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The Islander Mar 18, 1916

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 ion /-■*,
**y
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 51     THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, MARCH 18. 1916.      Subscription price, $1.50 per yepr
THE CITY COUNCIL
The regular meeting of the
City Council was held in the
Council Chambers on Monday,
March 6th. Present, Mayor
Parnham, Aldermen Brown,
Banks,   Carey and  Henderson.
The minutes of the previous
regular meeting were read and
adopted.
A communication was read
from Mr. Manson, M. P. P., acknowledging receipt of blue print
showing proposed extension of
the boundaries of the city of
Cumberland, and requesting the
City to furnish a precise description of the property proposed to
be added to the City and an
agreement duly executed between the owner of tbe property
in question and the City, setting
out the terms upon which the
property in question is being allowed to be added to the City,
also requesting the City Council
to pass a resolution affirming the
expediency of extending the City
limits. Upon the reading of this
communication the Council decided to get the feeling of all
parties interested before pi oceed-
ing further with the matter.
A letter from the officer commanding No. 19 Company Canadian, Army Service Corps, stated
that Robert Thomson had joined
the Imperial A**my Service Corps
Mechanical Transport Section,
and requesting that his name be
added to the Roll of Honour.
This was received and filed and
Robert Thomson's name is to be
included in the City Roll of Honour.
A communication addressed to
the Mayor and Council from John
Sutherland read as follows*
The officers and members of
the Boy Scouts have asked me to
write and^ascertain on what conditions they could have the use
of the City Hall. As you are
aware of the work done by the
Scouts in the City they hope you
will see your way to do the best
you can to further the good work
done and to encourage and stimulate the movement here.
In reply to this the Council decided to grant the Boy Scouts
and Girl Guides the use of the
City Hall to hold their drill and
meetings, the Council reserving
the right to use the City Hall on
any occasion that it may be required.
'THE WEARINESS OF UNCLE SAM."
0,   :..J<-r>
" Please don't, Mr. President; I,ve had about enough."—N.Y. Sun.
The Vancouver General Hospi- j
tal informed the Council that;
Clarke Russell was admitted to
the public ward for treatment
and under the care of Dr J. A.
Gillespie, conforming with the
Hospital Act and Amendment
Act, 1913. This was received
and filed.
The following accounts were
referred to the finance committee for payment if found correct:
Electric Light Co. $48.20
Van. Stencil Steel Co ....    3.15
E. Pearson     5.00
Jas. Stewart  10.00
Ward.. 20.00
Total $86.35
The assessment roll for 1915
was adopted with the following
amendments:
Mrs. D. Potter increased $400;
Canadian Bank of Commerce increased $700; Hugh Sloan increased $500; Robt. Henderson
increased $200.
Aid. Carey was granted permission to introduce a- Fire protection by-law. Council Adjourned.
EVADES ISSUFON FUEL GIL
The Vancouver Board of Trade
held their annual meeting at
Vancouver on Tuesday, and el
ected their officers for the year
1916. Mr. Rogers, the retiring
president, in his address predicted an early recovery of business in the province and that it
was necessary for us nationally,
provincially and individually, to
practice economy, and to call into productiveness more of our
natural resources, and dealt with
coal, iron, timber and almost every other subject under the sun.
seemingly very careful to evade
the question of fuel oil imported
into this province from California, dealing a death blow to the
coal industry of British Columbia. The retiring president does
not seem to have interested himself in the fuel oil question during his term of office. As president of the Board of Trade of the
largest city in the province, it
was expected he would deal with
this vital question, which is
gnawing away at the revenue of
British Columbia in all directions.
Is it possible that the Vancouver
Board of Trade, in considering
their individual interest loses
sight'-of the province as a whole
and are desirous of continuing to
dump the money earned into the
pockets of the oil kings of California with no possibility of ever
returning to British Columbia.
GIRL GUIDES AND BOY SCOUTS
IN FRIENDLY RIVALRY
On Tuesday evening, both of
the above associations gathered
together in the City Hall to join
in celebrating the opening of the
hall so generously given to them
by the city council.
In preparation for the opening
event, the Boy Scouts worked
hard all Saturday removing the
floor of the hall which had been
used while used as a picture theatre, and then they washed the
floor and put it in good shape for
which they deserve credit. The
various exhibitions of drill as exemplified by the Boy Scouts, as
well as the Girl Guides did credit
to them as well as to their scoutmaster A, J. Taylor.
