any further serious outbreaks will occur before the autumn
(t is believed here, with ordinary
caution In the woods and a continu-
nce of weather conditions the peak
of the fire season may now be regarded as past, it is thought.
Believe KOr Not-
TEN MILLION HEAD OF
GAME IN MIGRATION
Report Made By Mr. Carveth
Wells
Nairobi. Kenya. Blast Africa, Aug. 20—
A remarkable migration of game in
the Tanganyika territory Is reported
by Carveth Wells, of tbe Geographical
Society Expedition, the report being
made from tbe party's llrst headquarters In the Tanganyika territory where
they arrived on July 2>\.
Martin Johnson, noted animal photographer, who Is In the same district
with Wells, estimated that there a^e
ii limit ten million head of game migrating across tlie country In a solid
muss ten nilloH wide and thirty miles
long at one spot.
Zebras are stated lo be leading the
way in a mass ten miles wide and five
miles deep, followed by miles ol
gnomes  and  other  animals.
The explorer's camp at the time
reported was situated in longitude
S5E, and about tft'0 degrees south of
the Kiiuator.
Wells reported that notwithstanding this equatorial location, tbe air
was so cold he bad Io sleep In a sleeping bag and wear a thick overcoat
and sweater, while be would have
been very glad for a hot water bottle
at night
Mr. Carveth Wells will be remembered by ninny people In Cumberland
During the residence here of the Rev.
W. Leverscdgo and at tho time the
Men's Club of the Anglican Church
was at Its zenith, Mr. Wells lectured
in the Church Hall, taking for his
subject 'My three yenrs in the jungle.' PAGE TWO
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 1982
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FIUDAY AT CUMBERLAND. B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 1982
I'ASADA'S VAST MINKItAI, WEALTH
SPEAKING ill Winnipeg recently, Hon. Charles
Stewart, .Minister of the Interior, declared
that thus far Canada's mining possibilities
had only been scratched. It is a statement with
much more behind it than the after-dinner enthusiasm of a political optimist. It is backed, indeed, by reports of the most eminent scientists,
and supported as well by the verdicts of notable
British financiers like the Ut. Hon. Reginald Mc-
Kenna. It is true that many rich deposits are in
areas not now easily accessible, and consequently
not commercially feasible for development at the
present time. But when one considers what has
been done in the way of colonization and railway
building during the past ten years, opening up
rich districts which, only a few years ago, were
barely explored, it is not difficult to imagine what
the next twenty-five years will bring.
The problem, in fact, is not so much the finding
of ines and Hie building of railways to them,
but rather tlie devising of policies that will bring
Canada ihe maximum of benefit from whatever
we suppose, to export a certain percentage of
minerals in a raw or a semi-raw state, but it
ought to be possible to do a great deal of refining
here, providing the greatest measure of employment for our own people—The Ottawa Journal.
SUSPECTED  PERSON'S  RIGHTS
A WELL-KNOWN   Toronto   barrister   has   announced his intention of asking the Minister
of Justice to introduce legislation amendng
the Criminal ('ode of Canada in such a manner
as to clarify the rights and privileges of persons
suspected of having committed crimes. The
effort is aimed at preventing arrested or suspected
persons being questioned by policemen and so induced to incriminate themselves under such questioning; to stop them being "Third-Degreed".
In view of the world wide attention that has
been directed to the case of Sir Leo Money, ex-
Member of the British Parliament, and Miss Savage, where the young woman after a charge
against her had been dismissed was taken to
Scotland Yard and there "Third-Degreed" for
several hours, and of many other notable instances of police inquisition, it would appear to be
time that something were done to protect people
j from such injustices.
I It is a fundamental principle of British law
j that everybody is innocent until proven guilty.
It is equally fundamental that no accused person
lean be compelled to testify against himself or
j herself, as the case may be. The practice of police officers doing their utmost by questionings
and sometimes threats, to induce persons under
j arrest or suspicion to incriminate themselves is
|a practice to be discouraged. In fact, it should
j be made a criminal offense for anybody, police-
! man or other citizen, to attempt such an invasion
of personal rights.
At this moment of writing there is a poor unfortunate Scotch girl under arrest in the province
! of Quebec, charged with the murder of her il-
I legitimate child, who for hours was questioned by
j police in the presence of a number of other people
'and induced to make a confession of guilt. What
j brutality especially towards a girl in such a pos-
| ition! Without defending or condoning her con-
1 duct towards the child, it may truly be said that
! for her sin she had already suffered the torments
! of the damned and, with mind probably unhinged
' through her mental anguish, she was in no fit
| state to be so questioned but, to the contrary,
probably only too ready to make admissions that
I no lawyer acting for would have allowed her to
J make. " It is time such police practice were ended
! it cannot cease too quickly if we are to retain our
| sense of justice.
j VACCINATION IS
I DECLARED,TO BE
CAUSE OF DISEASE
■ Scientists Blame Sleeping Sickness on Innoculation
Geneva, Aug. 28.—Development of
a dread sleeping sickness disease,
known to the medical world aa "en-
I cephalitlc lethargy," as the result ot
vaccination to prevent other diseases
was brought to the attention of tht
League of Nations health committees
smallpox and vaccination commission
today.
I Several countries particularly England and the Netherlands, have notl-
i fled the League of occasional cases
I where vaccination lias engendered
l sleeping sickness.
I ln the Netherlands the condition
was so nnd that compulsory vaccination in tho public schools has been
suspended for a year.
[PLEADS FAIR DEAL
'■ FOR IMMIGRANTS
R.CJH.P.    Chief    Says    Hollce
Should Show Every
Consideration
Toronto.  Aug.  28—Colonel   Court-
! lnnd   St.'irniis.   commissioner   of  the
JANNINGS SCORES AGAIN
IN LATEST PRODUCTION
Courtenay Locals
Mrs. Hagarty and Sheila returned
recently from an extended visit in the
East. They visited in Ottawa. Ren
frew. Eganville, Killnloe and Lake
Clear. On returning they spent six
weeks in Detroit. Mich., and enjoyed
camp life at "'Villa d'Este," the summer home ol Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Cur
rier at Walled Lake, Mich. Mrs. Haq-
arty was obliged to receive medical attention while in Detroit, and was a
patient in Providence Hospital for a
few days. She is now feeling very
much improved in health and wholly
benefitted by her trip.
* *   •
The Rev. T. Menzies, Superinten
dent of Neglected Children, was in the
city at the week-end and was an in
terested spectator at the opening
dance at the Native Sons Hall.
* *   *
Mr. R. Sollan, of Hornby Island, was
a  visitor in  town  to-day.
* a    *
A large number of sailors from the
navy boats In harbor over the weekend, were at the dance given them by
the City and Board of Trade in the
Gaiety Theatre on Monday night and
had a thoroughly good time.
* *   *
Mr.  C.  Rive  has as  his  guest,  his
mother, Mrs. Rive, of Vancouver.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACT AMENDMENTS
i'jti:.:;.>!i»TioNS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed Crown
lands may be pre-empted by Britieh
subjects over IS years 01 age and by
aliens on declaring intention to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation and improvement  for   agriculture   purposes.
Pull Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is given
in Bulletin No. l. Laud Series, "How to
Pre-empt Land," copies of which can
be obtained free of charge by addressing the Department of Lauds, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent
Records will lie granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which is not timbered,
i.e., carrying over 5,000 board feet per
acre west of (lie Coast Range and 8,000
feet per acre east of that Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are to
be addressed lo the Lund Cimmlssioii-
er of the Land Recording Division, In
which thi' land applied for i3 situated,
and are made on printed forms, copies
of which can he obtained from the
Land Commissioner,
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements made to
value of |10 per acre, Including clearing and cultivating at least, five acres,
before Crown Grant can bo received.
For more detailed   information  see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved Crown
lands, not being timber land, for agricultural purposes; minimum price of
first class (arable) land is $5 per acre,
and second class (grazing) land. $2,50
per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease of Crown lands
Is given in Bulletin No. in, Laud Series, "Purchase and Lease of Crown
Land;;."
Mill factory or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of stumpuge
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homeBites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the 111 it year, title being
obtained after resldonce and improvement conditions are fulfilled and land
has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas not exceeding 'MO acres may be
leased by one person or a company.
GRAZING
Under the Crazing Act the Province
is divided Into grazing districts and
the range admlnlsifreil under a Crazing Commission. Annual grazing permits are issued based on numbers
ranged, priority being given to established owners. Stock-owners may
form associations for range management. Free, or partially free, permits
are available for settlors, campers and
travellers, up to ten head.
Mr. and Mrs. Warren Cooper and
Taddy, Mrs. R. T. Cooper and Mrs. E.
W. Bickle are on a motor trip to California. They are expected back on
Sunday.
* •   *
Mr. C. H. Pigott, of Langford Lake,
was a visitor in town during the week.
He reports that his brother-in-law. Mr.
A. H. Westrup, is recovering from his
illness in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence G. Markle,
of Red Deer, Alberta, were guests at
the home of Mr. Markle's sister, Mrs.
W. A. W. Hames, during the week.
They left for Vancouver en route to
their home on Wednesday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Markle are on their
honeymoon.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. Roland H. Perrott returned from their honeymoon trip to
Alaska on Thursday of last week and I
have taken up residence on Victoria
Avenue.
* •   •
Miss Eva Taylor, of Vancouver, was
a guest in town over the week-end.
Professor Walter Richards, who has
resided in Courtenay since the first
of the year, has had to go to Victoria
for the purpose of consulting a specialist. Mr. Richards has not been
enjoying the best of health and for
this reason may possibly be prevented from returning to Courtenay. He
will be missed at the consol of the
organ in the United Church where his
music has delighted the congregations.
* *   *
On Sunday last, Mr. Thomas Graham entertained a number of Nanaimo and Courtenay golf players at the
Comox golf course where a very enjoyable social match was played and
luncheon had at the Elk Hotel. The
Naanimo contingent aws headed by
Mr. R. Hindmarsh.
* •   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Filmer and
their son Noel, who came up at the
week-end with the Nanaimo golfers,
were visitors in town on Sunday. Mr.
Filmer formerly resided in Courtenay
and was the publisher of tlie Courtenay Herald.
* »    *
Well   Known   Here
Mr. A. C. Mather, who so narrowly escaped death in an automobile accident near Agassi?, in which one man
was killed, is well known to many In
the district, having been formerly
employed at the Blocdel camp near
Union Bay. He was driivng n car
which In a fog went over a 100-foot
embankment.
* *   *
In the hidden hole competition
I played by the ladies' golf club, Mrs.
'McLeod and Mrs. Bowie tied, the hole
being No. 7. These two ladles will
have to piny off for the prize donated
by Mr. J. H. Eakin.
* *    •
Mr. F. C. Pearse conducted a very
successful auction sale for Mr. J. Sigs-
worth on the McKelvie Road yesterday of his stock, land and personal
effects.    Good  prices   were  received.
Mr. and .Mrs. J. G. Richardson, MltJS
C. Richardson and Mr. Copley Bennett and Miss Jessie Smith are spend-
a week' k vacation at the head of Puntledge Lake;
Here an J Th
ere
(123)
Tourist traffic to Saint John this
season is the largest in its history,
and so far fs equal if not greater
than during the whole of last season. Tourists started arriving
earlier this spring, and have continued In much larger numbers
than in other seasons,
Colonel Scott, who h successfully producing tulip bulbs at Salmon Ar , British Columbia, believes I1";! tbe industry has a future, lie has one acre under this
product inn with drying, cleaning
and storage sheds. He grows fifty-
two varieties of bulbs and has
about a quarter of a million bulbs
on hand growing.
The Alberta Amateur Championships will lake place shortly at
Banff. Alberta, where the annual
Highland Gathering and Scottish
Musical Festival is being held from
August 31 to September 3. An
elaborate programme has been arranged of a Scottish character,
many of the athletic contests being
peculiar to that race, such as tossing the caber and putting the shot.
Plans are reported to be on foot
among sheep raisers to establish
In Vancouver a wool grading centre similar to that functioning In
Trenton, Ontario, where at present
most of the wool business of Canada is conducted. An authority
slates this would probably have the
result of increasing the returns to
the producer from 25 to 50 per
cent.
. land   Starnes,
j Royal Canadian Mounted Police plead
I ert at the Chief Constables Congress
; for a more sympathetic treatment of
' immigrants. "Our clear duty," he
said, "Is to support heartily the desire
of the government that those whom
it permits to enter Ihe country shall
become citizens as rapidly as possible."
Constables should treat immigrants
with courtesy aud consideration, having In mind the difficulties they were
faced with in transplantation to
strange conditions. It was not so
much the immigrant himself who mattered but his children, and ' these
should not be permitted to grow up
"sullen, discontented, hostile' to our
government, our flag, our ideals, cherishing memories of discourtesy, contempt, exploitation," Colonel Starnes
said.
Although the automobile Is sometimes said to be a rival to the railroad. It gives the latter a great
deal of traffic. The number of
freight cars used by the Canadian
Pacific Railway for the transport
Of automobiles has doubled during
tbe past five years, and the latest
order of 300 new cars for the company lias Just been completely
filled.
Trans-Atlantic records have been
made by two new vessels, the
"Duchess of Bedford" and the
"Duchess of Atholl," the first two
of the new cabin class quartette to
he built bv the Canadian Pacific
Steamships. The former has just
accomplished i»n easthound voyage
from Liverpool to Montreal in six
r'ivs, fourteen and a half hours,
while her sistor ship, enroute at
the same time, made a westbound
c:' ■ ' p ■• 'i M ' "I to Liverpool In six days, 1., hours
school ear operated
Canadian Pacific
the Ontario Depflrt-
't'on has been Issued
lis Shops, Montreal,
the district west of
The car Is a re-
class coach equipped
ate "little red school-
•Irhi claM-onm, with
lohe, school books,
tha, and so forth; n
> use of students and
as w^ll: nnd comfort-
:Tiers- for tbe teacher
■ar Is aide tn reach
fiiim
foi  P
like I
Mar*
lied Hi
in up-l
v' dto
livine
•linol
are UJl a,
...b.j.
