BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander May 31, 1924

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068589.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068589.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068589-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068589-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068589-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068589-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068589-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068589-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068589-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068589.ris

Full Text

 ;.
^UE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
40
With which la consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-THIRD  YEAR—No.  22.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION l'RICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Three Cornered Contest In Comox District
Conservatives Nominate Mr. W. Duncan; Provincial Party Mr. Every-Clayton; Independent-Liberal Mr. P. P. Harrison
Cumberland And Nanaimo
Fail To Break Draw In
Half-Hour Of Overtime
For weeks, local football followers have been speculating upon
the outcome of a game between Nanaimo City and Cumberland,
and all expected to have their curiosity satisfied here on Empire
Day, when these two met in a final for the prizes put up by the
celebration committee valued at three hundred dollars. Tha
game ended after half an hour of overtime play with the score
one goal each, and the curiosity of the supporters still unsatisfied.
On the play of thc day it was impossible to pick the better team.
At stages, for a few minutes at a time, one team would show a
decided superiority; but within a short space, this showing would
be reversed. Both teams were in perfect shape physically, and
were playinging just as hard and as fast at the conclusion of the
second period as they were when the first whistle sounded, and not
a man on the ground was showing signs of distress.
The game opened promptly at six o'clock, with every seat in
the grandstand filled, and many turned away to seek standing
room about the sidelines. For ten minutes, exceptionally fast
play was witnessed, the grounds were hard and fast. Then came
the deluge. For twenty minutes the rain came down in sheets,
and although at the end of twenty minutes the rain ceased, it had
done its work, and the playing field was covered with puddles; tho
ball was a heavy, soggy piece of leather that was hard to handlo,
and a bad article to attempt to place with the head. Each team
earned a corner within a few minutes of the start of play, which
whs  of  the  end-to-enc!   variety,  fast.  	
work  on  the  part of both  forward
lines, and great defense and  bloc.i-  Cumberland Mdl
ing by the defense especially by the
home defense, Dickinson    and    Bell, j 1—   M|lf|.jp Pinal
For 38 minutes the play was even, j 1M "luu lc * MIOI
when Bell, iu attempting to clear, was
fooled by a puddle of water,, the ball
stopping short, and was crossed over
to   Deluce,  who   registered   the  first
goal of tlle game, for Cumberland.
At the opening of the second period Nanaimo City came on the field
In fresh, dry uniforms, and although
they were soon mud-spattered and
dirty, they were at least dry, and added a little pep to the team which
might otherwise have been lacking.
Five minutes after resumption of play,
Routledge was obliged to clear a hard
drive, and a rush. He was doing
nicely, however, and had succeeded
in clearing the ball, when Dickinson,
who had come In on the defense, fouled within the penalty area, and Cumberland were awarded a penalty kick.
Deluce took it, and Tommy Routledge,
with a beautiful showing, cleared his
nets, thlB being within the past two
seasons the seventh penalty whicli he
has faced, and the fifth which he has
cleared. Within the next , twem.y
minutes Nanaimo were awarded two
corners, and Immediately after the
second. Mlnto put In the best shot of
Ihe day, which Blair only succeeded in
clearing by tipping over tbe bar for
another corner. With three minutes
to go from full time, Appleby headed
the ball into the Cumberland net for
the equalizer. For the first fifteen
minutes of overtime, Cumberland had
slightly the best of the game, but during the last period of the day, the
City had nearly all of the play, and
the game ended with a regular swanu
of white-shirts iu front of Blair, with
a dangerous move for him to face
every minute.
It is understood that there wlll be
no replay of the game, and that the
prizes will be divided between the
two teams.—Nanaimo Herald.
COUTENAY,—The semi-final round
in the Courtenay Oolf Club's tournament for tbe Mutrie Cup was played
on Tuesday afternoon, the competitors being F. C. Brock, of Courtenay
aud Charles Graham, of Cumberland.
Each player negotiated Uie two rounds
in 1'i.S but as Mr. Graham was given
the advantuge of four strokes nt tbe
commencement of the competition be
was declared tbe winner. He will
now play Thomas Gramham for the
final. Recently there has been a lot
of interest taken In the games played
on the links of the Courtenay Golf
Club and tlle game Is becoming more
popular than ever. It Is expected
that u largo number of visiting motorists will this year take advantage of
the opportunity of having a game
with the local players.
All committeemen of the Celebration Committee are requested to meet at the Athletic Club
on Tuesday morning at 0:30 to
make final arrangements for the
day's procedure. All commlt-
g,  lees are urged to attend. m
iaSSSMSM^iciSiclMiWiWI^MSiaWMiW I
Funeral Of Victim
Of Mine Disaster
Held Sunday Last
The remains of the late J. J. Kirk-
britle, a victim of the disaster in No.
5 Mine last Thursday, when two were
killed and two injured, was held on
Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from
the Presbyterian Church. Rev.
James Hood conducted an impressive
service both at the Church and the
graveside.
Representatives   of  the   St.  John's
Ambulance Association, the Firebosses' Association, the Cumberland Baseball Club, to all of which Mr. Kirkbrlde  was  In  some  way  connected,
and many friends were in the large
cortege  which  followed  the  remains
to the Cumberland Cemetery. Messrs.
A. Denholme. 11. Plump, J. Bono, H.
i Waterfield,  J.  Quinn  and  G.  Dallos
j acted as pall-bearers.     Fifty-six cars
| were also present  ln  the concourse.
List of Floral Tributes
Wreaths: Mr. nnd Mrs. P. P. Har-
I rison, Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox and family, Cumberland Baseball Club, Bob,
Mickey and Joe, Cumberland Lit. and
Athletic Assoc, St. John's Ambulance
Assoc., Royston Lumber Co., Mr. and
Mrs. Sharpies nnd Canadian Collieries  (D)  Ltd.
Sprays: Mr. and .Mrs. M. Williamson, .Mr. and Mrs. T. Robinson, Nanaimo, Mr. and Mrs. C. DeCoeur, Doris
and Ethel Waterfield, .Mr. aud Mrs.
F. Dillninn. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Robinson.
Crosses: Mr. and Mrs. Alex Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Kirkbrlde, Nanaimo.
Floral Globe Wreath from the Japanese Society of Comox District.
Pillow from Mother and family.
Gates Ajar from his "Old Friends
and Neighbors at the Saw Mill." Jas.
Haworth, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Heaps,
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Stockand, Mr. aud
Mrs. Samuel Stockand, Mr. and Mi's.
Samuel Miller and Miss Louisa Shepherd.
NOTICE
There will be a meeting of
thc employees of the C.C.D. Ltd.
In the Lecture Hall of the Athletic Association at 10:30 a.m.
on Sunday. June Sth, to make
arrangements for the Annual
Picnic on July 19th.
General Scout
Camp To Be Held
At Qualicum
Prospective Labor Candidate
Failed To Deposit His
Nomination Papers Friday
Nomination day passed off very peacefully on Friday. Even
the candidates did not put in an appearance and business around
the Provincial Government Office went on as usual.
In the Court House Magistrate Hames was presiding at the
preliminary hearing of the Japanese hammer case.
In the main office of the Government Building, Mr. T. H.
Carey, Returning Officer for the Comox Electoral District assisted by Mr. C. H. Macintosh, was present from 12 noon to 1 p.m, to
receive such nominations for the Provincial Legislature as may be
j presented.    Early in the morning Mr. T. A. Barnard, the prospec-
At a conference of Scoutmasters of; five Labor Candidate for this district was seen in Cumberland
the Upper island Scout District, held j and it was expected that he was aspiring for a seat in the Provin-
at the residence of the District Com- Icial House at Victoria.     It is not known why he failed to put in
missioiier,   Brigadier  Gen.   Money  at j his nomination papers.
Qualicum on Tuesday, May 27th, plans When one o'clock came the Returning Officer announced the
we« made for holding at Qualicum | following nominations on the steps of the Court House:
'            I Paul Phillipps Harrison, of Cumberland, B.C., Barriste
| nominated by Alex. MacKinnon, Alex. Campbell and forty others.
George Every-Clayton, of Little River, B.C., Farmer, nominated by T. F. Hudson, A. E. Emb'eton and twenty-five others.
William Duncan, of Sandwick, B.C., Farmer, nominated by
D. R. Macdonald, George H. Pidcock and ten others.
There are three candidates in the field, Mr. P. P. Harrison,
the Independent-Liberal candidate, local Barrister, a resident of
— | this city for almost twenty years.
Ail    J    I     D J 'William Duncan, Conservative Cnn-
MedalS 1 reSented       |<ll,,!lle' au ol(l time resident of Snnd-
wick and a farmer, and George Every-
He
Eagle Picnic July 1
The annual picnic of the Fraternal
Order ot Eagles will be held at Royston Beach, on Tuesday, July 1st, 1924
Keep thc date open.
GARDEN PARTY PUT
OFF UNTIL JUNE 11
Fair Weather Only
Thing Desired
INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
GETS A GOOD RECEPTION
FROM   COURTENAIANS
COURTENAY,—On Monday at the
Gaiety Theatre, Mr. P. P. Harrison,
Independent-Liberal candidate In the
present provincial election, held o
meeting for the purpose of laying bis
views before the electorate. Mr. Alexander'Urquhart acted as chairman
< nnd there was a fair attendance. An
Interested member of the audience
was Mr. William Duncan, Conservn-
tlvo   candidate.      Mr.   Harrison   was
| the only speaker and explained his situation In the present campaign, stating that be did not come before the
people as a straight party man because he did not want to become a I
rubber stnmp when he goes to parlia-,
ment. He was running bis own campaign and pa.. Ing for it with his own
money.     Therefore he could go to the
The Ladies' Aid of the Grace Methodist Church wish to announce thnt the
Garden Party which was to be held on
Mrs. Mounoe's lawn on June 4th has
been post poned until Wednesday,
June 11th, owing to the sports on
June 3rd.
During the afternoon tea and ice
cream will be served. There will
also be a sewing and home cooking
stall and other amusements. A cordial invitation is extended tn all.
Mine Inspector
Passed
Away
The stage Is all Bet for tho cancelled 24th May celebration which
will be held on Tuesday, June 3rd,
and the only thing desired now by the
committee ls that "Old Sol" be present In all his glory.
Notice ia given that prize winners I legiB|ature without a noose around
in the big parade will be announced j h,8 ,leck ,„ ,.egnni t0 the usefulness
In the afternoon while the children Q, a)1 mdependent candidate be men-
are being presented with their prizes, \t[oneA ti,e fact that A. W. Neill, was
for the various othletic contests. All j elccte(| t0 the Ottawa Parliament as
children present at the school at 1.15 i 0]1 independent nnd hnd made thc j
will receive a strip of five refresh- ,>._, nleIub(,r tnt9 district ever had. j
ment tickets which may he redeemed j Ml, Harrison believed In appointing
on the grounds. j local men to local positions  instead
All winners of prizes In the Athletic f ()f imporl|„g them.    Ho wns applaud-1
contests will assemble on the grounds L(1 BCV(mii times during his address
after the sports to receive their re. | a|1|, „t the oono|uaion thereof, though '
spective prizes. i an opportunity wus  given the audl-
_______  euce to ask questions, there were none
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Mumford, ac-1 forthcoming.     Mr. Harrison Is hold-
companled by Mrs. RoblnBon, motor-1 Ing a series of meotlngs In the dls-1
ed to Victoria last Saturday, return-j trlct and wlll be In Courtenay again
,     Monday. before the campaign closos.
James McGregor, a figure well
known to mining men nf Vancouver
Island, passed away at an curly hour
last Wednesday morning.
The late Mr. McGregor was very
well known In Cumberland as he was
appointed Chief Inspector of Mines
for thc Province In 1920, a position
which be held up until within 6
months of his death.
