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The Cumberland Islander May 24, 1924

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Array .  I
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1
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
v
Provincial Library     Jiuil 23
With which is consolMnted the Ciunberland Mew*.
FORTY-THIRD  YEAR—No.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
FLORENCE SEHL IS CONTEST WINNER
$6,089 Is Total Sum Raised
By First Contest Held Here
The Queen Contest carried on by the Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital drew to a close on Saturday night at 12
o'clock, amid scenes of excitement not witnessed here for many a
moon. The five contestants still in the running were Miss Josie
Balagno, Miss Beatrice Mitchell, Miss Mary Picketti, Miss Florence
Sehl and Miss Fannie Strachan, and there was the greatest speculation as to which of these five would capture first position.
An oflicial count was made
every hour, of the last evening
until midnight, and wildest excitement prevailed during the
closing hours. Thousands upon
thousands of votes were cast into the box in front of Lang's
Drug Store and the positions of
the five remaining candidates
changed places frequently.
Final Results
Maids of Honor
Miss Josie Balagno  155540
Miss Fannie Strachan.... 111880
Eliminated
Miss Mary Picketti   106060
Miss Beatrice Mitchell... 26000
In connection with the contest, the coronation of the Hospital Queen will be one of the
outstanding features and will
take place in the Ilo-llo Theatre
COURTENAY TO SEND
FLOAT TO CUMBERLAND
At the final counting, the con-!at 10:15 p.m. tonight (Friday)
testants stood as follows: j The ceremony will be attended
with  all  the  regal  pomp and
Queen 'glory in keeping with such an
Miss Florence Sehl  167630 event.
DETAILED ACCOUNT OF CONTEST
Cumberland, B.C., May 19, 1921.
To Tlle. Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital
Mesdames:—
I have the honor to submit for your consideration the final results of the
Hospital Queen Contest ns follows: —
Sehl, Florence, Elected 1st      107,090 167,630       $1676.S0
Balagno, Josie B., Elected 2nd  112,640 155,640       J1555.40
Strachan. Fannie, Elected 3rd       67.110 111.880       $1118.00
Picketti, Mary, Eliminated        56,810 106.060       $1060.60
Mitchell, Beatrice   26,000       $ 260.00
Thc following had previously retired from the contest:
Dando,   Olnd.is     36,430       $ 364.30
Mossey, Margaret   310      $     3.10
Maxwell, Jessie   660       $     6.60
Wilson, Drusslla E  2,730       $   27.30
Sheppard, Louise  1.120       $   11.20
Total    .342,550       608\366~ $6083.50
Total of blank ballots (spoiled)            240 550       %     5.50
FINAL   TOTAL    rWlMW UlW^Oil       iWOSfMhi
Courtenay Is taking a keen interest
In the Vlctorin Day celebration nnd
will be represented In the big parade.
The Native Sons of Canada will he
busy with preparations for their big
convention but will fliul time to decorate and send a float to Cumberland.
Others hnvo signified their Intention
of doing (he same.
MINE EXAMINATIONS
HELD LAST WEEK
The Ballot Box was removed, finally, from the stand at Midnight ou May
17th by Ihe undersigned, and the above Is result of count, after closing of the
Contest.
(Signed) A. T. HEYLAND
(Signed) J. de CANONVILLE
Auditors and Scrutineer:!.
Mr. R. C. Lung. Treasurer of the Campaign will render you an itemized
statement of all monies received In connection with the Hospital Queen Contest.
Yours very truly.
EDWARD W. BICKLE.
Cumberland Now
Leads In Upper
Baseball League
Supported to the limit by his home
town and his teammates, Dave Hunden stepped Into tho pitcher's box
last Sunday and hurled his team to a
4-3 victory over none other than
Westney Stlckney end his notorious
band of supporters from Nannlmo.
Nearly 400 fans supported the tennis
by their presence at the game ond
witnessed botli tlle greatest pitchers'
battle and the most closely contested
game this season.
By virtue of this win Cumberland
moves Into first place ln the Upper
Island League.
Bannerman Shows Speed
Bannerman's wonderful race to
hook Brown's foul tip left the fans
In a state of wonderment and amazement. He was accorded a great
hand for It.
That the best team won is admitted. The battery was equally as
strong as Nanaimo's. It was not any
stronger-neither was It any weaker.
With but un obvious weakness ln the
left garden the team's fielding was all
that could be expected. Not one
error was registered ln the infield.
Bannerman handling four chances
successfully and Johnny Marrochi, tho
old reliable, handled seven chances
without error. Sackl Conti nnd
Danny Bannerman share the slugging
honors for the day each securing two
clouts ln four trips to the plate.
Incident!)- Danny leads the club in
the race for the Royal Candy Co
medal for hitting, with an average-el
.665.
Stlckney Lost His Game
The Nanaimo team was certainl)
not the same brilliant organization
that carried Ihe Nanaimo colors into
the Provincial Play-offs last year.
Stlckney pitched a fairly steady game
and wbon he did weaken for a moment, he lacked Uie necessary support.
(Continued on Page Five)
GLADYS BOND DIED
LAST FRIDAY
The sad death of. an only daughter
occurred last Friday when Mr. and
Mrs. John Bond were called upon to
mourn the loss of their 11 months old
baby, Gladys, who passed away as the
result of an Illness lasting several
months. The funeral was held from
the family residence on 5th Street
on Sunday, many friends of the family being present and a large number of floral tributes being in evidence
Rev. E. H. Nunns performed the service both nt the home and the graveside.
List of Floral Tributes
Sprays: Daddy and Mamma, Grandpa and Granny Lewis, Orandpa and
Granny Bond, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis,
Mr. nnd Mrs. J. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. J.
Bond, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Gray, Nanaimo, Mr and Mrs. T. L. Thatcher,
Seqlum, Wn., Mr. and Mrs. F. Bond,
Coalmont, Mr. and Mrs. W. Holds-
worth, Coalmont, Mr. and Mra. R.
Morrison, Coalmont, Aunt Oladys
Lewis, Seattle, Mr. and Mrs. T. Banks,
Mr. and Mrs. G. O'Brien and Kathleen, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. White, Mr. and
Mrs. Jas. Potter, Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
Hitchens, Mr. and Mrs. Nlel McMillan, Nanaimo, Mi. and Mrs. D. Buchanan, Nanaimo, Mr. and Mrs. i>.
Johns, Nanaimo, Messrs. Alex. Blair
and Jim Beveridge, Mr. nnd Mrs.
Chas. Whyte, Hazel and Joe Damonte,
Mr. and Mrs. Evan Thomas, Royston,
Ivy and Gordon Cavln, Cour'. Bevan
No. 9830, A.O.F., Mr. and Mrs. A.
Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Horbury,
Rev. E. II. Nunns, Mrs. V. Marlnelll,
Mr. and Mrs. G. Johnson and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Martin, Miss Jessie
Stevenson, Miss Irene M. Bateman,
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Brown, Mr. and
Mrs. D. Coe, Misses. Picketti
Crosses: Mrs. Balagno and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Frelonl.
Wreaths: Cousins Lottie and Lllla
Lewis.
Globes: Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Segrave,
Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Mcintosh, Acme,
Alta.
An examlntnlon wns held in Cumberland Courthouse, under the Provisions of the Coal Mines Regulation
Act, for First, Second and Third Class
Ccrtlllcates of Competency as Coal
Officials on the 20th, 21st and 22nd
days of May 1921.
District Inscpector of Mines. T. R.
Jackson, acted as presiding examiner.
The following list contains the names
and clnss of certificate desired by
candidate.
First Class—Henry Devlin. Jasper
Rutbcrford.
Third Class -Arthur Roberts, Harry
Jackson, J. J. Kirkbrlde and David
Jones.
PRIZE WINNERS IN
CANDIDATE'S RAFFLE
The following are the prize winners
In the raffle recently held by MIsb
Josie Balagno, Carnival Queen Candidate:
Cushion, won by Mrs. Geer; Pillow
Slips, won by Mrs. V. Frelone; Box of
Candy, won by J. E. Robertson; Watch
won by W. Whyte,
CUMBERLAND PLAYS 2nd
ROUND AT HOME
Big Programme Arranged
For Victoria Day Celebration
What is undoubtedly the finest program ever arranged for a
public celebration in Cumberland, has been prepared for the Victoria Day celebration being held today (Saturday) at the Recreation Grounds.
The chief feature of the day will be the crowning of the
School May Queen, and the dancing of the May Pole dances by the
children of the Bevan, Union Bay and Cumberland Schools.
Cumberland will see one game at
least In the Connaught Cup serlei
when Shelly s play here next Saturday, May 31st, as a result of the draw
held In Victoria last Sunday. Nanaimo is drawn to play the winners of
the St. Andrews-Norlhfleld game at
Nannlmo on June 7 while the Vancouver Elks will play the Victoria
Veterans ou the same date.
Cumberland had no difficulty In defeating Kerrisdale last week to the
tune of 7 to 1, Graham, Turner, Milligan and Rannerman doing the scoring. Blair apparently thought one
was going over the top but It fooled
him by going under. He made no attempt for lt and that ts how Kerrisdale got their lono goal.
At 1.15 the pupils will assemble on the school grounds
and proceed via Penrith Ave.,
3rd Street and Dunsmuir Ave.
to Recreation Grounds where
Miss Margaret Watt, Queen elect
of the schools, will be crowned
by Miss Jessie Grant. Songs
by the school children and
speeches will also be'given.
Apart from this, a huge parade has been staged to start at
1.30 from the school grounds. In
this parade the school queen will
head the train in a beatuifully
decorated   float,   followed   by
many cars, bicyles and Comic
groups, wihch will compete for
prizes given for the most elaborately dressed vehicle.
Eight hundred dollars in
prizes, have been set aside for
tiie children's athletic sports,
and many a child will compete
first place in the different events
Forget your worries, for onco,
and join with the children in
their day's outing and help make
the youngsters happy.
A train will leave" Bevan at
9.30 a.m. for Cumberland and
return at 9 p.m.
CAVE-IN AT NO. 5 MINE
CAUSES DEATH OF TWO
No. 5 of the Comox Mines wns the
scene of a very serious accident ot
noon on Thursday when the face of
the West Sltlo Return of the new slope
caved In. causing the death of two
men, Wm. J. Jones, a machine runner
and J. Joseph Kirkbrlde, a tracklayer. There were Ave men In thi
place at the time of the cave-in. Robert Marshall, tlmberman. received a
broken leg and Injured arm and is
doing well as may be expected in tha
Cumberland General Hospital. J. McCartney, machine helper, received several bruises about the head and Is nlso a patient In Ihe hospital und wlll
be able to be around again ln a day
or two. James Boyd bebig a little
further back from the face of the
place escaped uninjured and was able
to assist the others who were less for
tunate. It appears the place was
fully timbered, the cavc-ln coming
without any warning.
The funeral of the late J. Kirkbrlde
will be held on Sunday and the remains of William J. Jones will be
sent to Ladysmith today (Saturday)
for Interment.
J.. McCartney, one of tbe injured,
mi,Jed here about two weeks ago
from Scotland.
W. J. Jones, deceased, commenced
work at the Comox Mines six weeks
ago and leaves a wife and child residing at Ladysmith.
J. J. Kirkbrlde, deceased, has been a
resident of this place for a number
of years, end a highly respected citizen. He was secretary of the St.
John Ambulance Association and took
n keen interest in First Aid work ond
Safety First. He leaves an aged
mother and sister to mourn ills loss.
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
Honorary President Thomaa Graham
Honary Vice President  A|ex  Auchlnvole
Director of Ceremonies   chas   Granam
President 0has parnhan,
Vice President   rohn ,,   Pottcr
Secretary  Jas. W. Tremlett
Treasurer  E. I>. Pickard
LIST OF COMMITTEES
Judges—Dr. Hicks. Dr. MacNaughton. Jas. Quinn, T. W. Scott, Rev. J. Hood,
Rev. J. Butler.
Starters—J. Williams,    E. T. Searle.    I). R. MacDonnld,    Chas. O'Brien, T.
Mordy, Rev. W. Leversedge.
Overseers—J. Sutherland, A. Thomson, II. Watertleld, E. Gomm, H. G. McKlnnon, W. Whyte.
(.rounds Committee—R. C. Lang, A. .McKinnon, J. D. Davis, Sandy Walker,
Jas. Walker, H. Murray, Geo. Apps. Sidney Hunt, W. McLellan.
Finance Committee -J. Sutherland, ll. R. MacDonald, A. A. Brown, L.  It.
Stevens.
Program Committee—Alex.    Denholme.    D.    Bannermnnn.   A.    J.    Taylor,
W.Whyte.
