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The Cumberland Islander Jun 3, 1922

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Array ■BPP
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With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTYrFlRST YEAR—NO. 22
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY. JUNE Uril, l'Ji'2
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:   TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Anpial Meeting
|f The_B.C.F.A.
TheT-jiiiiiual meetingot-the British
Columbia Football Association was
held ui the Vancouver hotel on Sut-
urdayr.Iast, May 27th. Mr. Charles
Graham: and Mr. J. L. Brown, of this
city, *8re in attendance at the meeting, *Bch Wits' exceptionally well
attended and a great deal of enthusiasm sjrown.
The;xusual routine business was
gone Into and a committee was up
pointed to revise the constitution and
to bring the constitutions of the dlf
ferent: organizations into line, thus
avoiding friction.    I
TherJormation of the British Col
umblaSr.Junlor Football Association
was also authorized, the meeting voting $101) for organization purposes.
This -junior association will have
chargsfof all Junior football through
out tha province^ but will be subser-
vant tcr.-the parent body, the B.C.
F.A.   S
The election of officers resulted as
follows: Hon. -Pr«8.r Liout.-Govoruor
W. C. Nlcol; Hon. Vice-Pros. Mr. 0. B.
Allan, Vancouver; President, Mr. F.
Campbell, Vancouver; First Vice-
President,' Mr. 1 Chas. Graham, Cumberland; Second Vice-President, Mr.
Archibald Halter, Victoria; Sec-
Treas,, Mr. G. K. Morton, Vancouver;
Council, Upper Island, Messrs. Ciillin,
Ladysmith;- J. McGregor, South Wellington; Lower Island, Messrs Sullivan and Cull, Victoria; Mainland,
Messrs Alec Robertson, II. B. Grieve,
Tom Nelson, J. Mutrle, Vancouver.
The ;drnw for the Connaught Cup
series was then gone into uud resulted as follows^
Cumberland ...vs. Nanaimo; J. Rod-
gers, Lfidysmftlf, referee.
Northfleld vs. Ladysmith 1st; Dawson, Nanaimo, referee.
South Wellington vs. Ladysihllh
2nd;  Quinn, Nanaimo, referee.
I. L. A., of Vancouver, a bye.
Games to be played on- Saturday,
June 10; in the event ot a tie at the
end ol the ninety "minutes, extra
thirty minutes to be plnyed. In the
event of a tie after two hours of play
the game to be replayed ou tho following Wednesday. These replays,
if any, will be to a finish.
Semi-final, I.L.A, vs. Northfleld or
Ladysmith 1st; South Wellington or
Ladysmlth 2nd vb. Cumberland or
Nanaimo.
Semi-final games to be played on
Saturday, June 17,. The referees for
the semi-Anal games will not be-appointed .until after the first round
has beeu.completed.
Local Youth Assaults
Chinaman—$15 and Costs
Saturday evening, three or four
youths went Into Chinatown and attempted to buy some beer off one of
the merchants. On being refused,
one of them, it la alleged, struck the
Chinaman a violent blow. Constable
Dunbar served the assallunt witli a
summons on Monday morning, charging him with assault. He was brought
before Magistrate Baird, Monday afternoon, and pleaded guilty, being
lined $15 and $4.25 costs.
MERVILLE HARVEST FAIR,
WEDNESDAY, MAY 88, 1022
Space to let for exhibition of agricultural "Implements, sideshows, etc.,
also tenders for contract for catering.
Those desiring same, please apply to
the Secretary, Merville Fair Committee, Merville, B.C., for terms.
SALE OF WORK
The Pythian Sisters of Benevolence
Temple, No. 9, ure holding a salo of
work on Wednesday, June 7th, from
2.30 to 6, In the G.W.V.A. hall. A
home cooking stall will also bo run
in connection with the sale of work,
uud afternoon tea will be served.
Whilst Drive and Dance
In the evening, commencing at 8,
there will be a whist drive followed
by a dance. Refreshments will he
served and the usual admission
charge of fifty cents will be made.
SCOTS GUARDS HAND
The recent visit of the Scots
Guards' band to this province brought
out one Interesting fact. The band at
full strength has a membership of
C. Out of the 63, two are Scotchmen and 01 Englishmen.
Intermcdlale Game Saturday
The Cumberland intermediate base
ball team arc schcdulod to meet
Bevan on the Recreation Grounds, on
Saturday, June 3. Mayor McDonald
will pitch the ilrst ball and Mr
Aitken, of Bevan, will umpire.
Lieut-Governor To
Make Presentation
The St. John Ambulance Association, Cumberland Centre, are holding
a free concert in the ilo-llo theatre
on Monday, June 12th, at 7.3U p.m.
Coupled with the concert will be the
presentation of tiie Coderre Cup and
Hie goVernmeht medals, and also the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited prizes to the victorious No. 4
mine surl'uco team, who were so Buc
cessl'ul in winning the dominion
championship. Barton's team, of
Nanaimo, will also be presented with
the second prizes in the same com
petition.
Lieut.-Governor W. C. Nicol will
present the cup, Hon. W. Sloan will
preseut the government medals, and
Mr. Thomas Graham the colliery company's prizes.
The public are cordially Invited to
tiie concert and presentation, which
is absolutely tree of charge. A Ilrst
class musical programme is being arranged and it Is expected that this
concert will surpass any ever attempted In Cumberland. The concert
starts at 7.30 sharp.
Following the concert, a dance will
be held in the dance hall below the
theatre, when a charge of $1.00 will
He taxed gentlemen, and ladles will
be admitted on bringing refreshments. First class music will be
provided and dancing kept up until
the wee sma' hours.
ftONALD DERBYSHIRE DIES
AFTER SHORT ILLNESS
The death occurred on Wednesday,
May 31, of Ronald William Derbyshire, aged eight and a half years,
son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Derbyshire of
ibis city. The funeral will be held on
Sunday, June 4, from the family residence to the English Church, thence
to the Cumberland cemetery. Rev. W.
Leversedge will officiate.
The pall-bearers are chosen from
ihe Sunday School and public school,
all being former playmates of the lad.
t'. IV. V. A. Whist Drive
A most enjoyable whist drive and
.lance was held In the G.W.V.A. memorial hall on Friday evening last under tlle auspices of the ladies' auxiliary. Some very nice and useful prizes
wore given for the whist and were
won by, first lady, Mrs. H. Parkinson, second, Mrs. Chas Graham;
gentlemen, lirst Mr. R. Waugh second
Mr. C. Cuwdell. .Music for the dance
.vas provided by Mrs. R. E. Frost and
.ilr. w. A. Owen. The next of these
popular whist drive and dances will
iie held on Friday, Juno 9.
First League Game Of The
Season Won By Cumberland
GARDEN PARTY, JUNE 21
Ihe ladles of St. Goorge's Tresby-
cerlan Church Intend holding a gar-
len party on Mr, Charles Parnham's
lawn on Wednesday, June 21. There
will bo a stall of plain aud fancy sowing, also a home cooking stall. Ice
cream and tea will ho served hy the
ladles during the afternoon.
POUND BY-LAW TO
BE  ENFORCED
Chief of Police A. J. Merry and
fames Baird have' been appointed
pound-keepers tor the city and have
been Instructed to Impound all stray
animals, Owners of cows, horses,
etc., would be well advised to keep a
.dose watch on their stock, thereby
laying themselves troublo and expense.
Branch of Retail Merchants'
Association Formed Here
Mr. Geo. S. Hougliam, provincial
•ecrelary of the Itelall Merchants' Association of B.C., Incorporated, gave
i very eloquent address to a number
if the retail merchants of Cumber-
land on Friday last.
Mr. Hougliam spoke on the Person-
tl Property tax, the oriental situation
mil the sales tax. At tho conclusion
if the meeting a discussion arose as
io whether a brunch of the R.M.A.
should be formed here. Mr. McKIn-
non was eventually elected president
nnd J. Sutherland secretary.
Mr. J. P. Hicks was a visitor in
town during the week on business.
Ho left this, Friday, afternoon for
Parksvllle to attend the joint recital
given by Mrs. Gertrude Huntley
Green and Mr. Gideon [ticks.
You tell 'em Mack, hand It right to
em! A 4-3 victory in the first game
of the Island league, Jack McAllister's gang drew first blood in the
opening game on the Recreation
grounds last Sunday and nosed
Courtenay out of as tight a ball guineas has been witnessed here for a long
ilme. A utce little singlo would have
'von the game more than once for
Courtenay, but the boyB were right
behind Shakespeare on the mound.
Shakespeare pitched a beautiful game
or the locals, tanning nine men
vhile against Larsen's five for Cour-
enay. Johnny Marrocbi, the local
protege, provided the thrills of the
game, when ho stalked through the
nail of fame in the sixth. He robbed
'-.arBen of a hit, when he stopped his
terrific drive with a runner on third
In the same Inning he made tho winning run for Cumberland, when he
tried to see how hard he could hit the
ball and succeeded in lifting it over
the fence for a homo run.
Largo Crowd Present
It was an excellent exhibition of
baseball, being as good a brand of
ball as can be seen in B.C. today.
The weather was ideal and over 400
fans saw Mr George Clinton officially
open the Island league when he hurled the lirst ball over the plate.
The local crew gave Larsen a hot
reception in the lirst frame, taxing
him for four hits and three runs.
Plump singled through short stop, as
did Bannerman. Conti at bat slammed a fly to centre. Andy Robertson
came in to meet it but found he was
not as tall as he thought, aud had to
turn right around and chase the ball.
•Meanwhile Plump and Bannerman
crossed tiie home plate, and Sackl
Conti was having a little fun all by
himself trying to make third base.
Finch was next up and did his bit by
bringing Conti home with a good
drive to left. Larson had tho ilrst
home run chalked against him when
Marrocbi slammed one over the fence
iu the sixth with no one on the bags.