IAPANESE FALL
PREY TO COURTENAY
COURTENAY,- Courtenay Baseball
team defeated the Royston Japanese
team Inst Sunday nt thc local ball
park by a score of seven to three.
Boyd and Downey were the battery for
the locals. There was n good crowd
of fans present. This mnkes three
straight wins for the cowpunchers and
Ihey are going to tr., to make it an
even four when they mix lt with Nanaimo again next Sunday afternoon.
This should be a great game as nn
doubt Nanaimo will come up determined to beat tho locals who have
taken away two games from the coal
city boya this season.
Beach from August 1st for fourteen , Paul Philli       Harrison, of Cumberland, B.C., Barrister at Law
days, a general Scout Camp for the I                --   _. ' L '"'"■
whole district.
The camp wlll be under the general
supervision of a "Gllwell Graduate''
loaned from provincial headquarters,
and the Gllwell method will be followed throughout. Under this plan
each Troop will be a self contained
unit, with its own camp in an allotted area, under the direction of Its
own scoutmaster, responsible for its
own camp arrangements, discipline,
cooking etc.
Instruction and practice periods
will be taken in common, as will also
such ceremonies as flag raising and
lowering, and camp fires.
Instructions in Woodcraft, first aid,
swimming, signalling and other
branches of Scout craft will be given.
The District Commissioner is offering c trophy for Troop competition
to be awarded for general proficiency
and It is hoped that trophies may be
secured for proficiency in first aid,
swimming and woodcraft. At least
one scout fleld day will be held, when
it Is hoped that parents and friends
of tlle movement will be present. ]
Such a fleld day should provide ade-!
quale assurance of the real value of|
the Scout movement.
It is expected that troops will be in
attendance from Nanaimo, Parksville,
Errlngton, Qualicum, Alberni, Courtenay and Cumberland. Lectures on
the Gllwell Method will be arranged
for the Scoutmasters during the evening periods.
To L.OC2.I M_>n  t-'"-vlon 0l "le Provincial party.
_ _■ __uuii iticii , |8 . ronllel. of LltUe Uiver
Early Friday it was expected that
there would be tlve candidates nominated, Mr. Cartwright Socialist and Mr.
Barnard, Labor, were not there when
nominations closed.
HARRISON AND DAVIES
TO RUN IN VICTORIA
The Colonist, Victoria, in a recent
issue, In part, says that two more
candidates will enter the local political arena, Mr. Claude L. Harrison
and Dr. Clem Davies, late minister of
Centennial Methodist Church.
Thc Provincial party leaders here,
It Is no secret, desired to place Mr.
Harrison's name before the party convention last week. .Mr. Harrison consented to stand, but only
Both players and officials of the
Cumberland United Football Club,
were guests at a banquet held in the
Union Hotel last Tuesday evening for
the purpose of presenting the team
with the gold medals they received by
winning the Upper Island Championship. ThoBe who received the medals were, Blair, Stewart, Monohan.
Conti, Brake, Hitchens,' Bannerninii.
Turner, Graham, Milligan, Deluce,
Plump, Horne, Heyland, James and
Harry Jackson. Twelve of the medals were supplied by the league and
the local club supplied the remainder.
A merry evening was spent in song
and story, and speech-making, Mr.
Jas. L. Brown filling the chair In ti
capable manner.
This makes four out of five years
that Cumberland has won this league,
Nanaimo City being the other winner.
This season they played twenty games
aud lost one, the lirst. to Nanaimo.
The silver cup, trophy for the league,
was given to Mayor Chas. Parnham
by Capt. Blair, for safe-keeping.
WILL CROWN HOSP1TAL
QUEEN NEXT TUESDAY
George Every Clayton, Provincial
Party Candidate, for the Coniox Electoral District, Bert Showier , Labor
Candidate Vancouver and D. S. Tait,
Victoria, will address a public meeting in the Ilo-llo Theatre on Thursday, June 5th at 8 p.m.
BUY B.C. PRODUCTS' WEEK
At ii recent meeting of the Board of
Trade a communication was read from
the B.C. Products Bureau of the Van-
certain I couver Board of Trade which said In
conditions. Ho could not endorse
the party's plank in favor of long-
term loans to fnrmers, and he would
not be bound by any party caucus.
Ile told his friends In tho party that
he must be left free to vote for any 1 prosper.
measure, providing he were elected, I    ■«•*•  'H
Buy B.C.
part that manufacturing cannot exist
without agricultural, ffjfrcBt,ry, mining and fishing production.
These industries are so Interdependent that each must support tbe other
If we  wish  lo see  British Columbia
that he could support, no matter by [
whom introduced; and ln other ways
he signified his Intention of remaining
virtually independent if he reached
the House. The Third party mem-,
hers were unable to accept these con-
dltlons, and Mr. Harrison's name was
not put to the convention.
Since then, it Ib intimated, representations have been made to Mr.
Harrison by many of his friends that
he should run as an independent.
His stand on political matters, so he
has let It be understood, Is that the
party system ls no longer suited to
the needs of the Province; and ho Is
known to favor thc election of inclc-
pendente as the only way of bring-
Ing about thc reforms he holds neccs-:
snry In public affairs. He opposes the
proposed Third parly program with
regard to the farmers, and instead
favors help to agricultural Interests
hy Government undertaking to dispose of the farmers' products by establishments of canneries and packing houses.
tiie reason we will hold
Products" week from June
2nd to 7th Inclusive. Reluil merchants are asked to make special displays of II. C. Products, employing
every possible menus of driving home
to nil citizens the great need of buying B.C. Products. And wo expect In
return that Vancouver will buy
Comox coal, that we may earn money
enough to buy B.C. Products.
5l_J_GI_EJ_EI_n__ra__!t^^
INVITATION
EXTENDED
The Women's Auxiliary of tho
Cumberland General Hospital
extends a cordial invitation lo
the candidates who remained in
the Hospital Queen Contest lo
thc final, their parents and campaign managers lo a supper to
be held at the residence of Mr.
and Mrs. Chnrlcs Ornhnm .on
Tuesday afternoon. June 3rd,
at 6 o'clock.
I    The Hospital Contest Queen, under
[the auspices of Iho Women's Auxiliary
will be crowned al the Ilo-llo Theatre
on Tuesday at 12:30 noon.
Miss Florence Sehl
Hospital Candidate Queen.
Miss Josie Balagno
1st Maid of Honor
Miss Fanny Strachan
2nd Maid of Honor.
We understand the ladles are making   elaborate  arrangement   for   this
crowning ceremony, the first  In  the
history of Cumberland.
SPOKE AT ROYSTON
Mr. Every-Clayton was the principal speaker at a Provincial party
meeting at Royston on Wednesday
evening,
Mr. Clayton claims that ho is not
tied to nny political party but had
voted and rendered assistance to that
which at the time appealed lo his conviction as the most sincere nnd the
best obtainable and says be has been
disappointed. At the last election ho
supportod the people's party, such a_
the  present provincial  party    is    iu
prlnclpl id what lie hnd hoped was
then In the mailing and assisted In
returning our present member. lie
said he wus compelled to admit that
an Independent member could not do
justice to his constituency aa one
could allied to a stronger body.
Mr. Clayton says the government
lias railed, the opposition has failed
to check them tip. lie hud not sought
nomination and consented only at the
request of a number ot' the supporters
of the Provincial Party
Shelly'sPlayln
Cumberland Today
Today, at ! p.m., Cumberland is al
home to Shelly, of Vancouver, in a
Connaught Cup fixture for the chnm-
piniishin of Canada. This is the
only game in this series that wlll be.
played In Cumberland nud it Is hound
to bo a good one as Rhelly's are noted
for being a fast-stepping aggregation.
Sammy Sullivan. „„ „|,| Cumberland
star Is on the line-up and probably
lice. Smith. For the game the locals
will fleld the following team: Blair,
Monohan, Stewart. Brake. Conti,
Kitchens. Deluce. Milligan, Oraham,
Turner unci Home, the latter taking
the place of Bannerman.
The Vancouver team Is travelling
I in Bhelly'B prlvnte yacht, and will
I be the guests of the Athletic Assoc!-
I atlon while in Cumberland, PAGE-TWO
THE Ci ML ERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY S4, 1924.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
STOP!
Before sending that order away for your windows and doors; just call in to our
place and get a figure, and we think that we can convince you that it is just as
cheap, and far more satisfactory to detd with us.
DON'T FORGET NOW.
Just phone at our expense for anything you want for your building.
We deliver anything to any part of the district.
IF IT'S BUILDING MATERIAL
WE HAVE IT
Edwards and Orr
GOLD SEAL CONGOLEUM AGENTS
Union Bay Road Courtenay
Phone 17 OPPOSITE CORFIELD MOTORS P. 0. Box 62
For the Bobbed
Hair Girls
Electric Curlers and Wavers from  $2.50 to $8.00
We have Electric Vacuum Cleaners for rent with attachments.      Phone your  reserve.
Our Fishing Tackle Department is the most complete
on the Island.
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
164
Radio Sets and Parts
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71
Native Sons of Canada
_®_T__r_T_i__I_iaMi_^^
Open Air
DANC E
Tuesday,
June
Roysl
on
Tennis Court
rt__5__n_i_Bn_ait__r^^
Refreshments by Canadian Daughters' League.
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
There is a growing demand for Whole Wheat Bread.
Try our 100 per cent Whole Wheat Bread, the only
Physical Culture Loaf. Always a nice selection of
cakes to choose from, which you know.
Not How Cheap—But How Good
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
The Holding-on-to Quality Store
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
MAY PAVE STREETS
OF COURTENAY
j/vO
i (M?\$L
tSSm wr
PREPARING FOR
CONVENTION TO BE
HELD NEXT WEEK
COURTENAY—Mr. Johnston, tbe
representative of a Vancouver contracting firm was a visitor to Courtenay on Wednesday in connection
with the further consideration of the
paving of Courtenay'a main thoroughfares. He met representatives of the
city council and many of the ratepayers at a meeting held at the cit.,
hall on Wednesday night. Much
favorable comment has been made regarding the Idea of paving and the
officials at the city hall are compiling all the data possible before anv
definite action is taken ln the mntter.
| STOLEN CAR FOUND
ON TUESDAY
COURTENAY.—On Saturday night
last Mr. Robert Curran, of Union Bay,
who was a visitor to the city had his
car stolen. It was full of groceries
and o;lier goods Mr. Curran had pur-
eliai :tl in Courtenay. The police
were Immediately notilied nnd made n
thorough search for the car finding it
at t'empbcll River on Tuesday. The
car thief Is expected to be brought in
shortly.
PURCHASES BUSINESS
IN MASONIC BLOCK
COURTENAY,—Courtenay Assembly No. Three, Native Sons of Canada
are malting great preparations for
their forthcoming convention to be
held in Courtenay on Tuesday and
Wednesday next when it Is expected
that seventy-five delegates from tho
various assemblies all over thc province will be ln attendance at a Orand
Council convention. The Sons have
given the Comox Valley signal honor
in holding tbe convention this year at
Courtenay and the local lodge ls doing
everything necessary to make tiie visiting Canucks enjoy their trip to the
Valley. A dance has been arranged
for Tuesday June 3rd at the Royston
Wooden Tennis Courts. It ls expected that the weather will be satisfactory for this big open air event. Tbe
ladles of the Canadian Daughters'
League will provide the refreshments
They have also consented to provide
a banquet for the visiting delegates
on Wednesday night
If time permits the delegates to the
Orand Council will he taken on a tour
of the camps of tbe Comox Logging
and Railway Company where they wlll
see the most modern logging apparatus in use. The convention will
meet for the first session In BooUi's
Hall on Tuesday morning ut ten
o'colck.
