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The Islander Jul 22, 1916

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Array /
The Newspaper with the Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VII., No. 17
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND. B.C.. SATURDAY. JULY 22.' 1916.
Subscription price, $1.50 per year
STEADY PRESSURE
FORCES HUNS BUCK
London July 17.—The success*
es of the Entente Allies are following each other rapidly. Today
brought news of further important gains for them on both the
Eastern and Western fronts,
arousing enthusiasm among the
British public hardly less than
that caused by the reception of
the news of the Allied offensive.
The despatch from General Sir
Douglas Haig today shows that
the steady pressure of the'British arms is forcing an ever-deepening salient into the German
lines, and the commander-in-chief
for the first time produces evidence in the shape of documents
captured from the Germans giving testimony to the high price
the Germans are paying in casualties.
The British have improved
their position along almost the
whole of their lines of the battle
front, capturing by assault 1,500
yards of German second line positions north of the Bazentin-le-
Petit wood, and a strong German
position at the Waterlot farm,
between Lougueval and Guille
mont, besides completing the
"aptureof the v hole of the village of Ovillers-La Boisselle.
These gains bring the British
almost to the crest of the Albert
plateau, where stretches the
German second line.'
The news from the Eastern
front today was equally important. General Kuropatkin, the
Russian commander, has launched an offensive against Field
Marshal von Hindenburg on the
Dvina River, and General-von
Linsingen's troops southwest of
Lutsk has been compelled to retire behind the Lipa River, while
in the course of Sunday's fight?
ing in Volhynia the Russians
captured 13,000 prisoners and
thirty guns. General von Linsin
gen's retirement, according to
the Petrograd military critics,
represents a great Russian tactical success. It was preceded by
heavy fighting, in which the
Russians smashed the Teuton
front on a width of a mile and
penetrated several miles into
their positions.
The war is now costing Great
Britain £6,000,000 daily, but with
such news as the success of the
Entente Allies, this sacrifice is
not grudged. The powers of endurance of the Teutonic allies,
should they be forced to act entirely on the defensive, have still
to be tested. The British nation
is full of confidence. It is taking
nothing for granted, however,
but it is fully prepared to acquiesce in the advice of its leading
ministers, like Foreign Secretrry
Grey and Chancellor of the Exchequer McKenna, who are publicly exhorting the nation to the
need of patience.
Mr. McKenna announced in
parliament to-day that the daily
cost of the war was £,6000,000.
He informed the House that no-
■ body could estimate what the
nation's war expenditure might
be a month ahead. He also intimated that it would become necessary this week to ask parliament
for fresh borrowing powers.
——————ii	
Nanaimo Talent Highly Praised.
The entertainment given in
the Ilo Ilo Theatre on Thursday
last hy the young ladies of Nanaimo, was undoubtedly a complete success, each number being
loudly encored and the large audience appreciated Ihe evening's
musical program, as evidenced
by the words of praise heard on
all sides. While all numbers were
excellent, the songs receiving the
most applause were, "Here
Comes Tootsie," sung by Miss
Cavalsky and chorus, "When
Chumley Came to Town," by
Miss Hazel Martin and chorus,
and "Toyland," by all members,
while "Soldiers in the Park,"
sung by Miss Cavalsky and chorus
was handled as if by veterans.
Miss Jean Patterson, in her song
"Rock Me to Sleep" captivated
her audience as usual, and many
expressed a wish to hear her
again. Dr. Ingham, who has had
the training of the young ladies
it, and if the young ladies return
in October with an operetta there
is no question about the house
being well packed.
"Peg O' the Ring"" which will
be shown at the Ilo Ilo tonight,
made another escape last night
from the lire at Courtenay. See
her tonight and be assured of
her safety.
SCORES LIBERAL LEADER.
Winnipeg, July 18-Hon. Robert Rogers, Minister of Public
Works, this evening addressed
the five hundred guests who attended the banquet following the
annual Manitoba Conservative
convention held here today. The
Minister was in excellent form,
and made a lighting speech which
aroused the greatest enthusiasm.