Quite anumberof the members
of the Boy Scouts association
were present and were loud in
the praise of the work already
done. After various drills were
carried out Mr. Mordy was called
to the chair and gave a splendid
address to the boys and gins.
The' following members of the
association were called upon to
speak, Mr, Sutherland. Dr. Hicks
Rev. Hood as well as assistant
scoutmaster Whyte, Miss O'Neill
and scoutmaster A. J. Taylor.
Miss O'Neill on behalf of the
Girl Guides threw down the
gauntlet to the Boy Scouts and
we have no doubl the challenge
will be accepted in the friendly
manner given, and the rivalry
for premier place will be a great
stimulus to both parties.
Games were entered into with
great zest by the young folks. A
unanimous vote of thanks was.
given to Mrs. Hood for the splendid coffee, Mrs. Hood responded
in a fitting manner. After a vote
of thanks to the chairman and
apologies of absence from Mayor
Parnham and Mr Willard the
meeting closed with the national
anthem.
MASQUERADE BALL A 8UCCE8S
The annual masquerade ball
held in the Ilo Ilo hall under the
auspices of the Cumberland
Volunteer Fire Brigrde, on Friday
evening was as usual a great
success. The masqueraders wore
gorgeous costumes representing
John Bull, Brittannia, the Allies,
Ireland, Scotland, Clowns, Negro
Minstrels, Flower Girl and Cow
Boy. The number of spectators
present would equal previous
occasions. John S. Bannerman
acted as floor manager and the
Cumberland Symphony Orchestra
supplied the music under the
leadership of Mr. J. H. McMillan. '1 WO
■L'tih. ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, ti. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLA6.
2ty? Mmbit
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, MARCH 18th, 1916.
There is no place where greater precaution should be taken
against fires than in the home.
Where women and children are
housed every human consideration
•demands the utmost vigilance on
the part of those responsible for
their safety. When fires occur at
night the occupants are frequently fortunate to escape without
injury or loss of life. It is easier
to prevent fires in dwellings than
to extinguish them; there is often
no one at hand to act promptly
in such an emergency.
Perhaps you have helped to extinguish a fire in a neighbour's
dwelling, possibly a fire which
endangered your own house, and
perhaps you have inquired into
the cause and discovered that
carefulness in some detail of good
housekeeping would have prevented the fire, Hot ashes may
have been deposited in a wooden
box or against a wooden partition
or outside where wind blew them
into some dry rubbish, hot coals
may have dropped on to an unprotected floor, or the walls may
not have been protected against
over-heating of the stoves or
stove-pipes, repairs to a cracked
chimney or defective fireplace
may have been put off until a
more covenient day, or paper and
other rubbish may have been
allowed to accumulate in cellar or
attic, where the carelessly dropped match was all that was required to start a fire. Have you
not felt aggrieved at your neighbor for permitting conditions to
exist which endanger your property? Was it a warning to you
and have you cleaned up and kept
your own place free from accumulations of fire-breeding material,
and seen to it that your stove,
your furnace, your chimney, your
SPRING OPENING
Ladies' Department:
MILLINERY
Newest Eastern Creations in Ladies Model and ready-to-
wear Hats, Flowers, Ribbons and Wreaths.
READY-TO-WEAR GOODS In Middies, Blouses, Pique and Duck Skirts,
House Dresses, Misses and Childrens Pinafores, Muslins
and Cambric Underwear.
WASH GOODS   Crepes, Fancy Muslin, Piques, Ducks, Galateas, Garbar-
dines, Prints, Printed Voiles, Zephyr Ginghams.
CORSETS   New Models in c/c A La Grace Corsets.
Mens Department:
HATS and CAPS Newest American Styles in Mens Soft and Hard Felt
Hats in all the leading Shades. New Shapes in Mens Motor
and Golf Tweed Caps.
NECKWEAR Newest Novelties in Mens Flowing End, Derby and Batwing
Ties. See our Window for Specials in St. Patrick's Day
Neckwear.
SHOES Newest Spring Lasts in Invictus Shoes.     "The Best Good
Shoe for Men."
SHIRTS W.G. & R. Shirts in Silk Mixtures, Black and White Stripes,
also the County Club Shirt with large open neck.