At 4.00 p.m. the Cumberland High School Junior Football Team wlll meet
tlle Union Bay Juniors iu final Empire Day Cup Competition.
List of events will be found on Page Six of this Issue.
MAKES ALTERATIONS
TO ICE CREAM PARLOR
MAY DAY
Today, Saturday, May 24th, will be the children's big day-
It will be a combination of .May Day and Victoria Day, and
hundreds of people should be ill Cumberland to join in the- festivities. While Saturday's celebration does not fall upon the
recognized date of May Day. there will he sufficient resemblance
to that day to warrant some explanation regarding Its origin.
The ancient observance of "May Day," now obsolete In the
country where it flourished for centuries, was so deeply grounded In man's relation to nature and became so Imbedded In literature that thc memory of it long survives the custom and Is
green today. It was the spontaneous expression of a simple
and natural people who had not yet outgrown their childhood,
and that characteristic Is traceable throughout English history
until comparatively recent tlmos, The familiar literary name
of England Is "Merrle England." Washington Irving, writing a
century ago. comments on tlle English love for rural life and
pleasure, and the disposition to be joyous and freehearted, which
wns true even of the city bred. The May Day custom was a
manifestation of this disposition, which thus greeted with enthusiasm thc advent of the season of warmth and life, the First
of May being taken ns the day symbolical of that renaissance.
In his Sketch Book. Irving speaks of a sequestered village that
"still kept up some faint observance of the once popular riles
or May," and at a later day Tennyson wrote:
"You must wake and call me early, call me early mother dear;
Tomorrow'll be the happiest time of all the glad new year;
Of all the glad new year mother, the maddest merriest day;
For I'm to be Queen o' the May, Mother, I'm to be Queen o' the May.
Allusions to May Day may be found in Chaucer. Spencer,
Shakespeare, Milton and others. The festival varied In Its
features, hut the Maypole garlanded with flowers, and the May
Queen, chosen from amongst the fairest of the maidens, usually
figured ln tiie ceremonies. Going a-Maylng was an expedition
of all the young folks to the woods and fields to bring In (lowers
and the Maypole, lo he set upamldst noise and merriment. Sometimes the HowcrB and branches of hawthorn were also used to
decorate the doorways and windows of the village homes. In
the dancing about the pole the queen did not join the revels, but
wns usually enthroned In a bower nearby amidst a profusion of
flowers Her symbolical character was in fact, the English successor to lhe Roman Flora, the Goddess of Flowers, who was
thus exalted as thc earliest form of May Day. Sometimes large
poles of durable wood were planted lo stand permanently and
were used year after year.
MEiwala
Alterations have just been completed to thc soda fountain aud lec cream
parlor of Lang's Drug Store which
make it one of the most up-to-date
in Cumberland. All the boxes have
been remodelled so as to assure absolute privacy and have been redecorated with artificial roses and greens
The service is now of the best and the
ice cream and drinks cannot be excelled.
WINNERS ANNOUNCED
The Campaign Committee for Fannie Strachan wish publicly to thank
those who assisted by contributing
music, transportation, labor, use of
buildings or in any other way helped
to elect Fannie Strachan as Maid of
Ilonor.       Prize Winners
Gramophone, Mr. Hamilton, Bloe-
dels Camp; Cigars. John Pearse;
Scarf. No. 25, Mrs. Hunden; Dolly.
Sirs. Parnham; Doily, Mrs. Leathead;
Album. No. 23, Not claimed. A Financial statement will appear next
week.
The Independent Liberal candidate,
Mr. P. P. Harrison, received a very
favorable reception on his visit to
Denman and Hornby Island on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, lie
visited the majority of tlio electorate
nnd delivered nn address at each
place. F.vcry business man In this
city and vicinity signed Mr, Harrison's
nomination papers on Thursday
Open Air Dance
Was Best Ever
In Cumberland
A feature of the closing hours of
the Carnival Queen Contest was tho
, open-air dance held on  the cement-
square at the intersection of Dunsmuir   Ave   and   3rd   Street  "On   the
[cement square" is not absolutely cor-
I rect, for the dancing was done in fact
I on a board platform which had been
laid over the pavement earlier In the
evening.     Plenty of lumber and nails
a score of willing workers and three-
quarters of an hour was all that wai
j necessary  to start the dance and  If
Sunday  morning hadn't  come around
we believe it wouldn't be ended yet.
Music was supplied by .Messrs Robertson, McLennan, P. Potter, J. Potter, W. Whitehoua and H. E. Murray,
who gave out their jazz tunes from
their perch on a big truck near the
side of the dance floor.
A better time has never been spent
before   at   any   dance   In   Cumberland
and the proceeds, which came in tho
neighborhood  of (800.00  considerably
'swelled the School Candidate's total
The ease wilh which the big floor was
' put down and taken up and the large
'sum  realized  will  probably  result   in
more dances of tliis kind In the Future.
provided the City Council gives its ner
: mission.
;     Mrs.   ('has.   Graham     left     Friday
' morning for Victoria.
THURSDAY'S ACCIDENT CAUSES POSTPONMENT
OF MAY 24TH SPORTS AND OTHER EVENTS
On going to press, word was received that the 24th of May
Sports have been postponed until some future date, probably June
3rd, on account of Thursday's accident in No. 5 Mine. Thc crowning of the Hospital Auxiliary May Queen and the Baseball Dance
have also been put off until Tuesday night, June 3rd. Word also was received that the baseball games in Nanaimo, which are announced elsewhere in this issue will not be played out of respect to
the late Joe. Kirkbride, who was a Vice President of the Cumberland team. PAGE TWO
THE CI ML ERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1924.
spiaisis
4
jjij^^fiilr^liyatyaHJOijlujIvji^m^taiaKli^iaciii^iaiifiiaiaiaiaiiatfflia^ —-
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
\
STOP!
Before sending that order away for your windows and doors; just call in to our
place and get a figure, and we think that we can convince you that it is just as
cheap, and far more satisfactory to deal with us.
DON'T FORGET NOW.
Just phone at our expense for anything you want for your building.
We deliver anything to any part of the district.
IF IT'S BUILDING MATERIAL
WE HAVE IT
Edwards and Orr
GOLD SEAL CONGOLEUM AGENTS
Union Bay Road Courtenay
P. 0. Box 62
Phone 17
OPPOSITE CORFIELD  MOTORS
For the  Bobbed
Hair Girls
Electric Curlers and Wavers from  $2.50 to $8.00
We have Electric Vacuum Cleaners for rent with attachments.      Phone  your reserve.
Our Fishing Tackle Department is the most complete
on the Island.
THE
Piket Electric
Radio Sets and Parts
Phone COURTENAY P.O. Box
164 B.C.
COURTENAY AGAIN
BLANKS NANAIMO
Native Sons of Canada
Open Air
DANCE
Tuesday,
June
Royshn Tennis Court
Refreshments by Canadian Daughters' League.
355
COURTENAY,—Last Sunday nt tho
Courtenay Hall Park, the loeal team
administered defeat for the second
time this season to the Nanaimo hall
tosaers who came up to the farming
centre to row with the cow punchers,
The home team almost handed the
game to the visitors, for, on account of
errors Nanaimo chalked up a trio of
runs in the first frame. Errors were
responsible for the total—but against
a scrapping team this is not much of
a handicap and Courtenay went in to
win—and did win, by a score of four
to three. A great deal of credit for
the win must be given to Barkhouso,
Courtenay's port sider, who certainly
pitched a heady, steady game and
won against adverse circumstances.
His battery mate. Downey, was in good
form and did some neat pegging.
Beatty, always a cool player crossed
the plate first tor Courtenay, when
he was allowed to come in from third
while Nanaimo's third baseman waa
enjoying a siesta. Woods twirled
for Nanaimo. Pat Fletcher did the
umpiring, although Piper, the Nanaimo captain was always wiljing to
assist him. There was a good crowd
out. Courtenay plays Royston next
Sunday at Courtenay and tbe locals
say they are going to make it three iu
a row.
FIFTH CELEBRATION
ECLIPSES ALL OTHERS
FOR SPLENDOUR
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY I
There is a growing demand for Whole Wheat Bread.
Try our 100 per cent Whole Wheat Bread, the only
Physical Culture Loaf. Always a nice selection of
cakes to choose from, which you know.
Not How Cheap—But How (iood
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
The Holding-on-to Quality Store
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
m
COURTENAY,—The coronation ol
Miss Honor Fechner as Queen of the
May took place last Wednesday afternoon at Courtenay Agricultural
grounds. The ceremony was attended hy a great gathering of people,
representative 'of every part of the
district. The day was the fifth of
its kind, the program, ill which the
children were the chief thoughts of
the organizers heing curried out without a hitch, except with the parade
and the only criticism tliat can be
registered here is that it was a little
late in starting. However, spectators along the line of march were
more than recompensed for their wait
for there was a long line of cars,
lloats and bicycles picturesquely dee
orated. Special mention should be
made of the Klks float, which repre
sented a forest scene, depleting the
stately animal form which the organ
nation derives its name, peering
through the trees. The color scheme
was purple and white, the lodge col
ors. The Brother Hills deserve
commendation for their efforts 111 this
respect. Following lhe Klks' float,
came that of the Native Sons of Canada. It was a massive float, twenty
foet long and eight feet wide. Over
the engine was placed a beaver, kind
ly loaned by Mr. .lames Forbes, of
I Forbes' Landing. Campbell Lake, in
characteristic pose at work cutting
down a tree, while directly In front
stood Jack Canuck and at the back
stood ten small boys, each representing a province of Canada and wearing a gold printed ribbon with tho
name of a province thereon. The
float was trimmed with broom flowers.
The boys of the Naval brigade had a
novel float, represtlng a battleship.
II was uniquely built and won first
prize. Another character In thc
parade was the representation of an
infant. This was built on a bicycle
ridden by George Edwards. There
were a good number of decorated cars
besides the floats some of them being
very pretty.
The parade was in charge of the
Native Sons of Canada, and Mr. William Duncan acted as Marshal. Particular mention  should  he made of
the Cumberland Boys' Band, which
rendered very excellent music during
the course of the festivities.
Arriving at the grounds the festivities proper began. Queen Honor,
accompanied by her maids of honor,
Misses Mary Morrison, Gladys Perez,
Kathleen Moore and Dorothy Cokely.
Mr. William Stubbs, principal of the
Public School was master of ceremonies at the grounds and he opened
the program by asking the assemblage
to slug "O Canada." Canada'B national
anthem. After this Queen Marjorie.
last year's Queen of the May, addressed her subjects, closing with the
crowning of Queen Honor, who will
fill the olllce until next year. Mr.
Theed Pearse delivered an address
on the naval brigade, and J, Frank
Franklin told of his work wilh the
Boy Scouts. The full program Is he"o
appended:
Songs—Div. 1. II and III.
Maypole Dance -Dlvs. 1 and II-
Myrtle Smith, Olive Anderton, Alice
Hurford, Annie Kushton, Mary Bell,
Barbara McBryde, Evelyn Catchpole
Main I Dack, Ruth Pldcock, Eileen
Grieve. Nona McNiel, Mirren Thomas.
Nora LIo d. Dorothy Hayman, Ilur-
nailliie Shannon, Sylvia Edwards,
Agms Sutherland, Hazel Warren,
Marjorie Finch, Muriel, Gladys
Perez. Margaret MacKenzie, Mary
Morrison, Clara Tippet, Dorothy
Hames, Kathleen Halley, Annie Crawford. Kathleen Moore, Dorothy Coke-
ley, Annie McDonald, Helen Lee.
Mountain March-Olive Anderton,
Alice Hurford. Annie Rushton, Mary
Bell. Barbara McBryde. Mabel Dack,
Ruth Pldcock, Eileen Grieve. Nona
McNiel, Mirren Thomas. Nora Lloyd,
Sylvia Edwards, Annie Crawford.
Margaret MacKenzie. Clara Tippet.
Kathleen Halley, Marjorie Finch.
Muriel Lelghton, Thelma Munroe.
Hazel  Warren, Agnes Sutherland.
Dante of the Zodiao— Lucy Piket.
Saxon Sutherland, Helen Gwllt, May
McLean. Phyllis Capes. Muhel MacKenzie. Pauline Havard, Joy McKenzie. May Tylor, Shula Allard. Dorothy
McKnlght,  Winnie Taylor.
Maypole Dance—Divs. Ill and IV.- •
Margaret Brown, Phylis Prain, Ruth
Thomas, Katherine Capes, Doris McKenzie, Irene Logile Viola Reese.