He strongly denounced Launer-
ism, for not only having tried to
keep Canada from making any
preparation to do her duty as
part of the Empire, but for having, during the war, endeavored
to hamper the efforts of the
Government. He also sketched
briefly the Government's designs
for the coming days of peace and
the steps to be taken for looking
after the immigration which is
confidently expected then to pour
into Canada. He declared the
Government were ready to lake
care of this development, and
felt sure of the support of the
country in the measures it would
initiate. Mr. Rogers, after some
introductory remarks, said: "It
is true, for reasons within the
common knowledge of all, that
we have not had many opportunities for political meetings since
the outbreak of the war. During
that period the Government have
been called upon to meet an emergency the like of which no
Government has ever been called
upon to meet in Canada before.
We had no precedent to guide
us, for never in all our history
had we such conditions forced
upon us. The Government, however, took hold of the situation
determinedly and fearlessly. We
recognized that Canada was British to the core, and we believed
then as we believe now, that all
loyal Canadians would endorse
our every action in taking the
necessary steps to aid in the protection of our Empire and securing victory for her flag and our
flag. We recognized that in such
a crisis assistance promptly given was doubly valuable, and
therefore acted without a moments delay.
MICHAEL MANSON, Conservative Nominee for Comox Electoral District.
For Better Lighting System.
HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS.
The results of the June examinations held in the High Schools
of the Province are announced
by the Department of Education.
Bridgeport, Esquimalt, Mats-
qui,- Peachland and South Vancouver High Schools, Hedley and
Maple Ridge Superior Schools,
and at St. Ann's Academy (Vancouver), and St. Louis College
(New Westminster) have passed
100 per cent of the candidates
presnted for examinalion.
In the advanced course, junior
grade, Dorothy Blakey, of King
Edward High School, Vancouver,
stands first with a total of 857
marks out of 1,000. In the commercial course the leading student in the second-year couiseis
Francis O. Tremlett, of King
Edward High Shcool, Vancouver,
who leads the list with 1,037
marks out of 1,200.
Of the 1,317 candidates who
presented themselves, 974passed.
Cumberland High School—Advanced course, junior grade.
Maximum marks 1,000. Number
of candidates, 7; passed, 4: Jacob
Lighter, 634; Charlotte Jaynes,
564; Lena M. Carey, 567; George
Moidy, 546.
Full course
irnum marks,
canditlates,5;
M. A, Partridge, 683.
Courtenay Superior School-
Advanced course, junior grade.
Maximum marks, 1,000. Number
of candidates, 1; passed 1: Thomas J. McQuillan, 553.
Private 'Study-Third Class,
non-professional. Maximum
marks, 1,100. Number of candi-
To the Editor of The Islander :
A proposal from the electric
lighting company to the City
Council in the form of an agreement to have the present lighting system contract replaced by
another, will be a question that
will be submitted to the ratepayers shortly for their approval or
disapproval.
As their seems to be considerable misinformation regarding
this project, I wish to state as
concisely as space will permit
some of the reasons gleaned
chiefly at the recent ratepayers
meeting' why this very necessary, change should be approved
of. As to our present lighting
system and the need of having
a radical change little more may
be said than to suggest to anyone to take a look at the town
on a dark night.
The only conceivable reason
that I can see why we have tolerated this condition so long
must have been on account of
the unfavorable financial position
of the city until recently. As this
state of affairs was remedied to
a considerable extent through the
aid given by the Provincial Government last year, the finances
of the city, according to statements made by various Aldermen
is now in a better state than has
been the case for a number of
charge will exceed the present
rate somewhat, the considerable
increase in the light received will
be more than off set when compared with the extra cost because
of the various advantages accro
ing.
The regulation of the power
wanted, and the sensible method
by which light may be switched
off or on according to the season,
and the fact that light required
will be under the control of the
City Authorities at all times—
not as at present—will certainly
be more benificial, and far ahead
of the "fiat rate" we have now.
The general  advantage  that
will accrue should incline every
ratepayer favorably toward this
proposed improvement.   It would
be the means of retarding the
progress of the city, if we should
make the same mistake as com
mitted ten or twelve years ago;
when we had the most advantageous opportunity of having, with
government assistance a sewer-1
age system,   that would  have!
made Cumberland as clean a town
as there is in the province.