Mutual Life of Canada
If interested in a sound investment study this result
of policy in Mutual Life
Cash Paid
Amount    by Mutual Lit*
51.000 $1,371.02
Policy No.    Plan    Age
38.186    Bndowm't 29
30 years
Net Cash Paid
lty Assured
J812.70
Gross
Premium
(29.40
Gain
1558.32
Amount Received
for Each $100 Invested
$108.70
Regular   Dividend   Allotment  for   1928—$3,400,000
In addition to this a special Cash Dividend of $700,000 Is now
being distributed to policy bolder.a
See Local Agwnt
R. STRACHAN
"The   Last   Command"   Called
Best of Efforts Offered
to Public
If Emll Jannlngs continues making
such great pictures, critics throughout the world will find it hard to procure adjectives to adequately describe
them.
(Tannings has scored again, this
time in a remarkable characterization
as. a military general. His newest
Paramount picture has been bit led
"The Last Command," and It comes
to the Ilo-Ilo Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday, September, 3rd, 4th and
6th,
This American-born German uctor
presents in this new production so
commendable n figure that It cannot
be compared to ihose of "The Way of
All  Flesh,"  nnd  Variety."
Added lo this remarkable clinrac-
terizatioii is an able director Josef
von Sternberg, who directed "Under-
world," and it supporting cast that
mighl be classed as "all-star," tho
list of players Including William Powell, Evelyn Brent and Michael Visur-
off.
"The Last Command" is a story
cf the red revolt ln Russia, showing
Jannlngs as a mighty general, strictly
I Military but beloved by his men. He
.befriends a girl but imprisons he.*
i companion, the girl i nreturn saving
i him from death at the hands of the
] blood-mail   revolutionists.     He   then
LIQUOR PROFITS—Con.
(Continued from page one)
Revelstoke         4,61
Rossland         2,886.
Salmon   Arm          1,274
Slocan     .».         433.
Trail         7,049.
Vancouver     148,045.
Vernon         6,435.
Victoria        39,341
Burnaby       29,327.
Chilliwack (townBhip)       7,262.
Goldistream           652.
Coquitlam (district)       1,643.
Delta         4,074
Esqulmalt          3,676
Fraser Mills        379
Went         1,395.
Glenmore   	
Langley         6,835.
Maple   Ridge         6,634
Matsqui          4,649
Mission         2.567
j North Cowichan       3,000.
North Vancouver  (district)     5,971
Oak Bay   5,579.57
Peachland    389.72
Pentlcton       5,455.85
Pitt  Meadows    735.56
Point   Grey     41,388.56
Richmond      8,469.45
Saanich      14,131.87
Salmon   Arm    1,993.89
South   Vancouver     54,527.62
Spallumcheen     2,077.66
Sumas     1,685.45
Summerland  2,541.37
Surrey      8,988.69
Tadauac     342.17
West Vancouver   5,635.84
Abbotsford      1,137.24
Burns  Lake    446.31
Creston     1,569.05
Mission   (village)     1,714.04
Quesnel      616.59
Smithers      1,404.00
Terrace  1,(154.60
Vanderhoof       580.87
$559,479.69
Always Reliable
Sold by all Grocers
comes to America t In search of this ■
fair savoir. and there tho thread of j
the story takes a strange twist.
It Is a gripping story one with j
poignant love and drama, mystery, |
aud thrills, so far different from "The
Way of All Flesh" and "Variety" j
that It Is hard to believe the same I
star played  in  them all.
Great settings mark "The Last Com- j
mand'5' as an elaborate production,
and the fine acting of everyone par- j
ticularly that of Jannlngs, marks it
as one of the mightiest pictures ever
made.
DeLuxeTRAINS
Low Fares
Jasper
Prairie Points
Eastern Canada
Central
and
Eastern States
ALL-STEEL  EQUIPMENT
COMPARTMENT LIBRARY. OBSERVATION BUFFET
CARS. STANDARD AND TOURIST SLEEPING CARS.
DAY  COACHES.
«   THE
(Continental
LlMHED "
Vaneouver-Montrea
9.51) P.M
Vancouver-Toronto
E. ff. Blckle, Agent,
I'mnberlimd, B.C.
Telephone 85
Or write 0. F. Earle. District Passenger Agent, Victoria, B.C.
Qanadjan National
Blue RtbbonTeai
250 Cups to the Pound
Blue Ribbon Coffee
I n 1 lb. Vacuum Tins
Week End Specials
at
MATT BROWN'S GROCERY
Corn Flakes, 2 for 25c, or 9 for  $1.00
Post Toasties, 2 for 25c, or 9 for     1.00
Van Camp's Pork & Beans, Is, 2 for 25c or
9 for      1.00
Del Monte Pork & Beans, Is, 2 for 25c, or 9 for    1.00
Pilchard's, 1/23. 2 for 25c, or 9 for     1.00
Pink Salmon, Vis, 2 for 25c, or 9 for     1.00
Picnic Jars of Strawberry Jam or Marmalade
2 for 25c, 9 for     1.00
Picnic Jars of Sweet Mixed Pickles, Sweet
Chow, Sour Mixed and White Onions, 2 for
25c or 9 for      1,00
Canned Fruits, Pears, Sliced Peaches, Apricots
and Black Berries, 25c, 4 for 95
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR PRESERVING
PEACHES NOW
MATT BROWN'S GROCERY
[
Automobile Side Curtains Repaired
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Also Harness Repairs
E. L. SAUNDERS
=   i
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS                   •
Lumber
II
Reforestation
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
1
Much has been said recently about re-forestation
WINDOWS, DOORS,
in B.C.   The present forest is the result of natural
SHINGLES,
I j       reforestation when the human hazard was not present
KILN  DMED FLOORINGS.
III      to defeat nature.
AND    FURNISHINGS
1           Natural re-stocking of cut over lands is now going
WF, DRL.IVER TO ANYWHERE IN SllUiU'
NOTICE WITH  REASONABLE CHARGES.
!       on, as may be seen almost everywhere, and nature will
] |       again re-establish the forests if only Are is kept out.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
Prevent Forest Fires ■ - You Can Help
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONFS J Nlght cbIIs: 134X Courtenay
( Office: 159 Cumberland.
I
II
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
_                                   ——                         ..'■—■ ..-,-■—. 1 . 1 FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 1982
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGE THREE
/>'
WOME
GAS
Ae<y<y
isijrasSSs tut
QUALITY!
Refinery of (he Home Oil Distributors Limited, North Shore nf Burrnrd Inlet
a 100 per cent. Canadian Industry	
H
HOME
Home Oil Distributors Limited
Producer! Refiner.) Distributors
567 Burrard .Street Vancouver, B. C.
chemists make dally quality checks on
Home Gas. Thus a high standard Is
maintained and the motorist Is guaranteed thla uniformity of quality at
all times.
"That's different," argued Behrend
"However, the States won't fight. Nobody HghtB for a principle. There am
ten million Germans in America—you
can be certain that we aro reaching
them."
"Ab they—those others—reached the
Czechs," observed Arndt .... but—
that's different!"
"Quite!" agreed Behrend, unconscious of Irony.
He dug again Into the precious inner pocket and reproduced the cigar
case.
Here smoke this one."
He held a match and Arndt obeyed
him, drawing luxuriously ou the cigar
with a face almost devotional. Behrend leaned back and continued.
"With America In, there would be
an end of civilized warfare. It's bad
enough to use black savages, aa the
French and British do . . but America
lias her savages too . . . not only the
African ... but Indians! Did you
ever hear of"—his voice dropped and
he ended on a low und mysterious
note . . . "of—scalping?"
Arndt smiled through the smoke.
"Oh yeB!" he answered gravely.
"You see." instructed Behrend,
warmly to his subject, "that's really
a barbarlous country. They burn
people alive . . . negroes. It's perfectly Incredible ... in this day and
■age. God's mercy they can't get my
our submarines. But anyway, America wou't flght. They're too busy selling munitions."
A slight sound made him turn. Paull
came into the room, a little hesitant
She went straight over to him, gave
him her hand.
"Mr. Behrend ...
Behrend took the hand in both of
his and patted it paternally. He reminded her, gently.
"No, father!"
"Yes," said Paul! dubiously. Turning to Arndt, she saw the eggs, lying
on the table. She looked back at Behrend again, smiling eagerly.
"Oh, you brought some eggs?"
Behrend was painfully embarrassed
He cleared his throat and said. "Well
—ln a deprecatory manner. Pauli
touched his arm.
"Just what we need so much—how
very kind."
She saw him apparently struggle for
speech and mistook the embarrasment
for something else. She looked apprehensively from her father-in-law
to Arndt and asked severely.
"Wbat were you talking about?"
Behrend laughed.
"About savages, little Pauli, just
savages,"
Paull went to the bedroom door and
listened. Over her shoulder she asked
mildly astonished.
"Savages?"
"Yes, Foreigners," Behrend (old her.
Arndt laughed.
"Oh, come now. August," he said,
tolerantly.
But Behrend insisted on being tak?n
with seriousness.
"Don't you read the paper.,? Ilight
in tho military despatches! They drop-
bombs on churches and hospitals,
They cut off the hands or little children."
Arndt's face sobered.
"And what is worse they probbaly
say the same things of us!"
"Of us?" repeated Behrend Incredulously, "then you don't believe these
storleB?"
"Do you?" asked Arndt, directly,
"Certainly, If you are a patriot you
are bound to believe in outrage. They
are necessary to stimulate public
feeling."
Arndt sighed.   He answered slowly.
"Whenever men, of all kinds, Including the lowest, are turned loose,
drunk with blood and hate, there will
be certain excesses!"
Behrend's eyes protruded with astonishment.
"Excesses!"
He rose Pauli came back from the
bedroom door and stood by tbe table
her anxious glance going from one
man to another. Behrend flung out
an arm dramatically.
"Really, my dear Arndt! Do you
defend the destruction of cathedrals?"
Arndt shrugged  . He  smoked  for
a moment  In  silence  and   then  an-
swered: —
"It isn't important.''
"What!" shouted Behrend, the color
aud clmler rising.
"No. When we are destroying millions of men." finished Arndt.
"'You condone outrages on women?"
asked Behrend, with the heaviness
and directness of a steam hammer.
"All war is an outrage on women."
Arndt replied quietly. "All the outrages that follow are as nothing to
that. The supreme criminal is not the
animal in the trenches, but the statesmen who declare war!"
Behrend's nevk was swelling. His
fists clenched. Paul! felt her heart
sink. Oh, must it begin all over?
She felt that she had not the spirit
to combat it, to act as buffer between
these two men aud their antagonism;
she hadn't the strength. And Carl-
was coming home. To think that
they could quarrel ou such a day! She
heurd Behrend say "Arndt!" in a voice
of fury and she intervened quickly: —
"Mr. Behrend. you haven't seen tha
baby, and he's awake now."
Behrend turned to her. "That's so,"
he agreed. His hands unclosed, the
fever in his eyes diminished. He asked
"Hay 1 see him now?"
She went to the bedroom door and
beckoned him.
"Come. He's the image of Carl,
Look!"
Behrend advanced almost on tiptoe, quite comically. Pauli opened
the door for him ami he went into, the
bed room. Pauli behind that broad
back, shook a warning linger at her
father aud said:—"When I come back
I'll take the eggs into the kitchen."
She followed Behrend into the bedroom, and they bent over the baby,
who was lying quietly, wide awake.
He had a smile for his mother, a puzzled stare for Behrend. Behrend's
eyes were wet. He blew his nose with
a vigor that made the baby jump and
laugh a little. Behrend was. au fond,
a sentimental mun. He had the sentimentality which so often is adjunct
of a bad temper and overwhelming
egotism. He touched the baby's cheek
with his thick finger.
"Very like Carl. Carl was a handsome baby." Behrend praised his
grandson. "Paull, it wus unkind of
you to have kept me from my share
in him so long."
She said nothing merely picking up
the baby as he reached out his arms
to her and Behrend continued:—
"To think! If it hadn't been for the
Muellers I would not have known if
the child were a boy or a girl!"
"Have you no use for girls?" I'auli
asked him, but her mind said—Mueller? Dr. Mueller?—he never mentioned?—but then Mr. Behrend must have
known how much the bnby needed-
Oh, these men and their selfish pride!
"Oh, quite," Behrend replied, taking
the friendly child from her and lifting
him high la bis arms. "Girls are
well they grow up to become good lit-
the housewives and mothers—like you
my dear. Decorative too. But boys -
well, a boy carries on the name you
sec, aud goes Into business. By the
way, 1 expect that carl will go Into
business with me when the war is
over nnd he is discharged from the
army."
The baby struggled, a little plaintively, and put out his hands to his
mother. She took him from Behrend
put him back lit his big bed. ranged
the chairs about It to prevent his failing out nnd gave him a homemade toy
a doll, stuffed with rags, manufactured out of an old white dress, the fei-
tures sown, on in colored thread. She
looked down at the child and spoke
gently: —
"But Carl must go on writing."
Behrend waved a hand, tolerantly.
"Oh, yes—now, that his first play
showed promise. But ns a hobby, my
dear, not as a life work. Very great,
very successful men have had hobbles
—painting, writing, collecting and
What not—Carl shall write of course
—in his holiday time—as a relaxation
But I am convinced that the sterner
life of the battlefield, the hardships
ho has been through will change his
outlook—he will come back to Us dif
ferent Pauli—a man with a sense of
his responsibility."
Different ?—she thought—oh, "not.
that—not with the love of beauty dead
within him, the sensitive heart hardened!    She asked quickly: —
"You heard from him often?"