Irene Shirland, Beth Mutrie, Lola
Quinn, Eileen Cokely, Alice Guilt,
Norma Bravender, Leslie Bravendev,
Kathleen Hagarty, Olive McLean,
Annie Potter, Saxon Sutherland, Joy
McKenzie, Winnie Taylor, Pauline
Havard, Isla Tuck, Phyllis Capes.
Mary Tylor, Catherine Fitzgerald,
Beryl Plercy, Margaret Cook, Lucy
Piket. Mabel MacKenzie, Sheila Allard.    <
Pageant of Months
January, Skating Dance-Nora Lloyd
Muriel Lelghton, Nona McNeil, Agues
Sutherland, Barbara McBryde, Annie
Rushton, Burnadlne Shannon, Margaret McKenzie.
Snowballers—Jack Ilamee, Olive
Anderton, Mary Bell, Ruth Pldcock,
Donald Haas,' Claude Smith, Evelyu
McKenzie, Kathleen Beasley.
February—Guide Display "As we
Were." Summary of work by Guide
Second, Honor Fitzgerald. Drill In
charge of Capt. Meredith.
March, "Measles"—Jlnimle Thomas.
April, Masquerade—Sylvia Edwards
Dorothy Hayman, Beryl Plercy, Gladys Kerton, Harry Perez, James McLean, Norma Bravender, Leslie Bravender.
May—Coronation  of May Queen.
June—Representing thc change
from school to play.
Catherine Beatty, Clara Tippet,
Hazel Warren, Thelma Walker, Chas.
Quinn. Fred Stephens, Ernest Hauk-
cnilal.
July—Navy League Boys—Parade
under Capt. Lloyd. Address of explanation by Mr. Theed Pearce.
August—Picnic—The members of
committee—Jack MacKay. The Kiddles- Marjorie Finch. George Hutchings, Jack Boomer. Robert Bowie,
David Smith, John Morrison, Willie
Mooson, Myrtle Smith, Daisy Kerton,
Sydney Smith, Mary [Unlock. Marvin
llaukodal.
September— Fair— Reggie Laver.
Evelyn Blackball, Phebe Walls, Dick
Lucas, Melvln McLeod, Bill McKay.
October—Opening of the Bridge -
Wilbur Plercy, Walter Tarllng.
November—Boy Scouts.
December— Xmas— Santa Claus,
Osborne Bell. Drill—Beth Mutrie,
Helen Cokely, Lola Quinn, Irene Loggie, Phyllis Prnin, Alice Guilt, Helen
Lee, Mabel Dack.
After the program the May Queen
and her retinue were regaled at a
banquet arranged under the management of the Canadian Daughters'
League. Courtenay Assembly No. 6.
In the morning the Elks Lodge carried
out a program of sports for the children and In the evening Queen Honor
gave a complimentary dance for her
young subjects at the' Agricultural
Hall. The day's festivities were
brought to a close by a dance or
ganized by the Jolly Bachelors' Club
iu the Gaiety Theatre.
The sports carried out In the morning were as follows, the winners being:
Bicycle Race—Chester Haas; Lawrence Moncrief.
Girls' Race, 8 years and under—Eunice Tippet; Florence Hagarty.
Boys' Race, 8 years and under-
Frank Hurford;  Philip Le Mare.
Girls' Race, 11 years and under-
Lola Quinn; Joy McKenzie.
Boys' Race, 11 years and under—
Willie Stewart; Jack Berkeley.
Girls Race, 13 years and under -
Nora Lloyd, Agnes Sutherland.
Girls* .Race. 15 \ears and under -
Dorothy Hames, Gladys Perez.
Boys' Race, 12 to Hi years—Jas.
Perez; Reg. Laver.
Girls' Race, 15 and over- - Gladys
Perez; Dorothy Hames.
Boys'   Race,   15   years   and   over
Chester Hans; Harry McQuillan.
Public School Boys' Egg and Spoon
Race—Robt. Hornal; Ralph Carter.
Boys' Running Jump -R. Laver;
Jim Perez.
Girls' Running Jump - Dorothy
Hames:  Gladys Perez.
Girls' Relay—Gladys Perez, Agnes
Sutherland, May Moncrieff. Nona McNeil (team)
Boys' Race. 12 to 111 years—Wm.
Hell; Ralph Carter.
Sack Race -Syd. Williams; Robt.
I Hornal.
:    Girls' Sack Race—Olive Anderton:
Norma Allen.
i ■ Standing    Jump—  Chester    Haas;
I Reg. I.nvcr.
 . —
GOLF TOURNAMENT
REACHES SEMI-FINALS
COURTENAY,—Play in the Mutrie
Cup tournnment of the Courtenay
Coif Club, has reached the ceml-final
stage, the plnycrs remaining in being
Thomas Graham, who on Wednesday
beat G. O. Graham, turning in the
best score of the tournament, two 47s.
This now leaves F. C. Brock, Charles
and Thomas Graham in the play.
tie. smoothed liis homespun coat, anl
rapped. Lizzie came. He walked
in. She said she liked the daisy.
Lizzie sat down—over there. He sat
down—over here. Mother came in.
She sat down—on thc lounge. Dad
came in. He sat down—on the
lounge.
The weather was fine, and everybody said so for ten minutes, at least.
Mother passed the cake, and Harry
wasn't razzed a bit when he took a
piece. Harry and Lizzie decided to
make candy. They went to the kitchen; so did Mother. Harry cracked
the nuts; then whipped the fondant.
There was n slash. The red lie was
ruined. Hut Harry didn't care. It
was worth It to be with her -and
Mother.
Everyone wns In Ihe parlor again,
seated as before. Tho candy was
about gone. Harry nsked. "Whut Is
the hardest kind of soap?" Everybody got excited, and Dad won when
he yelled "Castile." Mother took second money with her crack, "Ivory."
The clock struck once. It was nine-
thirty. Harry said good-night to
Dad. Mother helped him with his
things in the vestibule, lie said
good-niglit to Lizzie; then Mother said
good-night to blm. Harry tipped his
hat and departed.
Mother returned to Dad. Lizzie
stood with her face glued to the door-
pane. Harry hastily threw a kiss.
She thrilled, and Harry rode awn...
Breathlessly she plucked the petals
from the daisy. A tense moment.;
then a stifled cry nf joy. Passionately she clutched the torn petnls and
the robbed stem and held them to her
heart.     Harry was hers, all hers.
l*feRAG50K
1   %3snCTE»jS
POLKS:
Fifty years ago tonight—Harry ro-le
up lo the gate on his bike. The
thread of life held, and he volplaned
safely to earth. Even the daisy he
carried in Ills hand had not been Injured. Harry opened the creaky old
gate and walked to the door. He
paused a moment, adjuHted his  red
Not ever any more. This is the reason why.
Witli all my admiration and sentiment Tn favor of the girls, young and
still young, I had an experience lately
which  makes me  very well satisfied
to be a man.     Indeed it was my inability to refuse any request made hy
i an attractive woman that got me into
trouble.     I was asked to take part in
an affair in which the men dressed as
women and not being able to say no,
plunged into a weird adventure. First
off my stubby almost white mustache
i and   whiskers  fell  before the  razor.
| I could hardly hope to fool anybody
while   wearing   whiskers,   no   matter
; how   attractive   the   balance   ctf  the
| costume might be, and for the first
time in twenty-five years my upper lip
is hare.      I felt like I was not com-
pletely dressed.     My lip looked like
j I was just over from Cork, or like a
bee had stung it, and felt the same
way.     Then wearing dresses got my
goat.     The    first   night    something
broke and    my    skirt    came    down
around my shoes.     For once 1 had
plenty hair, a blonde wig doing the
trick.     Never again!      I do not see
bow the women manage to keep their
, legs warm wearing low shoes and silk
; stockings, but that is their trouble and
j they have my permission to continue
the custom.
1111
May Day
Celebration
Give us your order early for
Flowers and Crepe Paper Decorations for Cars, Etc.
HAND MADE TO ORDER
Large selection of colors in Dennison and Crepe Papers
2 FOR 25c.
Opposite Presbyterian Church
W. EMERIC
Phone
MUSIC STORE
Courtenay, B.C.
Phone
177
Comox Tailors
LADIES* AND GENTLEMAN'S
TAILORING
(1ET YOUR SPRING SUIT
All our work NOW Courtenay, B.C.
Guaranteed 'Phone 14 SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
BlEEElHSiaEIBlF-iaPI
^S^fBJli^^cl^iQlBJalBJBfSfBJiV
Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, MAY 23-24
From the Valley of content
to the whirlpool of wealth.
"Pleasure Mad"
A swift reeling down thc primrose path of the unreal, intoxicated by the sparkling champagne of
sudden riches, a vivid drama of Love, Laughter anil
Luxurious living.
1,00 K EXTRA LOOK
The fourth series of
"The Leather Pushers"
Round one with
BILLY SULLIVAN
COMEDY REELS
Mary Alden and William Collier. Jr.. in "Pleasure Mad"  MATINEE SATURDAY 2:30 P.M.	
BIG HOLIDAY DANCE SATURDAY AT 9 P.M.
SIS1HSIBIEIM
 MONDAY AND TUESDAY, MAY 26-27	
FRANCIS   COMPTON       and THE COMPTON  CO.
Presenting on  Monday
"A Little Bit Of Fluff"
AND ON TUESDAY, MAY 27
"Baby Mine"
Performance
At 8:15 p.m.
Performance
At 8:15p.m.
 NEXT WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, MAY 28 - 29	
The fastest moving automobile story ever produced.
REGINALD DENNY in "SPORTING YOUTH"
Thrills, Comedy and the Race!     It's the fastest you've seen on the screen—2 mile
minute speed demons tearing down fences, taking curves on two wheels, it will make
you feci like standing on your seat and cheering.
NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, MAY 30-31
CECIL II. Ke.lHIXK PRESENTS TRH'JIPH"
JUNE 2-3-4 MARIAN DAVIES IN "LITTLE OLD NEW YORK"
^raaia<s!lcjjei|g!leucileflcj~
ijt.^MtsisijiasiSSStVSBism
iajlB||if||i33jl|g
m
I
Your Family
A mother and children bereft of home is life's most
pitiful drama.
It is enacted all too often because life insurance
had not been provided.
Government statistics show that "ninety-five per
cent of men at age sixty are dependent" Other men
die without leaving anything for the support of their
families.
Life insurance has been evolved so that a man may
arrange his life's program to provide for his family.
It is scientific, safe and sound.
Have your wife and children sufficient life insurance protection ?
Let the Dominion Life take care of your dependents.
Full information regarding any form of policy
will be cheerfully furnished by writing.
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. ('.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL!
\VM..\lliKltlKIKI.|i,   Proprietor
i.OOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE j
Dunsmuir Avenue. Cumberland
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, ll. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike   service.
26   rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
II. YATES, Manager.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
I
1
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
DOUOIIXl'TS
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices — Lemon Custards — Lemon Pie*
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18 Cumberland.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  IIo-llu  Then.rv
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practical  Barber,  and   Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Heating Engineer
ill BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREIGHT RATES
Very few subjects are more complicated than the one involving any
] question of dominion wide or Inter
| provincial freight rates, so many dlf-
| ferent factors entering into the ques-
I tlon.
. Iu 1914 and from then on until Wll
i what is known as the "mountain
1 scale" was used on British Columbia
freight. This means that for over-
mile coming through the mountains
the rate is the same us for a mile
and a half on the Prairie; this worV;s
out to au Increase of freight rates
in British Columbia ot about 32 per
cent. It is further complicated by
the fact thai freight is classified in
two wnys, namely, Class and Commodity lates—the Hist being based on
mileage and regarded as slondar.l
and tbe Commodity rates which are
ba&ed mori' or less upon hat the traffic will stand, and are generally lower
than the standard rales in order lo allow certain freight to move at all.
John Oliver gattated for years
against tho discrimination caused by
the Mountain Scale, claiming tlmt tti«»
freight could be hauled through the
mountains on the C.N.R. as cheaply
as on the prairie. After various
hearings before the Board of Ruthvaj
Commissioners they decided in June
1922 to cut the differential nn the
1 Mountain Scale iu half, and the
Mountain Scale is now about 16 J-:i
1 per cent greater than the prairie It
is to be noted that this cut of 50 per
cent was not on the fretgh; rale but
on the differential part of it. probably
resulting in reduction of freight rate
of about li) per cent. It applied to
! class rates and to the commodity rate
for wheat and wheat products for
domestic consumption, but it did not
apply to grain for export. However,
on tbe issuing of the ordtv hy the
Railway Commission, the railways
themselves voluntarily made a reduction of 2 per cent on the export rates
on grain ami grain products. The
Railway Commission also ordered i*t
the same time in addition to the cut
on the Mountain Scale differential, a
general reduction of 7 1-2 per cent,
on certain basic products, principally
the following-Lumber and its produce, building supplies Including
| lime, brick and plaster, potatoes, fertilizer, ores and certain classes of
' iron.