There is one particular point I
would ask each ratepayer to recollect, and that is, that the darker, dirtier and drearier a town is
the more each separate property
is depreciated in value, and vice-
versa.
To summarize the foregoing, we
havo the following definite state-
TO RESUBMITTED
A repiesentative gathering attended the public meeting of the
ratepayers in the City Hall, on
Mouday evening, to consider the
new electric lighting system.
His Worship, Mayor Parnham,
occupied the chair and outlined
the object of the meeting, pointing out that the Council desired
to ascertain the views of the
ratepayers before entering iiido
an agreement with the Cumberland Electric Lighting Co,, Ltd.,
and read the following estimate
of the improved lighting system:
CITY OF CUMBERLAND.
Estimate  for  Improved  Street
Lighting.
Dunsmuir Avenue—
1-10' cutter inner -ope
mast arm $ 14 30
1 copper reflector equipped with 12" x 6" opal
globe, equalizing ring
and hanger 6 95
Labor 1 00
Complete cost of fixtures   22 25
5 fixtures at $22.25 $111 25
1-3' Arcadian gooseneck
complete 4
1 copper reflector, equipped with 10' x 6" opal
globe & equalizing ring      5 85
Wire, etc., 50
Labor , 1 00J
Complete cost of fixtures   12 15
4 fixtures at $12.15 $48 60
Rest of City—
1-3' cutter type "Arcadian" streethood, complete, consisting of lj'
ornamental gooseneck,
wired inside and one
piece fluted streethood 10 20
Wire knobs, etc., 50
Labor I 00
Complete cost of fixtures * 11 70
22 fixtures at $11.70        $257 40
3rd Wire System—
8650' No. 10 W. P.   wire $223 50
Insulators, brackets, etc.     26 00
6 switches complete, including conduit, condu-
A/tlerman Bate thought a little
explanation was necessarv, and
said the cost of the new lighting
system would be taken out of
the general revenue ; there will
be no increased taxation ; in the
past we have been paying about
$48.00 per month for little or no
light before changing the lighting system. Some of the aldermen thought it best to discuss
the new scheme with the ratepayers; that is why we are here
tonight. Wv all want moie light
antl better light, and it is possible to have more light without
costing the ratepayers one cent
extra. I believe, by having a
meter system, we can have more
light and pay less.
Alderman Carey, as a member
of the finance committee went
into the third wire system extensively, slso the finances of the
city, pointing out by figures,
that he seemed to have at his finger ends, that the city was in
better shape today financially
than it was five years ago, and
able to pay for the new lighting
system out of the general revenue with a third wire; each succeeding council will control the
amount of power consumed, or in
orher words light the city accord
ing to our income.
Alderman Henderson, chairman of the finance committee,
spoke also on' financial matters,
and favored the new lighting
system, and said there is one of
two things we must do, either
enter into a new agreement or
spend mortey in repairing the old
lighting system.
Wesley Willard wanted to
know what meter rent would be
charged ?
The mayor said that no meter
rent was mentioned and again
read the agreement which promised to light the city for twenty
years at seven cents per k. w.
hour. The meeting was unanimously in favor of the new system
as outlined by the mayor and
council with the exception of two
who are invariably against any
improvement for the benefit of
the city.
lets, etc.,
Labor
vears.   This position caused Aid-1       ... ,   ,  ,,. .i... ,-,„,,.,
_ .    ' ,...'..,      ! ments by members oi the Coun
erman Bate to assert that there i...,
would be no increased taxation,
if this work should be proceeded
with: that the total cost would
be paid out of the general revenue. Alderman Carey, chairman of
the firance committee also stat-
from
junior grade. Max-
1,200. Number of
passed 1:   Phyllis
has certainlv made a success of j dates,  1; passed 0.
ed definitely that judging
every present indication the city
would be free from debt at the
end of the year; Alderman Henderson and McDonald also declaring that the rateyayers had every
reason to be optimistic in this
respect.
The total original cost of installation of the new system according to the contract from the Electric Lighting Co. will be not
more than $800. The method of
light distribution by the new
plan will be fully reported in
another column of the Islander.