Courlenay Kct Three Runs
Shakespeare scattered his hits well
and gave the milkmen little leeway.
"Smiler" Petticrew scored in the
third when he singled, stole second
and was advanced to third by Larsen,
coming home on Horton's poke past
Ilrst. "Smiler" scored again >ln the
eighth. Ho reached first on a base on
balls and again stole second, going
down to third ou Larsen's fly to right
Held. Petticrew crossed the plate on
Shakespeare's wild pitch. The last
run wus obtained by H. Dixon, when
(Continued on Page Four)
MONSTER MOOSE
DANCE TONIGHT
Tim Maple Leaf Legion, No. 53, are
holding a monster dauco tonight
Friday, in lliu Ilo-llo ball from 9.30
to 2.30. The COUQUS Vancouver
legion orchestra will supply the
.uuslc. This orchestra has the reputation of being one of the best on ihc-
maiii.laml. All are who are fond of
lancing tu really good music, are
urged to be present at the llo-Ilo tonight! The charge for admission Has
beeMploced at ft.oo for gentlemen
uud 3fi Cent's tor ladles.
liOfALB DEFEAT JAtANESK 0-1
The Intermediate biisehullers came
hnck'.nt Hie Japanese, who made a
bleanjtip on life locals last Saturday,
and with St. Glair in Hie box won out
8-4. '1st. Clair did not extend'himself
to nniy great extent. Dave ltiehnnls
nnillug him a little difficult to bold In
the Orst couple of innings when Ihey
chased in a run or two on passed
balls. Kencliy pitched bis usual consistent game for the Japs. Both King
and Matt Stewart featured witli nice
one-handed catches in the outfield
during the game.
NEW POLICE CHIEF
I SWORN IN THURSDAY
The new chief of police of Cumberland was sworn in on Thursday
morning last before Magistrate Baird.
Mr. Merry comes to Cumberland
with an excellent reputation as an
efficient officer. We extend to Mr.
Merry a hearty welcome and trust
the people of Cumberland will give
the new chief that measure of cooperation, which Is so essential for
the keeping of any city free from
crime..
LEAGUE BASEBALL
*       GAME ON SUNDAY
An important league baseball game
will be held on Sunday, at 1 p.m., on
the Recreation Grounds, Cumberland,
when the Granby swatters try conclusions with the local seniors.
The game has been set for one
o'clock enabling Granby to mnko the
journey to Courlenay to play the
ranchers iu a league game. The
Courtenay game will commence at 1
o'clock. It is to be hoped a good
number of the local fans will journey
to Courtenay to boost Tor the ranchers.
Joint Recital Will Be
Rendered Monday Evening
Talented Artistes Will Render Joint Recital in Grace Methodist
Chuch on Monday Evening—Excellent
Programme Prepared
On Monday evening, Iu the Methodist Church, the two well-known artistes,
Mrs. Gertrude Huntley Green (pianist) ami Mr. Gideon Hickn (baritone)',
will give a joint recital, commencing al 8.15 sharp.
The following press notices, referring to these two arllstcs, are very good
comments, aud music lovers can look forward with assurance to uu onjuy'-
ablc evening. ,
PresK Comments |
Victoria   Times,   April   27th,   1922,
(Mero-Groeu recital): "Mrs. Green Is
now safely ensconced In the highest
niches of pianoforte playing, ond can
lie counted 111 the front rank of pros-
ent day pianists, such ns Myra Hess,
Yolanda Mero aud Ethel Leglnska."
.Victoria Colonist, March Uth, 1922,
(Godowsky recital): Mrs. Green, at
the first piano, played with characteristic, brilliance,  her  style being a
which of tho two were playing. She
bus the siiiiic polished und refined
technique, the same delicacy of in-
tonnlion, the same elegance of
rhythm."
Music uud Musicians: "Mr. Hicks
made a most favorable impression as
a soloist, and he showed a quality of
voice nnd abundance of vocal technique that are tare to iind anywhere.
A movie star Is in trouble because
lie got two marriages ahead of his
divorcee.
twin of GodowBky'B — In fact there i Mr. Hicks' selections wero of those
were moments when, without looking, tried songs that only an oxperiencod
it would have been impossible to say I singer maintains in Ills repertoire."
Program me lor Jinnl Itci ii.il
The following programme will be rendered on tills occasion:
1. Songs (a) "Invlctus"   Bruno lliilm
(b) "Love Me or Not"  Socchi
(c) "Rolling Down to Rio"   Edward Gorman
2. Piano (u) Prolude tu G Minor  Rachmaninoff
(b) Caprice   O.  Doliuungi
3. Songs (a) "Youth"  Francis Allison
(hi  "Spirit Flower"  Campbcll-Tiploii
(c) "Tourney of King John"   Salnt-Sacim
4. Piano (a) Waltz In A Flnt   Chopin
(b) Nocturne In G Major   Chopin
(o) Study In C Minor      Chopin
5. Songs (a)   "Spring Night"   Schumann
(b) "Since First I Mot Tbeo"        Itiibiustcin
ii. Piano (a) Sextette from Lucia.    (For left hand alonei  LooebeUzky.
(hi On WlngB of Song ,  MendolssobuJ
(o) Sixth Rhapsody    Liszt
Obtain One More
Point-Win League
South Wellington held Cumberland
I'nlted! to a draw lust Saturday, on
the Sporis Grounds. Nanaimo, before-
a  large attendance pf spectators.
The game was fast throughout und
many; nice passages of football were
.iiown, Especially by the Cumberland
loam, only bad luck depriving them
it victory.
flay ut die stall saw South Wei
.ingloii attacking Willi Boyd liuing
called upon to clear. Hostilities wur
■ lausiorrcil lo the oilier cud. flump
-..nil Sanies having good tries. Sooii
.liter,   Cumberland    missed   a   good
nance through James being ruled
jif-suie.': South Wellington took up
.uo iiuutit and. forced a corner, the
clitic torwuid .scoring from the re.
•uuiug ftiek.  i no bull travelled from
.id tu.ond for Hie luiimimii'i' oi. the
period! uud halt lime fuUud Sotitu
..'cllingtoii leading by tin lone goal,
( unibeilund took up the attack on
iue restart und gave tlio opposing He=
.ollce u busy time, Kenny had many
t'pug drivci for goal]   two   oi   which
■ -ii uck the crossbar, James eqiinll*-
uig ou the uie rebound of one. Hhori-
.y anor, Cumberland fa'ored again
after some nice play,   but  the tally
■ ■a:; okiUllow'ed through the scorer
ueliig ruled oll'-sidc. Soiiili Weliiug-
iuu paid occasional visits to Boyd's
end, but nothing resulted, und u hard
.ought game ouded in a tie 'of one
goal each.
ISO #OMAN ANOVVS"
KCKlifcN MASiiiiUt'IECE
SHOWING AT ILO-1LO
ijiae u terriuc storm thuuuering iu
>>uy aciObs tue ocmury, leaving ou-
aiiiii ii upneuvui aim ouuiige, so doe..
i\o woman Knows, crosa luc Bllvef-
■in-cL in a cataclysm oi huiuuu emulous, suuggioa, lunoiuons ami suu-
.ilne seiiioliuess.
"l\u Wo.nan Know..' lioyy showing
ai uie. no-no ilieutrc, I'uUay anil Saturday, is it uumait uuctiuieiit biil-
uiuiUy ami ui'Usticuiiy expressed..' It
mis auaiuu'd . tor tue screen' iron
iui/i,y M.-.'i^e-ii,' tne ■ P'jivo.rul am.
dramatic novel by'Edna Fe'rber anu
directed u., a l>uivei'.sai-Jewel production by rod browning, who here pre-
scnta io tlio screen a new and original fic.iuuent of a big and appealing
tlieiue.*
'Hie story is tliat of a typical
American family, owning a siuull
itore and living in a provincial mid-
western town, Sacrificing everything
lor a gitted sun bo that his musical
talents may be developed, the middle
class atmosphere of petty economics
and frugal living Is presented by the
little family and their friends iu un
amazingly realistic manner, the details of -which provide tbe picture
>■. itli the humorous touoli of homely
until needful for lightening the orao-
lionul, and dramatic cluna.v.s thai
follow each other in quick succession.
'Fanny liersolf," tiie girl of' the
story, is portrayed, by Maliel Julienne
Icolt, who thereby achieves a new
nid high place In the pholo-draniiitic
art. Mis-, Scott's portrayal of "Fanny" can in no wise be compared with
any previous .presentations of portrayals ot oharactpr on ill" screen,
'the has achieved the 'li itllli lion ol
itairdlng eiiiirely ulniin ns "Fanny"
md of having transcended, iIn- liar
rie'f of ia Teen alienee by Uie potenl
power of ptilitomitio ami emotional
...■ling.
As the ''.elf-saeriiicinc, slater, Wh'
devoteS her entire life and all it
,„, iibllitiea i" :i Ijalented hrpthor,
Mi ; scuit's art in iiiimcrouii In-
Btohces reaches unusual liolgblt-.
With a sincerity aud una^otednees
mil  spiritual    undcrstaiidiiig   of the
'■olc. this :■ lender girl lleoo s "Fan-
iy" translated in torma uf the alien!
drama-  the  lovable,    .lev     sister
mil daiigUler, wlio gives all Unit
nlhers may be happy,
Miss Scott is supported |>y "" ''x-
•cptiuunlly capable cist Including
Mario Schonek. Grace Marvin. Joseph
.-iwlcknril.'siiiari Holmes, John Hav-
Idsan, Max Davidson. I'l. A. Warren.