The   British   Columbia   government
was not satisfied with the  reduction
ou the Mountain Scale and applealed
; to    the    Executive    Council,    which
: means the Cabinet at Ottawa.     The
1 Cabinet   in   October   li>2?»   made   two
SSS£ji  recommendations    to    tbe    Railway
Commission—the first one dated October   2nd,    recommended    them    to
make a reduction of tbe rate on export grain.      In response to this the
Railway Commission on  the 10th of
October ordered  the  rate  on   export
grain to be reduced 10 per cent, which
was done, making a total  reduction
of 30 per cent, on grain for export.
On October 24th. 1923    the    Cabinet
1 made a further recommendation to the
; Railway Commission   which   referred
1 the matter of the appeal from British
Columbia on freight (other than  cx-
i port grain,  which  had already  been
dealt with), back to the Commission
with a somewhat vague recommendation tliat such relief should be given
as soon as conditions rendered it possible, and there at present the matter stands—the  Railway Commission
have not yet acted on the recommendation.
Tbe net results of the various reductions so far as wheat is concerned,
is, that t,he freight rates on wheat
for use In British Columbia, while
reduced, is still $3.80 a Ion higher '
than wheat for export—it is not that
the rate on domestic wheat has been
increased but that it has not been decreased so much as on the export
trade. It seems very unfair that the
local poultry raiser should pay $11.80
a ton more freight on the wheal he
uses than If it was going to he consumed in Britain or China. On tho
other hand it must be remembered
that special rates are always given
on large quantities of freight with a
long haul, including water competition, and that export wheat moving
\o tbe Atlantic Coast has a special
rate also. It must also lie remembered that the redact fun on export
wheat has produced nn increase of
trade through Vancouver, from 700,-
000 bushels In 1920-21 to, it is expected, BO million bushels during last
season, which has not only left a good
deal of money in British Columbia
but stimulated many other lines of
trade in the Province.
What is known as the Crow's Nest
T'ass Agreement and its very important bearing on British Columbia
freight rates is a subject hy itself,
and will be dealt with later.
PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS
ACT
Form v* (.Section 41}
PROCLAMATION    OK   KfcTH.MM.
OFFlCEfl
Province of British Columbia
In the Comox Electoral District
To  Wit:
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
to the Voters of Comox Electoral District that iu obedience to Ills Majesty's
Writ to me directed, and bearing date
Uie leth day of May. in the year of our
Lord one thousand nine hundred and
twenty-four, l require tlio presence
uf tile said Voters at Court House
Cumberland, B.C.. on the 30th day of
May at twelve o'clock noon, for Ihe
purpose ot nominating and electing
one person to represent them in the
Legislature of this Province.
The Made of Nninhul.mi of Clllldl-
dates h)iall be as Follows 1
'lhe candidates shall be nominated
in writing; the writing shall, be subscribed by two registered voters of the
district as proposer and seconder
and by ten other registered voters of
the said district as assenting to the
nomination, and shall be delivered to
the Returning Officer at any time between the date of this Proclamation
and one ii.ro. of the day of nomination.
In the event of a poll being necessary,
such poll will be open on the 20th |
day of June, al thc following respective places:—
Alert Bay
Bevan
Hold Point
Bowser Station
Campbell River
Coal Harbour
Comox Wharf
Courtenay
Cumberland
Denman Island
Duncan Bay
Fanny Bay
Granite Bay
Grantham
Headquarters
Heriot Boy
Hornby Island
Little River
Malcolm Island
Manson's Landing
Merville
Minto
Nahwitti River
Nlmpklsh River
Okisollo
Oyster  River
Port Alice
Port Hardy
Quathlaski Cove
Read Island
Read Island (South)
Rock Bay
Royston
Sayward
Shushartio Bay
Squirrel Cove
Union  Bay
Whaletown
of which every  person  is hereby required to take notice aud govern himself accordingly.
GIVEN under my hand at Cumber-
LIQUOR-CONTROL
PLEBISCITES ACT
#
PROCLAMATION   OF    KETCKNLNfi
OFFICER
1'
land. B.C
thousand
four.
, this 14th day of May, om
nine  hundred  and  twenty
THOMAS  JI.  CAREY.
Returning Office:
Province of British Columbia
In the Comox Electoral District
To  Wit:
PUBLIC   NOTICE   is   hereby   given
to ihe Electors of the Electoral District  aforesaid  that  1  have  received
lis   Majesty's  Writ   to  me  directed,
and bearing date the 10th day of May.
1024,   commanding  me  to  cause  the
following   question,   namely: —
Do you approve of the sale of beer
.. the glass In licensed premises within  a  bar under Government control
and regulation?
i be submitted according to law to
lie Electors qualified to vote for tho
lection   ol   a   member  of  the   Legin-
itivt Assembly for the Electoral Did-
rlcl  aforesaid;  and, further, that in
obedience to the said Writ a poll shall
be opened at eigbl o'clock iu the forenoon   ami  shall   be  (dosed   at  seven
j'clock in the afternoon on the 20th
lay of June, 1924, for taking and receiving the votes of the said Electors
in each pulim^ division of the Electoral District aforesaid at the respective places following: —
Polling Divisions
Alert Bay
Bevan
Bold Point
Bowser Station
Campbell River
Coal Harbour
Comox Wharf
Courtenay
Cumberland
Denman Islaud
Duncan Bay   .
Fanny Bay
Granite Bay
Grantham
Headquarters
Heriot Bay
Hornby Island
Little River
Malcolm Island
Malison's Landing
Merville
Mlnto
Nahwitti River
Nlmpklsh River
Okisollo
Oyster River
Port Alice
Port Hardy
Quathlaski Cove
Read Island
Read Island (South)
Rock Bay
Royston
Sayward
Shushartle Bay
Squirrel Cove
Union Bay
Whaletown
Of which nil persons are hereby re-
lUired to take notice and to govern
themselves  accordingly.
GIVEN under my hand at Cumberland, B.C., this 14th day of May, 1924.
THOMAS H. CAREY.
Returning Officer.
XOTICK OF DISSOLUTION
OF PARTNERSHIP
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the partnership heretofore subsisting
between us. the undersgned, as grocers, carrying on business as such under the name "Mumford's Grocery" at
the City of Cumberland, B.C., has this
day been dissolved by mutual consent
All debts owing to the said partnership are to be paid to Thomas H. Mumford ai Cumberland, B.C.. and ail
claims against the said partnership
are to be presented lo the said Thomas .
H. Mumford, by whom tbe same will
be paid.
Tbe said business will in future bO
owned   and   carried   on   by   the  said j
Thomas li. Mumford.
DATED this 21st day of April. 1924. ;
Thomas  Henry   Mumford,
John Walton.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 157, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR  NEEDS  WILL RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
SUNBURN SPRAINSACHlNG-F
MM me. II We.-TliBES JGc.-At all Dru. Storcl
Why Operate
for APPENDICITIS, GAM..
STONES, stomach and liver
troubles, when IIEPAT0LA docs
the work without pain aud no
risk of your We nor loss of time,
Contains no poison. Not sold
by druggists.
MRS. GEO, S. ALMAS
Sole Manufacturer.
iilii Fourth Ave. S. Phone
Saskatoon.
Price *«.■>".     l'racel post
extra.
4856
New Car Service
( ar for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting Ith Boat nt Union Buy
every Sund. y Morning. Leave Cum*
I 'Hand Motel. 8 o'clock.
Klliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C, BA.
ARCHITECT]
IIIIU II.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONE 2I1III     VICTORIA, BX. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1924.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
<9
SATURDAY, MAY 21, 1924.
THE GIRL OF TODAY
The young woman of today no
longer laces herself to breutlilessness
ond a red nose and pimpled forehead,
pushing what flesh there is into regions where it makes deformity; she
wears corsets, but only to outline and
partially to support, never to press
or pinch, and thus her digestive organs are kept free to do their work
anil assist in preparing the rounded
and velvety surfaces, the glow In tho
eye, the blush upon Ihe cheek, the
dye of the soft lips, for. unpoeticnl aa
it appears, the laboratory of beauty
is In the stomach.
In addition to all this, the girl of
today Is no longer ashamed of her
loot. She used to think It a disgrace
if she wore a larger shoe than a num-
hcr two and a half. Now she understands that it is a law of statuesque
beauty tliat a body should have an extremity equal to its support. She
no longer dreams of lengthening her
skirt because her feet tire large.
Hence she can walk with freedom
where she will, without pinched feet
or any of the discomfort that urges
her to sit still; and thus she takes
with delight thc exercise which has
done m much for her, which fills her
lungs witli fresh air, and oxygenates
her blood and gives it all its life aud
sparkle wherever its effects, are visible. After all, it is common sense,
tbe appreciation tbat nature says how
much to eat and what to wear, that
has reformed an ailing, an early-withered woman into a beauty of Uie old
Creek type.
Green we should lose no time in letting the latter know the fact.
It should  never  be forgotten  that
the golden rule requires of us that we
iihould   repeat   every   pleasant   tiling
| that we hear about people to them-
; selves or to those Interested in them.
•Praise that is sincere is a cordial to
' the heart and a tonic to the will.
i    Many are lhe  fainting souls, who
! have been revived and encouraged by
! a word of praise to renewed effort and
achievement.      To allow such words
j of commendation as we may hear in
J regard to others to fall upon our own
enrs and  go  no farther Is to throw-
carelessly away the food for want of
which another is perishing .
If we know of kind deeds done or
noble words uttered by anyone—the
humblest or lhe highest, it matters
not—it is our duty to tell of them.
if we know oi good, honest work
done in any Bold, from the clerk In a
store to that of the preacher of riglit-
eousnoss—we ought to tell of It.
If you know a woman to be beautiful and gracious or true and lofty in
her ideals;  If you think that a man
is noble in mind or unselfish in heart;
that a youth is full of promise: that
a mother is devoted or wise; that
sons and daughters are leading lives
of self-sacrifice that the old age of
their parents may be comfortable aud
liappyr for heaven's sake tell them
so. instead of repeating the ugly
tilings that you have heard.
Everything that is lovely and of
good report should be repeated far
and wide. There can be no question
about lhe duty of telling all that is
good.
ill!III!l!ll!ll!ll!lllllllPi«llii
Sidelights on a Great Industry
 I
Thirty Million
Dollars
THE RULE OF LIFE g
Whether  you   handle  a  pick  or  a 15
I pen. a wheelbarrow cr a set of ooolts =||
iMlg ditches or edit a paper,-ring an §=
auction  hell  or   write  funny  things. |=
I you must work.                                      . S
If you look around you. you  wlll =
see that tlio men who are best able to =
live the rest of their   days   without |||
work nre the men that work the hard- ss
est.    Don't be afraid of killing your- =|
self with  work.      It  is beyond your ; =||
power to do thnt.      Work gives you 5|
tin appetite for meals; it lends solidity S=
to your slumbers; it gives the appre- =S
elation of a holiday,     Thc busier you ==
are, thc less deviltry you will get Into, =s
the sweeter will  be your Hleep, and |||
the better satisfied you will be with =
file world. ■==
INVESTED    IN    SAWMILLS g
and logging equip     King George Hotel 1
Victor Bonora, Proprietor      g
I Inland     Timber     Industries     Have1 §£
j Payroll of $10,000,000 FIRST CLASS 1 =
MENT IN B. €. INTERIOR
M0>
Betty Brown §
Dresses 1
for Ladies, Misses and Juniors, in an attractive g
and entirely g|
NEW SUMMER RANGE §§
and Popular Prices g
Swiss Voiles Fancy Voiles §g
Brodella Flannel Willow Suiting g|
Foulards and French Fancies g
also |H
Sport Outfits j
in softest Flannel, in lovely shades of New Green, g
French   Blue,   Ivory,   Marigold,   Coral,  Cherr;- g"
Expected to arrive this week, a large assortment g
of Popular Scarfs in Oriental Silks and Crepes, g
YOU TELL 'EM
There is nothing more productive
of mischief than the "carrying of
talos," the telling from one to another
of little things that may excite jealousies, or ill feeling of any sort. On
thc other hand, there are few things
more conducive to happiness and general good feeling than the telling of
pleasant  things.
if Mrs. Smith has praised Mrs.