"Occasionally. I've written quite
regularly aud managed to send some
boxes."
"Yes—he told me so."
"I had to tell him of course, that
your father and I bad differed, otherwise lie would have wondered why I
had seen nothing of you since just before the youngster's birth."
Pauli nodded. She had written, too.
She recalled-Carl's answer:—
"Yau are my family.you and the
boy—no one else matters. Please do
not distress yourself about your father's quarrel with mine. All tbe
paternal affection and understanding
that has come to me has been from
your father Paull.'
They left the room finally and went
back to tbe professor. Arndt had reopened his strong box In their absence
taken out the Insurance policy, tossed it aside and put the five eggs in Its
place. One almost slipped from his
grasp. He was stiill shaken with the
danger as they came toward him, Behrend expatiating on the baby.
"A fine boy—he has the Behrend
brow."
Paull nodded.   She said:—
"I always say, "I shall have Carl
while I have his son.'"
"And lie is—how old exactly?"
"He was horn fn April, 1915," said
Pauli, "he is very nearly two years
old"	
"Does he walk?" asked Behrend,
jingling some coins in his pocket.
Pauli's face clouded.
"Not yet; the doctor says not to
worry he hasn't been properly nourished, you see."
She went to the table, looked for
the eggs, discovered them in the
strong box and smiled at her father.
"I'll take them out and bring you
back  your  box," she said.
Behrend pulled a handful of gold
from his pocket. Hound gold pieces
shining yellow. He dropped them one
by one on the table.
"1 don't do things by halves!" he
announced. "Here we have them, a
a gold piece for every month of his
life, and that makes twenty-three."
I'auli clutched the strong box aud
gasped.   Arndt said, his lips shaking
a little, trying to hiugh.
■     "If he were only my age."
The tension snapped they all laugh-
I wilh him aud Pauli walked sedately
away with the eggs. But her heart
run her heart danced. Gold! Gold
for tho baby, gold that would buy milk
aud eggs, oranges,  beef juice.
Dehrentl swaggered away from tho
money  on  the table,    fie asked: —
"You've heard about. .Mueller?"
"The doctor?" asked Arndt puzzled.
"No—no—not. Arnold—Helnrich—
they are not relatives," Behrend Informed him. "Your old comrade al
the University."
Arndt's face shnrpened to eagerness
He heard very little of the University
news now. he'd no chance to listen lo
the gossip nnd talk of the place since
lie stopped going to the coffee house
He looked an Inquiry at Behrend and
Behrend nodded!—
"He'.s been honored—he's won a
medal!"
Arndt asked, breathless with eciie-
ment: —
"How wonderful! What a gift lo
mankind"—
"Isn't it?" said Behrend and Arndt
went on:—
"A cancer cure! How proud he
must be- his life work, his research
justified—he has conquered death I"
Hut Behrend only snorted contemptuously:—
"Not that; a poison gas; a new one
—invincible!" He added, "Great man
that  Mueller,"
He turned in his pacing, looked nt
(he bedroom door anil Jerked a thumb
toward  it.
"Flue boy, that. Small, but the
square chin of his family."
Arndt wns lighting his second cigar.    He was in an excellent humor,
even the news of Muller'B—he termed
it downfall" in his mind—could not
shake him. He answered, smiling:—
"To be sure. My country is the
greatest in the world. My city Is the
greatest in the country. My street Is
the finest in the city. My house is
the best in the street. I am the head
of my house—and we call that patriotism!"
Behrend looked at him. He was
honestly puzzled as one is puzzled by
meeting something totally strange—a
new animal, say, or a visitor from
Mars.
There was no annoyance or anger In
his tone, but sheer bewilderment as
he asked:—
"Have you no pride of race?"
"We are of so many races," argued
Arndt.
Behrend shrugged at tho distinction
He inquired, modifying his first question a trifle:—
"Well, then, let us say—of country?
Arndt's thin, face flushed, his eyes
shone.    He nnswered gravely, with a
note of real exultation in liis voice: —
"I am very proud of being an Austrian!"
"You see-    But still you"	
Arndt broke in laughing:—
"But I am proud of being a professor.   See, August, that doesn't make
me want to kill all the lawyers!"
"But you defend your home?" Behrend pursued.
"Yes, answered Aj-utty,. jl'd defend
my home—by making it Impossible to
attack it." He chuckled, "I beg of
you, don't ask me to sleep with a
pistol in my liand and be proud of
the civilization that makes such measures necessary."
"This Is a war to end war!" said
Behrend.
"So was the Franco-Prussian "
Arndt reminded his skeptically.
"These people who starve us"—began tbe well-ted guest.
"As we starved them In "71," interrupted Arndt.
"They must be crushed to make the
world safe," continued Behrend, ignoring the remark, "and then "
"Then " Arndt interpolated tor him,
lowerin ghls voice in mock solemnity,
"Then comes a—peace conference."
He added as Behrend nodded.
"And war always begins with the
peace conferences. This war began,
my friend, in 1871."
Behrend shrugged. He was becoming irritated.
"When  we shook  hands  with our
adversary."
"Yes—and took his watch."
"What?"
"Alsace-Lorraine," explained Arndt.
Behrend who had been lolling back
in a chair for some minutes, sprang up
again.
"You wouldn't have us give back
thousands of square miles?"
"To hold which we have kept sixteen million armed men," countered
Arndt.
Behrend shook his head in dismay.
"Whomever it belonged to it has cost
ten million lives. Is any strip of
territory worth that io anyone?"
"A population of two million"	
"Which spoke another language,"
Arndt broke In. "What of their pride
of race? For half a century French
school children have been taught that
they must get back Alsace-Lorraine.
When will we learn that while pride
of race survives. God makes the only
lasting boundaries?"
CHAPTER XVII.
I'auli came to the bedroom doorway
She had a dark Cloak thrown about
her and carried the strongbox in her
hands. She stood thero listening anxiously. The voices of the two men
were not yet raised, but she tell instinctively the atmosphere or hontiiity
between  them.
"Our people WOUld never have consented!" she heard Behrend assever-
atc.Ii
"Our people were never asked!" her
father argued. "A few generals want-
i ed Mctz for strategic purposes, when
'will we learn that friendship Is the
; only strategy and good will a greater
1 protection than machine guns?"
! Behrend shrugged Impatiently.
I "All nations hold what they have
I won!" he declared.
i "How long?" his friend asked htm.
"Five thousand years of war from
■the beginning of history-and what
ihave they accomplished? Always the
.vanquished return to their flags nnd
i their faith. The real conquest* ar"
i of peace. From Resostrils to Napoleon who holds what he has won?"
i Pauli sighed. Impossible that these
1 two men should meet In amity and on
| n common ground. She came into tlie
: room and put tlie strong-box on the
j table, gesturing inward the gold.
"Here's your strong-box," she said.
I    Behrend Ignored ber. He wns stnr-
] Ing toward  Arndt.    He  hud  dropped
back Into bis chair again nnd now he
smote himself on one fleshy knee with
i ho palm of his hand.
"Well! I must say for a pacifist!"
he ejaculated.
Paull laughed. She asked teasingly
ln an effort to restore peace. "Have
you never heard of a lighting pacifist!'
Her father shook his head at her.
"I don't fight!" he asserted, "I dislike  no  one!"
"Very well,' Pauli agreed, "but for
goodness sake dont wake the baby." ! '
She went back to the bedroom, Behrend rose, followed her, looked in
once more and then closed the door
upon her and the child. When lie returned to tbe table the professor was
looking at the insurance policy before
returning it to the strong box.
"What's that?"
"My life Insurance," answered Arndt
"When, does it mature?"
"Next September.."
"Turn it in now," Behrend advised
him, "Money is going down fast. If
I were you I'd do it tomorrow. By
the end of the week who knows? Every day billions of crowns are dumped on the market."
The professor looked his Incredulity
"You mean, to say people are selling
short."
"Eactly!"  said  Behrend.
Arndt shook his head, his mouth set.
".No, August, I don't believe it!"
Behrend smiled tolerantly. He
swayed a little on his heels as he gave
proof.
"One does not epect you to know
much of business," he admitted generously. "But listen. A month ago,
my friend. I sold five hundred mil-
lino crowns. Today I can buy them
back at half the price. A clear gain
of two hundred and fifty millions."
Arndt got to his feet. His face was
like ashes.    He asked: —
"You?"
"I! In another week ft will be five
hundred millions. Every heller the
crown drops now fs so much profit to
me." | J
Arndttook bis head between his , ;
hands. He couldn't believe—the thing ■ \
was beyond his comprehension. He j I
asked   painfully:— !
"That Is to say—when the crown is '. !
worth less?" '•
"You have it. When the crown Is j !
worth less I am worth more. Five ; I
hundred millions.    That's money!"      j
Tlie professor's voice shot up. He j
cried:— [
"No—no—not. money. Blood and | ;
tears!" ;
Behrend flushed. He answered try-, ;
Ing to be patient, holding on to his i ;
temper. I j
"My dear Arndt I don't want to I ;
quarrel"  !
Arndt ignored him.    He raised hh   ;
bands.   He prayed, aloud, simply, pitifully:—
i    "God—God, keep me from hate!"
Behrend looked at him. The thought
j passed through his mind—Is this man
] —a little mad?   He said, soothingly:
"But, really—Arndt"	
!     One  word  shot from  Arndt   like a
i bullet.    He said grimly: —
;     "Go!"
Continued »xt ffeek
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One at $550 and the other at $1,000.
Both Cash Deals. Apply in first instance to the Islander office.
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t&*     PROMPT ATTENTION     »®
David Hunden, Jr.
COAL     —     GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
—     WOOD PAGE FOUR
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 1982
Coming to the Ilo-Ilo Theatre, Cumberland
This Friday and Saturday, August 24th and 25th
CMA
CUIAIPU1N
HE'S BACK AGAIN!
In the greatest show of mirth—tlvj
picture you've been waiting to see!
Chiiplin, king of comedy, back
again—still smiles and smiles ahead
ol them all!
Right this way to the big show!
See the greatest collection of laughs
gags and giggles ever assembled
under one canvas! Freaks, fun and
frolic—they're all here! All right,
professor, strike up the band! The
show is about to begin! Folks, step
this way!
Tuesday and Wednesday, August 28th and 29th
A Big Double Feature
Sui e he fights! As only Ken can I
But you ought to see his brand-
ne wriding tricks in the most
sensational horse race ever
screened. Over the open range
they race, up steep grades,
through treacherous rivers with
Ken's skill and daring bringing
him victory and the heart of a
Western beauty. It's his greatest!
The path of true
love is rough—
—especially when a man and
his wife have to come home at
dawn in a milk wagon!
also the screen treat
of the year
The Screen treat of the year!   For two kinds of people
onlv—those who are married and those who are not!
Get ready to laugh!   This is the funniest picture ever
inspired by the comedy of matrimony.
Don't get a divorce!   Or, at Least, until you've seen
this comedy of matrimony.
She's ertay young wife—
He's every young husband
—The comic story of their
domestic tragedies ia the
best laugh picture yetl
WMMia. MM. a„«*a*
MayM<Avoyw
Conrad Nagd
fflWH&SWGLE
with
AWTOBEMNCfiR-MYRNAlaCrY
ftOVMlWIM «3RA
AWfcRNER BRQS.PRODUCTIQN
CHAPLIN SAYS FILMS
ARE FOR EMOTIONS
Charlie Chaplin, whose newest
comedy, "The Circus" cornea to the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre, this Friday and Saturday believes Alms should appeal to
the intellect.
'In the "Circus," as in all my pic-'
tures, I appeal to the feelings," says
Charlie, "I am not at all fond of
merely clever things. 1 do not want
to make my films purely intellectual;
they must have moving power in them
Of course, different things move different people. 1 have sat down and
deliberately said to myself.
"I will enjoy this poetry of Keatri
or Shelley, or whomever it happened
to be."
"But I can't. 1 can't get It from
the words, as I can, for instance,
through watching a dancer. Pav-
lowa, to me, is all life. She embodies
everything. I try to clasp the poetry
in my films as she embraces it In her
great art.   And the rythm."
McAVOY AND NAGEL
SCORE IN NEW FILM
Is Unusual Comedy
"If I Were Single," Warner Bros.
picture starring May McAvoy and
Conrad Nagel, will be a welcome divertissement for the admirers of these
two popular players. It is a domestic
comedy to which director Roy Del
Ruth has Imparted many touches of
fresh treatment. The nagging of the
wife because of the husband's careless habits around the house will
have the patrons of the Ilo-Ilo Theatre where the feature will play next
Tuesday and Wednesday along with
"The Upland Rider", in spasms of
laughter. These scenes are remnis-
cent of every young household and
the very naturalness of the events
that transpire wil lappeal strongly
to mivie audiences.
WESTERN PICTURES
SHOW LARGE GAIN
IN PUBLIC FAVOR
Western pictures with their dashing action, spectacular stunts, and
clean sweep of open country are not
only holding their own Ln the field of
screen entertainment but are rapidly
forging ahead to the lead, according
to the crowds that have been attending "The Upland Rider," Maynard's
latest First National Feature which
comes to the Ilo-Ilo this Tuesday and
Wednesday along with "If I Were
Single."
The name of Ken Maynard has become a household word in the matter
of thrills, trick riding and good clean
dramatic action, and "The Upland
Rider" upholds that reputation.
"The Upland Rider" is packed with
thrills and a cross country race is one
of< the most daring and spectacular
stunts ever shown in any picture.
Marion Douglas has the leading
feminine role. Albert Rogell directed and Harry J. Brown supervised
production. The sceneic qaultties of
the picture are beautiful. Many ot
the scenes were taken in the hlstorl
cal Falos Verde estate in California
skirting the Pacific Ocean.
"The Upland Rider" is everything
an action western picture should be
and for thrills and stunts and daring
you can't miss it.