Although the  average monthly
Thero will be no increased taxation, if this work should be proceeded with.
Cost of installation will be paid
out of the general revenue.
Power required will be under
the control of the City Authorities.
There will be no minimum
charge.
The extra monthly charge will
be more than offset because of
the many advantages that will
accrue from the increase in
light received.
It will be necessary to renew
at considerable expense shortly
worn out attachments on the
poles, if present flat rate method
is continued. A lighter; cleaner,
brighter town is wanted ; a town
we need not be ashamed of.
39 00
mmmmmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmwmmJtoJ^
$328 50
Total cost of installation
without lamps $745 75
Lamp Prices—
60 watt nitros, each $1 10
100 watt nitros, each 1 25
350 watt nitros, each 3 50
The above company hereby
agrees to furnish current for
lighting the city streets for a period not exceeding twenty years
at the rate of 7c. flat, per K. W.
Hour.
Cumberland Elec. Light. Co.
The mayor further stated, it
was the intention of the Council
to string a third wire through
the city and place 350 nitro
lamps on the corner streets of
Dunsmuir Avenue on a ton foot
mast arm with 100 nitro lamps in
between each 350 nitro lamp,
the corners of the remaining avenues would be equipped with
Kill nitros with 60 nitro lamps in
between and to be controlled
wilh a swith and time clock,
which would allow of any portion of the lighting system to be
shut off at any time during fin
night, as the city authorities
may wish.
The system would be on a meter and the city will pay foi
what they use.
T. D. McLean wanted to know
what the estimated cost pet
month would be ? The mayoi
informed him about $70.00 pei
month; cost of installing the new
system would be $745.00 withoul
the lamps.
H. Mitche'l wanted to know il
everything was included V Tin
mayor answered yes.
T. I). McLean wanted to
know what would he the total
cost of installation, including (he
lamps ?     The mayor informec'
Conservatives Elect Officers.
The regular annual meeting of
the Central Conservative Association of the south half of the
Comox electoral district was
held in the City Hall on Friday,
July 14th when the president,
secretary, and treasurer read
their annual reports for the past
year, which were very gratifying.
The election of the officers resulted in D. R. Macdonald of
Cumberland being re-elected
president, Dr. H. P. Millard of
Courtenay vice-president, and
Colin Campbell secretary. There
was a large attendance from the
various executives of the district
assosciations and all felt confident as to the result of the com-
ingelection. The majority for Michael Manson, the Conservative
candidate would be greater than
ever and the Comox electoral district will as usual remain Conservative. The singing of "God
save the King" with three cheers
for Manson brought the proceedings of the Central to a close.
ALEXANDER CAMPBELL' him about $800.00.
"T
COURTENAYGUTTED
A disastrous lire took place at
Courtenay about 10.30 p. in. last
night causing the destruction of
one half of the business section
that is now lying in ruins. All
told fifteen buildings were burned down or blown up to save the
remaining part of the town including Royal Bank of Canat'a,
Courtenay Opera House, Calhoun
Block, l'eivtz Block and the
Courtenay Rev iew. , The bucket
brigade did exceedingly good
work in saving th j Riverside
Hotel. TWO
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
®Ijp jtalmttor
published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland.
C, Canada.   Telephone 3*5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, JULY 22nd 1916
/!*'&*:':fe*&&^ ■■'■•^
.*...•.*;
The reason why some towns
grow is because there are men of
push and energy in them who
are not afraid to spend their time
and money to boom their town.
They erect good buildings, organize stock companies and establish factories, secure railroads,
work for public improvements
and use every means in their
power to induce people to locate
in their city. Wherever they go
they tell of the advantages of
their city, they write about them
in every letter, they send circulars and newspapers to all whom
Ihey think they can get to visit
their city, and when anyone
visits them treats him so kindly
that he falls in love with them
and their city at once. It is enterprise and everyone pulling together that makes a progressive
town and don't let the fact escape
your memory.