Dick Cuniiiiings. Stllz I'lilwiirils.Daiiny
Hoy. lliiymbild Leo, Hemic ftadom,
loseplt Stearns, Dorothy Donn ant
Eugenic Forde,
"Hurricane Hutch" aid n Pollard
comedy wili In' screened villi Hin
fonluro,
un Monday Olid Tilestlay, Tom Mi:.
■ presi :.i"'l in "After v.uii Own
Heart." u typical Mix 1'i.alui'e. Comedy   reel;   will   1)0     SllOWU      SlSO.     On
Wodlicsduy and Thursday, I lie big
northern story, "The Call uf the
North will be uCreefiod.
G.W.V.A.
Notes
CANADA
IVFKK 01' JOE S
Iniorniatiou is sought concerning
tho w hereabouts of tlle following
•oiiirades: No. 349:1, It. II. Webb, 4th
Battalion; No. 31139, P. G. Suther-
and: Capt. Kiliuunil P, florin, P.P.
c.l. I.
Ali in el-vice men are reminded
thai those v fin arc in receipt of a pen
■iuii   I'm   war disabilities are exempt
,'ulll   pn||   lir..
Tli" Q.W.V.A,  will bold their next
hist   drive  and  dance    on    Friday,
.line V
Dili'}  Fourth   dan Bus IVar Claim
'I'biv lUxul of claims for adjustment
ii matters arising from war service,
liicli continues in pour into tho
,;k udijuurlcrs of'the Dominion Com-
•lanil, r:. w. V. A.,' 'at Ottawa, has
si-ought lo light the remarkable fact
sit every fuurth man enlisted for
ivcrseiis service during tho Great
fat c.ii(„idi-rccl that his balance with
ne branch ol the serv-ico or the
•Clier had not' been properly squared
i-ttiiy \vlieu he was demobilized. Since
liio formation of the G.W.V.A. more
than 12.ri,oiin claims have been submitted thruugli Us adjustment services. An average of 35 per cent of
fudge have been satisfactorily sot-
ilerl. ■ The "Clean- Sweep" Campaign
undertaken by the association last
Fall, and which still continues with
undiminished dnergy, has thus far
been responsible for the submission
of over 21,000 claims, of which i'aa
average of 38 per cent have been settled to the satisfaction of th? claimant. An olllce expert who surveyed
the work passing through the Dominion Command office, recently stated tiiat the'staif was less than half,
that which would ho required If the
same volume of work was to be undertaken by a well-organized government .department. Hu congratulated
the Dominion officials on the smooth
operation of Uie adjustment service,,
which tnvolvnt hundreds of personal
interviews nnd telephone coifs, besides a tremendous volume of coi'-
i.oKpoiidpnco. More than 80 per cent,
of ihe war service claims received by
liio government departments dealing
with such, are submitted by tne G.VV.
V.A. Less than live per cont have
been submitted by other veteran,ot-
■'iiiiz.-itions.
LOCAL STORES WILL
CLOSE ON SATURDAY
Tomorrow, Saturday, June 3, being
the King's Birthday and an official
holiday, tbe stores iu Cumberland
"ill be closed ail" day. To accomo-
fate tin? public the stores will remain
lpon until S o'clock tonight, Friday.
'lie post office wicket .will be open,
from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. only on Srlur-
ilay. The liquor vendors will also bo
closed.
I.T.I. ELECT OFFICERS
The following   communication   has
-»een  received at Vancouver:
DETROIT,  Mich, - - With approxi-
-i.-l'eiy    |u   per   cent   nf   lllO   total   VOtO
complied, John Mofsrlaad, of New
.'oik. prcBidenl uf the International
rypographiml t'liiun. is leading W.
W, Barrett by 5.7f>o fur re-election,
t was annuiineyd today bv Cburles P.
loward.   chairman    of    Ihe    union's
ll'ipalgll   ci-Mlimiltee.   Tile   Vote   Stands
■   .in I.    12.362;    Barrett,   0,603.
I'.'neli local held au election Wcd.nfs-'
lay with tho results being forwarded
ere.    Results so far arc as tollows:
First/ vi. • p.; .ideal, Charles P.
:iutt.n-,l.    faetroit.     ll.iil!;     %    n.
niifpiioU,  Norfolk,  '., „ s.Si!.
S< id  vlic-preBiiiuiii, W. It. Trot-
101*. Vaiicuiiver, 94129; J. Hoban,
•Icvcland. ii.Vtu.
Secretary-treasurer, W. I'. Town,;,
niilulb, 11.M1; .lulin \v. Hays, Min-
icnpolla; li.:inr,.
Mr. W. It. TrotlOr. of Vancouver,
■vho Is well In lead tor second vlco-
.ncsiilcnt of Jin givcato»l irado uitlon
in tho world, lias many friends'iu
Cumberland, n hu will Iu, pleased to
bear of bis success;
Mr. Me.Vair, in' Fan ly 11.iv. met with
.1 painful   accident    at    Fanny    Bay
Shingle   Mill   last   neck, when   two  uf
the lingers were cm off ami a third
one Injured. Ills many friends in
Cumberland will bo pleased to hear
thai In.' is making satisfactory Heps
towards recovery." '*'
•*•»»»->--• tm
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 3rd, 1922
POSE CULTURE
Matching and training ot Roses by
Mr. C. Rayner. Vancouver Rose Co.,
Ltd.
Although undoubtedly the rose Is a
lover of a stiff clay soil, it is astonishing the various ki:n'- and different
conditions that you find roses doing
exceedingly well  ln   from   silt to a
heavy clay, from sand to heavy
gravel, In fact you can come across
almost pure sand in the vicinity of
Shaughnessy Heights for instance,
where roses never do better. To aid
such soil as this a heavy mulching of
well rotted stable manure is of the
utmost benefit especially if you make
a hollow saucer around each plant.
In. such soils you cannot well over
:lli::;;:i!»lll!l!!lllll!!!lllllllllll!lll!l!iiillilii i mm ti
Price change, Edison Mazda
Lamps, effective May 1st
Wat is Type Clear Frosted
10 to 50 B 40 45
60       B 45 50    pf
50 Nitrogen C 70 75
75        "  80 86
100        "  1.10 1.20
150        "  1.60 1.70
200        "  2.20 2.30
300        "  4.00 4.10
400        "  5.00 5.15
750        "  8.00 8.20
1000 "  9.25 9.50
REDUCTION IN PRICE
OF LAMPS
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it Is a serious offence'** tanipe- with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
III
water, and it Is only where soils
heavy in clay having poor drainage
that you have to be careful—remember the rose is a water-loving plant,
not only you get three times the
amount of flowers where beds are
well drained and saturated with
water, but persistent hard spraying
with the nozzle held close underneath and then overhead will assist
very materially in keeping down red
spider, green fly and other insects as
well as many funguses.
Ordinarily roses make a splendid
burst of growth during May, blooming well towards the latter part of
June, and then seem to die away after
a month or so; and yet under artificial condition! they can be made to
have fresh bursts of bloom on an
average of every two months. Why':
Simply because ot the system of
heavy watering. We force the water
Into one crown or base of the root,
exciting thereby the growth of new
fleshy roots, causing a corresponding
bud growth above and another crop
of flowers.
Mind this is not done continuously
but for four or Ave days, then a rest
of a few days, whereupon the watering Is repeated.
Let us take the ordinary house
climber, namely the Caroline Testout.
The heavy base shoots of la3t year's
growth should have been trained in
the urn shape, that is to say the two
lowest right and left hand shoots
brought horizontally along the distance you wish the rose to grow and
then trained upright and allow to
grow to the height that you may consider the other shoots may on the
average attain; the second two shoots
should be carried likewise right
and left about one foot from the Ilrst
and the remainder also trained ln a
similar manner. By this system of
training you will have a space six or
eight feet horizontally covered, each
shoot running perpendicular about
one foot apart. Such growth being
well ripened will break the second
year ordinarily with alteral flowering
wood and if any of the side growths
seem inclined to break away making
Bap growth stop or spur them six or
eight inches from the main stem.
Another season from the head of each
of these perpendicular branches you
can allow one shoot to carry on.
Carrying out original idea and thus
reaching any height desired.
From the spurs on each side, aided
by careful stopping and disbudding,
you should obtain a mass of flowers
the whole of the distance.
SHELLY   PLANT
WILL   USE   COKE
VANCOUVER. — The big Shelly
bakery plant with branches all over
western Canada, Is about to be Increased by an addition to cost more
than a quarter of a million dollars.
Heading this Industry Is W. C. Shelly,
recent bead of the Rotarlans, live
civic booster and prime mover in the
great tourist movement For some
time the Shelly plant used fuel oil,
but now It has been decided to use
cuke solely, in loyalty to the B. C.
coal mines. Mr. Shelly is devoting
attention to the Interests of the coal
miners and says his own plant will
do its bit us the only fair and square
thing for Ihe province and the min-
The Other Way Round
The booking office pest was ln his
element. He stood obstluately at the
little window holding up a long queue
of heated and agitated travellers.
"Please tell me," he drawled to' the
clerk, "can 1 get to London for half
a crown?"
The clerk Informed him he could
not.
"Well, then, can I get to Brighton?"
he asked.
This went on for several minutes.
Then he turned to tlle growing
crowd and asked—
"Can anyone tell me where I can
go for half a crown?"
And they all told him.
\XXM
[irWMtDMW^ii't/fui
i imm^mgmmwmwmmmjs
alang ^
ionaires
These are great cfoys for the motor car user—in a
tire sense. Your dollar never before bought as much.
Your speedometer never before registered as much. Your
repair kit never was as idle. All because Dunlop Cord
Tires came and ushered in a new era. Five years ago you
paid half as much again for the same size tire; ten years
ago you paid twice as much, Prices have been tumbling.
Quality has been mounting. One time we thought 3,500
was mileage to boast of; to-day we may run into half a
dozen "25,000 Miters" in a forenoon. "Dunlop did it,"
says one enthusiast. The " Two Hands' are making us
Mile-ionaires," says another, and so on.