COURTENAY,—Mr,    Robert    (Bob) I
Duncan, formerly chief of police of the j
city has purchased the confectionery j
and refreshment business carried on ! ____________________________
in the .Masonic Block by  Mr. Harry j    UOURTENAY-Captain Guthrie, of
Richards. Mr. nnd Mrs. Richards have | Comox was the vlclim ot „ pcc_ila,.
COMOX MAN HAS
PECULIAR ACCIDENT
moved out to their place at Comox.
Comox Tailors
UDIK8' AND GENTLEMAN'S
TAILORING
All our work
Guaranteed
GET VOI'R SPUING SIIT
NOW
Courtenay, B.C.
'Phone 14
DIES WHILE ON
VISIT TO SON
COURTENAY.—The sympathy of a
wide circle of acquaintances is being
extended to Captain K. O. Halley,
whose mother, a visitor nt his home
from Salt Spring Island, passed away
on Tuesday night from heart failure.
The late Mrs. Halley was born In
Glasgow, Scotland seventy years ago
but has heen a resident of British Columbia .'ir many years. During a
long period she has made her home
at Ganges Harbor, Salt Spring Island,
II wh?re, after cremation al Vancouver,
'affiji the ashes of tiie body will be interred.
accident last Saturday night when
harrowing part of his farm. He had
a drag harorw hitched to a Fordson
Tractor and was making a turn. The
machine wus hooked up too dose anil
the harrow turned turtle with Captain
Guthrie beneath It. His hip was dislocated, two ribs were broken and he
was otherwise hurt. He Is at tho
Comox Hospital where he Is making
satisfactory progress towards recovery.
THE NET OF NIPIGON
NAVAL BRIGADE HAD
GREAT DAY AT SPIT
COURTENAY,—Last Saturday tho
boys of the Naval Brigade enjoyed
their annual outing under the guidance of Captain E. Lloyd. The gas
boat "Roona" and scow, loaded with
boys and girls and a few adults left
the wharf at Courtenay nt eight
o'clock in tho morning and went
across the bay to the Goose Spit.
During the day boat races, swimming
and other sports were indulged in and
the return to Courtenay was made
about nine o'clock in the evening.
] COURTENAY TO HAVE
REAL TOURIST PARK
COURTENAY,—Courtenay is to
have a real tourist park.     Mr. Wil-
j 11am Duncan has leased to a commute of thc Board of Trade and city
| council a tract of land comprising
about two acres on the Island Highway adjoining the Agricultural
Grounds for the purpose. The
ground wlll be fitted up with brick
fire places and other equipment for
lhe  enjoyment of visiting motorists.
TELEPHONE LINE
NEARLY COMPLETED
'lhe charm nl   irr_hw_Ur,   ihr .harm  nl   mirror-likr  tturUie*
I    ike a flower escaped from a garden is thc fish-.      Like some lace veil is this Old ... Inland . ...Net!
I_    net found  in inland Canada.    Nets belong  to | ^ oil feel
ong
the sea, to the sea-mists of thc Atlantic shores und
ta the salmon-runs of the Pacific. What are they
doing Inland, out nf habitat, "fish out of water," as it
were?
But when you chance upon the "inland net" of
'he Indian, wound around a crude wheel whittled out
of saplings, something inside, some inner sense, speaks
out saying "This ii the original. The Seacoast nets
of America came here long after this! These threads,
these meshes—they run back, back, back to the
Garden-of-Kden-time of this continent." And recent
discoveries of fossil-skeletons are placing that period
Lack much further than that 20,1100 years to which
we had become accustomed even if we couldn't understand or comprehend it.
The nets of Nipigon need nn aid from men in
order to write themselves as belonging in that class
of simple things which appeal to the heart. When
we happen on one of them in some clearing, its gossamer length thrown about the old wheel's throat it
speaks to us with the same human touch as of some
bright shawl.
What a vista of a world of the wild and free,
it conjures up. The "Twine" so inanimate written
on the page of thc Government's "Indian allowance"
becomes a thing of life, when you happen upon it
changed by the handiwork of the Indian Into one of
these inland nets. Nets of a lightness of quality to
complemenl the frailty and mobility of the dainty
canoe which is the hypaV-sensltiva fishboat of this
world ef Inland lakes and rival.
you might take it in hand and run it through
n finger ring. Compared with it, how crude seems
the coarse strength of tanned lengths that is the
herring-trap of the Atlantic coast. How rude and
strong the thick gunwale and heavy timbers, the long
oar-sweeps of the fishboats that work the herring
nets! These are fine paintings, jealously hung in an
inner room . . . not many of them . . . rare Those
others, in the beauty of their strength, are the sculpture in the gallery of Canadian handiwork. There
is no question of superiority only an interesting and
very entertaining one nf difference. Sometimes we
are in a mood for thc sculpture, for the strength of
the sea; and nothing can satiate this hunger when
it is upon us, but the way of the Maritime .%. . East
or West.
But these inland nets that stand for Canadian
lakes and rivers, those wonderful water highways, or
mere bridle paths, and canoe-trails of water, have
their own charm ... the charm of freshwater, the
charm of mirror-like surfaces, the charm of the deep
pence and the sweet smell of the woods.
What sort of world's work, someone murmurs, can
be accomplished of these toy nets . . . mora like
feminine draperies than tools of an industry?
The filigree meshes wound about this old, weathered skeleton of a reel do nol purport to be a Blue-Book
of the Immensity and range of the freshwater fisheriea
of Canada . . and they are immense . . . ao much at
a point-finger of the hundreds of miles of lakea and
rivers opened up tn sportsmen following tha beckoning
of . , , 'the nets of Nipigon,1'—Victoria Bayward,
COURTENAY.—Good progress Is
being made ou the Installation of the
poles for the new telephone connection with Campbell River. It is confidently expected that by tonight all
Ihe poles  wlll be  ln  position.      .Mr.
) E. L. Macdonuld who Is superlntend-
| Ing tbe work ls satisfied with the progress made to date and says tliat It
i will be only a short lime until the
people of Courtenay can say hello to
j Campbell River direct without any
delays.
L. D. CAFE BECOMES
MODERN DINING PARLOR
COURTENAY,—Mr.     Norman     H,
Bravender, who operated the cafe at
the Riverside Hotel until recently has
completed thc decoration of the premises formerly known aa the L, D. Cafe
on Union Street.     He is operating a
I first class dining room  where com-
! fort of his guests is only part of the
service being rendered.      Mr.  Brav-
: ender la known to the travelling public  as  an  expert  restauranteur and
| should build up a nice trade In his
' new location, besides commanding a
j great deal of local patronage.
, Tbe Rev. W. T. and Mrs. Beattle
have left for a visit to the Old Country
Mrs. Charles Slmms and son Thomas, left on Thursday morning for England, where they will spend a holiday. SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
4?
What do
other eyes see?
Ask and answer this question honestly
Your mirror can tell yon wluit
other eyes sec—if you will consult it honestly, ami honestly accept its judgment.
But you need not fear its verdict, Because unlovely skin need
not remain unlovely. The alluring youthful complexion Nature
gBVe you may he yours today
Millions of vvoii.cn now follow
this simple rule tu keep the radiance  and   beaut>'  ot   schoolgirl
complexion. You can, too.
Just this
Cleanse the _khi regularly, authorities say, to keep your com
plcxion lovely, radiant, youthful.
But beware of harsh cleansing
methods.  They injure skin.
Wash thoroughly with
Palmolive Soap—each night he-
fore retiring. Hub the creamv,
foamy lather well into the tiny
pore's, Rinse — aud repeal thu
was! ing.   IThen rinse again,
Then—if sk-n is dry—apply a
little cold cream. That Is all, Skin
bo cared for i> not injured by
cosmetics, by wind and sun, or
by dirt.
The simple, and correct way
ou cannot find a mure effective beauty treatment. Because Palmolive Soap is
blended of rare palm and
olive uils—famous for mild
but thorough cleansing qualities
since the days of Cleopatra. Aud
it is inexpensive.
Be sure you gel Palmolive —
which is never sold unwrapped.
All dealers have it. After even a
short period of this treatment
you will see a marked improvement iu your skin.
Many now use Palmolive for
the bath —letting it do for the
whole body what it does for the
face.
Volume and
efficiency
pro hue 25c
quality for
10c
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY Or
CANDA, LIMITED
Winnijvi-g Toronto Montreal
Palm aud olive oi'/i— miking else—glut
Nature's green color to Fttlniolive Soap.
!«!
_5_Hi__@|_,'_I__I_Ea__B_a_EI_i'_l_
" The Moat ol the Best for the Least"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
THE STORE THAT'S ALWAYS BUSY
I
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DR. A. H. WILKINSON
DENTAL   SURGEONS
King Block i
PHONE 116 Residence JUL
('ourtenny
PHONE 11
______@|_M_@l__H_^H_EI_EEIBH3l
Cumberland
CUMBERLAND     1'       T A 1 LO R S
For Sale by
Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
KING GEORGE V.
!
Demand is the Cause of Supply
Demand an old and WELL"
MATURED whisky and you
will get it.
"@Jadian <B[gT
WHISKY
are soundly  manufactured, old,
and well^matured whiskies.
If you demand these you will get
them.
Read the label on every bottle and observe the
date on the Government Stamp.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Montreal. Que.
Distillers of Fine
Whiskies since IS58
London, Eng.
New York, USA
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.   Ki (S
.**««_«__*
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    fUnnlng    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.     -     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B.  C.
mwm or
lUNDJCTMNDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
I     Vacant,       unreserved,       surveyed
' Crown lands may be pre-empted b>
Uritish subjects over 18 years of age.
: md by aliens on declaring Intention
Lo   become   British   subjects,   conditional   upon   residence,    occupation,
nnd   Improvement   tot    agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regu-
: atlons   regarding    pre-emptions    is
; given In Bulletin Ma. 1, Lund Series-,
f 'How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
, vhici! can be obtained tree of charge
. >\   addressing   tha    Department    of
\   .arids, Victoria, B.C., or to any Gov-
j     nment Agent.
Records  wlll  be granted  covering
only  land suitable   for    agricultural
purposes, and which ls nut timber-
land,   i.e.,  carrying  over  5,000  board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
md 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications  for pre-emptions are
|  u  be addressed  to the Land Com-
i   .ilsaloner of the Land Recording Dl
j   isiun. In which the land applied for
a situated, and are made on printed
'ormif, copies of which can be ob-
I   lined from the Land Commissioner
I     Pre-emptions must be occupied fo.
j five years and  Improvements made
I   o  value of |10  per acre,  including
; 'tearing und cultivating at least flve
i acred, before w Crown Grant can b<
!    «C-tlY«d.
F<n- more detailed Information see
ho    Bulletin    "Mow    to    Pre-empt
, Land"
PURCHASE
j Applications are received for pur
■hase of vacant and unreserved
Crown  lunds,  not   being  timberland,
I for agricultural purposes; minimum
urtoe of first-class (arable) land la $5
| per acre, and second-class (grazing)
I and f<-.r>0 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
if Crown Jnnilfl is given In Bulletin
No. 10, Lund Series, "Purchase and
| '.ease of Crown Lands."
Milt, factory, or industrial sites on
I    mbet1 land, not exceeding 40 acres,
n;* lie purchased or leased, the con-
!   'I'-nis      Including      payment      of
|    i.mpnge.
HOMESITE LEASES
n-urveyed areas, not exceeding 20
j ■••es. may he leased as homcsltes,
j iiP'tltiuna! upon a dwelling being
[ ctt'd ln the first year, title being
I ihtalnnb.e after residence and lm-
1 iru\ement conditions are fulfilled
I  inil land hns been surveyed.