LON CHANEY'S NEWEST A
POWERFUL TRAGI-COMEDY
Star Finds His Greatest Role
I'lajH a Tingle. Clowm In Inimitable
Fashion
Lon Chaney, In his first clown role
since his sensational success several
years ago in "He Who Gets Slnpped
comes to the Ilo-Ilo Thoatre on Friday
nnd Saturday, August .11 and Septom
her 1st, when he will appear as the
central figure of Herbert Brenon's
elaborate production, "Laugh, Clown
Laugh." The new play, adapted by
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer from the celebrated stage drama, sees Chaney stai
ring In tho role of the tragic clown
made famous before thc footlights
by  Lionel  Barrymnre.
The new picture is n vivid dram;
of backstage life, of the theatre, with
Chaney in the role <>f a clown who,
for the happiness of the woman he
loves, makes; a tragic sacrifice.
Loretta Young, new discovery of
the screen, plays the heroine Simon-
etta, and Nils Asther, of "Sorrell and
Son," the juvenile lead as Ltilgi. Bernard Siegel, Gwen Lee, Cissy Fltz-
Gerald and others of note, are in tha
cast.
A massive reproduction or a great
European theatre and other elaborate settings lend lavishness to the
tense drama. Chaney runs the gamut
of thespian art, appearing as a ludicrous comedian In the theatre
scenes, and in others plumbing the
depths of tragedy.
Herbert Brenon, who directed the
picture is famous as the director of
"Beau Oeste." Sorrell and Son,"
"Peter Pan," "God Gave Me Twenty
Cents," "The Sideshow of Life" and
many other notable plays.
Next Friday and Saturday, August 31, September 1
ION CHANEY
He held her in his arms—but he knew
that love had gone out of his life.
A love tragedy of circus life in which
Chaney rises to supreme heights of artistry. ..Exciting!    Uunusual!
ANjetro    ^jjokuvyn-     Mayer picture
THE GREAT BELASCO STAGE PLAY— .
now a marvelous picture
This one can be matched against them all for drama
and thrills.
The Man of a Thounsand Faces adds another imperishable portrait to his screen achievements. Here is an
unusual story, masterfully acted by the greatest of
character stars, superbly directed by the man who
made "Beau Geste" and "Sorrell and Son."
Never will you forget Lon Chaney as the clown who
finds love for one fleeting; moment, and then loses it,
hiding his heartbreak behind a painted smile.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 3, 4 and 5
THE
LAST
COMMAND
....The world's outstanding dramatic actor is superb as the
mighty General.
From the heights of pomp and
splendor. With men.. . . .Women . . . .a nation at his feet.
Through flaming love ... adoration Hate.  To. ... !
The most terrific climax the
screen has ever known. FIUDAY, AUGUST 24. 19S2
CUMBEULAND ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
PAGE FIVE
(»
V
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Whole Wheat Muffins
l1:: cups Comox Whole Wheat Flour
1 cup White Flour
2 teaspoons Baking Powder
'.i cup Sugar
1 tablespoon Butter
1 cup Sweet Milk
1 Egg
Mix dry ingredients thoroughly; then
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butter and add last, stir and drop Into
Muffin tins.
Game Regulations
(Continued trom Page Onei
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■ A combination that brings out that wonderful nutty
• flavor.   A healthful treat for the whole family.
COMOX CREAMEUY ASSOCIATION
Phone 8 Courtcr.ay, B.C.
ing the Highland District mentioned
in these regulations, the same is here
hy defined aa follows: "Starting at
the junction of the Finlayson Arm
Road and the Malahat Highway;
thence south along the Malahat and
Island Highway to Atkin Road; thence
east along Atkin Road to Thetis Lake
Road; (hence north along Thetis Lake
Road to Munn'a Road; thence easterly and southerly along Munn's Road
to Prospect Lake Road; thence along
Prospect Lake Road north and east to
the right-of-way of the Interurban
line of the British Columbia Electric
Railway; thence along tho said right-
of-way to Tod Inlet Road; thence along Saanich Arm to Coldstream Creole
thence following Goldstream Creek to
the Finlayson Arm Road; thence along the Finlayson Arm Road to the
-Malahat   Highway."
Kur. bearing Animate,
In the Western District, all fur-
hearing animals (except Muskrau on
Vancouver Island), open season from
November 1st. 1928, to February 28th'
1028. both dates inclusive.
Hilt.'  Limit
In respect of the big game throug-h-
nnt   the   Province  as   defined   in   the
"Game   Act."   no   person   shall   anywhere in the Western District kill or
, take or have In their possession dur-
j ing the open season more than three
| Deer, all of which must be of the male
j iex; and no person shall at amy time
kill or take or have in their posses-
I alon   during  tlie  open   season,   any-
| where in the province, more than one
Grizzly Bear and three Bear of any
other species.
! Dont start forest fires. Never drop
a lighted match, cigar, or cigarette,
or knock live ashes from your ppie.
Make your camp-fire safe and put It
out before leaving. Tlie Forestry
Department claims that the serious
Increase in forest fires every year at
ihe first of the open season is caused
by hunters. If this is true and hunters are not more careful we might
tie forced to prohibit hunting In timber areas. HUNTERS it. is up to YOtJ.
DON'T shoot unless you clearly soe
and are sure of what you are shooting
at.   It may be a doe. a cow or a MAN.
HEALTH SERVICE
of the
Canadian Medical Association
Question concerning Health, addressed to the Canadian Medical
Association, 184 College Street,
Toronto, will be answered. Quea-
tions as to diagnosis nnd treatment will not be answered.
Measles
Measles is a child-killer.   This disease which so many regard ns ot no J it kills, but because It seems I
seriousness and which Is thought ot | pare the ground  tor other disea
It is very easily spread and practically  all  who are  exposed  contract
the  disease,  unless  they  have  been
I protected  by a previous  attack.
|    It  is  n  mistaken  idea that   every
j child must have measles.   It ia criui-
I Imil   to   expose  children   to   measles,
j because to ilo so Is to risk their lives.
Measles is serious not only because
pre
as a necessary evil, accompanied by
Inconveniences, is, as a matter ot
fact, a serious menace to child lite,
and because of tbe number of children it kills, It ranks high amongst
those diseases thut take life in eurly
childhood,
In 11126, there occurred In Canada
SI*;i  deaths  from   Measles,  of  which
lt Is the pneumonia following measles
which makes it so dangerous. Tuberculosis may become active after measles.
Concerning the control of measles,
It must bo remembered thai measles
is most contagious during tlie days
before the rnsh appears. For this
reason, It is advised that every child
264 were children under one year of I with a cold in the head he kept away
age. Jlost deaths from measles oc-j from other children, not only to pre-
cur under live years of age. This dls-1 vent the spread of colds, but because
ease attacks especially those under | the cold may be the llrst stage, of
three   years.    The   older   the   child, | measlea.
the better chance he has of recovery, j    Part of the protection of child life
Measles Is a communicable disease   is   the  protection   of  the  child   from
it is passed from the sick to tlle well. ' measles.
Victoria Are
Champions
(Continued from Page One)
SCOTTISH
LAUNDRY
FIRST CLASS WHITE LAUNDRY SERVICE
IS*   Special Family Laundry Rate   "W,
also expert
DYERS AND DRY CLEANERS
A Trial Order Will Convince You.
Orders left at the Ritz Cafe, Telephone 150
Cumberland, will receive prompt attention
The GEM
BARBER SHOP
Opposite  Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
Cumberland, B. C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Children's hair cut any style 35c
Ladles' hair cut any style 50c
flied out to Harris. Webster singled,
and Cummins singled to left field.
Millard retrieved and ln trying to
catch Webster going down to third
tossed the ball into the bleachers, allowing Webster to score. Forbes was
safe on first when McKay dropped a
fly in right and Cummins scored
Forbes was nabbed trying to steal .second. Downey to Cummins. Two hits,
two runs, two errors.
Bobba, Harris and Cummins all
fanned.   No hits, no runs, no errors.
6th Innings—McKenzie fanned and
Dunn went out at first on an assist by
McKee.^ More walked and Dangerfield
fanned.   No hits, no runs, no errors.
Millard went out at first on an assist by Dangerfield, Downey filed out
to Oatman and Dixon fanned. No hits,
no runs, no errors.
7th Innings—Oatman walked and
Minnis went out at first on an assist
by McKee. Webster walked. Cummins
connected to Harris who nabbed Oatman going down to third and made a
nice double when he got it across to
Dixon for an out against Cummins,
No hits, no runs, no errors.
Robinson fanned and McKay singled.
McKee fanned and Bobba went out
at first on an assist by More. One hit,
no runs, no errors.
8th Innings—Forbes was safe at first
on an error by Bobba and McKenzie
fanned.    Dunn connected to McKee,
who-threw Forbes out at second on
fielder's choice. More was out at first
on an assist by Harris. No hits, no
runs, one error.
Harris and J. Cummins both weni
out at first on assists by H. Cummins
and MHlard went out at first on an
assist by Minnis. No hits, no runs, no
errors.
9th Innings—Dangerfield filed out
to McKee. Oatman and Minnis fanned.
No hits, no runs, no errors.
Downey went out at first on an assist by Cummins and Dixon singled.
Robinson sacrificed, Cummins to Webster,. McKay singled, McKee came up
with two on the bases. Apparently
Dangerfield tried to walk, but the
crowd went wild when the big fellow
sent n screamer away out to left field;
it looked safe for a moment but McKenzie got under it and the game was
all over.   Two hits, no runs, no errors.
AB R   H   PO   A   E
Cummins, ss  4
Millard, If  4
Downey, c  4
Dixon, lb   4
Robinson, cf  4
McKay, rf  4
McKee, P  4
Bobba, 2b  3
Harris. 3b   3
Visitor Charmed
With Island's Beauty
I>o the people of Vancouver Island
eally appreciate what they have lo
lifer the visitor in the way of scenic
entertainment? I dont think 80. Despite the well-chosen slogan of "Sunshine and Flowers for Victoria, despite tiie richly deserved emphasis upon tha beauty of the Malahat Drive
and tils- enchantment of the Bucllart
('.aniens Vancouver Island -really underestimates itself. The fact Is the
people of Victoria do not know their
iwu island.
After motoring all over the Pacific Coast from Tia Juana to Howe
Sound, 1 have no hesitation In declaring that Vancouver Island is the
one place on the coast that nobody
can afford to miss. It Is a little empire of beauty In Itself, a self con-
lalncd empire, and so little after all.
1 do inn menu to say that your
island excels all the rest ot the Coast
In every point or competition, tor it
does not, ll has nothing to compare
with the best half-mile of the Cliuck-
inuck Drive the cumulative magnificence or the Redwood Highway, or the
waterfall an gallery of the Vosemlte!
Bui on Vancouver Island there Is a
quicker stepping from one delight to  0o"gh, h- Agnew
-mother than anywhere else on  Ihe j Dando. c. Agnew, b. Begg 	
Pacific Const, and It Is beauty In the   Bums,  c.   I>aiicoe,  b.  Begg ....
large  not  lu  the  miniature. j Stewart, b.  Begg 	
Vet  for a few well advertised tea- i Vaughan, c. Holland, b. Begg
why so many come to Victoria on the
ferry, drive to Nanaimo and go by
water t„ Vancouver missing three-
fourths or the scenic attractions of
the Island.
When the new West Coast highway is built, its pulling power over
tourists will be mutlplled manyfold
if it Is linked up with the Island
Highway as it might be (Judging from
the mapi by a road up Nltlnat Lake
and along the railroad grade to Alberni.
For my own part I will never stop
boosting Vancouver Island both to
friends and strangers. Coming back?
Wall, rather!
AN  AMERICAN
(Taken from the Dally Colonist of
a recent Issue).
Local Cricketers
Defeat The Navy
(Continued  from  Page  One)
for 9 and  Stewart and  Vaughan  0
tor (i and 0 for 12 respectively.
Following are the scores of both
games:—
DURBAN (a.HE
(iiniliorlund Innings
Idiens. l.b.w, b. Coleridge   1
Hassell.   run   out     3
..11
.. 7
 10
  0
Telephone
Courtenay 226
Telephone
Cumberland, 150
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
X§PEBV
NATIONAL
IN Till tXNMJIXN
nncHiEft/
ilr^sa  lor MminiFicenk;
Mountain Grandc-i J
fm
985.85 fr»n> Vancouver, B.f
Good to Return October :tl.
For Full Particulars Apply
Cumberland^ B.e„ Edward W. Blckle* Agent
•   Telephone #5
Or write C. F. Earle, District Passenger Agent. Victoria, B.C.
CANADIAN NATIONAL
Advance
Fall
Showing
We are glad to be able to
announce the arrival jf our
NEW
FALL
COATS
0
1
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
2
0
1
10
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
2
14
0
0
0
2
0
0
2
3
R
H
PO
A
0
0
3
1
0
1
1
1
0
12
1
1
1
1
2
11
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
9
1
0
0
0
11
Hushed Through Specially for our
CUMBERLAND STORE
Everything the Newest—Absolute Style Authenticity.
Dressy   Broadcloths  and   Smart  Suede  Fabrics.
Elaborately Fur-trimmed nnd Silk Linings and at
Prices That Cannot Be Beaten.
ALSO AN ADVANCE SHIPMENT OF
New Fur Coats
In
MUSKRATS AND SEALSKINS
Every Coat has Our Guarantee with it
aa We Only Uuy from one of the Best Houses  In  Camilla
Come in and See Them
NEW CIIINCniMiA COATS KOI! (illtl.S AT SPECIAL
SC1IOOI.-OPEMKG I'ltlCES.
New Fall Millinery just received, every New Style
and Color is here, Felts and Velvets also
the New Feathered Hat.
See Them Here ut
"The Store the People Like"
John the Hatter & Co.