Brown's taste in the furnishing of
her living room we should not forget
lo tell Mrs. Brown. If Mr. Orangeman has found something to commend
In the speech of llr. Wearlng-of-the-
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and .Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
PPROXIMATELY   $30,000,000   is
invested in lumber mills and logging equipment in inland llrltish Columbia.
At a conservative estimate 8,000
men are engaged in the combined
timber industries of the interior, with
a payroll of close on $10,000,000.
The standing timber of Inland British Columbia is reckoned at 150,000,-
000 feet, and 43 per cent of the area
is described as absolute forest land.
According to the last official report
published, there are about 150 sawmills and shingle mills operating,
with a daily capacity of 4,000,000 feet.
Heavy Production iu IMS
In 1112,1 tbe logging camps in the
j interior produced 442.000,000 feet of
• logs of all descriptions aud the value
i of the sawn lumber alone was not less
! than $8,000.1)00. In addition large
\ quantities of poles, fence posts, rail-
| way tiles, shingle holts, etc., would
iadd many hundreds of thousands of
: dollars to this total.
i Thc pole and tie industry of Central and Northern B.C.. is developing Into a most important branch of
logging. As yet the pulp and paper
Industry lias no plant operating In
the Interior although an enormous
quantity of the very finest pulpwootl
on the continent is available.
These facts and figures demonstrate j
the vital importance of its inland lumber Industry to the whole province of
British Columbia.
This   series  of  articles  communi- ■
cated   by   the   Timber   Industries
Council   of  British  Columbia.
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
JOS.   DAMONTE!
Showing this week the newest novelties in Ladies' Silk Scarfs also Silk Wool Cardigans in
jrood color combinations.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
'Fashion Craft" Made to Measure Clothes at popular prices.       Style, Fit and Satisfac-
1 ion guaranteed.
Juat received another shipment of Men's Velour and Beaver Felt Hals in all the latest
.-■hades.
GENERAL   DELIVERY       =   Special showing this week of the newest styles in Men's English Broadcloth Shirts.
Delivered tu All Parts of District
Coal, Wood und Hoods of Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE    ffl    TELEPHONE
Sport Shirts, Belts,Neckwear, Caps, Summer Underwear, Men's and Boys' Khaki Outfits.
A complete stock of Men's and Boys' Canvas Footwear.
1
I
iil
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiillllllll
illilllllllll
NIC    rq   TBI
Wm. Douglas
FOR
1 Shoes for the Holidays   |
g Ladies' White Canvas Strap Slippers, leather soles,
B trimmed in Black and Green, per pair   $3.25
g Ladies' White Canvas Oxfords, trimmed in brown $3.50
g Ladies' White Canvas Pumps, rubber soles, pair $2.25
g Ladies' White Canvas Oxfords, rubber soles, pair $2.75
g Ladies' Yachting Oxfords, per pair    $1.75
g Canvas Shoes for Boys and Girls, all sizes and several
H different styles.
g Men's Canvas shoes antl Oxfords, in white and brown,
fH several styles, up per pair from   $2.25
g We are showing a beautiful line of Curtain Muslins,
g Scrims and Madras, in plain and fancy colors, ranging
g in price from 20c. per yard to $1.95
U WALL PAPERS
Wk For every room in the house, in gootl assortment.
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
| AjLL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
TOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office '.'ll'.'il Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
ll
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   2S
From 11 p.m. to   ft a.m.   2a
Ask for Geo. Mason.
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
IF IT'S BUTTER
ASK FOR
Comox
Creamery
Butter
.Made    from    Pure    Jersey
Cream.
IF IT'S JAM
INSI8T ON
Comox Brand
Jam
Made from fresh fruit In the
Valley. Pure cane sugar only
used In Its manufacture.
IF IT'S POTATOES
DEMAND
Comox
Creamery
Potatoes
Drown In the District and
graded according to Govt,
regulations. "Look for the
tag on the bag."
IF IT'S EGGS
OURS ARE
Strictly
Fresh Eggs
Candled and graded in accordance with the New Egg
Act.
OUR MILK DEPARTMENT DELIVERS MILK AND CREAM DAILY SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1024,
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
I
'
i
■
T.WHERRY
"WANNER
an* hr rrta Itot ot
Va>rk—al*UM tl n p
imtM  ata.
«2» Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, B. C. -
BARKER'S NEW FILM
HAILED AS HIS BEST
"Pleasure .Mad," the Metro-Louis
li. .Mayor picture which cornea to Uie
llo-Ilo Theatre Friday and Saturday.
wlll afford moviegoers of our city
another opportunity to marvel at Reg-
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
MEATS   POULTRY   FISH
         AND VEGETABLES
Telephone 143 P. 0. Box 162
COURTENAY.  B.C.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS. DOORS.
SHINGLES,
KILN'  DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND     FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHOUT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
._ I Night calls: 134X Courtenay
PHONES [J^. m c„ml)e„aild
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
Canada's Finest Barley
and Hops—Perfectly
Brewed
vBeerwithoutaPeer
and
U.B.C. Beer
ORDER NOW AND
GET FREE DELIVERY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
inald Barker's genius as a director.
ln other cities where it has been
shown this stirring society drama has
been hailed as marking a now epoch
in the career of the man already famous  for  his  productions    of    "The
Eternal Struggle, Hie    Old    Nest,"
"The Storm" and "Hearts Aflame."
The cast includes Mary Alden, Hunt-
ly Gordon, William Collier, Jr., Frederick Truesdell, Norma Shearer and
Winnlfred Bryson.
"Pleasure Mad Is based upon
Blanche Upright's novel, "The Valley
of Content." with scenario by A. P.
Younger and photography by Norbert
Brodin.
NEW SERIES OF "LEATHER
PUSHERS** COMING HERE
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
The 4ih series of these famous
stories will start ou Friday, with Billy
Sullivan, nephew of old John L. playing tiie leading part.
As in the other throe series, they
are full of action and comedy.
THE COMPTON COMPANY
On Monday, tbe Compton players
will be seen and heard in the very
funny farce "A Little Bit of Fluff".
On Tuesday, they will present another funny comedy "Baby Mine."
This company has been greatly
strengthened since their last appearance here, aud amusement lovers are
assured of a rare treat when this
Company plays here next .Monday and
Tuesday.
M       ir
vw
EYES
IRRITATED  BY
SUN.W1ND.DUST6-CINDERS
REGINALD DENNY
STARS AGAIN IN
RACING DRAMA
Reginald Danny achieved a worthy
reputation for fast action In the earls-
rounds of the famous "Leather rushers" series in which he was starred by
Universal. "Thc Abysmal Brute," the
Him version of Jack London's novel,
again witnessed Penny In a burst of
Rpeed.
Res galloped a lot of fast furlongi
in "The Kentucky Derby," thus adding to bis reputation for thc symbol
of fast action.
Now comes a picture in which Denny "strides" through the picture at
a hundred miles per hour. All previous attempts at speed rate as "slow
motion" In comparison to Ihe whirl
of "Sporting Youth," ihe Universal
Jewel producilon in which Denny is
starred, coming next Wednesday and
Thursday lo the Ilo-llo Theatre.
Denny Is noted  In  lhe Hollywood
film  colony  for  his  excessively  fast
driving.      He is n  wonderful  driver
and likes to play tag with  the best
racers.      Hut  bis  craving for  speed
was entirely satisfied during tlle film-
| ing of  bis  latent  feature.      It  Is  a
i story of automobile racing, written by
Hryou Morgan, author of the famous
j "Roaring Road" stories published In
| the Saturday Evening 1'ost.
I    The climax of the story comes In a
I big road race arid all of the thrill of
i such a race has been caught by tho
camera for the Denny film.    The road
race was staged at San Luis Obispo,
near  Monterey,  Callforia,  nnd   many
of the most famous drivers   In   the
country drove iu it.     Denny, by the
way. proved himself a first rate racing driver.
Denny is supported by Laura La
Plante and an all star cast. Harry
A. Pollard directed the picture .
CUMBERLAND NOW
LEADS IN UPPER
BASEBALL LEAGUE
(Continued From Page  1)
The playing diamond here sets many
visiting teams off its bearings.
Edmunds, at third losi all confidence in himself and finally placed
himself on his knees to block the ball'
on his lasl attempt. While Stlckney'
was poorly supported   he   is   to    he
j blamed himself for allowing the winning run to scamper home via Dave
Richards,  when  he  overthrew  third
! In the fifth inning.
'■ .Next Saturday at two o'clock and
'also on the Sunday at the same time
i the same teams meet In Nanaimo, The
| former is au exhibition ganie iu the
. Umpire Day Sports (here and the latter a league game.
! \iinaiinu AB lt II PO A E
j Harris,  lb       6   110   0   0
| Brown, rf,   . :i   o   i   o   0   d
' Bailey, If       4   0   13   0   0
, Piper, c 	
| .Millburn, cf,
Rice, ss	
Edmunds, 8b, .
Courtenay.   2b.
Stlcknoy, p.
Clarke, 3b.    ...
Total   	
Cumberland
Plump, lb    4
llannerinann, ss    4
Jones, 2b.     4
Conti,  cf    4
Marrochi, 3b      3
Robertson, If    3
Harrison, rf,
Richards, c .
Hunden, p. .
Parmer, cf,
Total   	
Summary:'
LADYSMITH MAN
GOES TO CALGARY
Archie Matheson, one of Ladysmith's
star football players, has left that
team and gone to Calgary to reside
in the future where he will. In ail
probability, lie on a Calgary football
team. Hla Ladysmlth teammates
put on a very successful smoker in
his honor on Wednesday 1G, at which
Ihey wished him the best of luck.
On behalf of the club T. A. Spruston
presented Archie with a handsome
travelling  bag.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. John Bond tender
their heartfelt thanks for [he many
expressions of sympathy and numerous floral tributes on the death of a
loving daughter and lo all those who
so willingly loaned tlielr cars nt tho
funeral.
Why Pay More?
RUNNING SHOES
Direct from the Factory to you
LIFE-BUOY BRAND
Rubber soled sandals, brown or white, children's sizes
4 to 101/., per pair $1.00
Misses' sizes 11 to 2, per pair $1.15
Boys' Black Athletic Oxfords, sizes 1 to 5 $1.50
Youth's Black Athletic Oxfords, sizes 11 to 13VL> $1.25
Children's Black Athletic Oxfords, sizes 4 to 10U. $1.15
Cavin's Shoe  Store
On account of our low overhead we can sell for less
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Hoard or by tho Government of British Columbia.
w
Commercial Printing
HEN you arc in need of printed stationery or any
other form of commercial printing call in and see
us; we will be pleused to submit samples, quote prices
and offer any suggestions where needed.
If you are living out of town mail us your requirements and you will receive the same courtesy as if you
brought your order in personally.
Below is a list of some of the everyday needs of
the business man and farmer. If you do not see what
you want listed, ask us about it.
BILLHEADS
ENVELOPES
SHIPPING TAGS
VISITING CARDS
FUNERAL NOTICES
CONSTITUTIONS and
BY-LAWS
PAMPHLETS
MENUS
DODGERS
CALLING CARDS
LETTER HEADS
CIRCULAR LETTERS
CONTRACT FORMS
CATALOGUES
POSTERS
BUSINESS CARDS
WINDOW CARDS
WEDDING SlnnON-
ERY
PROGRAMS
RIBBON BADGES
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ETC., ETC., ETC.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Cumberland Islander
"We Print, You Prosper"
PHONE 35— —CUMBERLAND, B.C.
t)  l   ti   i
( Aid) OK THANKS
Miss Fannie Strachan desires to
sincerely thank all those friends and
supporters who so ably assisted her
111 making her campaign In the Par-
nival Queen Contest the success that
It wns.
CONTRADICTS RUMOR
All It H PO A E
1   8   1
1
-Sacrifice hits: Marrochi
Brown; Sacrifice steal, Brown; Stolen bases. Conti (2) Piper; Left on
bases.   Cumberland    0;    Nanaimo   8.
Tlle Ladles' Auxiliary to the Hospital wish to contradict the rumor
(hat (hey nre paying for the costumes
of the train bearers and pages out of
tlie proceeds of the Carnival Contest.
These costumes are being supplied bv
the parents of the kiddies themselves
and are not costing the Auxiliary a
cent.
Struck out by Stlckney 7; by Hunden
6. Wild pitches, Stlckney 2: Bases
on balls oft* Hunden. 4. Umpire .1.
Bono.
Score by limpings
Nanaimo     002010000-3
Cumberland      20002000 x—i
Those magic boots of old—the seven-league boots
—were the work of an imaginative mind. Who could
ever expect to walk seven leagues in a single step?