CLOTHING Spring Samples of Campbells Made-to-Measure Clothing in
all the newest weaves and shades, now being shown.
fireplace, and your pipes could not
be the cause of afire?
Of 701 fires reported to the Department of Insurance by the
municipalities of this Province
during 1912, 430 (60 per cent.)
were in dwellings, and these fires
were, with exception of a small
percentage, due to negligence.
Keep basement, attics and
closets free from rubbish. Many
fires originate in the rubbish heap
Beware of the defective flue
or chimney. Take down stovepipes and have them thoroughly
cleaned, and have chimneys carefully examined at the same time.
Keep oily rags and floor polishing mops in metal boxes or cans,
as they are liable to cause fires
from spontaneous combustion.
Cleanliness makes for safety.
It is not too early for the health
departments of our municipality
to prepare for their spring cleanup day. The snow will soon be
gone, exposing to view the accumulated refuse of the winter
months. vVe have been favoured
with a covering mantle of snow
during several months, and, as a
consequence, are inclined to be
somewhat careless of sanitary
conditions. With the coming of
warmer weather, this neglect
becomes a source of great danger
and, unless prompt action is taken, may give rise to serious epidemics.
Municipal Councils and Board
of Health should initiate without
delay plans for a general spring
clean-up. Generous appropriations should be made for the purpose and a thorough organization
developed for removal of refuse.
The local pride of the people
should be appealed to on behalf
of a clean home—an appeal rarely made in vain. In many of our
towns and cities there are organizations interested in public questions, only requiring initiative to
secure effective action. The beautifying of their home town should
be made an incentive for energetic effort, thus increasing their
enthusiasm for the place called
'Home."
one
element,  the
money cannot   sur-
The human
thing that
round with a safeguard, is the
primary cause of fully four-fifths
of our accidents. The crime of
carelessness is responsible for a
large percentage of the widows,
orphans and cripples. THREE
•*•♦*%******%%*%*%%*%**♦*%**%%**%%'
JOFS NEW_H0USE
Stone the Builders Rejected Became the Foundation of Structure of Comfort.
By  FLORENCE  LILLIAN   HENDERSON.
There were two loyal hearts to
smile encouragingly after Walter Rose
and wish him an earnest God-speed
when he left Rlverdale. Mercy Dar-
Vow bade him adieu through swimming
eyes, but she had given him words of
blissful cheer and comfort. Little Joe
Dockrill, cripple as he waB, lifted himself on his crutches and waved encouragingly and hopefully.
"You know what ls best, dear," Walter's fiancee had told him. "If* you
think the prospects in the. city are encouraging, you should go there."
. "it is only for' a year, sweetheart,"
■aid Walter. "Tou and your parents
are practically dependent on your mar
ried sister. All I have ls the lot and
the old house, ready to fall down any
day. I could not think of taking you
there."
"It would be home with you, anywhere, dear," declared Mercy bravely.
"Tea, but the old folks have a comfortable home. I stuck to father from
a sense of duty, because he was attached to the old place. If I can get
enough ahead to put up even a small
cottage I can always earn a comfort
able living. Look after little Joe, won't
yoa, Mercy?" added the stalwart, honest-faced fellow, with a fond glance at
the little cripple.
"Don't you fear!" chirped in Joe
himself valiantly. "I'll look after myself. Why, you've fitted me out like a
prince, Unote Walter, and I'm going to
make you proud of me. I'll help get
that house up you want so bad. I've
got ah idea and I'm going to carry it
out-
Pretty patient Mercy went home
rather mournfully. Little Joe returned
home, the honest tear drops in his
eyes, but whistling cheerily, for he had
some very hopeful ideas under that
bright, curly pate of his.
Walter Rose was not "Uncle Walter"
at all, although the little fellow called
him that. Joe was a waif, an orphan
city lad turned out of charitable institutions when he had outgrown the
Spent 8everal Evenings Going Over
the Plans.
age limit, wandered to Rlverdale and
run down by an automobile and crippled for life. For two months the
homeless little fellow was kept in the
hospital. Then he was again turned
.adrift, his sole assets a pair of
crutches.
It was tender-hearted Mercy, true to
name and nature, who took him in,
but her Bister resented the intrusion.