The   Sign "Mileage Wanted" is now changed to
"Mileage Supplied"—use Dunlop Cords.
Dunlop Tire & Rubber
Goods Co., Limited
Head Office and Factories'. Toronto
Ktt-,%
Branches in the Leading Cities.
^—v^Avy.^^vmy/T^f^m
DEAL ON
V;
I      Crystal White Soap
m
§5 Regular Price 10c Per Cake
B
g FREE — 5 CAKES WITH EVERY 10 PURCHASED;
11 2 CAKES WITH EVERY 5.
pV*VV>llllf##WMIW/V\\\\XXV«S«rV//AX\n\\W/yS
Dun lop Tires Deserve Well
Because They Serve Well
x&
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
ii!iiiiii;i;1^:i;;:;ii;!iiii!i!i!i!!ii!ii»iii!i
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and Gl
Cumberland, & C,
R. Fyvie, Custom Tailor
FOR
SPRING CLOTHES
A large assortment of Samples of
the latest 1922 weaves and patterns
at prices that defy competition.
ALTERATIONS, CLEANING AND PRESSING
CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO
Ilo-llo Block Cumberland
Heintzman & Co. Piano
The Best by Test
Easy terms can be arranged on any instrument.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
YOU WIIX BE READY
for those holiday riiloa -after the
necessary weltling hns been done
on your car. Why not employ
us to do the work? We have
the proper facilities anil the skilled welders and our costs are low,
Give   us   the   chance.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED
IPS   f
DTOl
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons  « ■    Proprietor
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Oillcc 2020 Bridge Street, Ylctorlt, B.C. A
SATURDAY-, JUNE 3rd, 1922
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Three
BUE.
OS AYRES NOW
IS SPOTLESS TOWN
Sunrise every morning finds
Buenos Ayres fresh washed, rlean as
a Dutch housewife's doorstep and
something like a hospital.
This is a result of the thorough
washing given all the streets every
night and the liberal doses of disiiv
fectant spread about to cheek communicable diseases.
Every night gangs of white-clad
men, armed with brooms and hosos,
appear and undertake to rout out any
chance germs that may be lurking in
gutters and dark corners.
But this is only a part of the city's
constant war on disease. It also carries on educational campaigns, using
posters principally to warn the peo-
SI'OHT SlllltT; LOOSE PASTS)
NO (OAT; SUMMER VADS
VANCOUVER.—And here's the latest styles for mere men on the coast,
if you want to get in line with the
style while visiting the mainland
when the weather gets a Jilt warmer.
Local haberdashers and other specl-
liutfl 'in men's wearables say the
"thing" this season will be sport
shirts (with low collars), low unnien
UonablOB, no coat, short sleeves and
wide Panama hais. Fashions for girls
vary from flapperlsh fads to more
■taiil thing foV ladies of more mellow
charms, although the short skirt is
If anything, shorter than ever, the
knee-deep a/fair being most popular
pie of the means by which disease Is
spread.—Detroit News.
IF   YOU
Dont Read  This
YOU WILL LOSE MONEY ON YOUR NEXT PAIR OF SHOES
Compare these Prices
Black Box Toe, Rubber Heel, guaranteed solid $6.50
Brown Box Toe, welted, guaranteed solid $5.50
Tan Recede Toe, welted, guaranteed solid $6.75
Tan Box Toe, Best Calf Skin, Double Sole through
to heel, a shoe built for very hard wear $8.75
We have a number of pairs of white miner's Rubbers
which we will sell to clear at per pair $4.00
New lines of Ladies' Strap Slippers just in, at very
moderate prices $4.25 to $6.75
We will sell to you any pair of Shoes we have in Stock
at a bargain—We must reduce our Stock—Before you
buy your next pair it will pay you to call in and look
over our stock.
CAVIN'S SHOE STORE
We Don't Sell Dry Goods —We Sell Footwear Only.
Is
THE LADIES' AID
The old church   hell   hasMong been
cracked,
Its call was but a groan,
It seemed to sound a funeral knell,
With every broken tone.
"We need a hell," tbe brethren said,
But taxes must be paid;
We have no money we can spare—
Just ask the Ladies' Aid.
The shingles on the roof wero old;
The rain came down in rills;
The    brethren    slowly   shook    their
heads
And spoke of monthly bills,
The chairman of the board arose,
And said, "1 am afraid
That we shall have to lay tlio case
Before the Ladies' Aid."
The  carpet   had   been   patched  and
patched,
Till quite beyond repair.
And through   the   aisles   aud   on the
stops
'Cite hoards showed hard and hare.
"It is too had," the brethren said;
"An effort must fie made
' 'o raise an interest on the part
Of our good Ladies' Aid."
The preacher's stipend was behind;
The poor man blushed to meet
Tho grocer and tbe butcher as
They passed him on the street;
But nobly spoke the brethren then;
"Pastor, you shall he paid!
We'll call upon the treasurer
Of our good Ladies' Aid."
"Ah!"    saitl    the    nieii, "the way to
heaven
Is long and hard and steep;
With slopes of ease on cither side,
The path 'tis hard to keep.
We cannot climb the heights alone,
Our hearts are sore dismayed;
We ne'er shall get to heaven at all
Without tho Ladies' Aid."
=S3 B
1   Ilo-llo  Theatre   I
|   FRIDAY and  SATURDAY,   JUNE 2nd and 3rd   ■
"Fanny herself,"' the girl of the story, is portrayed by Mabel Juhtnne Scott,- who, as the self-
sacrificing sister, devotes her entire life and all its
possibilities to a talented-brother.
KNOWr
Slogan   for    tbe   home   gardener:
"Weed 'em and weep."
Baby Carriages
and Go-Carts
A NEW LINE JUST OPENED OUT    '
Wall Papers—A wide range of patterns and prices
from 10c a roll and up.      '
Beds, Springs and Mattresses — A full range and
prices adjusted to meet present conditions.
A full range of Bedroom and Diningroom Furniture.
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
EXTRA ATTRACTIONS
HURRICANE
HUTCH
and COMEDY It EELS
■e
m
H Amazfnof\
i: ttonf*
1 Or-
m told In
a great picture
Uf DIRKTIOVTOOBROVUNO
it: TTERI5 is marvelously plc-
== n tared   the  drama   of  a
■■-;'-■ woman's    battle    with    the
sj world.    Caught  in  a   whirl-
fT:_: pool of desperate experiences,
r=^ bhe is finally-swamped by the
—;.■:■ cross-currents   of   love   and
r= swept to the crest of happi-
555 ness.    It's a great picture—
== don't mill it!
1 ■flBBBBBaagsBBaaa
MATINEE SATURDAY 2:.i0 P.M.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Tom Mix
—IN—
After Your Own
Heart
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
The Call Of The
North
Usual Saturday Night Dance, 9.30
King Coal Is Scource Of
BREAD!
Do you eat it for, lunch with
i'resh fruit and milk?
Or do you e •; other less nourishing foods ?
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAYS BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Jersey Ice Cream
Are You a Real Judge of Food?
Can you tell bj the taste of Ice Cream for instance whether the sugar
is sugar or glucose ?
Can you estimate fairly accurately the percentage,of real cream used?
If you are a real connoisseur you will appreciate the JERSEY ICE
CREAM — If you am not its trade mark will protect you.
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay
Scores Of Household Needs
FOUL TIPS FROM
THE DIAMOND
'orfumes   and   Paving,   Paint
and Pipe Stems all
By-products.
New   Uses   Are   Found   Daily
for Tar, Gas and
Coke.
Hy STUART AMOUR
Coitl Is the Aladdin's lamp of industry. Science touches it and, lo, a
new substance conies into being for
the comfort uud profit of man. Hardly
a day passes without some new discovery being niiidc in tlio field of
chemical research which adds to tlio
value of this wonderful mineral.
Even if oil, water generated electricity or atomic energy should lin-
ally supplant conl ns a fuel, It will
Btlll have a commercial value almost
beyond computation. This is due to
the marvellous by-producls which
come from coal when treated in a byproducts oven.
There nre three main coal byproducts—-coke, gas and tar. From
these are extracted about inn different chemical substances which, in
turn, enter into tlio manufacture of
thousands of articles of overy-dny
use.
Manifold Duos
Coal has been described as carbonized sunlight. When you consider
ihat over r>uu varieties of dyes alone
are now extracted from it. the description would seem to bo n good
one. Coal also provides a roof for
your bouse, olcclrlo light swlctbos for
tho interior of your home, a soothing
syrup tor your baby, nud fuel to run
your ear. Your clothes are dyed from
it; when you motor, tho paved road
over which you speed Is made from It.
ami tho tires which make the speed
possible contain a considerable pro-
porllon of coal by- products,
Tor, to the nvornge person, is shift"
that Is put ou tho roads for the dual
purpose of keeping down dust nnd
Hiking tbe paint oft motor ears. Yet
from tar comes no less than twenty-
'elgbt chemical substances u-ed in
nearly every form of Industry known
lo tbe world.
Explosive Also
n is hard to realize that tbe deadly
explosive melinite, a comparatively
small quantity of which would blow
a city to ntoms. ami i" tli" raosl alluring and delicate perfumes up"" a
woman's dressing table come from
the uamo coal by-product,   They are
botli made from nitro-piicnol, which
belongs to the tar branch ot tho family of old king conl.
Combs and oil of wiatergrcon are
almost brothers—easily lirst cousins.