To hear every peison sating
something pieasant about its
people and its interests is the
surest, quickest ancl easiest way
to make a town attractive with
that sort of attraction that will
draw other people to it is for
every man and every woman to
have a plesant word for the
people and town generally. Talk
up your town if you would have
it do well. Talk up your town if
you would have others come to
you. Talk up your town if you
would feel an interest in it, and
have its people feel an interest
in you. There is no better way
to do it. And many a time one
little word of unplesant reference
to something that does not exactly suit you and not particularly
concern you as to that matter,
will turn a good man's influence
away from your town and may
even drive him away. At your
own fireside, talk up your town.
Among your neighbors talk up
your town. When you come in
contact with strangers, talk up
the most potent agency ever sel
in motion for helping your town.
■■..■:■:.:;
m
■§
s
CIC a la Grace 409
A general puipoie corset, made in
heavy Coutil, suitable for average
to stout figures.   Slightly curved at
waiit.    All materials guaranteed.
Price	
Y Ml--
C/Ca laGrace6f7
A new and very popular model, made in
fine French Coutil, medium bust, new
length skirt, suitable (or medium to (ull
figures.   Fully guaranteed.    Price	
{g?
CIC a la Grace 369
Corset made in Coutil, for average
figure. Medium bust and new length
skirt.   Four heavy hose supporters,
and steels tbat will not rust.
Price	
d
Another shipment of Ladies' Middies
and Wash Skirts to arrive shortly.
*:::;■:
'■'■Yi'V  . '•    * i'.'  i Y '*' '' ' ■'"     i .,■'■' '--'--•- *'-*--*i*' ••■••^•■••■'•^■'■•■•..v-;.,---:.**>t*:*^:*:*:*'..*..V"",'.,V'":" ■• ' •••::•■■'.'•:. •"■•••'•■
to convey all slops entirely away
from the house. Make good
walks and let the ground have a
fine coveringof grass, not weeds.
Put up strong supporters for the
clothes line. Keep the fence in
repair and plant currant bushes
near it. Set vines about the refuse barrel and train them over
it until it is hidden. If you have
a receptacle which can be closed
and not a row of old barrels to
offend the eye, and give out a
cloud_ of ashes every time the
wind blows. Make it a rule to
have the back yard at all times
as clean as the front one.
Our Business is * Growing/
Ornamental Trees and Shrubs,
Fruit Trees and Small Fruits.
NOT   HOW  CHEAP,  BUT  HOW   GOOD.
EVERGREENS   -   ROSES   -   RHODODRENDRONS
Descriptive Nursery and Bulb Catalogue on request.'
Dominion Nursery Company,
2184 4th Ave., W., Vancouver, B.C.
Many back yards are abominations to the eye and nose. One
find them in all sorts of litter from
an oyster can ti old boots, here
the slops of the kitchen are
poured to increase odors which
ought to warn every thoughtful
persun of the malarial influence
breeding there, to break mil
eventually in fevers ordiptheria.
If any member of the family dies
from one of these deceases, his \
death is probably lamented as a
"mysterious dispensation of
Providence." Bul the minister
would say, if he were to visit the
back yard, that death was caused
solely by a violation of hygienic
laws. A very strong argument
against dirty back yards is the
spirit of deception which is apt
to foster in the young members
of the family, for it is a cosntant
deceit to present a clean and attractive front yard to the gaze of
the passers, while the back yard
is not fit to be seen. Children
should be taught to be clean, for
the sake of cleanliness and not
because outsiders criticize them.
Do not allow anything to be
thrown about. Have drains made
More and more we are convinced that what this country most
needs is a religion or training
that will make a man pay his
debts. Shouting does not settle
accounts with God or man. Often we want to bounce a fellow
right out of church because he
went fishing on Sunday, but
never say a word to the pious
scamp who never pays his debts,
and such people are doing the
church more harm than any lot
of Sunday desecrators, for there
are more of them in the church.
Reaedr, are we getting close to
you? Then lay down this paper
and go and pay up and you can
read on at ease. And don't you
stop paying because the "statue
of limitations" excuses the open
account which you made for bread
and meat. You must pay it in
cash or God will make you pay it
in lire and brimstone. God knows
no such excuse for paying as
"homestead exemption," When
you raise that excuse to keep
from paying your, debts you can
stop singing, "When I can read
my title clear to mansions in the
Skies-" You've got none up there.