LEASES
.     .'<>r graisilig and   Industrial    pur-
|     .ses ureas not exceeding 640 acres
lay  be tensed by one person or a
t   ' mpuny,
GRAZING
L'nder the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
, .mc the i-Hnge udnilnlstcred under a
| Grazing       Commissioner,      Annual
gracing permits ure issued based on
I numbt is ranged, priority being given
j  ii established owners. Stock-owners
[  niy  form   associations    for    range
j  Management.   Free, or partially free,
permits  are available   for    settlers,
I oampers   and   travellers,   up   to   ten
head.
List of Events, June 3rd
i.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
j
10:00 a.m.—Boys' Race, 4 to 5 years, 25 yards.
1st prize, Belt; 2nd prize, Belt; 3rd prize Belt.
10:00a.m.—Girls' Race, 4 to 5 years, 25 yards.
1st prize, Bead Necklace; 2nd prize, Sweet Grass
Basket; 3rd prize, Dre3s Pin.
10:00a.m.—Boys' Race, 5 to 6 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Baseball Mit; 2nd prize, Belt; 3rd prize,
Pair Arm Bands.
10:00 a.m.—Girls' Race, 5 to 6 years, 50 yards.
1st prize Box Candy; 2nd prize, Sweet Grass
Basket; 3rd prize, Dress Pin.
10:05 a.m.—Boys' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Tie; 2nd prize Cufflinks; 3rd prize,
Pocket Knife.
10:05 a.m.—Girls' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Bead Necklace; 2 nd prize, Barrett; 3rd
prize, Pearl Bead Necklace.
10:10 a.m.—Boys' Race, 7 to 8 years,-50 yards.
1st prize, Pocket Knife; 2nd prize, Leather Purse;
3rd prize, Belt.
10:10 a.M.—Girls' Race, 7 to 8 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Box Candy; 2nd prize, Bottle Perfume;
3rd prize Sponge Ball.
10:15 a.m.—Boys' Race, 8 to 9 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Baseball Bat; 2nd prize, Leather Purse;
3rd prize, Pair Arm Bands.
10:15 a.m—Girls' Race, 8 to 9 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Bottle Perfume; 2nd prize Box Candy;
3rd prize, Pearl Necklace.
10:20 a.m.—Boys' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Belt Chain;
3rd prize, Eversharp Pencil.
10:20 a.m.—Girls' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Tennis Raquet; 2nd prize, Box Candy;
3rd prize Bottle Perfume.
10:25 a.m.—Boys' Race, 10 to 11 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Baseball Mit; 2nd prize Cufflinks; 3rd
prize, Pocket Knife.
10:25 a.m.—Girls' Race, 10 to 11 years, 75 yards.
1st prize Tennis Raquet; 2nd prize Sweet Grass
Basket; 3rd prize, Bead Necklace.
10:30 a.m.—Boys' Race, 11 to 12 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Eversharp Pencil; 2nd prize Baseball;
3rd prize, Leather Purse.
10:30 a.m.—Girls' Race, 11 to 12 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Bead Necklace; 2nd prize, Box Candy;
3rd prize Box Candy.
10:35 a.m.—Boys' Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards.
1st  prize,  Fish  Line  Reel;  2nd  prize,  Mouth
Organ; 3rd prize, Leather Purse.
10:35 a.m.—Girls* Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards.
1st prize, Box Candy; 2nd prize Lunch Grip; 3rd
prize, Box Handkerchiefs.
10:40 a.m.—Boys' Race, 13 to 14 years, 100 yards.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Necktie; 3rd prize, Pocket Knife.
10:40 a.m.—Girls' Race, 13 to 14 years, 100 yards.
1st prize, Manicure Set; 2nd prize, Tennis Raquet;
3rd prize, Beads.
10:45 a.m.—Boys' Obstacle Race, 14 to 15 years.
1st prize, Baseball Mit; 2nd prize Ball Bat; 3rd
prize, Eversharp Pencil.
10:45 a.m.—Girls' Egg & Spoon Race, 14 to 15.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Box
Candy; 3rd prize, Bead Necklace.
10:55 a.m.—Boys' Sack Race. 12 to 13 years.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Pocket Knife ;
3rd prize, Cufflinks.
10:55 a.m.—Girls' Shoe Scramble, 12 to 13 years.
1st prize, Manicure Set; 2nd prize, Box Handkerchiefs ; 3rd prize, Box Candy.
11:05 a.m.—Boys' Relay Race, (Team of 4 boys)
Confined to the four senior rooms Cumberland
Public School and one each from the Bevan and
Union Bay  Schools.      1st  prize,  4  Eversharp
Pencils; 2nd prize, 4 Pocket Knives.
11:15 a.m.—Girls' Relay Race (Team of 4 girls),
Confined to the four senior rooms Cumberland
Public School and one each from the Bevan and
Union Bay Schools.     1st prize, 4 Manicure Sets;
2nd prize, 4 Boxes Handkerchiefs.
11:25 a.m.—Boys' Three Legged Race, 13 to 11.
1st prize, 2 Pocket Knives; 2nd prize, 2 Belts;
3rd prize, 2 Eversharp Pencils.
11:25 a.m.—Girls' Potatoe Race, 14 to 15 years.
1st prize, No. 2 A. B. Kodak; 2nd prize, Fountain
pen; 3rd prize Box Candy.
11:35 a an.—Boys' Wheel Barrow Race, 12 to 13.
1st prize, 2 Baseballs; 2nd prize, 2 Belts.
11.35 a.m.—Girls' Skipping Race, 9 to 10 years.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Bead Necklace ; 3rd prize, Bottle Perfume.
11:50 a.m.—Tug of War (Best of 3 pulls—teams
of 8 boys).     Confined to the four senior rooms
Cumberland Public School and one each from the
Bevan and Union Bay Schools.      1st prize, 8
Watches; 2nd prize, 8 Belts.
1:15 p.m.—Pupils assemble on school grounds.
Procession headed by Band and May Queen's
float proceeds via Penrith Ave., 3rd Street and
Dunsmuir Ave., to Recreation Grounds.
2:00 p.m.—Songs by School Children.
Address by Chas. Parnham.
Crowning of the May Queen, Miss Margaret Watt,
by ex-Queen, Miss Olga Owen.
Speech from the throne.
Maypole Dance and folk dances, if any.
Women's Auxiliary.
..3:00 p.m.—Boys* Pillow Fight, 14 to 15 years.
1st prize, Cap; 2nd prize, Lunch Grip.
3:00 p.m.—Girls* Potato Race, 11 to 12 years.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Hair Ribbon;
3rd prize, Bead Necklace.
3:15 p.m.—Running High Jump, Boys 14 to 15.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Ever-
sharp Pencil; 3rd prize, Pocket Knife.
3:30 p.m.—Running Broad Jump, Boys 14 to 15.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Ever-
sharp Pencil; 3rd prize, Pocket Knife.
3:15 p.m.—100 Yards Dash Handicap—Open to
boys of all schools. 1st prize, No. 3 Brownie
Kodak; 2nd prize, Baseball Mit; 3rd prize, Baseball Mit. _.   ,
3:50p.m.—Tug of War Final
4:00 p.m.—Junior Football Final, Empire Day
Cup Competition. 1st prize, 11 Eversharp Pencils; 2nd prize, 11 Eversharp Pencils.
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leare jour orders at office,
Mrs King's Stationery Store
Phone 58.
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
Or Phone 16 Union Hotel
( I IMHERLAND  TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
|     HOTELS AND CAMPS
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye ull kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and Bee Mr. Sutherland, our Agent ln Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
lo have done.
Our  Work  and   Service
Will Please You ::    : I
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, IM. Phone IKK
DR.   R.   B.   DIER   AND   DR.
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, 0. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.80—7 to 9p.m. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1924.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER  ^Msrmsmm^i
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1924
CHEAP STUFF
The editor of a big .New Vurk news-, M
paper was recently taught a pretty
lesson by a man in a small town in
New Vork State. Aud it was a lesson that it might be well for lesser
men that the editors of great metropolitan newspapers to heed.
Ii si'ins that 1 lie editor of the big
daily referred facetiously to St. Johns-
ville, "wherever that is," as the editor put it, just as editors have a habit
of lining when some place with which
they are not familiar is mentioned.
Whereupon a citizen of the place
wrote to the editor in  this wise:
"If ever convenient for you to do
so. take your car, starting in this direction, and when the speedometer
has registered 107 miles, stop, and you
will be iu the vicinity of a neat little
village called St. Johnsville, N.Y., a
town of natural unlimited advantages,
where the wheels of industry and
prosperity arc constantly crying for
oil, and where our corn-nourished
brains are trained never, publicly or
otherwise to speak lightly of anything
unless both proper and fitting."
Years and years ago, the people of
tiie stage learned that a "fling" at a
neighboring small town would cause
a laugh. The stage folks are ever
eager to cause a laugh, and do not
care whether it is from thoughtful or
illllllllllll
1WASH GOODS
PRODUCTION
1923- - -
2,542,000,000
FT. BM.
This
eries  ot"  articles  communicated   by   the   Timber
Industries   Council   of   British   Columbia.
Special  Showing  this   Week  of  Dress
Ginghams and Wash Goods
Sport Skirts—Just received the newest Styles in Ladies' White Brodella Flannel Sport
Skirts, with Camisole tops.     Special Price ,  $5.50, $6.00, $7.50
Cardigan Sweaters—Silk and Wool Cardigan Sweaters in Combinations of White, Copen,
Card, Tomato, Orange and Jade .*.  $fi.50
TIIE BALANCE OF OUR STOCK OF MILLINERY AT REDUCED PRICES
Fashion Craft, made-to-measure Clothing,  Style, Fit and Satisfaction guaranteed.
Just received the newest styles in Men's Straw Boater Shape Hats,   Also   Velour   and
Beaver Felts, Summer Underwear, Lanky Bill Ties, English Broadcloth Shirts, Newest
Lasts in Men's Slater Shoes and Oxfords.
difficult to reconcile many of his
homely proverbs with conditions of
today. On this side of the Atlantic
we have won a reputation as gilded
spendthrifts ami master mechanics.
A pretty strong combination. If you
take the trouble lo reason it out,
.More  than  twelve million  automobiles are in use in the United States
and growth of his community. It la j ps
the chap who keeps his dollars roll- '_j=
ing nnd uses the new inventions that §|[
aid In the march of progress. But j§_j
all of this should not he taken to mean _=
! that you nre justified In spending =
1 more than you earn or living beyond ==
your means. There is a happy, pros- =_=
perous medium between the miser | _=j
and the spendthrift. Find that me- j_=;
(Hum, put your dollars to work, adopt i §=_
BOYS' JAZZ CAPS ARRIVED
il or   	
thoughtless people.     Hence the cus-1"""  Ca"a""  »""  >'L'l',ne  saturation
torn  of  speaking   lightly  of  smaller i I'0"" is 9ald tn ue far I,lstant'     0m I *- •-  ,•  ==
towns  has  continued, greatly to the   working   days   have   been   decreased ■ modern methods of living and  keep 'j||
amusement of many  persons. from ten '"""'s "e'' llay- a few >eai's j step with progress. :==
But  the  habit of speaking lightly •ag0'
-   ..        ; tnrli)
average   of  eight   hours
not  confined   to  tbe  stage  folks
today.   Yet this loss in hours of la-
is  not  confined   to  tne  stage  ioiks. i	
Others bave taken II up-even editors.''""',lils nem overcome and production
■ iMfcanoeri  niiinv  limes bv the ability
Hal whether it is indulged in by stage
Bul whether it is inuuigeu iu uy siu^u
folks, h.- private citizens, or bv learn- !'"' mechanical men to meet the situ
ed editors, it is a cheap, unfriendly !ltio"- To<lav lhe barrel of flour ls
and foolish practice to "speak lightly ' ,ll,m»t'(1 lnt0 a '"W ln a lmker!''
of anything unless both fitting and '.*""' " loaf ot lmM(1 is Ulnle<1 m,t "'
proper," as the citizen of St. Johns-! " »ll,S!,ino envelope, thc hand of hll-
ville so pertinently expresses it. '""" ncvo1' l:ominR lnt0 <'ontact wlth
 it.     It was not many years ago when
CHANGED CONDITIONS       "ough was k,K'a,lul1 in ,some °r n,_
  j big bakeries by men walking over it
Wc are always bearing much about '■'" ,helr tare feet- Tlie>' were com-
the virtue of saving. "Lay up some-! Pe'1"1 l0 wasn thelr feet t0 get t,lc
thing for a rainy dav," and "Young j'"»'Kh "«■ "' ll,c newspaper offlcc
prodigal in coach and tour will be an ! today one man with tbe linotype ma-
old beggar barefoot" are trite sayings ; '»lllle wi» set raore tyDe iu a" hour
thai have been dinged into our oars |«""' tllc "ld compositor could set by
all our lives. But thc real fact of hand in a ,li,v Tllc automobile will
the matter Is that it is the man who >aae you in a litte more than an hour
spends, not necessarily the man who ; wh»*- w01"'1 have hee" a tu" llil;'K
saves, wbo furnishes the motive power Journey with old Dobbin and Ihe rick-
for the wheels of Industry, Times ety buggy. The telephone saves your
have changed since Poor Richard ; ><«» a «ozcn tlraes n l,ay "n(1 ,ho tcl''"
wrote his famous almanac, and it is ' S™ph   brings  almost  immediate  rc-
   spouse to your inquiry.