Cumberland
"The Right Place to Buy"—Shop here and Save Time and Money
Oatman. cf  5
Minnis, ss    5
Webster, lb     4
H. Cummins, 2b   4
Forbes, 3b     4
McKenzie, If    4
Dunn, rf    4
More, c    4
Dangerfield, P. ..   4
Summary
Struck out by McKee, D; by Danger
field, 9; hits off McKee. 0; off Dang'
erfleld. 0. Walked, by McKee, 4; by
Dangerfield, 1. Errors, by Courtenay,
5; by Victoria, 1. Two-base hits, J.
Cummins. Double play, Harris to
Dixon. Left on bases by Courtenay.
7; by Victoria, 8, Time of game, 1:3s!
Umpires. A. McGregor and Mulliol-
land.
ttobathan.   b.   Begg     g
Goodall,   0.   Nugent,   b.   Begg    4
Vernon-Jones,   not  out    1
Extras     2
bb (and I hear that you cut down
Ihe publicity bureau appropriation,
this year!) the visitor must strike out
for himself and find what the Island
has to offer.
Like many other people, 1 have
11 liking for side trips by water while
'in a motor tour. In Victoria I inquired about tlie West Coast. No, It
could not lie reached unless one could
spend a week on. a steamship. I gave
It up anil started up the Island.
Every mile of the way was a delight. The .Malahat led to Quulicum
nnd there everything seemed to atop j
To be sure, there were vague reports I
of 11 district to the south-west, be-1
yond Mount Arrow-smith, reached by I
a narrow dangerous mountain road I
which tew well upholstered cars 1 „, , ,, . .
would  think  ot   undertaking.    So  r | UinP; Coie^^ c-Burns, b. Good-
Total            75
Bowling-Coleridge 1 for 18; Agnew 1 for 3; Baxter 0 for 16; Begg 7
for 18; Tucker 0 for 18.
H.M.S. Durban liming*
Capt Wills,  H.M.,  c Stewart,   b.
Goodall      4
A. B. Fogarty, b. Goodall ll
G. It. A. Holland, b. Goodall  0
.Midshipman  Merriman, c.  Idiens
b.   Goodall  14
C. P. O. Baxter, e. Stewart, b. Good-
all     2
Lt.-Com. Agnew, l.b.w., b. Burns
wont to the BOUthweat to Alberni. and
fell like a discoverer.
The road instead of being dangerous, merely had a few steeppitches.
Vnybody who can run a car out of a
garage could drive over it in safety
and with pleasure. For miles it
wound through a magnificent forest
f Douglas Firs, giant, primeval trees
ucb as one sees in the redwood district of California.
And .then, amazing us it seemed,
he West Coast was at hand in tlie
er>- heart of the mountains. The
finest one-day water trip on. the Pacific Const offered it-solf. in the shape
of.a voyage down the Alberni Canal,
through the myriad of islands of Bar-
kley   Sound   (still  green   and  cool   in
all
A. B. Pascoe, run out   6
j Subaltern Nugent, b. Goodall   0
A. B. Tucker, not out  0
Midshipman Begg, b. Burns  2
Extras
Bowling—Goodall 7 tor 25; Gough
0 for 12; Burns, 2 for 24.
Advt. in Totinpah * (Nev.J Daily
Times: Don't kill your wife, let ue
do It, wet wash or rough dry the economical  way.
*   *   *
A lecturer says men imitate women. That's all bunkum. You don't
see any Cumberland men with their
pants cut off above the knee, showing pink rosebuds on their garters.
You Answer
In the seeth of leap year fancies.
This one rises to the top:
Does the girl who pops the question,
Have to go and question Pop?
Airman proposes
by
trans-Atlantic
telephone
The telephone iutohi-
plWied     for    Lou     Gordon,
trails-Atlantic filer, what two
years of personal association
imd fulled to produce.
From London, LKnglnml,
(.■onion put in ji telephone
call for his Hweetbejirl al
Hruokllm', >lnssM U.S.A., In
tho short span of a throe*
minute conversation* he proposed marriage and the girl
established something of 11
record herself with a soul.
thrilling VsM.
Incidentally, ihls njis the
llrst proposal h) trans.At-
(untie telephone. Gordon's
success may loud to more*
B. C. TELEPHONE CO.
H.M.S. DESPATCH KUME
Cumberland Innings
Idiens, h.  Regler  26
Vaughan,  b.  Thompson    0
Hassell.   c.   Bowey,   b.   Walsh    2
Burns, run out  40
Gough,   b.   Walsh     3
Stewart, c. Walker, b. Walsh   0
midsummer) to Bamfleld and Ucluelet|Led,ngnain' c- Walter, b. Bowey....l»
with   Btops  at  quaint  mixed  settle- Nunna» aturapeH, b. Walsh  24
Goodall,   b.   Bowey   0
Brown,   not  out   4
Vernon-J ones, b. Walsh   0
nieiits of white men, ludluiis, Japan-
aud Chinese, where interest centred in tlie coming of the fast eighty-
foot mail tioat from Alberni.
If my state of California had anything like the Alberni Canal and Bar-
kiey Sound, with a motor road touching it, Its fame would he shouted from
one end of the continent to the other,
and the people of British Columbia
would travel a thousand miles to see
it. lint how many, even of the people
who live on Vancouver Island have
seen Barkley Sound? How many
could locate It on tbe map? Yet ihere
il Is with steamers and Siwasli motor-
boat plying up aud down and nobody
knowing a thing about it.
Tlie word "canal" suggests some-
tbtng flat and artificial, hut the Alii i Canal is a winding silt in the
mountains, twenty miles long, through
which the Pacific Ocean reaches the
middle of Vancouver Island. No highway borders this canal. Only the
ibandoned rock work ot a projector
railway suggests the struggle to cope
with Its mountain borders. Benches,
built up at thc mouths of mountain
u reams still hold (he Indian villages
hat wen- there when the Spaniard
Mhcrni sailed up the canal In 1701 or
thereabouts. Save for the timber cuts
the railway grade, ihere has not
been a chango since the Spanish dls-
covery.
Barkley Sound combines tho island
fairyland of the Strait or Georgia with
rugged   reefs   and   the   swells   of
the open Pacific. There are few sights
more beautiful than tbe vista near
Sochart With green islands and blue
sei   on   our   side,   and   the   sawtooth
summits of the MacKentle Range and
distant snow peaks Of Vancouver Island looming above the wooded tnoun-
lains  which  fringe the shore.
II   wiis   D   rare Opportunity,  also   to t
obtain q glimpse of the Industrial life
of tho West Coast, the fish canneries, 1
the   pilchard   reduction   plants,   tho j
seine   boats   and   t rollers   si reaming I
Into Ucluelel   Harbor, the motorized 1
Indian   life 'with   lis   dugout   canoe j
hangovor, so different from the com- 1
nierciat lines In other and more fam- j
Ilinr areas,   The simple truth Is that i
Barkley  Sound   would  he one of thu
greatest   assets   of   Vancouver   Island
In   bringing   tourist  trade,   if   people
knew  about   Us  charm and  easy  accessibility.
What Vancouver Island needs of
course. Is n greai drcullng automobile drive. Unking the Kastcrn and
Western Coasts. The average tourist does not like to drive out and
hack  over the same  road.    That  !s
Extras
1^
Total   129
Bowling—Thompson, 1 for 12; Regler 1 for 33; Waltth 4 for51; Dudley 0
Tor 10; Bowey 2 for 12.
H.M.S.  Despatch  Innings
Walker, b. Burns   0
Inglis, b. Goodall   1
Walsh, c. Hassell, b. Burns   5
Ueut. Cuthbert, b, Burns   0
Last, c and b. Goodall   g
Regler,   b.  Goodall    0
Thompson, b. Goodall   0
Bowey,  b.   Burns    0
Pybus,  b.   Burns     j
Dudley,  not  out   1
Terry,   b.   Burns     1
Total    17
Bowling -Goodall 4 for 5; Burin,
6 for 11.
H.M.S. Despatch 2nd Innings
Dudley, b. Ledingham   9
Walsh, c Hassell, b. Vernon-Jones 5
Walker,   b,   Vernon-.Iones     3
Last, run out   32
Lieut. Cuthbert, .c Stewart, b. Gough 6
Thompson, not out  13
Bowey,  not   out   3
Regler, Pybus, Digits and Terry
did not bat.
Extras   6
5   Wickets   Total    76
Bowling   Vernon-Jones,   2   for   26;
Ledingham I for !.; Gough 1 for 16;
Vaughan  »  for  12:   Stewart 0 for 6.
FREE
BABY BOOKS
Baby's Food
If you cannot nurse
baby use Eagle
Brand, since 1857
the leading infant
food, pure, easily digested, tale. PAGE FOUR
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY. AUGUST 24, 1982
|:::::::::|  Coming to the Ilo-Ilo Theatre, Cumberland j:::::::::::::::j i
This Friday and Saturday, August 24th and 25th
kafs&S
&&@&3%
HE'S  HACK  AGAIN!
In tho greatest show of mirth—ths
picture you've been waiting to see!
Chaplin, king oi' comedy, back
again—still smiles and smiles ahead
of them all!
Right this way to the big show!
See the greatest collection of laughs
gags and giggles ever assembled
under one canvas! Freaks, fun and
frolic—they're all here! All right,
professor, strike up the band! The
show is about to begin! Folks, step
this way!
Tuesday and Wednesday, August 28th and 29th
A Big Double Feature
Suie he fights! As only Ken can!
But you ought to see his brand
ne wriding tricks in the most
sensational horse race ever
screened. Over the open range
they race, up steep grades,
through treacherous rivers with
Ken's skill and daring bringing
him victory and the heart of a
Western beauty. It's his greatest!
The path of true
love is rough—
—especially when a man and
his wife have to come home at
dawn in a milk wagon!
also the screen treat
of the year
The Screen treat of tho year!   For two kinds of people
only those who are married and those who are not!
Get ready to laugh!   This Is the funniest picture ever
inspired by the comedy of matrimony.
Don't, gel a divorce!   Or, at Least, until you've seen
this comedy of matrimony.
She's way yonng wife—
He's every young husband
—Tbe comic story of their
domestic tragedies is the
best laugh picture yell
WhaMI* IBM. enuei
MayMcAxoyand
Conrad Nagel
IFIWERESINGLE
with
ANDRE BOUNCER- MYKNA LOT
ftOYDUUSTrl »«*M"i«t
AWAJINUR BROS. PRODUCTION
CHAPLIN SAYS FILMS
ARE FOR EMOTIONS
Charlie Chaplin, whose newest
comedy, "The Circus" comes to the
llo-llo Theatre, this Friday and Saturday believes films should appeal to
the  intellect.
"In the "Circus," as in all my pictures, I appeal to the feelings," says
Charlie, "I am not at all fond of
merely clover tilings. I do not want
to make my films purely intellectual;
they must have moving power in them
Of course, different things move different people. I have sat down ami
deliberately said to myself.
"I will enjoy this poetry of Keats
or Shelley, or whomever it happened
to be."
"But I can't. 1 can't get it from
the words, as I can, for instance
through watching a dancer. Pav-
lowa, to me, is all life. She embodied
everything. I try to clasp the poetry
in my films as she embraces it in her
great art.   And the rythm."
McAVOY AND NAGEL
SCORE IN NEW FILM
Is Unusual Comedy
"If I Were Single," Warner Bros,
picture starring May McAvoy aud
Conrad Nagel, will be a welcome di
vertissement for the admirers of these
two popular players. It Is a domestic
comedy to which director Roy Del
Ruth has Imparted many touches of
fresh treatment. The nagging of the
wife because of the husband's careless habits around the house will
have the patrons of the Ilo-Ilo Tlv
atre where tlie feature will play next
Tuesday and Wednesdny along with
"The Upland Rider", in spasms of
laughter. These scenes are remnis
cent of every young household and
the very naturalness or the events
that transpire wil lap-peal stronglv
to  mivie  audiences.
WESTERN PICTURES
SHOW LARGE GAIN
IN PUBLIC FAVOR
Western pictures with their dashing action, spectacular stunts, and
clean sweep of open country are not
only holding their own In the Held of
screen entertainment but are rapidly
forging ahead to the lead, according
to the crowds that have been attend'
lug "The Upland Rider," Maynard's
latest First National Feature which
comes to the Ilo-Ilo this Tuesday aud
Wednesday along with "If I Were
Single."
The name of Ken Maynard has be
come a household word in the matter
of thrills, trick riding and good clean
dramatic action, and "The Upland
Rider" upholds that reputation.
"The Upland Rider" is packed with
thrills and a cross country race is one
of the most daring anil spectacular
stunts ever shown in any picture.
Marlon Douglas has the leading
feminine role. Albert Rogell directed and Harry J. Drown supervised
production. The sceneic qaulities of
the picture are beautiful. Many of
the scenes were taken in the bistort
cat Palos Verde estate in California
skirting the Pacific Ocean.
"The Upland Rider" is everything
an action western picture should be
and for thrills and stunts and daring
you can't miss it.
LON CHANEY'S NEWEST A
POWERFUL TRAGI-COMEDY
Star Finds His Greatest Role
I'liiys a Tragic Clown In Inimitable
Fashion
Lon Chaney. In his first clown role
since his sensational success several
years ago in "He Who Gels Slapped,
comes to the llo-llo Thoatre on Friday
and Saturday. August 31 and September 1st, when he will appear as the
central figure of Herbert Urenon's
elaborate production, "Laugh, Clown,
Laugh." The new play, adapted by
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer from the cele-
brnled stage drama, sees Chaney stalling in the role or the tragic clown
inadn famous before tlie footlights
by   Lionel   Harrymore.
The new picture is a vivid drain:,
of backstage life of the theatre, with
Chaney In the role of a clown who,
for the happiness of the woman he
loves, make- ;i tragic sacrifice.