If you want reliable nursery
stock for fall planting, roses,
trees and shrubs that grow, see
A. H. Peacey, Cumberland, local
representative for the' Dominion
Nursery Company, Vancouver
KC.	
FOR SALE
White Wyandotte pullets (some
laying). 3 for $5.00,  Cockerels
-•2.00 each, yearling heps from
31,50 each.   Heavy laying strain.
J. G. Randall, Royston Station.
Vancouver Island.
One Episode Each Week  of The
Great Circus Serial
"Peg O' The Ring"
ILO ILO THEATRE
Once every week.   Admission 10c.
I
XKJskUnanoi*c Beauty may be only skin deep;
W alipaperS but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, A C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
■tm
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D. D.C.L., President
IOMN A1RD, General Manner. H. V. F. JONES, Aai't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000'   RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1
upwards.    Careful attention is given to every account.   Small account,
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdraw .ils to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. i!5»
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE,Manager.
THE   B. C.   GARAGE
JOHN THOMSON, Proprietor.
Local Agent for the
CHEVROLET
Model Four-Ninety.
Price $775.00.
Gas Engines, Supplies and Repairing
QUEEN BEER
HEALTH     f
and
PLEASUKE
There is nothing that
will add to the enjoyment of your picnic or
outing like the addition of a few bottles of
good beer. You will
not be disappointed if
you specify QUEEN
BEER
QUEEN   BEER
IS DKLICK)US &■ H K.AI/rH VU1.
Srowed from thr ohoioest cHhcBEJl!PJi JS^HJi-
LEY and J3.6, ,Ji&J'S
Good Beer Aids Digestion,  Improves Your Appetite-Good Beer is FOOD and DRINK.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
im
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.] 4
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
B.C. PROHIBITION ACT
DOES NOT PROHIBIT.
Measure Provides for Free and
Unrestricted Importation of
Liquor from Outside
Points.
The B.C. Prohibition Act, on which the electors of British Columbia will be asked to register their opinions at the poll, is not a prohibition act in any sense of the term. So contrary is it to the principles
of prohibition that prohibitionists themselves are freely criticising the
measure ancl the rr*m who is neither "wet" or "dry" is asking the
pointed questio as to vhat will be secured by the Bill save the building up of industry and trade at points outside the province.
All of which goes to show that it is advisable that the elector who
desires to vote intelligently on the subject should carefully examine
the Act before election day.
The "Wide-open" clause of the Act, Clause 57, reads in part as
follows:
"Nothing in this Act shall be construed to interfere
(a) wilh the right of any person to import from with
out the province liquor for bona fide use in his private
dwelling house."
This clause means that any resident of the province is allowed to
purchase all the liquor he desires, just as often as he wishes, without
any control or regulation by the government, so long as he sends his
money outside the province for his supply.
This clause would, for instance, allow any person to place a standing order with any liquor dealer outside the province for a weekly or
monthly shipment of whisky to be delivered to his dwelling. On such
an order the supply of liquor would reach him constantly as long as
he met the bills. In tho face of such conditions the question may well
be asked "Is this Prohibition ?"
In the preliminary campaign in connection with the bill and at
the present tirrte prohibitionists have made a grand stand play, both
on the platform and through their propaganda literature, of the
drunkard and the frightful evils which accompany drinking. Yet, in
the bill for which they themselves are admittedly entirely responsible
they have done absolutely nothing to lesson the consumption of liquor
in British Columbia, the sole effect of the legislation being to send
money spent for liquor outside the province. Incidentally it may be
mentioned that the drunkard who already has the taste and the habit
is the man most likely to be the first to take advantage of the privilege to buy outside and, should the act pass, would thereafter have
liquor in quantity in his home, whereas he now takes his liquor by
the glass.   As the small boy would say, "What's the Use?"
The great question lying behind the referendum vote on the
prohibition question' is whether the regulated sale of liquor under
government license and control is not better than the unregulated
and unrestricted importation of liquor from outside points.