———————— I    I( waa (lie mechanic who took the
' ■ '      : glory out of war, and made their way
into the ground like moles to protect i
themselves   against   lhe   wonders   of
his achievements; who robbed war of
the glitter that belonged  to the tin
. soldier of old and showed the world :
I what a horrible nasty tiling it could
he.      And   because   of   his   achievements, the people of the world are try-1
ing to get the leaders nf humanity to j
say, "never again."
And so it is wilh money.     The fel-1
£■£*>£, MyM cu ProtMlM      =s
m<»!l^aM.I!«-lyCM«llM      l=r
tut >_!_fig SSJ^JSJSJf''*1*'.    : HI
,— _J« Ott-kC-	
u      Wi_i for liamCn Book. i —
llMlMCltllatttCa.ICUIMIotltMI.aauW       ==
JOS.   DAMONTEJ
GENERAL  DELIVERY      ,g
Grocery Department
Comox Strawberry Jam, 4 lb tins .... 85c. Sweet Eating Chocolate, j/_-lb cakes 25c.
Empress Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. tin $1.00 Hamsterley   Canned   Strawberries,   2-lb
Empress Black Currant Jam, 4-lb. tin $1.00 tlns'   40c-
Neptune Sardines, 15c. 7 for $1.00 Herrings in Tomatoe Sauce' 3 tins      25c-
Fresh Ground Coffee, per lb  50c. Nice Juicy 0ranges' 5 dozen             $1'00
Wedding Breakfast Coffee, 1-lb tins 50c.       Ginjrer Snaps' per lb       *  20c-
Libbys Corn Beef, 1-lb tins, 2 for 55c.       Assorted Biacl,its' per lb 35c- 3 lbs $1-00
,,   „ , „„ N.W. Soda Crackers, cartons 35c,
I'otatoe Flour, 1-lb. pkts, 2 lor 35c. 3 for jjijq
Corn on Cob, large tins, 3 for $1.00        Cream Olive Toilet Soap, 5 for 55c.
Turkish Table Figs, 2 for  35c.        Bulk Cocoanut, 2 lbs. , 45c.
KltKSll TOMATOES, CUCU.MBEnS, HEAD LETTUCE, CAULIFLOWER, CABBAGE, RHUBARB.
FRESH PINEAPPLES, BANANAS, FLORIDA GIIAPE FHUIT. LEMONS. NEW SEASON'S BULK
HATES.      PICNIC PLATES, PICNIC SETS, PAPER TABLE CLOTH, WAX PAPER.
Delliered to 111 Parts of District.     |§
Coal. Wood and Hoods ol Any Kind  _=
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHAROE3
1 Campbell's
Cumberland
TELEPHONE
TELEPHONE
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'   and   Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
low wbo hoards and hides his dollar:
is not getting along very fast himself
and   is  not helping  in  the  progress j ALL RINDS QF FERTILIZERS
New Prices on Go-Carts
and  Sulkies
Go-Carts, old price $20.00, now , $17.00
Co-Carts, old price $27.00, now $20.00
Sulkies, old price $15.00. now   .... $12.00
Others priced at $9.50, $11.95 and $22.50 each.
WALL PAPERS
We carry the Watson-Foster anil Boxer lines in a
lull range of patterns prices, ranging from 12U, cents
a roll.
CROCKERY
Plain White Cups and Saucers, per dozen  $1.50
The lowest price for many years.
Linoleums and Lino Rugs in a good range of patterns,
suitable for every room in the house.
EXTRA SPECIAL
A May Tag Electric Motor Washer, slightly used and in
good condition, a snap $60.0.0.     Call and inspect this
machine and make wash day a pleasure.
Extension tables in Golden and Fumed Finish, Specially
priced this week at $18.50
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
! GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
! THE MOOREWHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
| Office 2«20 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - •  B. C.
Car  For  Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   23
From 11 p.m. to   I) a.m.   21!
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
L'i^jl.jT.Miilii.^^
IF IT'S BUTTER
ASK FOR
Comox
Creamery
Butter
Mad*    from    Pure    Jeraey
Cream.
IF IT'S JAM
INSIST ON
Comox Brand
Jam
Made from fresh fruit ln the
Valley. Pure cane sugar only
used In its manufacture.
IF IT'S POTATOES
DEMAND
Comox
Creamery
Potatoes
Grown in the District and
graded according to Govt,
regulations. "Look for the
tag on the bag."
IF IT'S EGGS
OURS ARE
Strictly
Fresh Eggs
Candled and graded In accordance wilh the New Egg
Act.
OUR MILK DEPARTMENT DELIVERS MILK AND CREAM DAILY
Ask for Geo. Mason.
1 SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
/
DON'T CARRY DEAD RATS
To "knock" nnother is evidence of
jealousy or common dishonesty. To
speak ill of nn Individual shows a
want of charity. To peddle gosiip
is proof tliat you are a dangerous
person.
Tbe unreliable the ..principled
folks in any community are pretty
well known. Those who exaggerate
He and bear false witness are tagged
with the lack of good breeding.
You would not bring into a friend's
house a dead and stinking rat; neither does your friend want you to drag
in any dirty gossip.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
.MEATS   POULTRY   FISH
  A.N'P VEGETABLES 	
Telephone 143 P. 0. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
■
i
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOHS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
than  "alibi-ing" and you will  be a finest town."
bigger asset to your business, to your it is your duty to become an iutelli
community and to yourself. gent, as well as au ardent booster for
  Cumberland.      Know your  city,  and
Seeking the publics good ]el others kll0w ahom "•"
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 134X Courtenay
Office: 169 Cumberland
LET'S  QUI!.   ALIBI-IMI
The "panicky" business man is
ever with us—a slight depression and
he immediately climbs to the house
top and shouts that tho country Is
going to the eternal bow-wows. He
is not content to meet the situation
courageously by adopting such policies thut conform with trade condl-
llons, but instead moans to bis fellow trailemeu the "seriousness" of
what he Interprets us an approaching
calamity. Ile surrounds himself
with an atmosphere of doubt and anxiety; he becomes a destroyer of business morale, destructive to the end
of bis unfounded conclusions.
Business today not only calls for j
men with faith lu the future of our !
nation, but a faith in the industry they
collectively  represent—men   who  not ■
only have a true vision of the futura j
but the will and courage to grapple
Intelligently  with  tho problems  that
arise from the "iips and downs" of |
trade and commerce which, ns cycles,!
come and go like summer and winter,
and to meet these problems with no j
loss of warranted optimism.
Let's not talk about "poor business.' ,
let's   plead   for   "better   business."
When the monthly sales report shows '
a  lower level, turn  on  more steam,
mix  more  aggressiveness  with  your j
initiative.     Spend more time "trying"
Tlle Islander as a property Is privately owned, but as a newspaper, It
is dedicated to the service of the public.
Its aim is to contribute as much as
it may to the life, growth, and cultural development of the community.
tbe state and the nation.
It seeks to reflect the best thought
and sentiment of the people, but It will
not cater to passing public opinion.
It desires to assist the people to j
achieve their legitimate aspirations,.
but will not knowingly encourage i
their Illusions.
In politics, it Is uncontrolled, with
factions, it has  nothing In common,
Willi the political feudist and denia- j
goguci, no patience.
Its position on public questions
shall lie conscientiously taken, fairly
presented, and faithfully maintained.
It knows no classes, recognizes no,
interests, seeks no  favors, but shall
strive to merit thc public's confidence, j
respect and support.
"1)0 vor KNOW—"
One of the first quallllcatlons of a
city booster Is that lie shall know his
city, and be able to tell of it Intelligently to those whom he wishes to
Impress with the advantages of life
there. Cumberland grows around
us in many ways, yet there are few
who could mention the concrete examples of growth, or tell In exact
terms why Cumberland Is a great
place in which to live.
Il Is not sufficient to tell the prospective resident that Cumberland Is
the tinest town In the Province, etc.
You   must  tell   him   why   It  is  "the
TODAY
Look to This Day for it  Is  Life
the  very  life of life.      In  Its  brief
course lie all the verities anil realities of your existence.
The Bliss of Growth
The Glory of Action
The Splendor of Beauty.
For yesterday Is already a dream
and tomorrow is only a vision; bul
today, well lived, makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and ever:
tomorrow a vision of hope. Look
well, therefore, to this day. Such i.-
the salutlon of a dawn.
Be Interested In yourself alone an i
alone you will be.
It Is queer how many people there
are In the world looking for the biggest half when common sense tell i
us there Is no such thing.
Every man should study conciseness ln speaking; li Is a sign of Ignorance not to know that long speeches, though Ihey may please the speakers, aro the torture of the bearer.
Insanity may be caused by shock or
by the advice of a good lawyer.
The man who can acknowledge a
mistake without blaming it on someone else has true moral courage.
ALBERTA'S ATTRACTIONS
The fact thnt three big events aro
being staged within a few days of
each other during July lends added
attractions for the tourists who will
visit Alberta during the season. Tliepe
events are thc Mounted Police Pageant at Macleod, July 1, 2 and 3; the
Calgary Exhibition and Stampede, the
largest affair of thc kind held annually on lhe continent, July 7 to 11';
:lii' Edmonton Agricultural Fair and
Stampede and the Dominion Convention of Elks the following week. This
makes it possible for tourists coming
through from the United Slates to
take in the three celebrations and
.-onie side trips to tiie mountains within tho space of three weeks.
REDUCTION IN
I.AKEHEAD STOCK
Grain in store In the elevators at
the bead of the lakes bave already
dropped to a point below one-half of
what was there at tlio opening of
navigation, The decrease In stocks
hy over eleven and a half million
bushels brought the stocks In store
on .May In below those of the corresponding date of last year.
ROUND-UP ATTRACTS
MANY STOCKMEN
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING, .   ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR  TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND  OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
B_Bl_atfCa__.
MMBtfi"
Pure Beer—
,
Why Pay More?
RUNNING SHOES
Direct from the Factory to you
LIFEBUOY BRAND
Rubber soled sandals, brown or white, children's sizes
4 to 101/., per pair $1.00
Misses' sizes 11 to 2, per pair $1.15
Boys' Black Athletic Oxfords, sizes 1 to 5 $1.50
Youth's Black Athletic Oxfords, sizes 11 to 13'/. $1.25
Children's Black Athletic Oxfords, sizes 4 to 10V. $1.15
Cavin's Shoe  Store
On account of our low overhead we can sell for less
Winnipeg livestock dealers nre being attracted to Alberta for the big
round-up of 10,000 wild horses to
commence next week. Tills will he
the greatest round-up of stray horses
ever held In that province and Is expected to gather in animals that have
been roaming the ranges southeast of
Calgary for years.