Lore»:;i Young, new discovery of
the screen, plays the heroine Simon-
etta. and Nils Asther, of "Sorrell aud
Son." the juvenile lead as Luigi. Rer-
nard Slegel, Gwen Lee, Cissy Fltz-
Gerald nnd others of note, are in tha
cast.
A massive reproduction or a gre<tt
European theatre and other elaborate settings lend lavlshness to the
tense drama, Chaney runs the gamut
of thespian art, appearing as a ludicrous comedian in the theatre
scenes, and in others plumbing the
depthB of tragedy.
Herbert Brenon, who directed the
picture is famous as the director of
"Beau Geste." Sorrell and Son,"
"Peter Pan," "God Gave Me Twenty
Cents," "Tho Sideshow of Life" and
many other notable plays.
Next Friday and Saturday, August 31, September 1
ION CHANEY
He held her in his arms—but he knew
that love had gone out of his life.
A love tragedy of circus life in which
Chaney rises to supreme heights of artistry.   Exciting!    Uunusual!
a N etro     ^joiu i L>yn-     \ty& picture
THE GREAT BELASCO STAGE PLAY—
now a marvelous picture
This one can be matched against them all for drama
and thrills.
The Man of a Thounsand Faces adds another imperishable portrait to his screen achievements. Here is an
unusual story, masterfully acted by the greatest of
character stars, superbly directed by the man who
made "Beau Geste" and "Sorrell and Son."
Never will you forget Lon Chaney as the clown who
finds love for one fleeting, moment, and then loses it,
hiding his heartbreak behind a painted smile.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 3, 4 and 5
THE
LAST
COMMAND
...The world's outstanding dramatic actor is superb as the
mighty General.
From the heights of pomp and
splendor. With menu . . .Women ... .a nation at his feet.
Through flaming love ... adoration Hate.   To. ... !
The most terrific climax the
screen has ever known. FRIDAY. AUGUST 24. lusn
— JUST TRY THIS
Whole Wheat Muffins
1W cups Comox Whole Wheat Flour
1 cup White Flour
2 teaspoons Baking Powder
Hi cup Sugar
1 tablespoon Butter
1 cup Sweet Milk
1 Egg
Mix dry ingredients thoroughly;
then
add well beaten egg and milk.
Melt
butter and arid lasi. stir and drop
into     I
MuiTiu tins.
■-  ■  —    .:■..._
.
There is nothing s<>
Delicious and Tasty
as Hot Muffins made with Whole Wheal Hour. This
is particularly true when (Jomox Flour is used, as it
contains
".4// the good that's in the wheat!"
You'll not only enjoy bread baked from Comox
Whole Wheat Flour, but you'll enjoy belter health as
well.
Comox Crer.mery Butter
"THE GOLDEN SPREAD
FOR
WHOLE WHEAT BREAD!"
A combination that brings out that wonderful nutty
flavor.   A healthful treat for the whole family.
COMOX CREAMEilY ASSOCIATION
Phone K Courtenay, B.C,
Telephone
Courtenay 226
Telephone
Cumberland, 150
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
FASPEIFW
(fsioo Souare miles]
of Maqnlficenl
Moiintuin Gronac.ii J
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER.  CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
PAGE FIVE
10
4/
■4
<GE
Game Regulations
(Continued trom Page One)
il-
! I ing  tbe  Highland  District  mentioned
; ! in these regulations, the same is here
j   by defined  as  follows:   "Starting at
I I tlie  junction   ot  tbe   Finlayson   Arm
; | Road   ami    the    Malahat    Highway;
I  thence south along the Malahat and
; | Island Highway to Atkin Road; thence
east along Atkin Road to Thetis Lake
Road; thence north along Thetis Lake
Road to Munn'a Road; theme easterly and southerly along Mann's Rond
to Prospect Lake Road; thence along
Prospect Lake Road north and east to
the   right-of-way  ot  the   inter.urban
line of the Rrillsli Columbia Electric
Railway; thence along the said right-
of-way to Tod inlet Road; thence along Saanich Arm to Goldstream ('reek
thence following Goldstream Treek lo
the Finlayson Arm Road; thence along the Finlayson Arm Road to the
Malahat   Highway."
ftir-lmirhig Animals
In the Western District, all fur-
bearing animals (except Muskrats or.
Vancouver Island), open season from
November 1st. 1028, to February 28th
1028, both dates Inclusive,
Bag Limit
lu respect of the big game throughout   the   Province us defined  In  the
I "(lame   Act,"   no   person   shall   any
I where in the Western District kill oi
. take or have in their possession dur-
, ing the open season more than three
I Deer, all of which must be of the male
tex; and no person shall at any time
kill or take or have in their posses-
I sloil   during   the   open   .season,   any-
, where in the province, more than one
Grizzly  Hear and three  Rear  of any
oilier species.
Dont start forest fires. Never drop
a lighted match, cigar, or cigarette.
or knock live ashes from your ppie.
Make your canU'-lire safe and put it
out before leaving. The Forestry
Department claims that the serious
increase In forest lires every year at
ihe first of the open season is caused
liy hunters. Ir this Is true and bunt-
ors are not more careful we might
be Torced to prohibit bunting in timber areas. HUNTERS it is up to YOU.
DON'T shoot unless you clearly see
and are sure of what you are shooting
at,    It may be a doe. a cow or a .MAN.
HEALTH SERVICE
of the
Canadian Medical Association
i tern
Visitor Charmed
With Island's Beauty Khw theC
Do Hi,
iople
appi
Question concerning Health, addressed to the Canadiau Medical
Association, 184 College Street.
Toronto, will lie answered. Questions as to diagnosis and treatment will not he answered.
Measles
Measles Is a child-killer.   This disease which so many regard as of ito ] tt kills, but because it see
seriousness  and  which  is thought Of  pare  the  ground   for  othe
It is very easily sp
cally all who are >
tlie disease, unless
protected by a previ
it is a mistaken
i child must have mew
| ina] to expose child
j because to do so is l<
Measles is serious
■eau   anil   pi
IXpOSed   con
they   have
ous attack,
idea that  e
iles.    n Ea c
en
in
k their liv
only because
to pn
llseaae
of Vancouver
what they hi
the visitor in the way of
entertainment? I dont think so,
pite the well-chosen slogan of
shine and Flowers [Or Victoria
pite Ihe
richly deserved emphasis up-
on the beauty of the Malahat Drive
and the enchantment of tbe Bucbart
Hardens Vancouver island really misestimates Itself. The fact
teople of Victoria do not kno
as a necessary evil, accompanied by I It iB the pneumonia following measles
inconveniences, is. as a mailer ot which makes it so dangerous. Tuber-
fact, a serious menace to child lite, culosts may become
and because of the number or child- sles.
ren it kills, it ranks high amongst Concerning the control of measles,
those diseases that  take life tit early } it must be remembered
after me;
SCOTTISH
LAUNDRY
FIRST CLASS WHITE LAUNDRY SERVICE
I3P   Special Family Laundry Rate   "^TJ
also expert
DYERS AND DRY CLEANERS
A Trial Order Will Convince You.
B«MB*Mn«a«MBaVIVHBnMaVWBVaVMMMBValBHBWMBMB>M
Orders left at the Ritz Cafe, Telephone 150
Cumberland, will receive prompt attention
The GEM
BARBER SHOP
Opposite   Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
Cumberland, B. C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Children's hair cut any style 85c
Ladies' hair cut any style 60c
childhood,
111 Ift-hi, there occurred In Canada
803 deaths from Measles, of which
2ii4 were children under one year oi
age. Most deaths from measles occur under five years of age. This disease al tacks especially those under
three years. The o'Wer the child,
thc better chance he has of recovery.
Measles is a communicable disease
it is passed from the sick lo the well.
is most
before
contagious durit
the rash appears
it Is advised thai
i)ld in the bead b
ier children, not
td
with a o
from olli
vent the
tlte cold
measles.
Part of tbe protection
is the protection of tbi
measles.
>f colds
the n
lot  measles
g   the   days
For   this
every child
kepi away
lily lo piv-
nit because
i   stage, of
it child life
child   from
Victoria Are
Champions'
i Continued from Pago One)
flied out to Harris,
and Cummins singled
Millard retrieved and
catch Webster going down to third
tossed the ball into the bleachers, allowing Webster to score. Forbes was
safe on first when McKay dropped a
fly in right and Cummins scored,
Forbes wns nabbed trying to steal sec-
ind. Downey to Cummins. Two hits.
two runs, two errors.
Bobba, Harris and Cummins all
armed. No hits, no runs, no errors.
6th innings—McKenzle fanned and
Dunn went out nt first on an assist by
_VIcKee, More walked and Dangerfield
fanned. No hits, no runs, no errors.
Millard went out at first on an as
slst by Dangerfield. Downey Hied out
o Oatman and Dixon fanned. No hits,
no runs, no errors.
7th  Innings—Oatman    walked    and
Minnis went out at first on an assist
j by McKee.   Webster walked.  Cummins
j connected to Harris who nabbed Oatman going down to third and made a
) nice double when he got it across to
| Dixon   for an  out  against  Cummins.
j No hits, no runs, no errors.
i    Robinson fanned and McKay singled.
j McKee   fanned   and   Bobba   went   out
at first on an assist by More.   One hit,
| no runs, no errors.
I    8th Innings—Forbes was safe at first
J on an error by Bobba and McKenzie
fanned.    Dunn   connected   to   McKee,
i who-threw Forbes out at second on
fielder's choice.   More was out at  first
Ion an assist by Harris.    No hits.
runs, one error.
Harris and J. Cummins both went
,„ , ,"    7T7l0Ut at flrst on assists by H. Cummins
Webster singled. ftnd MH,ard wem m ^ ^ on
to   left   Held, assist by Minnis.   No hits, no runs.
ln trying to em)rs
j 8th Innings—Dangerfield flied out
i to McKee. Oatman and Minnis fanned.
No hits, no runs, no errors.
Downey went out at flrst on an assist by Cummins und Dixon singled.
Robinson sacrificed. Cummins to Webster,. McKay singled. McKee came up
with two on the bases. Apparently
Dangerfield tried to walk, but the
crowd went wild when the big fellow
sent a screamer away out to left field;
it looked safe for a moment but McKenzie gol under it and the game was
After   motoring
le ('oast from
und,  I   have  n
.ring that  Vain
all
)ver
Ha ,1 nana ti
i hesitation
ouver Island
(why so many come to Victoria on tha
*  '   •    drive   to  .Nanaimo  and   go   hy
ouver   missing   three-
scenic  attractions  of
the
When the new West Coast highway is built, its pulling power over
tourists will be mutiplied manyfold
if ii is linked up with the Island
Highway as it might be (judging from
the map) by a road up Nitinat Lake
and along the railroad grade to Al-
herni.
For my own part 1 will never stop
boosting   Vancouver   Island   both   to
is  the j fiends and strangers.   Coming back?
v their I Well, rather!
A.\   AMERICAN
i,.   fa-1     'Taken from the Dally Colonist of
Howe a reoam lssue).
in  de-|
Island j
ive  to j
scenic
Des-
"Sun-
. des-
the
one place on the coast that nobody
can afford to miss, it is a little empire of beauty in itself, a seir con-
talned empire, and so little after all.
I do not mean to say that your
Island ex.'els all th.. rest of the Const
in every point of competition* for it
docs not.    li has nothing to compare
.viih ihe best half-mile of the Chuck-!
muck  Drive the cumulative maguili-
cence of the Redwood Highway, or the !
waterfall art gallery, of the Vosemite. |
Mm  on v   ;couver Island there is a I
lulcker supping from one delight to
mother  than  anywhere  else  on  the
Pacific Coast, and il Is beauty in the
large   not   in   ihe  miniature.
Local Cricketers
Defeat The Navy
(Continued  from  Page One)
for
tor
Following
games:—
1) ami   Stewart ami  Vaughan  0
8 ami ii ror 12 respectively.
he   soores   of  both
Two hits, no r
AB R
. no errors.
Cummins, ss.
Millard. If.
Downey, c.
Dixon, lb
Robinson, cf.
McKay, rf.
McKee. P. .   .
Bobba, 2b .
Han-is. 3b
PO
4
0
0
10
0
0
0
0     0      2
Idiens
HasBel
(lough
I ilo.   <
Burns, *
Stewart,
Vii I'm- a few well advertised tea- j Vaughan
ures (and I hear thai you cut down ■ R°hathai
lie   publicity   bureau   appropriation, I °oodall,
lil'lfll.W GAME
Cumberland Innings
l.h.w,  li. Coleridge   1
run  out   3
b. Agnew   n
c Agnew. b,  Begg   7
c   Pascoe,   I).   Begg    30
h    Begg  	
Holland, b,
'•   Begg   	
Nugent,   b.
veal
tht
visitor must strike nut
il llnd what tbe Island
tor himsel
has io offer.
Like many oilier people, I have
ii liking for side trips by water while
on :i motor tour, in Victoria I in- {
quired ahom the West Coast. No, it j
could not In' reached unless one could |
spend a week on a steamship. 1 gave i
i' "I' and started up the Island. j
Every mile of the way was a de-
Vernon-Jones,
Extras  	
Begg
Begg
..10
.. 0
not   out
2b
I     I     1
1
Advance
Fall
Showing
3   0
3    0
AB R
Oatman. cf 5   0
Minnis, ss. 5   0
Webster, lb 4   1
H. Cummins,
Forbes. 3b
McKenzle. If.
Dunn, rf. 4   n
More. c.        4   0
Dangerfield; P. 40
Summary
Struck out by McKee,
field, 0; hits olf McKee
crfield. 0. Walked, by McKee, 4; by
Dangerfield, 1. Errors, by Courtenay,
5; by Victoria. I. Two-base hits, ,1,
Cummins, Double play, Harris to
Dixon. Left on bases by Courtenay,
1: by Victoria, 8. Time of game. 1:35.
Umpires. A. McGregor and Mtilliol-
land.