The first come from phcnol-bakelile
and Ihe latter from nitro-pbenol,
both extracted from middle oil, an
offshoot of tlio tar family. Tar also
furnishes photo developer, paint,
shingle stain, gramaplione records,
pipe stems, food preservatives, dyes,
moth halls and a bewildering variety
of other articlos.
lYImt ('nines from Coke
When, on rare occasions, you think
of coke. il. probably conjures up a picture of a glowing lire and nothing
more, it probably never occurs to you
tbat washing soda, silicon used in
powdered form as a metal polish, carborundum, used in tbe borne as a
knife sharpener, graphite, a lubricant,
acetylene gas and a score of other
articles now almost vital to com-
morce. come from the same source.
Cas, besides giving light ami furnishing beat lor a variety oi purposes, contributes sugar substitutes,
varnishes, sizing for paper, rubber
compositions, explosives, food preservatives, headache medicines, baking
soda ami hundreds of oilier commodl
lies iu everyday use.
AmnVonlii from 0ns
(me of the brigbtost children of the
gas branch ot tho family is ammonia.
This substance can furnish you with
almost anything but a wife, [taking
powder, smelling salts, dyes, fertilizers, explosives, anaesthetics, rubber
goods, medicine, batteries, lireproof-
Ing and countless oilier articles nro
all created from ammonia,
The light oil subdivision of the gai
family is nol to lie passed over when
the record for usefulness is being
considered. Varnishes, linoleum, motor fuel, sizing for paper, cotton aid
wool dyes, saccharin, perfumes, tobacco, seasoning, salvarsan, silver
plating, gold and silver recovery
agents ami Insecticide are among tlio
articles into ihe manufacture of
which light oil enters. ■ Vancouver
Province
ANOTHER  CHANCE   HISSED
Bloom "I'm glad I met your wife.
She seemed to lake a fancy lo me."
recijlie "Did she? I wish you'd
met l.er soonci."
Hy "Heck.'
Is   Courlenay   downhearted?    Oh,
no; of course not!
Nobody but Hie catcher noticed Mr.
Geo. Clinton's wide out on Sunday.
Finch should prove one of tho
team's best hitters, poking out lo
safeties on Sunday.
Hats off lo Mnrroclil! Ilo speared
llorton's drive, cutting off Larsen at
the plalo in the sixth, nnd poled out
a bonier in tlio same inning.
Conti reached third base on his
drive to cenlro but is not credited
with a hit as A. Robertson should
have made a put out, but misjudged
tile lly.
The Japanese slugged their way to
the tune of IS-:! against tho Intermediates last Saturday. Konchy
Pitched for (he Jnps, and Bennie and
Hunden for the locals. As for tbe
local's errors—don't  mention them.
Id two games for the Cumberland
Intermediates, Fanner hit .715, while
Richards ami Stewart averaged .066,
All tine,, proved good slickers-Jest
Boason,
The   Japanese    are    playing   good
ball     On   Sunday  tiny journeyed  lo
lie Hay ami won tholr game iu eleven
mings.    Ilojo won    his    own game
">'  I ging OUl  a  Hue,, bagger  Willi
a lli.iii on second. Ilojo pitched for
Jnp . ami llangerlieid did Ihe bulk of
the Hay's twirling,
'ihe   Comox   District   Intermediate
league is scheduled    to   0|  ut tho
Hay Sunday, with tho clam-diggers
and ihe Japs opposing each other.
The game Is duo to start at II a.m.
A large contingent of Nipponese aro
expected to travel and a special train
may lie arranged.
DEADLOCK ARISES
OVER HANI) CONCERTS
Arrangoinenla for Sunday band
concerts havo not yel been completed.
i'be Vancouver Musicians Mutual
Protective Union, in a letter to tho
Park's board, Btatod that the offer of
i *! wage eeu',i not be accepted and
reaffirmed Its Btand tliat it would lie
unfair to otbor muslcluns to accept
anything loss Mian JC,
I In board replied thai It regretted
Ihe nttltudo of the union but that
Its decision was final. Four
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 3rd, 1922
CUMBERLAND ISLANDEh
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, JUNE 3rd, 1922
"SAFETY   FIRST.'
"Safety ilrst" is ihe slogan of the
CaaidUu Collieries, (Dunsmuir
Limited; the company spend large
sums oi money every year in an endeavor to put before their employee:
tho absolute need of "Satety First.
This week, commencing June 1st, has
been set apart for the special env
puasia of this slogan In Toronto
and  it  will   be   known  as  "Safety
Week."
We are not in the big city claBs
here, neither Is the district thickly
populated, but It Is high tlma that
that percentage of leeklessuess,
which evory community possesses,
should sit up and take notice and wt
earnestly recommend to our new
chief of police to keep these reckless
automobile drivers, who dash up and
down Dunsmuir Avenue at a rate ol
35 to 15 miles per hour, under keen
observation.
Not only ln the streets, but on the
roads throughout tho district, are to
be found drivers who are either wilfully careless about speed laws, road
boss or tbe youthful variety, who
Imagine it enhances their prestige te
"show off" by reckless driving.
The colliery company here are
doing all in their power to promote
"Safety First," and as the majority ot
the residents are employees and come
in contact with "Safety First" every
day at tbe mines, we cannot understand why, as soon as they get behind the wheel, "Safety First" appears to be a foreign name to them
Adults are usually more alert to
what i3 going on around them than
are children. Most human beings will
do anything which is asked in the
nt-ne of lmle children. It Is for their
cakes perhaps more than any other
section oi the community that those
who drive cars should take thought.
TIIE KIND THAT COUNT
If you take a walk about town you
will no doubt find quite a few fellows
out of work because they are looking for something that does not exist
—a soft Job,
During tbe past few months we
have read and heard a great deal
niiout the unemployed. But It strikes
us the unemployed off the pay roll is
no menace compared with the unemployed on the pay roll. It is hard for
some men to realize that the war Is
over aud the battle for success is on.
This is the "come-back year," and
the 'ellow who will come back in 1922
is tiie fellow who will work for all he
Is worth. .Looking for an easy berth
o;' a bettor Job somewhere else Is
like looking for a whangdoodle.
Th'..    Is no such animal.
There are some men who are right
making the biggest strides toward
succosb that they ever made. They
lire tho men who nre paying no attention to the complaining grouches and
chronic seekers for soft snaps. They
are pitching in and earning the confidence of the management, by the
right kind of co-operation and the
best kind ot service,
Tho man who lias the real desire to
get ahead has greater opportunities
today than when we were crazy with
cash and insane with the 'Idea of
spending It.
Churches Would End "Ads."
Some business men travel around
BO lauch that when they ent at home
ihey leave a dime under the plate.
Prices may be down, but they are
never out.
A number of church leaders on the
oast •want to enact laws for the end
ng of beer advertisements in the city
■nd country papers, while   some   go
till further in wanting to stop "ads"
f tobacco and cigarettes, and other
iijngs regarded with disfavor by ex
,-emists.    With all due deference to
,ie churches, and every possible re
peet to   the   freedom   of    belief, it
/ould seem these   good   people are
rying to go a bit too far in telling
he newspapers   how   to   run their
lusiness.      The    advertisement    of
ivory legitimate    kind come in very
tandy for the newspapers who need
lie money. Every newspaper donates
nuch valuable free space and is the
onstant target for actual imposition
if this sort.      In    fact, the average
paper would go broke In no time, it
it yielded  to  every  request for  free
publicity.   "AdB" for beer or cigar
■ttes are quite proper.    Beer Is sold
under the law.   it It Is good beer, the
newer has a perfect right to say so
and liis money Is us good as- anyone
-dse's in helping tiie publisher to pay
ais way.—Sidney Review.
FIRST LEAGUE GAME
WON BY CUMBERLAND
(Continued From   Page One)
he made a double to right and was
chased In by A. Robertson. Shake-
ipeare then pitched himself out of a
lice hole, striking oul the last man
rn the ninth with a runner on third
Hex Score
AB.-R. H
Courtenay
Petticrew
Cummings
Larsen
Horton
Dixon
II.  Robertson
\. Robertson
McLean
Downey
I.  Robertson
PO.
1
1
0
13
1
Totals
32
3
6
12
24
2
Cumberland
AB.
R.
H.
A.
PO.
E
Plump
4
1
2
3
4
0
Bannerman
4
1
1
0
10
0
Contt
4
1
0
0
0
0
Finch
4
0
2
2
10
. 0
James
4
0
1
0
1
0
Lomansky
3
0
0
3
0
2
Marrocbi
4
1
1
1
1
0
King
3
0
0
0
1
0
Shakespeare
3
0
1
1
0
0
Totals
33
8   10   27
Summary—Earned runs, Cumberland and Courtenay two; Three-
base hits, Larsen; Two - base
hit, Dixon. Home run, Marroci
Stolen bases, Petticrew, two; War-
rochl. Base on balls, oif Shakepeare,
three; Larsen,, one. Strike outs
Shakepeare, nine; Larsen, five. Loft
on bases, Cumberland, seven; Courtenay, five. Double plays, Petticew
to Cummings to Horton. Wild pitch,
Shakespeare. Hit by pitcher, Lomansky by Larsen. Time of game, two
hours.    Umpire, Altken.
Score by innings. R.   H.   E.
Courtenay 001000011—3     6     2
Cumberland        30000100X—4     8     2
Tlle average love affair begins with
a kiss. That's why kissing is so dangerous.
You can't stand still and   win the
human race.
Wood for Sale
$700
$4.00
DOUBLE LOAD
for	
SINGLE LOAD
for	
Any Length Required
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
SINGER SEWING MACHINES
PIANOS
MARSHALL
MUSIC
EVERYTHING IN MUSIC — LARGE OR SMALL
Jeune Furniture, Courtenay
Representative
Observations Of A
Federal Member
May 5th. Debate on resolution
asking Government to take immediate
action to secure exclusion of further
Oriental immigration.