.300 TO ASSIST SETTLERS
A new departure is about to be
made in tbe immigration policy or
Canada, following an agreement between tbe Canfldail. National Ratlwyu
and the Overseas Settlement Hoard,
under which groups of settlers are to
be brought to Canada and settled in
communities. EJacb bend of a family will be assisted to the extent nf
$300, in addition to help given in the
way of reduced transportation costs
to all immigrants under the agreement between the Canadian and British  governments.
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address—       * Opposite the Drug Store.
Those magic boots of old—the seven-league boots
—were the work of an imaginative mind. Who could
ever expect to walk seven leagues in a single step ?
The story of the seven-league boots was written in the days long before the present time with
its great possibilities. These days there is no need
for such wonderful steppers. There is the telephone.
It is no effort now to talk a hundred times seven lea-
gues. The world isj'irtually at one's door. This age
of wonderment is based, loo, on imagination, but it is
imagination plus practical' experiment and great development.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
AND
U.B.C. Beer
Free Delivery Service
WHY NOT ORDER A CASE?
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
Thii tdvtrtlMment la not published or dlsplxyet* by the Liquor Control
Board or by the Government of llrltish Columbia.
Commercial Printing
TX7 HEN you are in need of printed stationery or any
"" other form of commercial printing call in and see
us; we will be pleased to submit samples, quote prices
and offer any suggestions where needed.
If you are living out of town mail us your requirements and you will receive the same courtesy as if you
brought your order in personally.
Below is a list of some of the everyday needs of
the business man and farmer. If you do not see what
you want listed, ask us about it.
BILLHEADS
ENVELOPES
SHIPPING TAGS
VISITING CARDS
FUNERAL NOTICES
CONSTITUTIONS and
BY-LAWS
PAMPHLETS
MENUS
DODGERS
CALLING CARDS v
LETTER HEADS
CIRCULAR LETTERS
CONTRACT FORMS
CATALOGUES
POSTERS
BUSINESS CARDS
WINDOW CARDS
WEDDING SlmiON-
ERY
PROGRAMS
RIBBON BADGES
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ETC., ETC., ETC.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Cumberland Islander
PHONE 35-
"We I'rint, Yon Prosper"
—CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EASTBOUND
SUMMER  EXCURSIONS
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
WINNIPEG fiJ^O  (\(\ ST  PAUL
MINNEAPOLIS        *[W.W.UU DULUTH
CHICAGO   $ SIUIII LONDON $118.75
DETROIT   (105.0. TORONTO    (113.76
NIAGARA FALLS, (1.0.02
MONTREAL  9I.1S.7.. QUEBEC (141.80
ST. JOHN  (117.0(1 HALIFAX        (168.4:.
BOSTON, (168.60
NEW YORK, (117.10
$13.00 additional for oeenn trip between V.'ineouver-I'rlnee Run rr
On sole May 22 to Sept. 16. Final return limit, Oct   81
Choice of routes—Htop overs and hide -trips.
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PAKK
$10.25 Return  from  Victoria
EDWARD w. BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland
C. F. EARLE, li.l'.A . Victoria, B.C
Canadian National Railways
___
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wootl Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones I and 61
Cumberland, B.C. THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1924.
Ho-IFo Theatre
(5X3k CUMBERLAND fSISk
^/FRIDAY, SATURDAY, MAY 30-31V®'
"TRIUMPH"
"Triumph" is the most luxurious picture DeMille ever made.
Dazzling gowns, Lavish Gorgeous Settings
The whirl of fashionable society moulded into the most luscious screen feast since
De Mille made "Male and Female" and "Manslaughter"
Clyde Cooke in "THE ORPHAN"
MATINEE SATURDAY 2:30 P.M. DANCE SATURDAY 9:30 P.M.
COMING MONDAY, TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2-3-4
Marion Davies in
"LITTLE OLD NEW YORK"
Miss Davies disguised as a little Irish Boy gives the most appealing characterization ever seen on the screen.
BIG SCENES IN A BIG PICTURE
The fight in the fire-house, the whipping post scenes and the attack of the moli.
SHOWS START AT 6:45 AND 9:00 P.M.    Children 25c. Adults 50c.
MATINEE TUESDAY 2:30 P.M. Children 15c. Adults 35c.
COMING NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JUNE 6-7
THOMAS MEIGHAN, IN  "THE CONFIDENCE MAN"
ligialgMMc'JKii
iJ-iaiBigiaiBmiftiETrapij,
I
j__®|_[_H__|__!I_fi___l_^^
1
1
Your Family
A mother and children bereft of home is life's most
pitiful drama.
It is enacted all too often because life insurance
had not been provided.
Government statistics show that "ninety-five per
cent of men at age sixty are dependent" Other men
die without leaving anything for the support of their
families.
Life insurance has been evolved so that a man may
arrange his life's program to provide for his family.
It is scientific, safe and sound.
Have your wife and children sufficient life insurance protection?
Let the Dominion Life take care of your dependents.
Full information regarding any form of policy
will be cheerfully furnished by writing.
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
TIPtP retT SmN-IRPITATIOW.BRUIStS
JABS Kk. _ SOt.—IUB6S Wfc-At III tnj Stmt
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AMI RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
DOUGHNUTS
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices — Lemon Custards — Lemon Pies
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18 Cumberland.
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF PARTNERSHIP
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I
the partnership heretofore subsisting
between us, the undersgned, as grocers, carrying on business as such under the name "Mumford's Grocery" at I jj
the City of Cumberland, B.C., has this !
day been dissolved by mutual con-1
sent.
All debts owing to the said partner- j
ship are to be paid to Thomas H. Mum-1
ford at Cumberland, B.C.,    and    all!
claims  against the said  partnership ||
are to be presented to the said Thomas ! 0
H. Mumford, hy whom the same will
be paid.
The said business will in future be
owned and carried on  by  the said I
Thomas H. Mumford.
DATED this 21st day of April, 1924.
Thomas Henry Mumford.
John Walton.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
T.WHERRY
NMtttKIOTANNER
TO:        THE ELECTORS
OF COMOX ELECTORAL DISTRICT
GREETING:
This pamphlet is issued under authority of the
several District Committees composed of local citizens,
many of whom belong to different political parties, but
are now unanimous in their desire to ensure the election of Mr. Paul Phillipps Harrison, of Cumberland,
B.C., Barrister-at-law, the Independent-Liberal Candidate.
The word "Independent" indicates absolute freedom from the rule of the Rubber-stamp Brigade.
The word "Liberal" refers to no particular party,
but denotes the principle of re-modelling and enacting
laws to meet promptly the radical changes which from
time to time occur in the economic and social status of
organized society as opposed to the ultra-conservative
or reactionary principle of remaining stationary and
only enacting legislation to meet such radical changes
at the last moment when forced to do so by political
pressure exerted by organized laoor, or for some other
like reason.
To those who reside in the more remote parts of
the district and who are not personally acquainted
with our Candidate, we may say that he was born in
Victoria, B.C., some 43 years ago, and is the eldest son
of His Honor Judge Harrison, now retired, wjio for
some 35 years occupied the Bench for two Counties on
the Mainland, and in later years for the County of
Nanaimo. Mr. P. P. Harrison has resided with his
family at Cumberland, B.C., and practised law there,
for the past 18 years.
We are supporting him in his candidature for tho
following reasons:
1. During the past 18 years we have on many
occasions experienced convincing proof of his broad-
minded attitude in politics, combined witn a most commendable independence of spirit, and the ability to
make a determined fight for anything that he is advocating or supporting.
2. That he has always been strongly opposed to
Oriental immigration into Canada.
3. That his entire legal practice is with the general public, such as miners, farmers, fishers, loggers,
merchants, etc., and he does not serve any interest or
class in particular, we therefore are assured that if
he represents us in Parliament he will not be prejudiced in favor of any particular interest or class.
4. That as his entire legal business depends upon
his retaining the people's confidence, it is to his interest
lo give them proper representation in Parliament.
5. That he has not accepted and will not. accept
funds for his campaign from any Party, Association,
or the like, in short, he is financing the whole of his
campaign with his personal funds. We doubt if any
other Candidate in this Field is doing this.
6. We are certainly in accord with Mr. Harrison's
winning as an Independent-Liberal and in his view that
if he were to do otherwise he would put himself in the
position of practically saying that he is satisfied that
the Government has accorded our District the consideration to which it is entitled, while as a matter of
fact we feel that they have, in many instances, failed
to do so. It is our experience, covering a period of
many years, that Political Parties, become nothing better than 'Political Machines' whereby its members who
are elected on a straight party ticket, uphold their
Party even when they are acting contrary to the interests of the people, thus constituting the infamous
'Rubber-stamp Brigade,' every member of which is
completely subservient to the dictates of the Party
Bosses, particularly as such members are individually
under obligation to their Party, ior funds to carry on
their campaign. This condition of affairs can only be
remedied or at least ameliorated by our persisting in
placing the interests of the District before that of any
Party as we are doing in this case.
Mr. Harrison will refrain from making wild promises for thc purpose of catching votes.
He has agreed with us to make a most careful investigation into the complaints of Timber Operators
regarding the present Royalty on logs; And also the
question of an embargo on the exportation of logs,
and if the facts fully warrant it, he will advocate and
support any equitable measure which can be adopted to
meet the situation in a way satisfactory to all concerned. And a like enquiry into the matter of the
present system of repairing and maintaining public
roads, ditches and culverts, in order to ascertain if a
reasonable scheme can be worked out whereby the
farmers can obtain a fair share of employment in that
connection, particularly during the slack months in
farming operations and thus enable them to meet their
taxes.
Also amendment to the Poll-tax Act, so that the
collection of such tax will not be made from any person
liable to pay the same, until such person has resided a
reasonable time within the place where it is sought
to collect the tax.
Also the filling of local Government positions by
local people, where competent, instead of th? present
method quite often adopted of giving the sama to persons who reside elsewhere and have no stake or interest in the District.
Mr. Harrison is also strongly in favor of the principle of Recall by the people of any Member of Parliament whom they may feel is not giving them proper
and adequate representation and will give his support
to any legislation of that character, which contains
proper safe-guards to prevent fraudulent or corrupt
practices in carrying out its provisions; And will also
give support to any legitimate plan to procure an
amendment to the present Act relating to Divorces,
st) as to put women on an equal footing with men, as
regards obtaining a divorce for certain matrimonial
offences. As the Act, in question, now stands a husband may obtain a divorce on the sole ground that his
wife has been unfaithful, while a wife must not only
prove that the husband has been unfaithful but must
also prove that he has deserted her for the space of
two years and upwards or that he has been guilty
of extreme cruelty.
There are, of course, many more matters of interest, which the expense of printing prevents us from
setting out.
We urge all those who are interested in the welfare of the District to join with us in electing Mr.
Harrison.
The Joint Executive of Mr. Harrison's Committees
A. URQUHART.
WM. DOUGLAS.
J. McPHEE.
A. MAXWELL.
FRED bIMISTER.
JOHN H. CAMERON.
JOHN WALTON.
A. McKINNON.
J. SUTHERLAND.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKKRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
26   rooms,   electrically   heated.
Excellent outline—
For reservations Phone 15.
R. YATES, Manager.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
I. Won Bay Road
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo.Ilu  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical  Barber,  and  Hairdresser, Shampooing,  Singeing.
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Heating Engineer
see
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 157, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR  NEEDS  WILL RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments ot these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting 1th Boat at Union Bay
every Sund;y Morning. Leave Cutn-
lirland Hotel, 8 o'clock.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT '
«0» B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONE .818      VICTORIA, BX.