Then Mercy spoke to Walter about
the friendless outcast. Walter took
him to the old house. His father was
very old and feeble. He needed constant attention, and took a great fancy
to the bright, jolly little stranger.
Joe was so cheery, so accommodating, so handy, despite his crippled condition, that within a month Walter felt
that he had secured a treasure. Little
Joe made the long evenings lively. He
was a faithful attendant upon aged
Mr. Rose, and nearly the last smile
upon the lips of the old man waB for
the lad wbo had so brightened his
final hours on earth.
Joe had taken a great interest in
the plans Walter had drawn for the
new house. When the latter decided
to go to the city, he wanted to arrange for the care of his little charge
with a neighbor.
"No, Uncle Walter; no, positively!"
asserted Joe. "I've planned it all out.
Let me stay here, only leave old Dobbin and the wagon. I can't do much
real work, but I can drive, and I'll pick
up enough odd jobs about town to keep
me comfortably and sometimes to put
aside for that famous new house you're
going to build.  See if I don't!"
Walter agreed to this, but with some
reluctancy and misgivings as he looked
at the thin, wistful face and crippled
condition of his charge/ And now Joe
was the only occupant of the lonely old
house that shook dangerously when
the wind blew hard, and only a portion
of which was at all habitable.
"I'm going to set up light housekeeping in the dining room and move
my cot there," planned Joe. "Just as
soon as I get it fixed just as I want it
—then for the plans of the new house."
Daytimes after Joe drove down to
the depot and waited around for a
chance to haul a trunk' or carry a valise or package ln the old wagon. He
had to have help with the heavier
freight, but then his charges were
light At the end of a month Joe had
enough ready cash to provide for hm
limited living needs. Then he started
in on what he called his "grand idea!"
He spent several evenings going
over the plans for the new house. He
measured and calculated. With ths.
aid of a builder's book he had picked
up, Joe was able to figure put just
what kind and how much of lumber,
brick, stone and the like was needed.
He even got so far. as to actually estimate the number of nails in the an i
ticipated construction!
Every week he wrote to Walter in
the city. Three times a week he drove
around to see Mercy. She had no timo
to visit him, for she had to slave hara
to please her narrow-minded, complaining sister. Joe was so cheery and
courageous that be brightened up her
spirits considerably, despite the fact
that her lover did not write the most
hopeful letters In the world.
With the end of the year Walter
Rose wrote that he had not done as
well in the city as he had anticipated.
He was homesick, however, and was
coming back to Rlverdale, to be
among friends, even if he had to work
a little harder and wait a little longer
for that new house.
Walter was puzzled at the gaiety and
suppressed excitement of little Joe
as the latter met him at the depot with
old Dobbin and the wagon. The animal looked well kept, the vehicle was
freshly painted. Walter sighed as they
came in sight of the old house. It was
a discouraging home-coming.
"I had hoped when I came back
here," he told his companion, "that I
would surely have earned and saved
enough to provide a neat home nest
for Mercy and the old folks. Instead
df that I have less than (300, a mere
beginning.   Why, what's that?"
Well might Walter stare! The old
place looked like a lumber yard. Piled
up symetrically were old boards, laths,
shingles, rubble stone and dimension
stone sufficient to lay a pretentious
foundation, and heap after heap of
bricks.
"It's the result of my grand idea!"
cried Joe proudly. "You know they
are doing a lot of tearing down and rebuilding ih the new factory town of
Blairsville, eight miles away. What
you see yonder is waste stuff thrown
away—nails that they let drop to the
ground, stone, brick and lumber that
the wrecking crews bury or burn up.
I've picked up over two hundred loadi
that they were glad to give me to get
rid of, and, say, Uncle Walter! there's
enough bricks—I've counted them—to
build as fine a house as was ever put
up in Riverdale!"
"You blessed little fellow!" said
Mercy, when an hour later she knew
that the new house was a certainty,
and tears of joy fell upon the bright
golden head as Bhe kissed Joe gratefully.
And, lo! the stone that the builders
had rejected bad become the foundation of a structure of comfort, love
and happiness!
(Copyright, 1913, by W. <J. Chapman.)