Every B.C. member and the Yukon
member spoke strongly in favor of
motion, seconded by an Alberta M.P
where the question is becoming seri
ous also. Minister of Immigration
moved an amendment to strike out
the word "exclusion" and use instead
the words, "effective restriction."
B. C. members thought the latter
sounded too much like more of the
io called "Gentleman's Agreement"
and voted for the words plainly
Handing for rigid exclusion.
Government and most of the Progressives voted for the amendment,
and it carried. Not as good as the
original motion, but gives the Government a chance to show what they
3,in do by negotiation,
May 9th. Military estimates reduced by Government by $100,000.
May 10th. Debate on proportional
re presentation. Debate adjourned
which probably means the end of it
;or tills session as Government has
taken all remaining days for its own
business.
May 11th. Attended luncheon at
I'Jdeau Hall.
May 12th.    Estimates.
May 15th. House debated from
2 p.m. to 1 a.m. the following morning. Resolution tliat oleomargarine
should not be imported Into Canada
It was Bhown that it had been prohibited 36 years ago and only allowed
during the war because of scarcity
and high prices of butter, and a distinct pledge that it would be allowed
only during the war. Also that it was
often sold as butter. Motion defeated
by the Progressives, mostly voting
against it because they saw the bogey
of protection, though they could not
Bee any protection in demanding a
compulsory  wheat board.
Advocates of the oleo interests
waxed eloquent over the "rights" of
the working man to be at liberty to
buy what he liked. Neill, the mover
of the resolution, said he thought the
working men of his district would ap
predate, at its true value, this interest of the big American corporations
In the working man's liberty and
Euggested that working men had also
rights to a living wage and that if
Parliament legislated wisely, employment might be found for all, and the
working man enabled to buy a decent
article of food for his family. He
warned the Progressives that if they
did not stick by the farmers of B.C.
and the far east, they could not expect to be considered anything more
than a sectional party, considering
only prairie Interests.
Seldom has a forthcoming Mary
Fickford production aroused a worldwide Interest equal to that evinced
Blnce the first announcement of her
intention of reviving "Tess of the
Storm Country," the picture which
placed her at the head of the ranks
of screen stars nine years ago. This
revival will be a greatly elaborated
version of the famous Grace Miller
White story and will be released under the one-word title of "Tess."
Miss Plckford is daily the recipient
of hundreds of letters from all parts
of the world congratulating her on
her decision to restore the much beloved Tess to the silver Bheet.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  - •  B. C.
Special Showing
This Week
WASH
GOODS
Newest Patterns in Voiles, Organdies, Crepes, Galateas, Prints,
Picques, Ducks, India Head
and Beach Cloths.
Just received the Newest Styles in Ladies' Gingham Dresses, suitable for Afternoon
Wear, Special Values from $3.50 to $7.50. J,.i
Special Sale of Children's Coveralls in Blue Ducks and Chambrays with white trimmings, values to $1.90, Special Sale Price $1.25.    Sizes 3 to 7 years.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Special Values in Men's Silk Sport Shirts, White Duck
and Flannel Tennis Pants, Boys' Khaki Pants and
Shirts; also Youths' Long Khaki Pant.
Newest Styles in Men's Hats and Caps, Straw Hats,
Panamas, Outing Shirts and Soft Collars.
Boys' Blouses, Sport Shirts, Summer Underwear and
Hosiery.
ikir«!r^^
NEW COAL FIELD
ON ISLAND TO BE
INVESTIGATED NOW
Lui Francescini
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Soeelulty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
SACKI'S
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballerg
and other Sportsmen
Meet Your Pals
Here
Sack! Conti Proprietor
The possibilities of the new coal
area between Courtenay and Cape
Mudge are apparently to be investigated this season hy the Geological
Survey of Canada. Members of the
field party to undertake the work in
the Comox Held are already arriving
on the Coast. A. C. S. Sheppard and
J. A. Macdonald have come from Ottawa to specialize ou tlle coal area
under J. D. Mackenzie , of the Vancouver office of the Dominion Geological Survey.
Mr. Sheppard will have charge of
all the mapping in connection with
this survey of the coal fields. Last
year the work of thoroughly explor
ing and mapping this area was
started, but owing to adverse weather
conditions it was not completed. It
is hoped to linish the work this season.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know how to make your car behave,
tnd will give you a lot of tree advice on tbe subject if you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8
Cumberland
P.O. Box 349
Our experience is that pride goeth
with a fall.
MARY UP TO DATE
Mary had a little lamb,
That day has passed away;
No lamb could follow at the pace
That Mary sets today.
Now, Mary sits at motor wheel,
With skirts too short hy half;
No lambkin stays bur airy Sight,
But you can see her calf.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
I'Trst Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Also
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Partridge Specials
Now is your chance to
buy your requirements
for summer season—Our
stock of shoes must be
reduced—Look at these
prices:
50 Pairs Ladies Brown
Calf Bals, Regular $7.60,
on sale at $4.90.
About 100 Pairs Ladies'
Strap Slippers in brown
and black calf, 2 strap
oxfords and brogues,
were $7.50, Reduced to
$5.50.
A Large Range of Men's Fine Dress Shoes in black, mahogany and tan, in the latest recede and round toes, on
sale at $4.90, $5.50, $6.50 and $7.50.
We carry an immense
stock of Summer Footwear to suit everybody,
in white, brown and tan
canvas, rubber and leather soles. Priced as
low as $1.00 per pair.
1
ModelClothing&ShoeStore
Opposite Post Office
p. O. Box 343 1
&
SATURDAY, JUNE 3rd. 1922
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
Wo are in a position lo handle job work in ;i satisfactory manner, and will appreciate any orders received. The Islander plant is well equipped in every way,
being the largest and most up-to-date of any found in a
town the size of Cumberland. We have added considerable equipment to the Islander Plant during the past
year or so in order to be in a position to successfully
handle anything that may be placed in our hands in
the commercial job printing line. The Islander has had
splendid support in this direction, and this fact is very
much Appreciated, If at any time our customers are
not satisfied we hope they will tell us so, and we will endeavor to make it right. We go on the principle that
only the very best work'is wanted by our many customers, and we endeavor to give them what they want.
To those who have printing to be done, we ask them to
give us a chance to do it. We feel sure that our prices
will be found reasonable, consistent with good workmanship.
LETTERHEADS
BILLHEADS
PROGRAMMES
POSTERS
ENVELOPES
VISITING CARDS
DAtfCE TICKETS
INVITATIONS
BUSINESS CARDS
SPECIAL FORMS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ETC., ETC.
The telephone at your elbow seems so simple
an instrument, it does its work so quietly and
quickly, that it is difficult to realize*the vast
and complex equipment, the delicate and manifold adjustments, the ceaseless human care in
the central office.
It is the skill behind tho st nes, together with scientific
development and construction, efficient maintenance and
operation, which make it possible for you to rely upon the
telephone day and night.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
To Be Heard In Musical Recital Monday
Royston Lumber Co. | Rough Boys Well
Leathered
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Conl, Wood nnd floods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE  CHARGES  ,
fElLEPHONEl  PO TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome  Hole).
SAI.K Ol' WORK
The Pythian Sisters intend holding
a Sale of Work and Homo Cooking in
tho G.W.V.A. hall on June 7th, whist
drive to eonimonee at 8 o'clock,
dancing from 10 to 12.
cents.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
S.  DAVIS, *>
unsmutr
Avenue
Pullman  porter's are  being taught
sing,    Travellers will join ln on
\dmlssion 5Hj "Where nre my wandering shoes tonight?" y
J«M	
'^©£2? j3f?|5?S
MRS.   GERTRUDE   HUNTLEY  GREENE.
Intermediates
11ASEI1.UL    LEAGUE   ORGANIZED
A well attended meeting ot the
newly organized Comox District Intermediate baseball league was held
in the Athletic Club on Sunday evening. The officers elected by tlio league
are as follows: Hon. Pres., Thomas
Graham; Hon. Vloe-Pres,, Alexander
Auchlnvole, Jack Quinn and R Anipl;
Pros., Jas. L. Brown; Vice-Pros.,
ilojo; Scc.-Treas., Alex S. Denholmc.
A trophy has been secured for the
league winners, one of the Japanese
associations in Canada being the donor. Further particulars in connection
Willi the cup and other prizes for
base stealing and hitting will be
made later on.
The schedule for tho season was
presented at tlio meeting. It was
round some dllliculty would arise in
setting permanent dates due to the
football and also the uncertainty as
In whether the Island league team
would play here on the Saturday or
Sunday. Consequently, the dates set
to play are only approximate as
other llxlurcs may interfere, and In
such cases it has been left with the
managers of the loams to arrange Ihe
ilale of the game.
Cumberland Is drawn against Bevan In the opening game here, nnd
Union Bay against Ihe Japanese al
(lie Bay ill the other fixture. The
schedule, which is subject to change,
Is as follows, Uie home team mentioned Ilrst:
June    2.—Cumberland vs. Bevan.
June   4.—Union Bay vs. Japanese.
June 11.—Japanese vs. Union Bay.
June 11.—Bevan vs. Cumberland.
Juno IS.—Union Bay vs. Cumberland.
June 18.—Japanese vs. Bevan.
'June 24.—Bevan vs. Japanese
24.   Cumberland vs. Union Buy.
2.   Cumberland vs. Japanese.
2. - Union   liny vs.  Bevan.
8.—Bevan vs. Union Bay.
8.—Japanese vs. Cumberland.
10.—Cumberland vs. Bevan.
lo'.- Union Buy vs. Japanese.
32.—Japanese vs. Union Buy.
22.—Bevan vs. Cumberland.
80.—Union liny vs. Cumberland
80—Japanese vs. Bevan,
6.—Bevan vs. Japanese.
6.—Ciiiiflicrliind vs. Union Bay.
13.—Cumberland vs. Japanese.
13.—Union Bay vs. Bevan.