Readers desiring literature or information concerning the Prohibition Act may secure same by writing to Merchant's Protective Association, Room 24 Canada Life Building, Vancouver, B. C.
UNION   HOTEL
Opposite the Railway Station
WM. JONES.
This Hotel has been renovated throughout and is now a strictly first-class Hotel
in every respect.    The best and finest
supply of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Silver Spring Beer
Contains backbone and
stamina, and gives you
back the appetite that
. you have lost. Drink the
Beer that's pure at the
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland,   B. C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my   business  is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A line selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COaL mining lights of the   Duininior.
in Maiiitubft, SHskatchuwan and Albert;*.,
tha Yukun Territory. theN rfchwwtTarri
-■■riesHiidiua portion . f tho I'ruviaue nf
British Columbia, may he 'eased for a term
■f twemy.one yeam ar «uannual rental • f
§1 an acre. N»>r more th-tu 2,500 Han a
* ill be IfAsed tn one applicant.
Apphcatii.n for a lease must be made by
lie ^pi-lieant iu pert-tin to the Agent or sub
tgeitt of the district iu which the rights
■:<\.nd h>r tue situated.
In *m veyed ter;itory the land must be
,mtbed bv rtecti.ms,iirlci<Hlsubdi.»iotis
f Motion*, Mid in   uii-u \nyfd  erritory
In-  uot Hppllttdfor nhall he staked uut by
li-'*lp ictiit himself.
Ku-n ap|ili(Htion must be -Ace-.miianied
by affiu i.ffo which will be refunded if the
i«hta xpphutt forare not available, but not
i hei wi»e. A royalty shall be paid on thu
lerehaut-ihleoutput of the mine at the
■ a e i f live ...Hiits per ton,
T.ih |ters"ii , p.-ratini; the mine shall
■umiih tbe Agent with sworn returns ac
nui-iiiW f'T 'he full quantity of meroh
miablecoal mined and piy (he royalty
..ert-oii. If the u< al mining tights are
>"t h ing < penned, such returns shall be
ri.ri ihbed at. leatt.-noe a year.
Tbe leai-e will include (be coal minin
lights mily, but be I isee may be permit-
-ed to purchase whatever available sur
face iig' ts may be considered necessary
f rthe working.<f the mine at the rate of
$10. (maimer e.
K«ir full information applioation should
be made to  the Secretary of the Depart-
■lu-ur nf the Inteiior, Otiaw.i,   or to   any
A^ent or Sub-As.'! ut' fDnminion Lands
W   VV. CORY,
Deputy Minister of tbe Interior.
N.B— Unauthorised publication of thie
tdvi*rrih«inent w ill not be paid for.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the    Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
King George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop.
First Class in Every
Respect    :    :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland.B.C.
THOS. E, BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C,
Phone 67
Agent for tho
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Henderson, Proprietor
Bstlraaten anil Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI  BROS
Grocers aad Bakers
Agents for Pilsekeii Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.     '
EFFECTIVE   MAY   1st.   1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Silt.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri, 1 Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M,
7.35
P.M.
4.35
E'.M.
4,35
A.M.
9.35
P.M.
3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.1U.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.     A.M.
10;30 :   7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4.10
9.10
3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25 ;
10:55
7:25
10:55,   7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05
3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00
3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55
2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50
2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45
2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3.30
8.30
2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
Human Interest Story of Broker
Financier's  Home-Coming.
By JOHN   LINFOOT.
Bremerton, huddled up tn hia seat
looked out of the window of the West-
bound Limited Neat farm houses, well
tilled fields. Hew past, with sleek cattle thut looked up. munching contentedly, out of the lush grasses, lt was
the prairie country of Iowa, the region of black earth and farmlands,
the nation's dairy and the center of
her agricultural wealth.
"It lookB like my home country,-'
he reflected, as he caught sight of a
distant lange of low hills, blue In the
haze of the afternoon. "And to think
that I might have been living here,
perhaps with my few acres, happy
never knowing or caring of anything
that lay behind theae hills!"
The train slowed, drew Into the sta
tlon. waited a few moments, and then
puffed out again. A .man came Into
the carriage and stopped at Hremer
ton's side. The financier looked up
with a Btart and unconcealed Impa
tlence.