TRUTH   ABOUT   PATRIARCHS
Scientific Analysis Haa Reduced the
Number of Their Years on Earth
to a Reasonable Point
How old was Methuselah? Nine
hundred and sixty-one years is the age
which, from our earliest youth, we
have been accustomed to assign the
patriarch. Scientific research abroad,
however, has reduced these imposing
figures to 78% years!   '
The experts point out that there
has always existed a certain amount
ojt doubt, even among orthodox b
lieyers, in the literal truth of the Bible
concerning the great age to which the
patriarchs attained. Many theories
have been evolved to reduce the biblical records of this kind to something
near the allotted span of man.
It has been surmised that, in the
earliest times, the monther—the period of a moon cycle;—was called a
year. Thus, Adam's 930 years of life,
calculating a year at 29 % days, the
length of a lunar month, works out to
76% years. After the. month year
there would appear to have come a
five-month year, the limit of five being derived from the fingers on one
hand, lt being remembered that primitive peoples always used the fingers
for purposes of calculation. Then
came the 12-month year.
Ground for this rearrangement is
alleged to be given in the psalmist's
limit of life of three-score and ten
years. Furthermore, it is maintained
that between the times of Noah and
of David, no such extraordinary
change could have taken place as to
reduce the life of man by eleven-
twelfths. On the flve-month-year basis Abraham's 175 years shrink to 72
andtlsaac's 180 to 74.
It may be, lt is also pointed out,
that there Intervened a six-month year,
discovered by Jacob while watching
Laban's flocks. Thus Jacob's 147
years work out at about 73. The 12-
month year began with the Egyptians,
who saw that a complete period was
made up of the two "years," in one of
which the days were longer than the
nights, and in the other of which the
nights were longer than the days.
It is a curious fact that the Christians apd the Jewish years will not
forever be separated, for, in due
course of time, Rosh Hashona will fall
at Christmas time and then catch up
the Christian year. This, however,
will not occur for 30,000 years.
Wise   Man.
"So he has broken his engagement
with her?"
"Yep, so I hear."
"Do you suppose he broke lt because
she has to work for a living?"
"No; I understand that he broke it
because she thought that having to
work for a living was a disgrace."
l\\*
Reaching For a Strap
"Bobby," said the lady in the car,
severely, "why don't you get up and
give your seat to jour father? Doesn't
it pain you to see him reaching for
the strap?"
"Not in a car," said Bobby.   "It does
at home."
She: "Have you ever been wounded
in an engagement?"
He: "Oh, yes. When my fiance
broke off our last one, I was fearfully
cut up."
Told His Superior
They were about the roughest, rawest lot of recruits the sergeant ever
had to tackle. He worked hard at
them for three hours, and at last
thought they were getting into some
sort of shape, so he decided to test
them.
"Right turn!" he barked. Then before they had ceased to move came
another order: "Left turn!"
One yokel slowly left the ranks and
made off toward the* barrack room.
"Here, you!" yelled the sergeant
angrily, "where are you off to?"
"Ah've had enough," replied the recruit, in disgusted tone. "Tha doesn't
know tha own mind for two minutes
runnin'!"
The Conversation Closed
Talkative    Pasuenger    (trying    to •
start    conversation):    "I — er — see
you've  lost your arm!"
Gentleman: "So I have.   How careless of me!"
Child Envied the Angels
"Mamma,   did   you say the baby
came from heaven?"
"Yes; why?"
"I don't think he came; I think he
was fired.   How could the angels sing
with him puttin' up that holler all the
time?" FOUF
TH   ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Red Cross Acknowledge Receipt
of Lineni
The following letter was received by Mrs: W. Willard. of this
city, and explains itself:
Grarville Canadian Special Hospital, Ramsgate, Kent. Eng—
Mrs. Wesley Willard, Cumberland, B.C. Dear Madam.— Looking through Red Cross linen received. I found P. C, of Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland. Thinking you would be interested, I
take this opportunity of informing you the destination of your
valued contribution to the Red
Cross Society.
Enclosed is a post card of the
Hospital. This formerly was an
Hotel, being the finest in Ramsgate and equipped with all modern conveniences. Situated on
the sea front and overlooking the
noted Goodwin Sands, we get
quite our share of the rough
weather at this time of year.
However, it is a splendid health
resort, and the convalescents are
looking wonderfully well with
the sea breeze. Our winter has
been quite mild, quite a difference to yours, I guess. Having
been in B. C. about two years I
am anxious to return, as I think
the climate delightful. (Was in
Similikameen Valley.)