20.—Bevan vs. Union Bay.
20.—Japanese vs. Cumberland,
.nine
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Our Ottawa Letter
Will   British   Columbia •
Remain White and British?
British Columbians, irrespective of
party, aro alarmed over the Oriental
invasion. Without exclusion that
province—one of the greatest in the
Dominion—will soon bo as Oriental
as China and Japan. The Orientals,
especially tho Japs, are Increasing
with rapidity In British Columbia
that Berlously threatens white and
British supremacy, and even in Alberta the Influx has been sufficient to
cause alarm. Mr. McQuarrie, New
Westminster, brought tho demand for
exclusion of the Japanese before Parliament this week and had a unanimous British Columbia representation behind him until tho vote, when
.Mr. Monro, Cliilliwack, funked the
Issue and Hon. Dr. King swallowed
himself. Hon. Arthur Meighen and
liio whole Conservative party stood
solidly for a while British Columbia,
while Premier King and Mr. Crerar
voted for delay In action. The pres-
■iit law Is as restrictive as is possible
to seem by negotiation. There Is
only one remedy and that exclusion.
:lo great Is the danger that without
this drastic action in twenty years
British Columbia will be dominated
by the Japs, its Industries in their
control, and the great fruit valleys
peopled by the yellow race instead of
lie splendid Canadian and British
■itizcns of today. By tliat time Albcr-
ii will bo In the position of British
Columbia today, with an alien race
with Its foreign Ideals, customs and
morality a grave menace. Mr. King,
Mr. Crerar, Liberals, Progressives,
vea. even that pseudn Labor man,
Mr. Woodswortb, voled against pro-
lectioti to the British Canadians of
British Columbia from the yellow
peril. Thousands nf ex-soldiers In
thai province are in want aud distress, while the Japs thrive ou their
lobs,
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Good Selection ol Pipes, Cigar nnd
Cigarette Holders.
James Brown
Cumberland
WILL FLOAT CANADIAN
COMPANY TO DEVELOP
ISLAND COPPER CLAIMS
London. England, Tho Cordoroy
Syndicate Limited, of 62 Queen Victoria streel, a company having a capital of $,100,000, hns just acquired the
group of copper-bearing claims Im-
tnedlately adjoining Ihe Tidewater
Mine oil the West Coasl of Vancouver
Island, from the Alert Mining Syndicate of Glasgow, which first, opened
up Hie Prince group twonty years
ago. 'file Corderoy people propose to
float a Canadian company lo develop
the Prince group and to erccf a treatment plant when n sulllciently large
tonnage of ore has been blocked out.
Tho property was acquired on the
advice of Dr. T. R. Marshall, D. Sc„
iKdln.i, M.I.M.M., London, who spent
sonic live years In British Columbia,
and who formed a high opinion of the
copper deposits of Sydney Inlet.
DROP US A
LINE
If there is anything you require in furniture
and we will be pleased to forward our latest
quotations — You will lie under no obligation
(o buy — Let us prove that our prices are (ho
same as those prevailing in Vancouver today.
Jeune Furniture
COURTENAY, B. C.
Representative of The Marshall Music Co.
A hair on tbe bead   is   worth two
mi tiie escort's shoulder.
Vesuvius is erupting,   Russia will
blame It oil the Genoa conference.
Beautiful ComoxLake
Take a KODAK with you
The lake is just the place to go for pictures—
our store is just the place to come to for film.
Autographic Kodaks $6.50 up
Frost's Pharmacy
YOU WILL APPRECIATE OUR DELICIOUS
Home Made Cakes served with
Afternoon Teas
from 3 to 5 in Our Dainty Tea Room.
The
Maples lea House
Royston Beach
ICE CREAM
CHOCOLATES, ETC.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL!
WM.MKR1UFIELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE Alterations, Repairs, Finishing
' and Pressing
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. P. C |
Ladies' and
Gent's  Tailoring
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory experience
EDWARD ROBINSON
Phone 121 Box 33
i     Mar) purl Arenac, Cumberland.
More limn  700,000 buildings in tho
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ i'liltod States arc equipped with radio
Leave Ordors at Frost's Drug Storo. 'receiving outfits. Six-
*HE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 3rd, 1922
Men's Boys' and Youths' Suits
Our Stock of Men's Suits is not large but comprises
uorae of the nicest lines detired.
Men's Brown Tweed Suits--made of good tweed, smart
patterns, and the very latest and best designs. Our
New Price $22.50 and $25.00.
Men's Grey Check Tweed SL'uits—made from a very serviceable tweed, one which we can guarantee will give
you value for your money, see this special line. Price
$25.00.
Men's Navy Serge—all wool, made of a hard wearing
material, warranted fast color, style correct and the
price $27.50. •
Men's Fine Navy Serge—a beautiful quality such that
will give complete satisfaction to the purchaser, and
made in that snappy way which gives style to clothes.
Price $37.50.
Youths' Suits • Bloomer Pants—our stock of suits for
big boys who desire something up ,to the minute is
very good, and the line of goods carried has the stamp
of one of the best houses in the trade whose mark is
a guarantee of good goods, correct style, and best
value.
For The Smaller Boys—we have a choice selection of
suits which are very desirable, has good appearance,
the quality is right, and the style just wliat any boy
would appreciate. Bring the boys in and be fitted for
the 24th.
DRY GOODS
GENTS FURNISH1NOS
Bevan Notes       Personal Mention
Mrs. George Beattie and daughter
Marjorie led for Nanaimo on Tuesday
lust and returned on Wednesday.
Mr. Barnell and -Mr. Linton, timber
cruisers, are now staying at the
Bevan Hotel.
Mrs. F. Parks spent' May 24th in
-Nanaimo.
Mr. Clarke, nt the Bevan Hotel, left
for Victoria on Tuesday lust and returned on  .Monday.
Mr. P. Bruce went to Nanaimo on
Wednesday last slid returned Thursday.
Mr, and Mrs. J. Aitken, Mr. and
Mrs. W. Williams nnil family and Mr.
and Mrs. W. Herd and family spenl
May 24th at Oyster Itlver.
Mr. and Mrs. George Ileattie and
daughter Marjorie, and Mr. J. E. Joy
spent a very enjoyable day nl Campbell River on Sunday last.
Mr. and Mrs. Yates, Mr. and Mrs.
Malpass and fumily, Miss E. Crighton
nnd Mr. F. B. Ells, of the Bevan
Hotel, spent the holiday at Campbell
River.
Mrs. S3. Robertson is still very ill in
the Cumberland General Hospital.
CHAPLIN'S MOTHER
MAY BE DEPORTED
WASHINGTON. — Immigration authorities are investigating the conditions upon which Hanna S. Chaplin,
the aged and shell shocked mother of
Charles Chaplin, motion picture actor, and Sidney Chaplin, Is allowed to
remain In the United States. This became known today with the Issuance
of an order hy E. J. Hnnnlng, assistant secretary ot labor, granting stay
ot time to enable Mrs. Chaplin and
counsel employed by her sons to present legal grounds for permitting to
lie a serni-permancnt resident. Mrs,
Chaplin, herself an actress, it was explained, was mentally deranged by
shocks suffered during one of the
Hist of the German aerial raids on
London during the war. She was
given permission to enter the United
States and remain for one year. The
time has expired.
Birth
Born   to   Mr. and .Mrs. tt. II. Mar
shall—a son.
Grace Methodist (lull Moles
VANCOUVER ISLAND BROOM
Many peeople are laboring under a
false impression as to the origination
of tho beautiful golden broom, which
makes Vancouver Island famous.
The Scotch can hardly be blamed for
trying to take credit for bringing the
first seeds of broom to the Island;
they surely are responsible for bringing the thistle, and the honor Is all
thelr's, but the broom did not come
from "Bonnie Scotland." The first
seeds of broom were planted on Beacon Hill, Victoria, in 1S53, by a Mr.
Thomas Flewln, an Englishman, who
wished to give our Island a little
touch of the Motherland. The task
ot getting broom to grow was very
difficult, but after untiring efforts Mr.
Flewln was successful, and now
Beacon Hill is almost universally
known for Its profusion of broom,
which originally came from that
beautiful county of Kent,  England.
The W. H.O. Club of the Grace
Methodist Church will meet on Friday, June 9, at 7.30 p.m. in the parsonage. All girls are requested, to be
present as this will he the last meeting until after the summer season.
Ou Monday evening last, the tennis
club of the Grace Methodist Church
was reorganized. The officers of last
year were re-elected Mr. Alf Jones,
pres., and Mr. Dave Stevenson, sec.
THE COMING CONCERT
If the general public fully realized
the real nature of musical talent to
be heard at the recital to he given' on
Monday next by Mrs. Gertrude Huntley Green and Mr, Gideon Hicks, no
building in the city would be adequate for the enthusiastic audience.
These artistes are residents of Victoria, but they belong to ihe front
rank of the world's musicians.
The great Godowsky, of whom Mrs.
Green has been a pupil, declared he
never met such talent as hers, and of
Mr. Hicks, the beautiful baritone,
similar tributes have been paid. Cas-
sals, the world's most repov.-ned
cellist, said of him, in singing "It is
Enough," that lie gave the noblest
and most consistent interpretation of
tliat marvellous solo that lie had
heard anywhere either in America or
Europe. Yet these two remarkable
unobtrusive artistes are to be In Cumberland on Monday; surely no one
will miss hearing them.