11
.ml there everything seemed to ston
I'n lie sure, there were vague reports
it a distrlcl   10 tho south-west,  hc-
iiihI Mounl  Arrnwsinltli. reached by
1   narrow  dangerous  mountain   road I
viiii h   few    well   upholstered   cars j
would  think  of undertaking.    So  I
vent 10 die southwest to Alberni. an 1 j
ell like a discoverer.
The road instead of being ilangei -
ins. merely had a few steeppitohes.
\nyboily who can run a ear out of a
a rage  could  drive over  It  in  safety
Total    75
Bowling—Coleridge 1 for 18; Agnew I for 3; Baxter U for 10; Begg 7
for IS; Tucker 0 for IS.
II.M..S. Hurl,im Innings
Capt   Wills,   lt.M„   c   Stewart,   h.
Goodall       4
A. B. Fogarty, b. Goodull 11
11. It. A. Holland, b. Goodall  0
Midshipman   Merriman.  c,   Idiens
ii.  Ooodalli  14
C. 1'. O. Baxter, c. Stewart, b. Good-
"«   2
l.t-l'om. Agnew, l.b.w., b. Burns ....22
t.'apt. Coleridge, e. Burns, b. Good-
all     0
A. B. Pascoe, run out   G
Subaltern  Nugent, b. Goodall   0
\   I:   I u:;ker. not out   0
Midshipman Begg, h. Burns   i
Extras    (j
mil
vltb
mini
pleo
h rough
For miles 11
niigiiiliieiil forest
rs. giant, primeval trees
ees ill the redwood dis- [
Total    67
Bowling—Goodall 7 for 26; Gough
for 12; Burns. 2 for 24.
amazing
Wesl    Ci
wa
In
rt   ol
the
wate
it  seemed,
at   hand   in the
mountains.    The
trip on the IV
by Dangers': oil' Dang-
We are g
announce
able to
al of our
NEW
FALL
COATS
$35.85 from  Yin uver, ll.C
flood tn Return October ill.
For Full Particulars Apply
I lillibrrlanil. ll.C, Kilniird IV. Illekle. Agenl
■   Telephone 1(5
Or write C, F. Earle, District Passenger Agent. Victoria, B.C.
CANADIAN NATIONAL
Rushed Through Specially for our
CUMBERLAND STORE
Everything tho Newest—Absolute Stylo Authenticity.
Dressy  Broadcloths mid  Smart Siu-de Fabrics.
Elaborately Fur-trimmed nnd Silk Linings and at
Prices That Cannot Ho Beaten.
ALSO AN ADVANCE SHIPMENT OF
New Fur Coats
MUSKRATS AND SEALSKINS
Every Coat has Our Guarantee with it
as We Only Buy from one of the Best Mouses in Canada
Come in and Sec Them
SEW I IIINI IIII.I.A  (OATS FOR lillll.S  AT SI'KCIAI.
SCIIOOI.-Ol'liMX;  I'KICES.
New Fall Millinery just received, every New Style
and Color is here, Felts and Velvets also
the New Feathered Hat.
See Them  Here at
"Thc Store the People Like"
John the Hatter & Co.
Cumberland
"The Right Place 10 Buy"—Shop here and Save Time and Money
Advl.    in    Toliopah  '(Xev.j
Times:     Don't   kill   your   wife,
ilo it. wet wash or rough dry I
oilolllical   way.
Dally
ctur,
says men Imitate women. That's all bunkum. Vou don'l
see any Cumberland men wiib their
pants 1111 oil above the knee, showing |iink rosebuds on their garters.
*    .    .
Vou Answer
In Ihe seeth of leap year fancies.
This one rises to the top:
Does the girl  who pops tiie question,
Have to go and question Pop?
Airman proposes
by
trans-Atlantic
telephone
The    tolonlio tecum.
lilWicd     for    I.1111    (ronton,
fn Atlantic lller, nluil two
years el' nersoiuil association
hail failed In produce,
r'rnm   I,mull,11,   Knglalld,
Uordoll   put   In   a   lelepli	
enil fur Ills sweetheart al
llrenlilliie, llas«„ I.S.».. lu
Hid short   span of a  llirec.
tu In ii 1 iiersallnn, be pro.
posed marriage and tbe girl
established something ol a
record herself wilh a soul.
Iltrllllng Myes".
Incldenljillj, this wns the
llrst proposal b) trans-Atlantic telephone. Gordon's
success ma) load to more.
Inesl one-day
rifle Coast offered Itself. In tlle shape
if 11 voyage down tbe Alberni Canal,
hrougli tiie myriad of islands of Bar-
:ley Sound   (still  green  and  d  in
altlsummer) In Bamlield and Celuelet
vltb stops ai quaint mixed settlements of white men. Indians. Japanese and Chinese, where InteroBt ecn-
trotl in ibe coming or tlie fast eighty-
foot mall boat from Alberni.
II my slate of California had any-
llilng like Ibe Alberni Cunal and Barkley Sound, with a motor road lunching il, its fame would be shouted front '
 oni of tin. continent to tlie other, j
ami the people of British Columbia j
would travel a thousand miles to see 1
it     Bui how many, even of ttie people j
who  live  on   Vancouver   Island   have
seen    Barkley    Sound"     How    many
could locate ti on ttie map?   Yet there
ii is witli steamers ami Siwasb motor-
lioal  plying up and down and nobody
knowing a thing about it,
Tlie word "canal" suggests something Hut ami artificial, but tiie Alberni Canal is a winding sill in the
mountains, twenty miles long, through
which the Pacific Ocean reaches the
middle of Vancouver Island. No hlgb-
waj borders this canal. Only the
abandoned rooltwork of a projector
railway suggests tlie struggle to cope
wiiii it.s mountain bonlers. Beaches.
Imili tip ai tiie mouths of mountain
streams still bold Hie Indian villages
H.M.S. DESPATCH (iAMK
Cumberland Innings
I Idiens,   b.   Iiegler    26
j Vaughan.  li.  Thompson   0
Hassell.   c,   Bowey,   b,   Walsh   	
Bums,   run   out 	
Hough,   b.   Walsh   	
Stewart, c, Walker, b. Walsh
l-eilingliam.  e.   Walker,  b.  Bowey.,
Xunns. stumped, b. Walsh
Goodall,   b.   Bowey
Hrown.   not   out
Vernon-Jones, b, Walsh
Extras   	
Total
Bowling   Thompson,
 129
1 for 12; Regler 1 lor 38; Walsh 4 foral; Dudley 0
for 10; Bowey 2 for 12.
H.M.S.  Be.twitch  Innings
Walker,  b.   Burns    0
Inglis. b. Goodall   \
Walsh, 0. Hassell. b. Burns   S
Lieut. Cuthbert, b. Burns   0
Last,
Itegler.   b. Goodall   ..
Thompson, b. Goodall
Bowey,   li.   Burns   	
Pybus.   b. Bums   , .
Dudley,   1101   out  	
Terry,   b.   Burns   	
ind b. Goodall   g
  0
  0
  0
  1
  1
  1
hal   wen
Mi,.re when  ibe Spaniard
Alberni s
lied up ibe canal In 1701 or
horoabou
s     Save for tlie timber cuts
mil the 1
lilway grade, there has not
1 11 a 11
nnge llnco 'lie Spanish dls-
Borkloj
Siiiind combines tbe island
'alryland
it Ibe SI rail of Georgia with
li,.   nine.
,|   reefs   and   Ibe   swells   of
! 11
'aelile   There are few Rights
(linn
hi .iiniiul Uian 'he vista near
Sodinrl with Ktvn Islatuln and lilt.p
■■>■ 1  mi  mil'  Dido, and  tha  nawtootli
uinm.lH u| tl.p M icKeniato ll;inn<' and
dlHtani Minw iienkn "f Vancouver !■•:■■
land loomlnjj above the wooded moun-
i.iins which fringe tlie shore,
li waa ;i rare opportunity, also in
ili!;iin 1 glimpse nf the Industrial Hfp
nf 'lie W'i-si CoaBt, ilii' fNh canneries.
Mi" pilchard reduction jiliinis. tha
hcIiiu !m;iis and trollers streaming
Into (Tciuete. Harbor, thc motorlwd
Indian   life 'with   Its   dugout   caiiou
angover, so different from the cmn-
men lal lliuu in ollior nml more fam
illnr :\r\-.\- Tho Blmplo truth \< thai
Barkley Sound would in- otic nt ihe
t Vancouver
Total    17
I    Howling   Goodall  -I  for G;   Uurni.
6 for II.
1I.M.S.  l>cs]Hitcll '.'nd   liming*
Dudley, h. Ledingham  9
Walsh, c. Hassell, b. Wnion-Jones 5
Wnlker.   h.   WriHin-.lonns     3
LiiHt,  run  mr  32
Lieut. Cutlibert, .0 Stewart, b. Gough 5
Thompson,  mil  out         13
Bowey,  no|  out  3
Regler,  Pybus, Digits nnd Terry
diil  not   hat.
Extras   6
S   Wi.k.'tn   Total       76
Bowling   Vernon-J ones,  2  ror 2fi;
Lodlngham I for B; dough l for 16;
Vaughan (» (or 1^; St«-wnrt 0 for ti.
;i-<rl-
1)1
uri»t   tr
Island
people
FREE
BABY BOOKS
Baby's Food
If you cannot nurse
baby use Eagle
Brand, since 1857
thc leading infant
food, pure, easily digested, iale.
B, ('. TELEPHONE CO.
knew nboul  its charm mid ease ae- |
feasibility
Winn   Vancouver   Island   needs  of
course, Is a ureal ctrcullng automo- j
bile  drive,   linking  the   Kasiern   nnd I
Western  ('oasis     Tin, average tour-
Is!   lines  noi   lllie lo drive otil   and
bock   over  tbe  same.   road.    That   is PAGE FOUR
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Friday, august 24. i9sa
= New Fall Goods =
Announcing the Delivery of some of Our New Goods
Just tu Hand
LADIES' PELT HATS—
Although early in the season, our stock comprises a goodly
selection of new Felt Hats for My Lady, and you will be
astonished at the variety we have on show In our .Millinery
Departmeut, we Invite you to call and see our new hats.
LADIES' FALL COATS—
Our stuck is just beginning to arrive, and we feel sure that
ere long we will be in a position to give you a good selection
and what Is more we think that we will be able to give you
equal value for what you will pay In the City, and we oan
assure you of a square deal.
FALL SILKS—
We are gradually adding to our silk department, and in this
is Included Velvets which promise to be one of the big seller*
this season, in Tact it is one of the leaders, in black especially.
HEAVY SPUN SILK—
This lino is equal to the British Spun if not a little heavier.
.nnl  moBl  suitable tor frocks etc.    We have .several of the
leading shades, fully 88 Inches wide 11.50 yard.
SILK HOSIERY—
Our Fall deliveries are just arriving, and Boon we expect to
have .1 verj  complete assortment of ihe best makes of the
wanted hosiery, Circle-Bar, Kayser, and Hole-Proof, three of
ilif leading nukes and each of them a reliable make.
SCHOOL DAYS—
Boys and tlirls don't want to ho reminded of school days, but
Mothers must make preparations for the coming event, and
so you will tind our Btock of clothing for this occasion ready,
and we will be pleased io show you and also suggest suitable
lines, we invite you to see our ranges of goods.
SUTHERLAND'S
CUMBERLAND, B.C. PHONE IM
"Tilt: stoiii: THAT APPRECIATES YOUR PATRONAGE"
City Meat Market
We carry at all times the best to be obtained:
PRIME BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND PORK
Our Cooked Meals cannot Be Beaten.   We Have Built
Up a Reputation in This Line of Which We Arc Justly
Proud.   Try Some of Our—
COOKED CORN BEEF JELLIED VEAL
BOILED HAM BAKED HAM
BAKED HAM VEAL LOAF
JELLIED TONGUE BOLOGNA
City Meat Market
Wc Deliver
Phone 111
Ice For Sale
PROMPT SERVICE
For Quick Action Phone H, Cumberland
for
WOOD and COAL
also GENERAL HAULING of all descriptions.
:-:   James Whyte   :-:
Cumberland Supply
The CASH Store
It can be done! - It shall be done!
And We can do it!
Read over our Prices and see if wc do not Prove the
Above Statement
Heinz Baked Pork & Beans, 3 for       25c
Heinz Baked Pork &Beans, 2 for 23c and  17c
Van Camp's Pork & Beans, small, 2 for . 25c
Van (amp's Pork & Beans, medium, each   17c
Brunswick Sardines, new pack, I tins . 25c
B. C, Pink Salmon, per tin      7c
Sliced Pineapple, no. 2s, tin             l!)c
Burford Pours, no, 2s, per tin   lflc
White Slur Baking Powder, l(i oz, tin         25c
Sesqui  Matches, per packet    45c
Royal Purple Malt Vinegar, quarts   25c
White Star Yeasl Cakes, each             5c
Clark's Tomato Catsup, per bottle      24c
Libby's Prepared Mustard, In glass     20c
Rowat's Sweel Mixed Pickles, large  65c
Heinz Sandwich  Relish, per bottle   35c
Toilet Paper, per bundle of 8  30c
Shelly's Bread & Cakes
Jusl  Arrived our New Stock of Aero Brand Overalls
and Work Shirts,   Made in B.C. for B.C. Men
Cumberland Supply
The CASH Store
Phone 155
Phone 155
James Hick, paymaster of the Canadian Collieries (D.), Limited and son
Archie left on Wednesday on a visit
to Portland and other cities of *.he
state nf Washington    and Oregon.
NOTICE TO PARENTS
it will be necessary for children
to show evidence of vaccination before being permitted to attend classes
on the re-opening of school.
GEO.  K.  MacNAUGHTON,
34-35        .Medical  School  Inspector
Cumberland Personals
1:
CANADA'S JIUNICIPA1 YEAH BOOK
The third annual edition of the
Canadian .Municipal Directory has
just come to hand and again shows
a considerable Improvement over earlier editions.