Hoping this will reach you safely, will conclude by remaining,
Yours  sincerely,
WALTER T. BERRETT,
In Care Linen Store.
ILO !L0 ITEMS.
THE BROKEN COIN
Episode No. Eightcen-"The Underground
City."
Episode No. Ninetcen-"The Sacred Fire."
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas."
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Rescue."
Episode No.  Twenty-two--"An American
Queen,"
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies' Aux*
iliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be hdd in the
West Cumberland Band Hall on
Wednesday, April 26th.
A. Carrigan has returned from
a trip to Nova Scotia.
Gustava Olafson, a logger, was
accidently killed at camp 2, of the
Comox Logging Railway Company, on Friday by the falling of
a dead tree. The Coroner decided
that an inquest was not necessary.
<JE>0an>QI><3KS>(!i><£B}(i!>G2£S><iE>OHK>C 5CG2B)GOQOkWG 0<a***)Glt
<jw
Debate on Merits of Prohibition.
Thursday evening, in the lodge
room of Mount Horeb L. 0. L.,
No. 1676, a very interesting debate on Prohibition was discussed. Mr. Willard, who took
the lead on the affirmative side,
made a very good case for Prohibition, and Mr. /J. S. Banner-
man, on the negative, made an
equally gdod showing against it.
Other speakers who took part in
the debate were: For, Mr. A. J.
Taylor and Rev. Henry Wilson.
Against, E. S. Baldwin and S.
McLeod, W. M. The judges decided that the case for "Prohibition" had los» by a score of 5
points. A notification of the result will be communicated to the
House at Victoria.
The Spirella '
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.   JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
For Sale CheAp—A McClary's
"Kitchener" stove, in good
condition. Apply Leslie J.
Aston, Shoemaker, Cumberland.
8. C. WHITE LEGHORNS
White  Heather Strain   (Finest
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pulletS for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland,
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LU iiaU    1 HCH I nc
PHO. CHAN6EP WOW., TUE8, THUR8. * SHT.
TONIGHT    18TH. EPISODE
"The Broken Coin"
MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
EVERY TUESDAY,'One Number
- of the - \
"BLACK BOX"
Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
BROADWAY FEATURES
Every Thursday.
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a
9
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The Long Distance Telephone Saves Trips.
MlO()0(iO()0()OI)OilO(IO(iO()Oia)CSI!0(iO()0()0()0(iOi)a(10()Ol»
FIRE   INSURANCE     S
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j Queen Insurance Company, *
(Fire and Automobile,) and        j
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W
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO K
EDWARD  W.   BICKLE jj
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG., §
DUNSMUIR AVE.. Cumberland ffl
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It saves the many inconveniences ond uncertainties
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It enables you to get the same i esults with minimum
effort and without loss of time.
YOUR telephone is a long distance telephone.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd.
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0JO-.XXIO-.--O----OHO----OJJO--JO--
FURS
Get "More Money" lor your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yonr section
SHIP YOtjn FOBS DIRECT to' "SHUBERT" the largest
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***A. *** tjii\ja*^i**ifmc D.pt,c eg Chicago, U.S.A, I THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
ONE WHO SHOULD KNOW
King Constantine of Greece complains that the Allies' treatment of
Greece is like the German's treatment of Belgium.
The King of the Belgians (to Tino)—"Like Belgium? You are
wrong, my royal brother."- From London Daily Sketch.
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
•Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
■Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7,30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor]
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 2nd Sunday in Lent.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service   of  Intercession   on
Wednesday at 7.45 p.pi.
Litany on Friday at 11 a.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
Girl Guides.
The Girl Guides meet evtry
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian -Church,
The Patrol Leaders and  Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
Notice is hereby given that, thirty days
after date hereof, applicatiun will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the transfer of the licence for
the sale of liquor by retail in and upon
the premises known as the Union Hotel,
situate at West Cumberand, British Columbia, from J. N. McLeod to William
Jones, of Cumberland, British Columbia.
Dated this 19th. day of February, A. D.
1916.
J. N. McLeod, Holder of Licence.
William Jones, Applicant for Transfer.
FOUND—In a starving condition, on Canadian Collieries railway between two trestles at
Happy Valley, one bay mare with
black points, small white star on
forehead. Owner can have the
same by paying expenses.