The story of the seven-league boots was written in the days long before the present time with
its great possibilities. These days there is no need
for such wonderful steppers. There is the telephone.
It is no effort now to talk a hundred times seven leagues. The world is virtually at one's door. This age
of wonderment is based, too, on imagination, but it is
imagination plus practical experiment and great development.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
EASTBOUND
SUMMER  EXCURSIONS
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
WINNIPEG
MINNEAPOLIS
$72.00
ST. PAUL
IU'LI'TII
LONDON        #l!8.;,1
JM18.76
CHICAGO    | NII.0M
DETROIT     9106.02 TORONTO
NIAGARA FALLS, 1120.02
MONTREAL  *I!I2.7.> QUEBEC $141.80
ST. JOHN  *II7.»0 HALIFAX $168.45
BOSTON. $168,50
NEW YORK, Ull 17.10
$13.00 additional for ocean trip between Vancouver-Prince Run i"
on sale May 22 to Sept. 15, Final return limit, Oct 81,
Choice of routes -stop-overs ami side -trips.
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PARK
$40.25 Return from Victoria
EDWARD W, BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland .
C  F. HARI.H. li p.a . Victoria, B.C.
Canadian Mahonal Railways
BE
^. £
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 1 and (il
Cumberland, B.C
nn, u\..
w THE CI Ml ERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1924.
^JeUi3ri:£j'5ji-jr5i'[=iii
FREE
shaves for
10 mornings!
To Shave in Greater Comfort
—make this test!
Why start day after day wrong—by a shave that leaves your
face sore and uncomfortable. — when better shaves, quicker
shaves are possible?
Millions of men now shave in less time, and in far greater
comfort, us the result of a test such as we offer you here,
It took us 18 months to perfect Palmolive Shaving Cream
for you. We made 130 laboratory experiments. But wc gave
you these 5 distinct ways to shave more quickly, more comfortably.   Make the test—free—and judge for yourself:
Multiplies itself 250 times in luxurious lather.
Softens the toughest beard in one minute—with
no necessity for rubbing-in.
Lather will last 10 minutes ou your face—moist,
rich, effective.
Strong-walled bubbles hold hairs erect — for
cleaner, easier cutting.
Your skin is left comfortably cool—soothed hy
the careful blending of pain and olive oils.
If comfort is worth anything, it is worth your while lo
accept our offer.   Make the lesi—see for yourself ho'v well
j've done onr work.
Just post thc coupon today.
It brings you 10 free shaves.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
Toronto
Mad* in Canada
PALMOLIVE
SHAVING CREAM
10  SHAVES  FREE
Juhi till lii ami mall tn The Palmnllve
Company of Cunncla, Ltd., Dopt.D-471,
Toronto,  Om.
Allan sa	
fits-	
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
KING GEOKGE V.
Demand is the Cause of Supply
Demand an old and WELL-
MATURED whisky and you
will get it.
jgjgjSlcMeli^ (fi
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE 1
DR. A. H. WILKINSON I
DENTAL SURGEONS |
King Block jfj
PHONE 111!                   Residence 701. ij
. Courtenay ! S
**.
»»
[adian (Bis)
WHISKY
are soundly  manufactured, old,
and well-matured whiskies.
If you demand these you will get
them.
Read the label on every bottle and observe the
date on the Government Stamp.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited
WALKERVILLE   .   ONTARIO
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    -    I'linnliig    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0, Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. U.
»8IS OF
Montreal. Que.
Distillers of Fine
Whiskies since 1858
London, Eng.
New York, U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
" " of British Columbia.
Control Board or hy the Government
<2.3S->ff^!£X
^siaHaaicM
"Tha Moat of the Best for the Least"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
THE STORE THAT'S ALWAYS BUSY
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, Burvayed
'iown muds may be pre-empted b)
British subjects over 18 yean of age,
imi by aliens un declaring intention
to become British subjects, condt-
lunal upon residence, occupation,
i ml improvement Cue agricultural
jurpoBeB,
Full Information concerning regu-
utlons regarding pre-etnptloiw l:-*
given in DulleUn Mo. i, Land Series,
How ;o Pre-empt Land," cupies of
chicli can be obtained free of charge
ty addressing lhe Department of
.an da, Victoria, B.C., or to any Qov-
mnent Agent.
Records will be granted covering
mly land suitable for unriculturai
lUrposes, and which is not timbcr-
luni, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
md s.imii feet per acre east of thai
Range.
Applications  for pre-emptions are
i»e addressed  to the  I.und <"'om-
ilssl r Of the Unit] ItfcqrrilHff Dl
Islon, in which the land up.died for
- situated, and ure made un printed
:iiis   copies of  which  fun  be  ob-
int'd from the Land Commissioner
t'1'e-emptlt.ns must tie net upled r<>i
.ive years mid Improvement! made
ii value "i $10 per acre, Including
■.carina and cultivating al least Ave
teres, before v i.'rown Gran) can b*
Kur more detailed Information see
Uuttotln    ' Mow    r.    Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received f<»r pur-
■ii ise   uf   vacant   nnd   unreserved
!ri wn lands, nol belli", UnilHrland,
'or iijrrirulinral purposes; minimum
■th'. of Mrst-nlass farable) land li |6
ner in ••<•. and second-class (graslng)
md I'iM per nere Further infor-
•iiniii.n regarding  pu relume or ihr<>
f Crown lands is given In Bulletin
Mo.  in.  Land Series, "Purchase and
i,wmc "i t.'rown Lands."
.Mil), factory, or Industrial sites on
imber bind, not exceeding to sores,
in> ho purchnned or leased, the con-
lit ions      IneluditiK      payment       of
. mpaae
HOMESITE   LEASES
i n«tirveyed areas, not exceeding 20
■ it*s   may   be   leused ns  honmsltes,
inHHiona!   upon   a   dwelling   being
.H It'll In  ihe Ilrst year, title being
ih.t-.in; '»e   after  residence   and   lm-
tfiient   conditions   are    fulfilled
ben surveyed.
a ml
LEASES
gracing   and   industrial    pur-
area.; not exceeding 840 acres
■■ leaaed  by one person or a
ny
GRAZING
i'n
For Sale by
Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
ider the Grating Act tho Province I* divided Into grilling districts
and the ran^o administered under 'i
Gratdnfl Commissioner, Annual
graitlnn permits are Issued based nu
numbers ranged, priority being given
•o established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for rang*1
management. Free, oi partially free,
, permits are available for settlers,
| camprrH nnd travellers, up to ton
head.
List of Events
1. 10:00a.m.—Boys' Race, 4 to 5 years, 25 yards.
1st prize, Belt; 2nd prize, Belt; 3rd prize Belt.
2. 10:00 a.m.—Girls' Race, 4 to 5 years, 25 yards.
1st prize, Bead Necklace; 2nd prize, Sweet Grass
Baaket; 3rd prize, Dress Pin.
3. 10:00 a.m.—Boys' Race, 5 to 6 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Baseball Mit; 2nd prize, Belt; 3rd prize,
Pair Arm Bands.
4. 10:00 a.m.—Girls' Race, 5 to 8 years, 50 yards.
1st prize Box Candy; 2nd prize, Sweet Grass
Basket; 3rd prize, Dress Pin.
5. 10:05 a.m.—Boys' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Tie; 2nd prize Cufflinks; 3rd prize,
Pocket Knife.
fi. 10:05 a.m.—Girls' Race, 6 to 7 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Bead Necklace; 2 nd prize, Barrett; 3rd
prize, Pearl Bead Necklace.
7. 10:10a.m.—Boys' Race, 7 to 8 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Pocket Knife; 2nd prize, Leather Purse;
3rd prize, Belt.
8. 10:10 a.M.—Girls' Race, 7 to 8 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Box Candy; 2nd prize, Bottle Perfume;
3rd prize Sponge Ball.
9. 10:15a.m.—Boys' Race, 8 to 9 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Baseball Bat; 2nd prize, Leather Purse;
3rd prize, Pair Arm Bands.
10. 10:15 a.m Girls' Race, 8 to 9 years, 50 yards.
1st prize, Bottle Perfume; 2nd prize Box Candy;
3rd prize, Pearl Necklace.
11. 10:20 a.m.—Boys' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Belt Chain;
3rd prize, Eversharp Pencil.
12. 10:20 a.m.—Girls' Race, 9 to 10 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Tennis Raquet; 2nd prize, Box Candy;
3rd prize Bottle Perfume.
13. 10:25 a.m.—Boys' Race, 10 to 11 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Baseball Mit; 2nd prize Cufflinks; 3rd
prize, Pocket Knife.
11. 10:25a.m.—Girls' Race, 10 to 11 years, 75 yards.
1st prize Tennis Raquet; 2nd prize Sweet Grass
Baaket; 3rd prize, Bead Necklace.
15. 10:30 a.m.—Boys' Race, 11 to 12 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Eversharp Pencil; 2nd prize Baseball;
3rd prize. Leather Purse.
16. 10:30 a.m Girls' Pace. 11 to 12 years, 75 yards.
1st prize, Bead Necklace; 2nd prize, Box Candy;
3rd prize Box Candy.
i 7.   10:35 a.m Boys' Race, 12 to 13 years. 100 yards.
1st prize, Fish Line Reel; 2nd prize, Mouth
Organ; 3rd prize, Leather Purse.
18. 10:35 a.m.—Girls' Race, 12 to 13 years, 100 yards.
If! prize, Box Candy; 2nd prize Lunch Grip; 3rd
prize, Box Handkerchiefs.
!!». 10:10 a.m.—Boys' Race, 13 to 14 years, 100 yards.
1st prize. No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Necktie ; 3rd prize, Pocket Knife.
20. 10:40 a.m.—Girls' Race, 13 to 14 years, 100 yards.
1st prize. Manicure Set; 2nd prize, Tennis Raquet;
3rd prize, Beads.
21. 10:45 a.m.—Boys' Obstacle Race, 14 to 15 years.
1st prize, Baseball Mit; 2nd prize Ball Rat; 3<-d
prize, Eversharp Pencil.
22. 10:45 a.m.—Girls' Egg & Spoon Race, 14 to 15.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Box
Candy; 3rd prize, Bead Necklace.
23. 10:55* a.m Boys' Sack Race. 12 to 13 years.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Pocket Knife;
3rd prize, Cufflinks.
24. 10:55 a.m.—Girls' Shoe Scramble, 12 to 13 years.
1st prize, Manicure Set; 2nd prize, Box Handkerchiefs ; 3rd prize, Box Candy.
25. 11:05 a.m.—Boys' Relay Race, (Team of 4 boys)
Confined to the four senior rooms Cumberland
Public School and one each from the Bevan and
Union Bay Schools. 1st prize, 4 Eversharp
Pencils; 2nd prize, 4 Pocket Knives.
26. 11:15 a.m.—Girls' Relay Race (Team of 4 girls),
Confined to the four senior rooms Cumberland
Public School and one each from- the Bevan and
Union Bay Schools. 1st prize, 4 Manicure Sets;
2nd prize, 4 Boxes Handkerchiefs.
27. 11:25a.in.—Boys' Three Legged Race, 13 to 14.
1st prize, 2 Pocket Knives; 2nd prize, 2 Belts;
3rd prize, 2 Eversharp Pencils.
28. 11:25 a.m.—Girls' Potato* Race, 14 to 15 years.
1st prize, No. 2 A. B. Kodak; 2nd prize, Fountain
pen; 3rd prize Box Candy.
29. 11:35 a.m.—Boys' Wheel Barrow Race, 12 to 13.
1st prize, 2 Baseballs; 2nd prize, 2 Belts.
30. 11.35 a.m Girls' Skipping Race, 9 to 10 years.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Bead Necklace ; 3rd prize, Bottle Perfume.
3L 11:50 a.m.—Tug of War (Best of 3 pulls—teams
of 8 boys). Confined to the four senior rooms
Cumberland Public School and one each from the
Bevan and Union Bay Schools. lr.t prize, 8
Watches; 2nd prize, 8 Belts.
32. 1:15 p.m.—Pupils assemble on school grounds.
Procession headed by Band and May Queen's
float proceeds via Penrith Ave.. 3rd Street and
Dunsmuir Ave., to Recreation Grounds.
2:00 p.m.—Songs by School Children.
Address by Chas. Parnham.
Crowning of the May Queen, Miss Margaret Watt,
by ex-Queen, Miss Olga Owen.
Speech from the throne.
Maypole Dance and folk dances, if any.
Women's Auxiliary.
33. 3:00 p.m.—Boys' Pillow Fight, 14 to 15 years.