The contents of the hook have been
standardized throughout and the alphabetical arrangement makes the Information contained therein easily
accessible. lu the Introduction, the
point is made that there are 4,300 self-
governing communities in Canada
with 50,000 officials engaged in con-
ductlng the affairs of these many
Cities, towns, and villages. It comes
us a surprise that there are so many
Individual urban and rural communities and there is undoubtedly great
credll due to the editor, Mr. H. Wisely
Bragg, for the excellent manner in
which this vast amount of material
has been collected together, and so
carefully classified.
The contents of the book are so
arranged   as   to   give   -Municipal   men
tint most comparative Information and
cannot fall to be of the greatest possible assistance to elected and appointed officials, enabling them to
compare our community with others
of u similar size and population. It
is further a book or considerable importance in every .Municipal office for
no other work of this kind is published iu tbe Dominion, and no man interested in Municipal progress can
ul'ford to be without it.
The book is divided Into three chapters, the llrst being an alphabetical
directory by provinces, of .Municipal
men from coast to coast, the larger
places having a full personnel included, and tlie rural communities, tho
chief officials.
Part two deals witli particulars of
a reference and comparative nature,
and provides the best and most complete information ou the tlnaucial
standli.g of communities, and also
gives tabulated information on the
very Important question of waterworks. There are also a number of
leading articles that supply a fund of
useful knowledge on several different
subjects, all applicable to municipal
endeavour,
The third part of the book is devoted lu a Uuyef's guide, for the use
of .Municipal offlcals, and everything
th.it they have occasion to require, is
listed together with the names of the
manufacturers and dealers. In connection with tliis last part ot the
work there Is also a free Buyer's service, which will prove of considerable
assistance to Municipal men.
It is Interesting to note that this
.Municipal Year Hook. Is to be followed mi by tho publication, in about
four months time, of a new work entitled "Municipal Who's Who in Canada", which will be an interesting
biographical book of reference profusely illustrated, and constantly
made use of in every newspaper office.
In the capable hands of this well-
known publishing firm, and edited by
Mr. M- Wisely Bragg, familiar to all
Municipal men for twenty years, it
Will indeed fill a long felt need.
The Publishers are THE WISELY
BRAGG PUBLISHING COMPANY
LIMITED nt filC Lagaucheterie St.
West, Montreal and the Price $2.50.
Mrs. L. H. Finch
TGACIIF.I1   OF   PIANOFORTE
AM> THEORY
Pupila prepared for Examination
Term  Commences  Tuesday.
September 4th.
Residence, 2nd St.      Phone f,0
Designed
FOH
Dependability
Firestone engineers found
that the life of a tire depends
as much upon the flexing life of
the cords of the carcass, as
upon the toughness of the
tread.
To provide extra strength,
stam'r.i), and long wear, Firestone dips the cords of the
carcass in a rubber solution.
This saturates and insulates
every strand of every cord,
minimizing internal friction
and gives thousands of extra
miles. The Firestone Dealer
• in your locality will gladly serve
you, and lave you money.
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER CO.
OF CANADA, LIMITED
Hmii.lton, Ontario
Most Miles per Dollar
jirestone
BUILDS THE ONLY
GUM-DSFPED TIRES
Hading & Ledingham
LOCAL DEALERS
-Miss Lily Banks returned home
Vancouver Friday last.
Mr. Thos. Mumford paid a visit to
Campbell River last week end.
Mr. F, s. McKinnon spent Monday
at Campbell  River.
Mrs. MacNaugton and family moved
to town from their beach residence
on Wedenesday of this week.
• •      *
Mrs. Ross left tor Vancouver on
Wednesday of this week and will
spend a few days iu that city.
; • •
The Rev. A. K, Nuilns of Victoria
is spending his vacation in town with
his  mother .Mrs K. H. Nunns.
Mr. and Mrs. J, Home and family
left on Monday lor Vancouver where
they will reside in future.
Mr. nnd Mrs. A. McKinnon, were
visitors to Campbell River on Sunday being accompanied by Miss C.
McKinnon.
Rev. E. O. Robathan, Dean of the
Comox Deanery left on Thursday for
tlie West oast of the Island on an
ofiical  visit.
Master Jerry Bryden arrived in
to.vn on Monday of this week to spend
a week's vacation with his grand-parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Tarbell.
Miss Josie Balagno and Miss Nettie
Robertson returned at the week end
after spending a two weeks' holiday
touring the interior of the  Province.
* *    •
Mr. Arthur Paul, of Nanaimo. representative of tho Singer Sewing Machine Co.. was a visitor to Cumberland during tlie week.
Miss Norma Parnham returned to
town on Sunday after spending a
three weeks' vacation in Vancouver
the guest of Miss Eleanor McKee.
Miss Jessie MacDonald left for Vancouver on Monday of this week en
route to Montreal where she will
exchange with a Montreal teacher at
Maisonneuve.
* *    *
Miss Irene Mounce. of Vancouver,
left Cumberland on Thursday after
spending a vacation the guest of Miss
Tarbell. Miss Mounce expects, to
leave for Ottawa on  Monday.
* *   •
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Davis and family returned last week end after
spending tlie paal two months In Colorado on a visit to Mrs. Davis' parents.
Mrs. M. Nunns and Mr. R. Shaw motored to Campbell River on Sunday
last returning the same day. They
were accompanied hy their niece Miss
Anne Jeremy who has been spending
part of her vacation here.
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. -Mumford motored to Victoria on Tuesday evening of
this week to meet Mrs. Mumford's
brother Mr. Edwin Brown, of London,
England. Mr. Brown representing
the Canadian National Railways Is
accompanying a number of British
students who .are touring Canada.
* •   •
Rev. J. R. and Mrs. Hewitt and
daughter returned to Cumberland last
Friday from their holiday trip. During the past few weeks the Rev. gentleman and Mrs. Hewitt have been
visiting places of interest in the in-
lar trip, Vancouver, Prince Rupert
terior and also went over the triangu-
and Jasper Park.
• •       •
Miss Olga Owen, a former resident
Of Cumberland and daughter of Mr.
W. A. Owen, of this city, who has
been city hall stenographer at Nanaimo for the yast few years has resigned her position. Miss Owen has
accepted a position With a Vancouver
firm which offers many advantage*
Her many friends In Cumberland will
he glad to hear of her advancement.
Cumberland Review No. 17 will hold
a sale of work and home Cooking and
afternoon tea iu tbe Fraternal Hall
ou Wednesday. September 19th. A
whist drive will also be held in the
Fraternal Hall on Thursday, August
30th.
m     *     v
Mrs. Tommy Bourne, of Vancouver,
daughter of Mr. aud Mrs. L. R. Stevens, of Cumberland, won the spectal
prize given by the president of the
i Tyee club, for the largest fish caught
j during Tuesday aud Wednesduy at
! Campbell River. Mrs. Bourne landed
' a beautiful twenty-live pound specimen. Mrs. Bourne is also a member
of ihe Tyee club, gaining that honor
last year. Along with her husband
she is enjoying a delightful holiday
al  tbe  popular llshing  resort.
Miss Margaret  Bannerman left  for
Revelstoke on  Saturday after a six
weeks' visit to her father, Mr. Thomas
Bannerman of this city.
•   •   •
Mr. and Mrs. A, G. Jones nnd sou,
also Eddie Phillips returned on Sun-
clay after a Tew days vacation in Vancouver.
Miss Isabella Herd returned on
Sunday after having spent the last
two months in Duncan witli her aunt
Mrs.   F.   Payne.
Come in and see our
New Victor Radio
WE HAVE A COMPLETE SELECTION OF SHEET
MUSIC AND RECORDS
LATEST SHEET MUSIC
"You're a Real Sweetheart"
"That's My Weakness Now"
"That's My Mammy"
"Ramona"
"There Must Be a Silver Lining"
and others
Candy Special
Neilson's Creamy Toffee - ■ • 25c. a bag
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
Union Bay
Miss   Winnie   Bowden   has   ns   her
guest, Miss Jean Klncnld, of Vancou-
Mr. and Mrs. H. Lelthead are spend-;
it g a two weeks' vacation in Vancouver.
• *      a
Mr. and Mrs, H. Sherburn had as'
their guests the former's parents. Mr.
aid  Mrs.  Sherburn.  of Victoria.
Mr. and Mrs H. Geary and family
ae visiting friends in Victoria and
Seattle.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Walker and family and Mr. and Mrs. L. Carter and
fi mily are spending a fortnight's va-.
cutlon camping on Denman Island.
Mrs. E. McKay has as her guest for
a week Miss Edna Humphrey, of Na-
naimo,
• •   • i
Mrs. E. King and daughter Dorothy
arc in Vancouver, the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. E. Mitgford.
Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Abrams are
spending a vacation visiting friends
In Seattle and Spokane, Wash.
The many friends of Mr. J. Pollock:
are pleased to hear that he is recovering from his accident.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Kerr and Mrs. E.'
Hicks and baby motored to Victoria
on Wednesday.
Mumford's Grocery
I'hone 71 Phone 71
"IP YOU GET IT AT MUMFORD'S—IT'S GOOD!"
YOU CANT SAVE MONEY
BY WISHING YOU COULD
BUT YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY
SPENDING WISELY!
Minto
Compare Values before you buy.
Values in Prices! Values in Quality!
IT NEVER PAYS TO BUY INFERIOR GOODS JUST BECAUSE
THEY ARE CHEAP;    YOU LOSE IN THE LONG  RUN
Look over these Values
Every item of Proven Reputation and Quality
Tiger Salmon, Uis, 6 for  $1.00
Royal City Pork & Beans, 7 for  1.00
Pineapple, 2s, 7 for   1.00
Mackerel and Soused Mackerel, 4 for  1.00
Strawberry Jam, 4s, new pack   65c
Mr.   Walter  Gordon,   from   Hornby: ,"„,,„..„ , , ,	
Island, was a visitor In the Valley on,
Monday, calling on old friends. |    Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Monks  are
*   *   * j visiting Mr. Monks' mother, Mrs. Jas.
Herbert  Wain met  with  a  painful ■ Monks.
accident when at work over at Central
Mrs. Horwood returned from her
trip to Vancouver on Friday last, and
Fraser Carter on Monday.
Mr. D. L. Stewart is busy clearing
Lake,   having   the   misfortune   of   a away the brllsbi preparatory to build-
crushed foot.
Mrs. Adam Monks is convalescing nt
the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
W. C. White, after a serious illness.
She returned with her parents and
Wesley who motored to Alberni on
Sunday.
*   *   *
Mr. Oke. colporteur, is in the Valley
this week making his headquarters
with Mr. and Mrs. White.
I ing a new house.
The Welsh people of Cumberland
and district held their annual picnic
at Millard's Beach on Sunday last,
and had an enjoyable day, the rain
holding oil until evening. Needless to
say. the Valley people were out In
force.
Mrs. Matt Piercy is having a three
weeks' holiday with her father at Ren-
I ton. Wash.
f SINGING
; Mrs. M. B. Tribe, L.R.A.M., has
I returned from England and will
; resume    ber    singing    classes
: early next month.    Mrs. Tribe
; will teach one day each week
« in   Cumberland   if  a  sufficient
I number  of  pupils  can  be  se-
j cured—Phone   229,  Courtenay,
Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies Visit Lake
of the Hanging Glaciers in British Columbia
(118)
S-O-T-I.C-E
TENDERS are Invited for tbe Palming of the Walls und Celling, also
Varnisb anil Stain, Counter, Tnb'e
and Seven (7) Chairs In tho City Hall.
All to receive two (2) ronta. Tend
era to be received by t! ■ Clerk In the
City Hall on or before » p.m. August
27th, ms,
For full  particulars apply to
Board   of   Works
CORPORATION   OF   THE   CITY   OF
CUMBERLAND 33 - 34
FOR SALE—Saven-roomed House
Cor. Maryport ave,. For further Information apply Miss A. Watson, 2527
Hemlock St., Vancouver, B.C.
FOR SALK—Fawcett Steel Range,
R holes, polished top, also Franklin
Heater, good as new. Apply Mrs.
Glover, Lake Trail road, Phone 101R
Courtenay.
LOST—One Canary-Bird. Kindly return to Mrs. Mac.Mlllan.
Hundreds of lovers of the great
outdoors have joined the
Trail Riders of the Canadian
Rockies, an organization of poets,
novelists, scientists, educators, artists Indian chiefs, cowboys, nature lovers in general, and those
who wish to perpetuate ancient
trails in the Canadian Rockies and
set the grand kick of a wonder
ful horseback r!d« through the
Canadian Rockies to scenic wonders which have been viewed by a
mere handful. John Murray Gibbon, of Montreal, first organized
this great ride, which this year
started August 2, for the Lake
of the Hanging Glaciers, from
Banff and Lake Windermere, B.C.
Each year it haa been bigger and
better and the membership now
exceeds a thousand, many of whom
have won the gold and enamel
button signifying that they have
ridden at least fifteen hundred
miles. Of the hundred so qualifying, 2.1 are ladies. Three of the
girl-members who joined up with
the main party this year on the
start for the Lake had already
covered upwards of 200 miles of
mountain trails.
Tht; Lake of the Hanging
Glaciers, about 7,500 feet above
sea level, in the Selkirk Range,
was discovered about 20 years ago,
but is still as wild as ever. It*
name gives some idea of its spec-
taculnr appearance, which is that
of an immense cirque, with eight
glaciers forming a morraine which
drops off sheer in an ice wall
nearly 300 feet higher thaji the
lake itself. • From this wall icebergs are fulling continually, and
forming a miniature Arctic sea
in the heart of the mountains.
Surrounded as it ie by jagged
Alpine peaks, many of which exceed 11,000 feet in height, this
district has challenged the ambition of many Alpine climbers.

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