J. S. DAVIS, Union Bay.
T. D. McLEAN
\ Matchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
C   PICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
•   [Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Bool  , Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsm'     Av?.,
Cumberland, B.C.
We have just received a consignment of
60 Watt Nitros
the lamps which consume K less
current and give a prettier, whiter
light than the ordinary Tungstens.
Try One in Your Parlour.
Every  One  Guaranteed.
PRICES:
60 Watt Clear Nitros, -   $1.10
100    "      "      " -   1.25
200    "      "      "       -     2.10
Add 10% for Frosting.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
**m*U******m*\****tm
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
A SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my   business  is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS  SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
1
1
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER *
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex lfMertum, Proprietor
Kstimates anil Designs furnished
on Application
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No'games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
MAROCCHI B EOS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining lights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory. theNorthwest Terri
tories nnd in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at sn annual rental of
Sl an acre. Not more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the righto
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivision!
of sections, and in uusurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
tbeapplicaiit himself.
Ench applioation must be aceompanied
by a fee of f 5 which will be refunded if tha
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five centa per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined snd pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag righto are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least onoe a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rata of
$10.00anncre.
For full information applicatiun should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorized publication of tbis*
advertisement will not be paid for.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ  UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7,35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
.7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00     3.00
(f)LakeTrail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55      8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
i
3.50     3.50
1
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45 j 3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
•
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3.30
8.30    2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY I ht.   IHLAMDEK, CU    tSfcKLAJN   ,  r>.
W."
SEVEN
$
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O.. LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES. Ass't General Manaeer
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, 113,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names pf two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by tbe survivor. S60
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
^
Wa Una nofo   Beauty may be only skin deep;
TY aiipapeiS   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKINNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'  «
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so verygocd.
*
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
< Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home growr.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
II
BRITISH SCIENTISTS
ARE AMONG THE BEST
Our   Military    Inventors    Have    Led
Where  Germans Copied—Let
Brains be Mobilized
The British Empire is mobilizing ita
industries for the manufacture of
shells. When shall we mobilise our
scientists? asks a British writer. The
urgency of this question is emphasized
by the news that the French Academy
of Science is in the closest possible
touch with the French army. Officers
inform the academy of new needs as
they arise and submit questions for
solution. Thus in present conditions
wire entanglements are usually removed by a very clumsy process—
using high-explosive shell to tear down
their supports,. It might be possible
to devise some more effective scientific means of achieving this end. The
present idea is to meet poisonous gas
by the Issue of respirators. It would
be better and quite as practicable to
neutralize the asphyxiating gas with
some other gas or vapor. To give an
example, chlorine fumes would be rendered harmless by soda solution sprayed. In place of choking vapor there
would be a snowfall of a solid viscous
substance, chlorine of sodium, or common salt.
Science Decides
The war Ib more and more becoming
a matter of science. German scientists have given various kinds of asphyxiating gases and bombs charged
with formaline and other choking
fumes. They have turned out high
explosives in gigantic quantities and
of relative stability. When the allied
blockade interfered with the supply of
nitrates—and nitric acid is an essential ingredient in uvery explosive—the
German chemists produced their plant
by which nitrogen was extracted from
the air.
There is an ill-founded idea that the
British are inferior to the Germans ln
scientific acquirements and inventiveness. This has been much exploited
by the Huns, but it is sheer nonsense.
One of the most famous American millionaires states that he has made an
immense fortune out of British brains
and declares that the British are greater Inventors then all other nations.
Sir William Ramsay recently showed
that the most remarkable chemical inventions of the last few years were
the achievements of Englishmen.
We Show and Huns Learn
The British army was the flrst in
Europe to be equipped with the machine gun and to grasp its value. Having done this it stood still and was
content with a tiny allowance of these
guns. The Germans ordered just before the'war 50,000 machine guns. The
result is that they are aften able to
hold their trenches with machine guns'
worked by half a dozen men, whereas
we are compelled to offer the German
high-explosive shells a splendid target
of many splendid lives. Britain led
the world ln the adoption of the Dreadnought type, and here again the Germans merely copied us. The one real
German invention is the Zeppelit., and
to this a reply could long since have
been discovered. ~
Hun Charity Statues
Many of the war charity schemes
in Germany take the form of wooden
statues. These have been erected in
many of the towns throughout the
country. People drive nails into the
statues, each nail costing roughly 25
cents, the proceeds usually going io
the Red Cross funds. The idea is
that the statue should be covered witli
nail armor, and there is scarcely a
German town of any importance
which has not erected in some prominent position one of these charity
statues. Berlin has the most imposing one—a huge effigy of Hinde.iburg.