Why Operate
for APPENDICITIS, GALLSTONES, stomach and liver
troubles, when HEPATOLA does
the work without pain and no
risk of your life nor loss of time.
Contains no poison. Not sold
by druggists.
MRS. GEO. S. ALMAS
Sole Manufacturer.
280 Fourth Ave. S. Phone 4855
Saskatoon.
Price t*M.     Pracel post, Sir,
extra. SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN'
4(
The Mercantile Store Co.
G. H. WYCHERLEY
The General Store With a General Purpose
KH_cH_EJ_E!_ll_0_[_EI_lB_@J^^
We are
offering YOU
A few real bargains in
our various Departments
■I-
SATURDAY
MAY 31, 1924
KaftftS MONDAY
201b. Sack - - $1.95
JUNE 2, 1924
Boots and Shoes, Department No. 2
Ladies' Patent Leather Sandals, with
Louis and Cuban Heels, Per pair.
$4.95
Ladies' "Log Cabin" Sandals, Per pr.
$5.00
Ladies' Brown Calf Oxfords, Per pr.
$6.50
Ladies Black Coif Oxfords, Per pr.
$5.50
Ladies' White Calf Sandals, Per pr.
$4.75
Ladies' "Non-Rip" Sandals, Per pr.
$2.95
Ladies' one strap House Slippers, Pr.
$1.85
Boys' Dress Shoes in Brown Calf, Pr.
$4.95
Boys' Strong School Shoes, Brown,
$3.85   $4.95
Boys' Running Shoes, White Black
and Brown, Per pair.
$1.55
Men's Fine Dress Shoes, Black Only
Per pair.
$4.75
Men's   Fine Brown Calf in Bals or
Blucher. Per pair.
$4.75
A few Pairs English "K" Shoes
Per pair.
$10.50
Leckie Dress Shoes, in Black or
Brown Calf, Per pair.
$8.50
Men's Work Shoes in Brown Leather,
A dandy shoe, Per pair.
$3.75
Men's Work Shoe, Black Leather, A
wonder, Per pair, only
$3.75
Men's Brown Calf Work Shoes, with
Toe- Cap, Per pair
$4.75
Men's Black Work Shoes, with Toe
Cap, Per pair
$4.75
Leckie Mine Shoes, per pair, up from
$5.50
A strong Mine Shoe, with nails, per
pair, only
$3.75
Girls' Brown Sandals, per pair, from
$1.35
White Sandals, Rubber Soles, from
90c
Girls' Pattent Slippers, per pair from
$2.00
Large Stock of Infant's Boots and  Shoes and Slippers in stock.
Gent's Furnishings, Department No. 3
Men's White Straw Hats, only
$2.50
Men's Dress Pants, per pair from
$1.95
Men's Khaki Pants, per pair from
$2.00
Work Socks, 3 pairs
$1.00
Cotton Socks, G pairs
$1.00
Gent's Suits, up from
$15.00
Just arrived Men's Headlight Overalls; Large assortment of
Master Mechanic Overalls. Men's Straw Hats
Stetson Hats, new design, just in.
$1.50
Ladies' Wear, Department No. 4
Ladies' Suits, to clear, from
$19.50
Ladies' Coats, to clear, from
$11.50
Kiddies'    Rompers,    Overalls    and
Coveralls at lowest prices.
We have just received a large shipment of the "Bias" Corset.     These
Corsets are undoubtedly the best on
the market today.
Ladies' Summer Underwear in large
assortment.
Children's Straw Hats
25c
The Mercantile Store Co.
PHONE
133     Cumberland, B.C.
B.O. BOX 100
MINAKI, THE BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY
&■    i   _ ■■■".' - _» u -__> ■*■ ,_-ji(*af('«w ■___•_' -rff
m-     r     J   . -^>?'    - _A-"1f'.." &rT^__f#__r> *• ^Tt"
*t_4&
J»*'3SJ?*"!
' V     '?    ■:-   -_4
MMQVQ*
The Indian, with a natural aptitude for confering upon place; names which were appropriate!
to their setting, called it "Mee-Naw-Kee, the Beautiful Country." The white man who followed
in his footsteps, but who enjoys the comforts of Minaki Inn, the splendid hostelrv operated by the
Canadian National Railways, agrees with the Indian's name and his estimate'of beauty. ' For
Minaki, because of its beauty and charm of simplicity, is drawing more and more Canadian and
American tourists to itself year by year.
"TRIUMPH COMING
HERE SATURDAY
BE
KI
LAMPS
ELECTRO-AUTOMATES
'  ■ (AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LAMPS)"-
NO BATTERIES! - NO ACIDS!
} <
'WILL   LAST   A   LIFE-TIME'
tPUaUlfwiM.    I _ST    a    in™_TiMR:«PO»vfU
Practical,  Durable,  Always Ready on Land, Under
Water, Any Climate, Anywhere
The Electro Automate ia an Electric Lamp made in France without a battery or refills, and o( a new conception. It Is a perfect
machine; the result of years of teat in the plants of the manufacturers tn Switzerland and Trance :: This marvellous little
pocket lamp, embodying simplicity, reliability and compactness,
weighs only 12 ounces,     lt Is patented 111 all countries.
The dynamo, with permanent niugnet, based on new methods.
gives dense magnetic fields of perfect concentration, which surrounds the induction without loss of magnetic dispersion, and
permits the maximum exploitation of the energy.
Construction of these lamps is very carefully carried out by
skilled Swiss clock and sclentitic Instrument makers :: Electro
Automate Lamps are tight and dust-proof. They can be used
In all climates, including equatorial regions. They will everywhere render the utmost service, giving a clear white light, without fear of the bulb burning out or the generator booming
warm.
All Electro Automate Lamps are guaranteed for six months, conditionally that they are not tampered with. With reasonable
care they will last for years. Any part can be renewed at slight
cost.     Lamps are provided with a pocket for extra bulbs.
This lamp is especially useful to travellers, tourists, marine and
mining engineers, automobilists, dairymen, in fact everybody.
They are indispensable on life-boats and rafts, where a light i>;
needed that will not he extinguished by wind or wave :: Ever;
mine should be provided with one or more of these lamps at its
portal or entrance, for the convenience of the employee or official
whose work takeB him in and out of the mine at irregular intervals. It Is the cheapest and best light on the market for this
purpose :: Marine engineers welcome Electro Automate In their
engine room. It saves them Irom the annoyance and loss of
time occasioned by the unreliability of battery lamps when they
wish to locate trouble gr find something in a hurry :: Pilots are
favorable to these little lamps because they tire always standing
by ready and able to do tlielr part In any and all kinds of
weather. They are hardy little fellows and wlll stand any
amount of knocking about, even to the bulbs, which are superior
to any others on the market:: Mushers over the northern trails
take these lamps lu preference to others, because they give a
never ending light and ndil less than a pound of weight to their
outfits. The winds can't blow them out and the snow or wet can
not short circuit them.
DIRECTION'S
Tht working of this self-generallng lamp Is very simple. Pull the
lever completely and sharply with the fingers and let go, allowing
It to open fully ln order to lake another full stroke. Strokes
should be even and sharp for best results. This lamp ls the
only one of Its weight that wlll give a perfect light. The bearings of this lamp should be oiled about once a month.
SOLD LOCALLY BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
In his latest motion picture, "Triumph," coming to the Ilo -Ilo Theatre Cecil B. De Mille, the moat brilliant showman-producer in the whole
screen world, returns to the type of
modern society drama in which lw
scored his earlier and most decided
successes. Film fans who recall with
pleasure "Manslaughter," 'Why
Change Your Wife?" and ".Male and
Female." are assured that In "Triumph," Mr. DeMille offers them the
same gripping, eye-Riling combination of dazzling ladies and gowns,
romance and thrill that made those
pictures so popular.
"Triumph" is Uie story of a girl
(Leatrice Joy) and two men who love
her. The girl starts as a humble
factory foreludy and becomes a famous opera singer wilh two worlds at
her feet. And yet wealth and fame
are not enough until—
Fate tumbles one man (Rod La
Rocque) from a millionaire's fortune
to a park bench. Fate sweeps the
other man (Victor Varcoui) from
overalls to a limousine and perfumed
pajamas. Ami through their vicissitudes of fortune, one thing remains
constant -their love for the girl and
the intense rivalry between them. Up-
one which lover does Fate finally
smile?     And what of the girl?
s
NOTICE
Fifty dollars reward will be paid for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or
persons who turned on the water valve at Hamilton
Lake on or about May 17th, 1924, causing loss of water
and damage to property.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
BIG FIGHT SPECTACLE IN
"LITTLE OLD NEW YORK"
One of the most spectacular scenes
ever filmed in motion pictures is tho
big mob scene In the Cosmopolitan
picture, "Little Old New York." starring Marion Davies, which opens at
the Ilo-llo Theatre Monday. Tuesday
and Wednesday. Miss Davies, swung
. n the shoulder of big Louis Wolhcim,
is rushed through a mob ol a thousand howling men to the whippingpost to receive the puuishemcui which
the crowd demands because slu rang
the flrebell and stopped the prizefight.
The scene occurs in the stroetfl surrounding Howling Oreeu and Ihe Battery of New Vork as they appeared a
century ago. Over sixty thousand
feet of floor space was covered by
the pounding feel of the mob and
forty-live Immense Bunlighl arc tights
shot down a bfflllauce which rivaled
the sun and made il appear as though
il were really oul doors Director
Sidney Olcotl and his assistant. Haul
llarrfson. shouied themselves hoarse
directing the great mob which followed Wolheim down the Btreets, The
slender little figure of Miss Davies,
perched on the Bhoulder of Wolheim
as she is hurried to her doom is silhouetted against the sky above tho
beads of lhe crowds.
Vou must Bee the climax of this
great picture al ihe Ilo-llo Theatre
on either, Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.
SURVEYS PROSPECTS FOR
SWEDISH IMMIGRATION
J. Erlander, or Stockholm, Sweden,
is travelling across Canada to study
immigration problems with regard to
more Swedes coming over. Mr. Erlander, who owns a newspaper in
Stockholm, is very gratified al the
warm welcome which Wester" Canada
gives to Scandinavian settlers. He
is returning shortly from the coast
'over Canadian .National lines. PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 31. 1924.
K
ill!
We
Specialise
Hosiery
Ladies' Lisle Hose, in a good quality of Lisle, in shades
Brown, Black, and White, Price per pair 50c.
Ladies' London Lady Superfine Lisle Hose, a first class
quality, in shades Brown, Beige, Fawn, Polo and White
Price per pair    75c.
Every pair guaranteed to give satisfaction.
Ladies, Ribbed Mercerised Lisle Hose, in Brown,
Grey, Black and White, a hard wearing hose, will give
complete satisfaction. Per pair 90c.
Churchgate Art Silk Hose, looks just like real silk,
wears well, shades Polo, Beige, Black, Brown and White
Price per pair  75c.
About 24 pairs only Ladies' Pure Silk Hose, in Black
only, sizes 9 and 9'/., Regular $1.50. Special pair 95c.
Children's Socks in a great Variety of colors in Lisle,
Art Silk and Cotton. See our selection as we have
some choice designs.
For all kinds of Hosiery Try Sutherand's.
J. Sutherland  i
Local Briefs
Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton will not
receive on Monday nor again until
October.
* *   *
Mrs. M. DickenBon arrived on
Thursday from Chorley, Lancashire,
on a visit to her daughter, Mrs.
Pearse and Mrs. Woods.
»   *   *
Rev. E. H. Nunns and Mrs. Nunns
made a short visit to Vancouver last
Monday.
.   *   •
Mr. A. Mann and Miss Mann spent
the week end in Nanaimo and Vancouver.
a     *     .