1st prize, Cap; 2nd prize, Lunch Grip.
34. 3:00 p.m.—Girls' Potato Race, 11 to 12 years.
1st prize, Pair Sneakers; 2nd prize, Hair Ribbon;
3rd prize, Bead Necklace.
35. 3:15 p.m.—Runninn High Jump, Boys 14 to 15.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Ever-
sharp Pencil; 3rd prize, Pocket Knife.
36. 3:30 p.m.—Running Broad Jump, Boys 14 to 15.
1st prize, No. 2 Brownie Kodak; 2nd prize, Ever-
sharp Pencil; 3rd prize, Pocket Knife.
37. 3:45 p.m.—100 Yards Dash Handicap—Open to
boys of all schools. 1st prize, No. 3 Brownie
Kodak; 2nd prize, Baseball Mit; 3rd prize, Baseball Mit. „   ,
38. 3:50 p.m.—Tug of War Final
39 4:00 p.m.—lunior Football Final, Empire Day-
Cup Competition. 1st prize, 11 Eversharp Pencils; 2nd prize, 11 Eversharp Pencils.
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at  office,
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
Phono 56.
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
Or Phone 15 Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
A, A. Brown
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
Tlle Largest and Mont Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds ol Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop lu and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent ln Cumberland, who
wlll advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work  nnd  Service
win Please Ion : t     i:
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.
Phone 8802
DR.   R.  B.   DIER   AND  DR.
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Olllce:   Cor. of  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 130 to 5.80—7 to 9p.m.
J. SUTHERLAND
i
i SATURDAY, MAY 34, 1824.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
AV
The Mercantile Store Co.
G. H. WYCHERLEY
The General Store With a General Purpose
Effil5J5M»!l2M
Tfaveyou
ordered
Your GROCERIES
Saturday and Monday in Grocery Specials- When
work is scarce you should look and read before
buying-Our prices with few exceptions are
as low as Vancouver
B.C. Sugar, 20 lbs (paper bags) $2.00
Flour, 49 lbs  $1.95
Meadow Brook Strawberry Jam 90c.
Ormonds Soda Biscuits, pkts .... 25c.
C. & B. Soda Biscuits  50c.
Mercantile Best Tea 60c.
3 lbs for  $1.70
Rose Dale Tea per lb 65c.
3 lbs  $1.85
Braids Lanka Tea 70e.
Braids Best Tea   90c.
Ridgeway's 5 O.C. Tea 95c.
3 lbs for $2.80
Mercantile Best Fresh Ground Coffee, per lb 4.  40c.
Mocha and Java Fresh ground coffee, per lb   50c.
Peas, 2's, 2 for   35c.
Corn, 2's, 2 for  35c.
Beans, 2's 2 for 35c.
Napoleon Tomatoes, 2</:>'s 2 for 35c.
per case $3.90
Small White Beans, 4 lbs for .... 25c.
Brown Beans 4 lbs for 25c.
Lima Beans, per lb  10c.
Malkins Best Baking Powder, 12 oz.
tins  25c.
Thompson's Jelly Powders, 3 for 25c.
Per dozen  95c.
Holsum Sour Mixed Pickles, gal $1.90
Holsum Sour Chow Pickles, gal. $2.00
Holsum Sweet Mixed Pickles,     per
gal  $2.40
Holsum Sour Mixed Pickles, 16 oz.
Per jar   40c.
Holsum Sweet Mixed Pickles, 16 oz.
Per jar   50c.
Holsum White Vinegar, bottle 25c.
C. & B. Pickled Walnuts, large size,
per bottle 65c.
Brooms, reg. $1.00 brooms, each 75c.
Fly Tox—the sure fly killer.     Get a
bottle today, per bottle   50c.
giSISISIBHjiEiiiH^^
THIS WEEK END WILL BE A BUMPER WEEK END FOR RUNNING SHOES OF
ALL KINDS. CALL AND SEE OUR STOCK. WE SHALL HAVE MANY
7 P _ SLIGHTLY SOILED f7 P _
I t)C AND UP UP FROM I Ut
LADIES' SANDALS, TWO-TONE, A PATENT WITH NEW HEEL.
Gent's  Brown  Oxfords,
for the summer season,
per pair, from
$4.85
Men's    Brown    Canvas
Shoes, leather soles, all
sizes, per pair
$3.25
Gent's  Dress Shoes, in
Black and Brown Blucher, also bals
$4.95
A wonder in Work Shoes
Black and Brown. Look!
per pair, only
$3.75
Boys'    Brown    Canvas
Shoes, leather soles, sizes
1 to 5, per pair
$2.85
Youth's  Brown  Canvas
Shoes, leather soles, sizes
11 to 1, per pair
$2.50
HSEKEKHiH^ aiBiaiBluaBIS/3l?ISISIBIBISI3luHBMEEEIBII
DRESS UP FOR THE HOLIDAY.    YOU CAN DO THIS AT LITTLE EXPENSE
AT THE MERCANTILE STORE
Large stock on hand of Ladies' Crepe
Dresses for street wear. Only $3.50
Ladies' Sun Hats, from   50c.
White Shoes for Tennis and Boating.
Get a Gent's White Straw Hat for the
holiday  $2.75
Gents Summer Pants, 'Newest Style,
per pair $3.00
We have a large range of Children's
Dresses with Pants for the holiday.
Children's Running Shoes in Black,
White and Brown.
KHAKI GOODS FOR HOT WEATHER
Men's Pants, from   $2.00 Boys' Long Leg Khaki Pants
Kiddies' Frolic Suits,   in   Butchers'
Blue, Red trimmed $1.25
The same   in   Dark   Blue,   heavier
goods $1.95
$2.00
Boys' Knee Pants from $1.50
Large Sun Hats for Ladies, fine for
garden wear   50c.
Large Sun Hats, for men 40c.
Same for Boys   20c.
LARGE STOCK OF .LINOLEUMS, CONGOLEUM RUGS, MATTRESSSES; ALSO
PILLOWS AND SHEETS AT THE VERY BEST PRICES.
The Mercantile Store Co.
PHONE 133
Cumberland, B.C.
B.O. BOX 100
"Can British Columbians
Repudiate Premier
Oliver"
That is tho question every voter
must ask himself before June 20,
Isolated out here behind the Roolty
| Mountains and three thousand miles
I from the political, financial and popu-
i la t ion centres of Canada, this province
I has struggled and fought for thirty-
: five years for its very existence.
Canada's tariff policy has prevented
1 British Columbia from enjoying com-'
| mcrcial relations with    our   natural
land adjacent trading markets—Wash-
i ington, Oregon and California.     And '
Canada's freight rate structure is do-,
| signed in a manner which facilitates
the movement of Western raw    pro- \
ducts Eastward and Eastern nninufac-i
! lured  products  Westward, disregard-
ling altogether the natural short haul
I in nnd out to Pacific tide-wator.     So
that since Joining Confederation, this
Province   has   been   the  outpost,  the
j tail-end of Business Canada.
I    The Panama Canal entirely changed
all this by dividing Canada into two
transportation   slopes,  und  therefore
into two trading areas;  the Eastern
area to he served from the Atlantic,
and the  Western area  to  ho  served
from the Pacific.
But is is one thing to have a natural
heritage or a moral right, and it is
another thing to collect tliat heritage
:>r enforce that right.
Notwithstanding British Columbia's
claim  to  greator    recognition    from
: Business Canada, the executives ol
every large financial, commercial, political and transportation corporation
j in Canada nre personally interested
and personally live in Eastern Canada. Although Vancouver Is the third
: city in Canada, there is not a Vancouver director on the Canadian National, on the C.P.lt., on the Canada
Grain Board, on the Dominion Hail-
way Board, or any one of the largo
institutions of Canada. Under such
conditions, what chance has B.C. to
get proper recognition—to even get u
hearing?
Tbe only chance we have of developing this end of Canada within the
next generation, is to get out aud fight
for recognition, fight for equalised
freight rates, an equal charge for
equal service applying to other parts
of Canada, fight for free and unrestricted use of the Panama Canal flghl
for representation or financial nnd National directorates, and fighl for the
right of this Province to develop and
mow.
Whether one likes or dislikes Premier Oliver; whether one agrees or
disagrees with him on other questions
(and the Vancouver Sun disagrees
with him OH many tilings), it must be
admitted:
1. John Oliver's great homely common sense aud dogged fighting qualities particularly adapt him for a
champion of equity nnd justice.
■2. Thai he is fighting for conditions which nre fundamental to the
prosperity of British Columbia. Without these conditions ,we can muke no
real   progress.      :i.   Thnt  grent  pro-
LAMPS
ELECTR0=AUT0MATES
• (AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LAMPS).
NO BATTERIES! - NO ACIDS!
$5.00WILL LAST A life.TIme&5.00
Practical, Durable, Always Ready on Land, Under
Water, Any Climate, Anywhere
The Electro Automate is an Electric Lamp made In France without a battery or refills, and of a new conception. It is a perfect
machine; the result of years of test In the plants of the manufacturers In Switzerland and France :: This marvellous little
pocket lamp, embodying simplicity, reliability and compactness,
weighs only 12 ounces,     lt is patented in all countries.
The dynamo, with permanent magnet, based on new methods,
gives dense magnetic fields of perfect concentration, which surrounds the induction without loss of magnetic dispersion, ami
permits the maximum exploitation of the energy.
Construction of these lumps is very carefully carried out by
skilled Swiss clock and scientific Instrument makers :: Electro
Automate Lamps are tight and dust-proof. They can be used
in all climates, including equatorial regions. They will everywhere render the utmost service, giving a clear white light, without fear of the bulb burning out or the generator booming
warm.
All Electro Automate Lamps arc guaranteed for six months, conditionally that they are not tampered with. With reasonable
care they will last for years. Any part can be renewed at slight
cost.     Lamps arc provided wltll a pocket for extra bulbs.
This lamp is especially useful to travellers, tourists, marine and
mining engineers, uutomobllists, dairymen, in fact everybody.
They are Indispensable on life-boats and rafts, where a light Is
needed that will not be extinguished by wind or wave :: Every
mine should be provided with one or more of these lamps at Its
portal or entrance, for the convenience of the employee or ollici.il
whose work takes him in and out ot the mine at irregular intervals, lt is the cheapest und best light on the market for this
purpose :: Marine engineers welcome Electro Automate in their
engine room. It saves them from the annoyance and loss of
time occasioned by the unreliability of battery lamps when they
wish to locate trouble or find something in a hurry :: Pilots are
favorable to these little lamps because Ihey are always standing
by ready and able to do their part in any and all kinds of
weather." They are hardy little fellows and will stand any
amount of knocking about, even to the bulbs, whicli are superior
to any others on the market:: Mushers over the northern trails
take these lamps In preference to others, because they give a
never'ending light and add less than a pound ot weight to their
outfits. The winds can't blow them out and the snow or wet can
not short circuit them.
DIRECTIONS
The working of this sell-general Ing lamp Is very simple. Pull the
lever completely and sharply wilh the lingers and let go, allowing
it to open fully In order to take another lull stroke. Strokes
should be eveii and sharp for best results. This lamp Is the
only one of Its weight that will give a perfect light. The bearings of this lamp should be oiled about once a month.
SOLI) LOCALLY BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
NOTICE
Fifty dollars reward will be paid for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or
persons who turned on the water valve at Hamilton
Lake on or about May 17th, 1924, causing loss of water
and damage to property.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
gress has already been made by htm
in tbe case of grain rates, grain elevators, and harbor improvements, and,
working with n sympathetic Government at Ottawa, there is every reasoa
for asking for and expecting even
more favorable consideration In the
Immediate future.
4. That to replace Premier Oliver
at this particular time with either Mr.
Bowser or Gen. McRae would In effect
say lo oflicial Ottawa that we were
not sincerely interested In Premier
Oliver's campaign. But this is not
so: we are Interested, vitally Interested.
Disregarding petty issues, disregarding personal sentiment and disregarding political sentiment, our
provincial election gets down to the
simple economic question—Can this
privlnce afford to repudiate Premier
Oliver? - Vancouver Sun.
LOCAL BALL TEAMS
TO PLAY NANAIMO
Both Cumberland's football and
baseball teams travel to Nanaimo to-
taseball teams travel to Nanaimo Sa-
funlay. to try conclusions with the
Xanaimo teams as part of the 24th
of May sports In thai city. The baseball game, which Is an exhibition one.
takes place at 2.00 p.m.. The following filacers represent Cumberland:
Plump, Richards, James, Marrocbi.
.Mclntyre. Bannerman, Hunden, Conti,
McKay, Farmer, Harrison and Jackson (trainer). The same two teams
will meet the following day (Sunday)
in an Upper Island League fixture.