The figure of Hindenburg himself is
no less than 33 feet high from the
soles of his mighty boots to tho crown
of his colossal hat, and the statue
rests on a square pedestal over 6 feet
high. At Hamburg a woode. statue
of the German St. Michael has been
erected. Hamburgers are now spending their marks in nails which they
drive into the statue in the cause of
charity.
Grocer: "Good morning, Mr. Ponple.
How is that butter that I sent you?"
Popple: "Better, thank you. It i»
gaining strength every minute!"
Sure to  Lou
Clancy was chuckling.
"What's the Joke?" asked Mooney.
"Why, Casey bet me $10 he could
■hoot a peanut oft! me head with a
shotgun."
"What's funny about that?"
"I took him up because I know hell
miss it."—Judge.
The Adventure* of Johnny Mouse EIGHT
THE ISLANDEK. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Mr. and Mrs. John Gillespie
left for Victoria on Monday.
R. Nottingham left for Nanaimo on Monday.
John Bennie left for Nanaimo
on Monday.
John J. Weir returned from
Victoria on Tuesday.
Aid T. E. Banks left for Victoria on Monday and returned on
Thursday.
Fred Bell, Samuel Jones and b.
Draginda are moving their furniture and effects to Nanaimo.
A Red Cross Tea will be held
at the home of Mrs. J. H. Macmillan on Tuesday next, March
21st.
Alex King has secured a position with the Powell River Paper
Mills and left for that place on
Sunday.
Master McLean who underwent an operation for appendicitis at the local hospital is able to
be around again.
Born—to Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery
Hannay. of Courtenay, on Friday,
March 17th, a daughter.
Wanted to buy or rent—A Sewing Machine. Terms must be
reasonable. Apply to Cumberland
Cleaner, Dunsmuir Avenue.
A special meeting of the Conservative Assosciation will be
held in the committee rooms on
Tuesday. All members are requested to attend.
A more glorious victory cannot
be gained over another man than
this, that when the injury began
on his part, the kindness should
begin on ours.
J. R. Lockard, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., returned
from a visit to Victoria on Tuesday.
C. H. Macintosh, of the accounting staff of the Canadian
Collieries, is suffering from an
injured knee and is now an occupant of the Union and Comox
District Hospital.
Rev. S. J. Green, of Nanaimo,
chairman of the district, will
preach in Grace Methodist Church
tomorrow morning and evening.
Doctors McGuire and Dalby,
Dentists of Vancouver, will visit
Cumberland on or about the 3rd
or 4th of April, 1916. This will
give the residents of this city and
district a splendid opportunity to
have first class dentistry.
One of the many items on the
programme at the Patriotic concert to be held at Bevan on Tuesday next will be a tableau in four
scenes taken from the death of
Nurse Cavell, originated by Mr.
A. J Taylor, who will in future
secure copyright for his productions. A special train will leave
Cumberland at 7 p. m. on Tuesday returning after the concert.
p
' .^WN^-W-w/X
THE   BIG   STORE
NORTHWAY
GARMENTS
Customers that Come to Stay.
And where is the woman who isn't look
ing s for the merchant who carries the
most stylish and best made apparel?
Northway Garments have been bringing
these folks together for twenty years.
Keen to be better dressed than most
women, Northway Styles capture her
interest on sight.
Alert to detect that real sincerity which
means shape-keeping and perfect tailoring qualities,—she finds them in North-
way Garments, which are made under
the personal supervision of members of
the firm in tne workrooms.
See our new smart up-to-date suits; they are very smart and
the styles are the latest. No two alike, we strive to give
you satisfaction.
New Sport Coats are arriving from time to time. Our
present assortment comprises the most desirable Coats and
you will find our prices are right.
New Northway Skirts, and-every one with an individuality
of its own.   We think you will' be pleased; ask to see them.
L.
SIMON LEISER
&
CO.,
LIMITED.
THE
BIG   STORE
•
Phone 3-8

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