1*. 1'. Harrison, the Independent-
Liberal and James L. Brown, leave
for the north end of the Comox Electoral Ulstrict ot) Monday.
* •   *
Mrs. E. W. Dickie, Mrs. Sidney Horwood nnd Miss Edith Bickle left for
Vancouver on Wednesday.
111
Illllllllllll
PETER McNIVEN
. TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
H
TO THE
ELEGTORS OF COMOX DISTRICT
Visit The Maples Ice Cream Parlor, Royston,
AND GET REAL SATISFACTION
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
_EI_Io__i_SJ_fi_M__Ji_i_^^
FREE       FREE
BALOONS
FREE       FREE
A Balloon   FREE   to every
boy or girl purchasing their Ice Cream Cones at this
store on Tuesday, June 3.
Open   ALL  DAY.  June  3rd
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Mrs. M. JI. Lang will not receive on
Tuesday 3rd, or again this season.
*   »   *
Mr. P. P. Harrison, the Independent-Liberal Candidate addressed a
series of meetings during the past
week at Mlnto on Tuesday, Union R_y
on Wednesday, Comox on Thursday
and Little River on Friday. At each
point Mr. Harrison received a very
favorable  reception.
':_>
FipnOi^raE\
WRITING PAPER
A vtcation time nKtiiity' Ait
mfdiea writing em) in. |W« In-
dlvl-lMUt$ to jour m«s»|t.   ,.,,
"The paper that'siaodtovrtt* upon"
CAM. OF THANKS
Mrs. H. Kirkbrlde and family wish
to sincerely thank all those who so
kindly loaned their cars at the funeral of the late J. J. Kirkbrlde, also
for the many expressions of sympathy
and numerous floral tributes.
CARD OF THANKS
I wish to express my sincere thanks
to all those who afforded me their
support in the recent May Queen Contest. 1 deeply appreciate the honor
conferred upon me and am very
grateful for the untiring efforts put
forth by so many on my behalf.
Florence   Sehl.
Owing to an oversight on the part
of Miss Belli, campaign manager, the
above card was not published in last
week's Issue. Following are the winning numbers ln Ihe raffle: Bureau
Runner, 38, Mrs De Coeur, Pillow
Slip, 155, Audrey DeCoeur, Centre
Piece, 1)7, Mrs. L. Finch, Box of Candles, "7. Tom Edwards, Basket of Toffee, 7,  Mrs.  Sutherland.
H
ere an
dTn
ere
The annual
statement of th*
Canadian Pacific
Railway and tha
report which th*
company's president, E. W. Beatty, made to th*
shareholders at
the annual meeting are matter*
of first rate interest, not only to
the fast growing
number of Canadian citizens whs
are part owner!
in the great rail-
E. W. Baattr. K.C. roa<li but to all
interested in Canadian progress and
development. By reason of the way
in which the company's operations
touch all phases nf Canadian life
and enterprise there can be no pronounced depression or prosperity in
any part of the country without it*
being reflected in the earnings of
the Canadian Pacific. There is a
barometer of the country's foreign
trade also in the results of the operations of the company's steamship,
upon the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
Thus there was considerable reason for gratification in the president's statement made at the annual
meeting on May 7th, that the operations of the company had been conducted throughout 1923 in a satisfactory manner and with satisfactory
results. Mr. Beatty pointed out that
gross earnings for the year, which
had totalled $195,837,089, were
greater by $9,1112,000 than those of
1923. Working expenses, however,
increased by $7,984,000 to $158,358,-
079, This large increase in operating costs was due to large expenditures made upon the property in
order that it might be kept to the
highest possible physical standard
and capable of rendering tht beat
possible service to the community.
As a result the property was never
in so excellent a condition as it
now is. Net earnings for the year
were $37,479,010, an Increase of
$1,177,000.
The total tonnage moved by the
company during the year amounted
to 30,852,1194, an increase over that
of the previous year of 3,108,408,
due to a heavier movement of grain,
lumber, manufactured articles and
general merchandise, the largest
increase being in grain and grain
products. Mr. Beatty pointed* out
that this satisfactory condition had
extended well into the present year
and that due to favorable operating
conditions and heavy traffic net
earnings for thc first quarter of 1924
had increased over those of tht
tame period lasl yenr by $1,253,814,
IX   MEMORIAL
In loving memory of our dear little
son   Ronald   Wm.    Derbyshire,   who
passed away May 31, 1922.
Two years ago a message came
From God who thought it best
To take denr Ronald from this world
And give him joy and rest
The golden gates were opened wide
A gentle voice snid "Come,"
And with farewells unspoken
Ho gently entered home.
Sadly missed but fondly remembered by Mother, Daddy and SIsIcm'
Norma.
Nanaimo, B.C.
News  of  Denman
Island
DENMAN ISLAND,—A short time
ago Mr. P. P. Harrison, the Independent-Liberal candidate visited the island. A very short notice of his cony
ing was given but there was a good
audience. He explained why he was
an Independent-Liberal and stated
that he was paying his own expenses.
In answer to some questions from the
audience, .Mr. Harrison stated that the
Independent members of Ihe hons'>
were the only members who could
prove themselves not to be "Rubber
stamps." He asked thut he be given
a chance. "Life was a chance in all
phases, and that he would not turn
out to be a rubber stump."
Mr. Balke, thc chairman, and road
boss wns asked if there would be any
money left over after the election to
spend on the road. He replied he
wns doing his best to make good roads
and proposed to do so as quickly as
possible and ended by asking the Interrogator if he would like a job. Mr.
Harrison next day visited Hornby
Island.
Grocery Specials for
the Week-End
Quaker Royal Ann Cherries, 2 lb. tins 35c. 3 for $1.00
Sunshine Bartlet Pears, 2 lb tins 35c. 3 for ........ $1.00
Sunshine Fruit Salad, 2 lb tins 40c. 2 for 75c.
Quaker Apricots, 2 lb tins 30c. 2 for 55c.
Sliced Pineapple, 2 lb. tins 25c. 4 for 85c.
Quaker Brand Jam and Jellies, 1 lb Glass Jars, assorted
Extra Special 25c. per jar, 2 for 45c
Comox Creamery Strawberry Jam, 4 lb tins 85c.
Marmalade, 4 lb. tins 70c.
Crown Brand Sardines, per tin 15c. 7 for $1.00
New Brunswick Sardines, il tins 25c. per dozen .... 90c.
Kippered Snacks, 3 tins 25c. per dozen 90c.
Kippered Salmon, flats, 3 tins 25c. per dozen 90c.
Pink Salmon, 1 lb tins, tall, 3 tins 50c.
Quaker or Aylmer Golden Bantam Cob Corn, 3 lb tins
35c. 3 for   $1.00
Fancy Mixed Biscuits, per pound 35c. 40c. and 50c.
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2V_ lbs. for 50c.
Chrisp GrahaVn Wafers, per lb 25c. 2 lbs for 45c.
Sodas, per package 35c. 25c. and 2 for 25c.
Sodas, 5 lb. Boxes, each $1.00
Sodas, 7 lb. Boxes, Plain or Salted, each $1.15
CROCKERY SPECIALS
Fancy Flower design Berry Sets, 1 Bowl, 6 Fruits,
per set  $1.95
Fancy Flower design Salad Bowls, each 95c.
Fancy Flower design Cake Plates, each $1.00
Egg Cups, White and Gold design, 4 for 25c.
Water Tumblers, all sizes, 6 for 85c. 6 for 75c.
Pepper and Salt Glasses, per set of two 25c.
Fruit Dishes, glass, 6 for  65c.
Lemon Squeezers, each   25c.
Fruit and Salad Bowls, glass, each 75c. 95c. and $1.25
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
Last Friday night the Canadian
Girls in Training from Union Bay,
gave a concert In Uie Denman Island
Athletic Club Hall. It was a rather
lengthy affair and consisted of songs,
piano solos and a playet. The artists
acquitted themselves very favorably.
After the fluish of the program supper
was served and the dance followed.
It was early morn before some arrived
borne nfter a very pleasant evening.
Last week a tea and presentation
was given at Mrs. P. J. Doheny's
home by the Women's Auxiliary
branch of Bt. Savlous' Church to Mrs.
Albert Graham formerly Mrs. Moaner,
on her return from thc honeymoon in
Victoria. A very nice letter was read
by Uie president Mrs. Street from thc
ladies, wishing the bride "very much
happiness." The Vicar, Rev. W. Leversedge, who was unable to be present, conveyed his good wishes. The
honored guest was known to be particularly fond of plants and a very
nice asparagus fern and Smilax In a
handsome jardiniere was presented to
her. Mrs. Graham thanked the ladles
after which a bountiful tea was
served.
Miss Rosa Baikie has now finished
her Normal course and Is staying wt'h
her parent..
The stork arrived at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. J. lsbister and left son.
Master Clarence Graham is now
home with his parents after completing his course nt Sprott-Shaw School
Victoria.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
The beauties and advantages of Ontario are stressed in the special Tourist June Issue of Rod und Gun In Canada. In addition to a description
of Ontario's tourist attractions and
various points of beauty In the province, with suggestions for summer
camps and trips, the stories In the
magazine deal with Ashing and camping In Algonquin Park, with timber
surveying In northern Ontario and
| hunting and out-of-door stories in
! other parts of the province. Of spec-
I lal Interest this month will he the
I story of the Le Pas Dog Derby, whicli
j hns been written by M. U. Bates who
I was Rod and Gun In Canada's special
representative nt this picturesque
event. A lnrge number of unusually
one photographs illustrate this description. Thc June number Af Rod
and Gun In Canada contains eiglily-
elght pages brimful of stories and
articles dealing with practically every
phase of sportsmen's Interests.
Rod and Gun in Canada ls published
by w. J. Taylor Ltd., Woodstock, Ont.
SERVICE
 .»_ .8. <?>_	
1923 Ford Touring  $475.00
1921 Ford Touring -  375.00
1917 Ford Touring  125.00
1920 Ford Roadster  350.00
1923 Ford Light Delivery   450.00
1917 Ford Light Delivery   125.00
1923 Ford Coupe ,  575.00
1924 Star Touring, bought in April,
scarcely used, $142.00 off.
SERVICE
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Telephone 46
Courtenay, B.C.
Auction
Sales
WEDNESDAY NEXT, JUNE i
For Capt. G. R. Bates, Lower
Road Sandwick. The whole of
his valuable herd of Jersey cattle, including 3 fresh heifers, 7
heifers due June, 1 pure bred
Jersey Bull 4 years old. Sale
at 2 o'clock.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18
For Mr. R. E. Ault, Grantham.
The whole of his very valuable
herd of Dairy Cows. Particulars later.
The above sae s are absolutely
without reserve. Terms Cash.
Full particulars may be had
from the Auctioneer.
G. J. HARDY
ITelephone 10 Courtenay
Miss Marjorie Mordy spent last
week end In Vancouver.
.   *   •
Mrs. It. Spitall left for Vancouver
last Saturday to meet her sister who
Is coming to the coast on a visit.
•     •     *
Mr. and Mrs. John Walton and
daughter Rhoda, motored to Victoria
last Friday night, returning Sunday
night.
NOTICE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 163 PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS ACT, I hereby publish the names of the Agents
of the several candidates who are
nominated to contest the Electoral
District of Comox, for the Legislative
Assembly for the Province of British
Columbia.
Agent for Oeorge E. Clayton, Mr.
Thead Pearse, Courtenay, B.C.
Agent for William Duncan, Mr.
Fred  Fleld, Courtenay, BC.
Agent for Paul P. Harrison, Mr.
James L. lirown, Cumberland, B.C.
Cumberland, B.C., Dated May 30th,
1024.
T. H. CAREY,
Returning Officer, Comox Electoral
District.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068589/manifest

Comment

Related Items