In the football division the following players will travel: Blair, Stewart, .Monahan, Hitchens, Conti, Brake.
Bannerman, Turner, Graham, Mllli-
Rim uud Deluce. The game Is scheduled lo take place on the Central
Sports Ground today (Saturday)
at G.00 p.m. and Is for a prize of two
hundred dollars. Nanaimo is fielding their strongest team lu an effort
to win so u hard game will result.
SECOND GAME
ENDS IN DRAW
The second friendly gnmc of soccer
between the Cumberland Fire Brigade
and lhe Merchants Rep. team resulted in a 2-nll draw, thc second in two
games played between these teams.
The lirst game, played a week ago
Wednesday, ended in a 3 all draw and
With last Wednesday's ending In a
somewhat similar manner, tbe many
supporters are wondering more and
more what thc linal outcome will be.
Wednesday's game was a hard
fought one but wns somewhat rough
owing to the Firemen taking advantage of their superior weight. Tlielr
was no necessity for Conif playing as
roughly as lie did. He ouglll to remember these games ure only friendly ones and should be played in a
friendly spirit. Perhaps lie thought
he was playing senior ball against
Nanaimo or Ladysmlth.
The next game, which will probably
be next Wednesday, will surely decide
the winners and If it doesn't the boys
say tbey are going lo try baseball.
Why not try tennis or golf?
EX-MAY QUEEN WILL
BE UNABLE TO ATTEND
Miss Olga Owen. Cumberland's l!)2'l
May Queen, will be unable to attend
this year's celebration so the local
school lias made arrangements to have
one of its own girls, Jessie Gran',
a last year's Maid of Honor, perform
the ceremony, whereby Miss Margaret
\\',itl of lievan will lie crowned Queen
'.: lhc- .May tor 1924.
At ti.Ilo o'clock iu tiie morning the
City Hand will parade up to the Sporls
Ground unci will be in attendance during tbe entire celebration, At 1.1C
o'clock in tbe afternoon all school
children will assemble on the school
ground in readiness for the big parade. Here each one wlll be glv-'it
a strip of (ive refreshment tickets
whicli may be redeemed for Ice cream
etc.. at a stand erected on (he grounds
Immediately after the conclusion of
all sports, the various prize-winners
will assemble In (be Held where they
wlll be presented wilh Ihelr prizes.
PROVINCIAL PARTY
NOMINATION CONVENTION
COURTENAY, Lasl Friday nlglit
nl the Gaiety Theatre Major Reginald
Tupper and Mr. Grant were the visiting speakers on behalf of the Provincial party candidate, Mr. G. Evcry-
Claylon, who was chosen as Die
party's standard bearer in lhe pending Provincial election. Thc nominating convention was held In the afternoon, three names being proposed:
Captain O. II. Bates, former supervisor of the Soldier Settlement Board;
Rev. M. Walker of Union Bay and Mr.
Clayton. Mr. Clayton is a farmer, residing al Little River. Major Harry
Clarke, of Headquarters Camp Three
was chairman of the meeting. Major
Tupper came over from Vancouver In
place of bis father. Sir Hibbcrt Tun-
| per wbo was unavoidably kept at home
I by Illness. PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1924.
NEWS ITEMS from SUTHERLAND'S
Local Briefs
Announcing the arrival of some
New Art Silk Waisl-s, real good value
at *S.».">. Shades Mauve. Green and
White.      At Sutherlands.
A good assortment of Ladles'
Waists in line muslins, both White
and Colors. These are gathered
from higher priced qualities but are
grouped for quick salo to effect a
speedy clearance. *l.f>». At Sutherlands.
Girl's Dresses, from ages 0 to 14
years, comprising six different styles
made of a good quality Gingham and
nre a real good snap nt $l«!i> each.
At Sutherlands.
Ladies' House Dresses, about fifty
in file lot, made up of real heavy material in various colors. Price %\M
At Sutherlands.
Ladles' Gingham Drosses, extra
special value, several different styles
to choose from and the sizes run from
3G to 44. They are a smart lot of
dresses and are good value at $3,95.
At Sutherlands.
All Silk Hose, Black only. About
30   pairs  in  all  sizes,  regular  price
{1.60. A Clearing Line at flic, per
pair.     At   Sutherlands.
Art Silk Hose, in most of the wanted
colors, give good satisfaction at 75c.
a pair.     At Sutherlands.
Ladles' 1). .t A, Corsets. See our
special line of this celebrated make
of guaranteed goods In Pink and also
In White. Price $1.50. At Sutherlands.
Ladies' Elastic Girdles, in most of
the wanted sizes, at $1.25 per pair.
At Sutherlands.
Ratines, In the shades of Pink, Blue.
White, Green, Snnd, Helio and Mus-
tard.      Double  width, a  good cloth.
suitable for dresses and skirts. Price
' 75c.     At Sutherlands.
Boys' Navy Serge Suits, made of the
w<?ll known grade of Fox Serges, will
give satisfaction, all sizes. At Sutherlands.
Men's Suits, a fairly good range of
Men's Suits, every one will give you
your moneys worth of value. See
our range and be convinced. Sutherlands.
Mrs. Henry Gibson and child und
Mrs. H, Thompson left Friday morning for Glasgow, Scotland. Tbey will
travel over Canadian National lines.
*       ft       *
Mrs. Robertson, sister of Mr. J.
Kirkbrlde, arrived in Cumberland
Thursday night from Nanaimo.
...
Miss Laura Robertson returned on
Thursday from Vancouver where Bhe
underwent an operutlon in the General Hospital.
CARD OF THANKS
1 hereby extend my sincerest thanks
to all who aided me in the recent May
Queen Contest.
Josie Balagno.
CARD OF THANKS
the real
coofe
rrnlKL
DRYGOODS
& GENTS FURNISHINGS
Free Recipe Book
Write the Borden Co, Ltd, Vancouver
Our Lead Increased
OVER
ONE-EIGHTH
ALTHOUGH
THIRTY-FIVE
ONLY FIVE
of the Life Insurance business done in British Columbia in the year
ending 31st December, 1923, was done by The Great-West Life.
life insurance companies nre represented in the Province,
of these reached the two million mark, while The Great-West Life
tops the list with $5,088,812.
THE FIGURES ARE FROM THE PRELIMINARY REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF INSURANCE
Premiums for   Amt. of policies   Net Amount
the year    new and taken up    in force
Great-West  $911,121 $5,088,812
2nd Company  789,177 4,054,713
3rd           "            622,100 3,338,533
4th           "            486,883 3,300,000
5th           "            436,703 2,141,935
Exclusive of Industrial
$28,541,351
23,880,426
20,623,29k
15,250,000
10,542.388
MI.AO   OFFICE  - WINNIPEG
LOCAL   REPRESENTATIVE
Low rates and
exceptional profits paid to policyholders explain this marked preference
for The (Iroal-
West Life.
A. WALKER
CUMBERLAND
I wish to thank Dr. Hicks, Uie
Matron, the nursing staff and Mrs.
Mclntyre of the Cumberland General
Hospital for their kindness and attention during my recent Illness, and also the kind friends who visited me
while a patient there.
Mrs. J. Monks.
RUSSIA—NAME CHANGED
Notification haa been received from
the Postul Admlnlsteration at Moscow
that thc official name of their country
is now "L'Unlon des Republlque Sn-
vietlstes Soclallstes" — abbreviation
URSS—(Union of Soviet Socialistic
Republic) and thnt this address, Instead of Russia, should be used on
correspondence.
Slimmer Mall Service to Yukon
Attention is invited to the fact that
navigation in the Yukon will open
about tite first week In June. Parcel
Post i-erviee will then be resumed.
Feel Better
In Few Hours
Or No Cost
This Is the time of year when cour
liver becomes sluggish and your Intestines become clogged up with poisonous waste. Your liver does not
properly purify blood thnt flows to
your skin, The result Ib sallow complexion, dark circles and pimples. \s
these poisons continue to flood your
system, your resistance is lowered,
you fee! dull and tired and sick.
Make this test! Cleanse and tone
your liver with Dr. Thacher's Liver
and Blend Syrup. Contains pure ingredients prescribed by Physicians.
Helps nature strengthen your stomach, soothe tired and over-taxed
nerves, brace up system and purify
your blood. Notice quick difference
In way you look, eat, sleep and feel,
You, too, will be satisfied, as others
have, or no cost.
Dr. Thacher's ts sold and recommended by Lang's Drug and Book
Store in Cumberland and by leading
Jdruggists in every city and town.
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
Delicious
DESSERT
Take home some of our Ice Cream.
We serve only Comox Ice Cream and the best of
FRUITS SYRUPS NUTS, ETC
at our Soda Fountain
Give us a trial and be convinced
EJSKJiMtWSHBJSiai^^
COZY BOXES QUICK SERVICE
PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
wanted-wpaE McGregor drag
Saw.      State  price  and  condition
Smith, Islander Olllce.
Auction Sale
AT MISTO
(About .1 miles from Cumberland)
G. J. Hardy has received instructions from Mr. C. F. Fernance, who Is
leaving for Australia, to sell by Auction, without any reserve, at his farm
situated at Mlnto, off the Cumberland
Royston Road, on
Saturday, May ill, at 2 pju. prompt
the whole of bis Household Furniture
including Blankets, Bed Linen, Etc.,
Qrnnd young dairy cow, freshened
last January and now giving 3 gallons milk per day; Light Driving Mare
with Foal at foot. Young Jersey Heifer. 2 Yorkshire Sows and their young
pigs. Ford Touring Car In good running order and numerous other effects. Terms, Cnsh. Further particulars may be had from Mr. Fernance on the farm or ln Posters or
from the Auctioneer.
G. J. HARDY
Phone 10       Courtenny       l'hone 10
FOR SALE
WANTED—TO HEAR FROM
er of good Farm for sale,
cash pirce, full particulars.
Bush,  Minneapolis Minn.
 JFOR   SALE—HOUSEHOLD   FURNI-
OWN-!    ture Including piano In first class
State;    condition,  gramophone  and  dining
D. F. [    room suite   (new)   Apply  MrB.  \V.
G. Evans, Townslte. M.31
PETER McNIVEN
. .TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
THE MAPLES
Ice Cream Parlor, Royston
Is Now Open
COOL   DRINKS
Fruit Stock Just Arrived—Complete as Follows
LEMONADE POWDER, SHERBET, LIME JUICE, LIME JUICE
CORDIAL, RASPBERRY VINEGAR, LOGANBERRY JUICE.
QRAPE JUICE, HOP ALE AND SHANDY
BELFAST GINGER ALE
SPECIALS
a£.5C QUAKER GLASS JARS ZoC
Strawberry Jam, Raspben-y, Black Currant, Red Currant Jelly, Marmalade.
Corn Flakes, 2 pkts. for < 25c.
Post Krumble Bran with parts of wheat, 2 pkts. 35c.
Del Monte Sliced Peaches, Pears and Apricots 35c.
3 tins for , $1.00
Swift's White Laundry Soap, 9 cakes for  55c.
Swift's Washing Powder, large pkts 35c.
3 for $1.00
Jelly Powders, all flavors, 3 pkts. for 25c.
FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
Bananas,   Oranges,  Lemons,  Grape  Fruit,  Almeria
Grapes, Eating and Cooking Apples, Head Lettuce,
Hot House Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Cauliflower,
Green Cabbage, Cucumbers, Onions, Etc.
SUNKIST ORANGES
all sizes
3 DOZEN d»i   AA 4 DOZEN
5 DOZEN «P 1 .XfyJ 5 DOZEN
Large sizes, 75c. and 90c. per dozen
Lemons, per dozen 35c.
Large Grape Fruit, 3 for   25c.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
—•—
WANTED—GIRL TO WORK IN OF-
flce and make herself generally use-1
ful.     One with high school educu-1
tlon preferred.    Apply P.O. Drawer
430 Cumberland.
FOR RENT-OFFICE CONTAINING
two rooms, four good living rooms
upstairs; also two rooms at the rear
of the Royal Bank Building. Rent
reasonable. For further particulars
apply Thc Islander P.O. Drawer 430
Cumberland. J.S1
Chevrolet
FOR ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION
Don't fail to inspect the CHEVROLET SUPERIOR
models, if you intend to purchase a closed or open passenger car, light delivery, or a ton truck.
The CHEVROLET is the cheapest, strongest, and most
economical, fully equipped, light car on the market.
It will pay you to make a thorough inspection of these
models, before deciding.
"Comparison Sells Chevrolets"
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
Courtenay, B.C.

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