The future of the flapper will consist of worrying over the flapper of
the future.
 l-.J l^'Ul-
To Be Heard In Musical Recital Monday
RHEUMATISM
LUMBAGO m n  n  ,
NEUniTIS  vs.    E   U I,   c
SCIATICA ltl\iV«  3
Have you given up T Have you
resigned yourself to that old,
gnawing pain that nothing seems
to relieve ? Do you think because you can't go to Hot Springs
or take some expensive treatment that you have no other
alternative? We have many
cases considered hopeless, tried
everything, baths, scrums, electricity, Who found recovery in
using T. R. C.'s. (Templeton's
Rheumatic Capsules). We-have
thousands of letters that prove
beyond doubt T.R.C's to be the
most practical and successful
Rheumatic remedy sold. At druggists, $1.00 pcrbcix. For Free
Trial write Templeton, Toronto,
Sold hy It. E. FROST
LOST
Jlis. Geo. Kerr McNaughton will
ot receive on Monday, June 5, or
igaln this season.
Mrs. Thomas Graham and Miss
iraham motored to Victoria Friday
.Horning.
.Miss Edith Horbury arrived home
jn Tuesday from Victoria, where she
las  been attending Normal School.
Mrs, Thomas Rickson returned
o town on Monday, after spending a
eolith's visit in Vancouver.
Miss Marjorie Mordy arrived home
rum Normal School on Tuesday last.
Miss Ellen Gordon, ot Nanaimo,
.wis u visitor in town during the
,\ eeki and was the guest uf her Bts-
,or, Mrs. W. Walker.
Mr. A. J. Merry, the newly-appointed chief of police, arrived in
own on Wednesday. He commenced
lis official duties on Thursday, June
1st.
.Miss It. Clinton arrived home on
Tuesday afternoon from Victoria.
Mr. and Mrs. William Henderson
left on Saturday for Motherwell,
Scotland, on an extended visit to
Irieuds and relatives.
LOST ON MAY 24, IN VICINITY OF
Recreation Grounds, a child's gold-
filled wrist watch. Finder please
notify Islander odice. Reward
given. /
Miss Annie Pryde returned home
on Wednesday from attending Normal
School in Victoria.
Mr. Charles Seaton returned from
Vancouver on Monday after undergoing treatment in the Vancouver
General Hospital for the past two
months, His many friends will be
pleased to know that he is making
utisinetory recovery.
Mr. J. Dallos, Mrs. Dallos and Mrs.
Gordon motored to Victoria ou Thursday, returning on Friday.
Mr. and .Mrs. Mordy, Mrs. Bunbury
and Miss D. Bunbury motored to Victoria on Friday and returned on Sunday.
Rev. and Mrs. Wlllemar, of Sand-
wick, who for the past five weeks
have been visiting friends of the
coast cities, returned from Parksville
on Monday from a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Thwaites.
FOR SALE
I'OR SALE—CHALMERS SIX, SUIT-
able for hire or stage purposes.
Would take small ear In part payment. Apply Smith. Royston Garage, Royston.
3IX ROOMED COTTAGE IN GOOD
repair. Reasonable price for cash.
Apply Islander Office. JO
FOR SALE HEALTHY YOUNG PIGS
from <i weeks to 2 months old, $5.50
each. Also, wanted, hoifor calves,
must bo from first class Jersey
grades. R. Waddell, R.R. 1, Cumberland. J17
VIOLIN FOR SALE, FIRST CLASS
condition, value $73.00, will sell for
$20.00, bow and caso included.
Apply P. O. Box 519.
Mr. "Chick" Reid met with an acci
dent at No. 4 mine on Monday, a trip
running over his arm. He was taken
to the hospital for treatment.
Mr. D. McNIven left on Friday for
Portland, Oregon.
Mr. and Mrs. McCarthy have moved
down lo Royston Beach for the summer months.
T.ev. W. Leversedge visited Denman
Island and Parksville during the past
week.
Mr. Chas. F. Earle district passenger agent at Victoria for the Canadian
National- Railways, was a visitor in
town during the week on business.
— , li ESSgB.!  q. il 'JLU.—
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second
and fourth Wednesdays of each month,
hi the Fraternity Hall, Dummulr Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Edward Gomm, Chief Ranger.
J. Vaughan, Secretary.
F. Slaughter, Treasurer.
Job Printing in all
its branches at the
Islander Office.
Mr. George O'Brien, Safety Engi-
i eer Canadian '.Collieries (D) Ltd.,
left for Ladysmith Monday morning,
Mr. W. A. Owen motored to Nanaimo Saturday morning and .re-
t urned Monday.
=5
Specials for Week
Fairy Sodas, 1 lb packages package, 20c
Fairy Sodas, 7 lb boxes box, $1.00
Crisp Ginger Snaps per lb, 20c
Jelly Powders, all flavors .... 2 packages, 25c; 6 for 65c
Blue Ribbon Peeled Peaches package,25c; 2 for 45c
TEA AND COFFEE
For Complete   Satisfaction   Try   the Following
Lines
B; & B. Choice Tea per lb., 50c
Our Special Blend Ceylon Tea per lb., 60c
Maravilla 3XXX Tea per lb., 65c; 51b. boxes $3.00
B. & B. No. 1 Fresh Ground Coffee per lb., 70c
B. & B. No. 2 Fresh Ground Coffee per lb., 60c
Pacific Milk 16 oz. tins, 15c; 7 for 95c
Pacific Milk baby size, 3 for 25c; 12 for 95c
Fink Salmon 1-2 lb. tins, 2 for 25c; 1 lb,25c
Del Monte Pork and Beans 3 for 25c
Stanley's Pure Strawberry Jam 4 lb. tins, $1.10
CANNED VEGETABLES
Peas, Corn, and Tomatoes 5 tins for $1.00
COOKED MEATS
A FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES
Burns & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
.Mr. Allan  R.  Nunns  left for Vancouver Tuesday morning.
Mrs.  McKelvie and    children    left
for Vancouver Wednesday morning.
Mrs. Charles Graham left for Victoria Friday.
Mrs. D. Alexander went to Victoria
Friday morning.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF AT UNION BAY
Week Ending May 25th, 1022
Peerless, coastwise; Nile, Vancouver; Charter, coastwise; Charmer,
coastwise; Ellen McNeil, Vancouver;
Chehallus, coastwise; Eedud, coastwise; Cheerful, coastwise Beatrice,
coastwise; Daring, coastwise Olive
M„ coastwise; Alcedo, coastwise;
Ciiemainus, coastwise; Jessie Mac,
coastwise; Dola, coastwise; Gleeful,
coastwise;  Melanope, Vancouver.
Miss Paul, of the Nursing Staff of
the Comox General Hospital, left for
Nanaimo Thursday morning.
Mr. Coiville C. Graham left for
Vancouver on Sunday last.
Mr. itnil Mrs. James Hayworth
motored to Nanaimo last week end.
MR.   OIDE O.N HICKS.
&STI0UN
IfiiO EXSURSIONS
From Vancouver and Victoria
w:nmim:<i       C*79 AA ST. i\in,
MINNEAPOLIS    <i'»^'W  1MLITH
CHICAGO     $86.00 LONDON     $1111.75
DETJlOlT     $105.85        TORONTO    $11)1.75
NUGAKA  FALLS   $120.(15
MONTREAL     $182.76 QUEBEC      $111.80
ST. JOHN    $100.30 HALIFAX  „   $1011.95
ISO 1T0N     $158.85
NEW   VlitlK      $147.10
$13.00 additional for ocean trip between Victoria and Prince
Rupert. On sale daily to August 21st. Final return limit Oct.
31st.
Choice ot Routes—Stop ivers and Sidetrlps,
B, W. BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
r>iuf;.i afk hi mi■MiC&UEjn
it iyatumuui
"Ivanhoe" To Be
Filmed Shortly
Universal is making a gigantic production of Sir Walter Scott's "Ivan-
hoe." Universal City, for the time
lieing, has been turned into a mediaeval castle and knights In armor are
no longer a novelty along the Lank-
orshim Boulevard. The production
will be a Jewel, possibly a super-
Jewel, Ever since Carl Laetnmle
sent King Baggot to Europe to 01m
this classic of English literature, he
lias anticipated making It over again
with ail of the Improvements which
the modem method of story telling
and modern photography could add
to it. The Duggot "Ivanboe" was
filmed eight years ago iu four reels.
It wus a stupendous production at
the time and Mini history both in Eng
'nnd and In tlle United States.
Universal has met such tremendous
success with its educational historical serials, such as "Winners of the
West," "With Stanley in Africa" and
"The Adventures of Robinson Cm
soc," that It hns established to Its
own satisfaction a new Held not only
for the making of serials, but for
features as well. "Ivanhoe," as a
lewel picture, Is expected to bear the
same relation in its fleld as "Winners
of the West" and "Stanley In Africa"
have done in theirs.
It was Mr. Luemmle's Intention to
have King Duggot direct "Ivanhoe"
and to that end all of (lie preliminary
work has been done nt Universal
City, It may be, however, that Bag-
got will lie unable lo llnlsh up "The
Kentucky Derby" In time to take advantage ot the cast, whicli has been
se'octeil. Universal is not willing ns
yet to onnounce the personnel of the
cast, which is bound to create a
ripple of surprise when It Is an-
nnnounced. I
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD
for 	
$7.00
Cut Any Length Required.
CHAS. PEARSE
Phone 86F Happy Valley
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Form 9.
LAND ACT
Notice of Intention to Apply to
Purchase Land
In Coast District Range II and situate ln False Scooner Pass, and lying
East of Schooner Pass which lies East
of Braham Island, at the Entrance to
Seymour Inlet.
Take notice that I, Ambrose Allison,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation lumberman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted at the South West Corner ot Lot
i!!I8 at the head of False Schooner Pass,
thence East 10 chains, thence South 60
chains, thence West 20 chains, thence
South 15 chains, thence West 20 chains
to shore line, thence along shore to
point of commencement, and containing 100 ncres more or less.
A.MBROSE PICTON ALLISON
Dated: April 22nd, 1922. Jy 1.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all tlio time.
Henderson's

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