"Excuse me, sir, but are you John
Bremerton?" asked the other.
"Well?" Bremerton demanded curt-
lj
■ "I was aure that I waB on your
track. I knew I had recognized you
1 want the Inside story of the failure
of the Cornucopia bank. I am a repre
sentatlve   of   the   lowa    Free-Soller."
"Good Lord, man, that story has
been printed tn every newspaper be
tween here and Kingdom Come," said
Bremerton angrily. "Don't you read
tbe metropolitan press out here?"
"O yes, Indeed," said the reporter
smiling, "but you know, Mr. Bremerton, that the atory has never come
from your own lips. You bave succeeded In secluding yourself from all
the newspaper men. Now It would
be a great feather In my cap If you
would give me an exclusive Interview."
"You see, sir," the reporter continued, "of course we have all the details ot the failure. We know that
you were made tbe victim of an unscrupulous gang of financiers who
'wanted your properties. Nobody has
ever breathed a word agalnat your re-
"I   Have  Always  Loved  Vou,  John."
putatlon. When the crash came you
went back, faced the music, and came
out witb flying colors. But what are
you going to do now? You are an
iowa man by birth, are you net? 'And
you never married. Mr Bremerton'
Have you come back to settle In your
state and marry your lirst sweetheart?   I want a real human story
"A real human story!" repeated
Bremerton mechanically, and smiled a
little bitterly at the Irony of events
which had left hlB life, except (or
widened experience. Just where It had
been when he had left Framlngton. a
pennilrss country boy, fifteen years
before. And bis first sweetheart—
Lizzie Gray! She was only fifteen
then and he twenty one, but he was
going to become rleh nnd famous In
the metropolis—perhaps he would
even, make twenty dollars a week -
and then, when thnt miracle occurred
be was going to Bend her the fare lo
come to him. and tbey would live hup
plly all their HveB He had written-
every day for a month, then every oth
er day, tben twice a week, once a
week, once a month; after a year his
letters ceased. After two years be had
stopped thinking of ber. He bad
heard, not long afterward, that sbe
was married.
"Framlngton! Change here for
Des Moines!" shouted the conductor
and Bremerton started up hastily and
seized bis BUlt case. He had taken
pasBage to DeB Moines, although he
had been Indifferent where he went.
Stnndlng upon the platform he
found the reporter at his elbow. He
had entirely forgotten him.
"I'm afraid there's a wait of two
hours for the Des Moines train." he
said. "We Just missed the connection. Now. Mr. Bremerton, won't you
please help me with that story? It
will mean    a great deal to me, sir."
Bremerton was a man of quick decisions    He pulled out his watch
"Three o'clock." he said, glancing at
the dial. He turned to the other
"My son." he said, "I'm going lo take
an hour's stroll through the old placo
Perhaps It wlll get* me Into a sent!-
mental mood, or a reminiscent one.
If It does—well. I'll be back at four
and I'll give you that story."
He strolled out of the station. Except that a few new buildings had
sprung up It was astonishing how little tbe town had changed during the
fifteen veers of his absence Here
wbb the old. Irregular street with its
stores—he even remembered the
names ol them There was Jim Haw-
ley, the carpenter. Btlll bending over
hla bench industrious aa ever; ther*
the same old orchard In which l.e had
gathered Btolen apples when he was a
boy. Then he was passing Into the
open countrv and always his feet led
him toward his father'., home lie
had refused to rent the old place after
the old people had died from some
sentimental motives which lr was
ashamed to confess to himself
How empty and forlorn Ii looked ..nil
Its boarded windows, and the garden,
once trim, hut now overgrown with
weeds And at the end ol the lane
was the drays' cottage That was not
forlorn, but stood, trim and Immaculate as ever, in Its neat llltle garden.
A woman was walking up the lane
She had turned In from below. Just
where the Gray cottage abutted on
the pike She would see lilm when
she camo out of the bend a few feet
from the stile. Bremerton remem
bered how his heart had hammered
that morning he had flrst kissed her
It was here, and Lizzie had walked
Just as she walked now. unconscious
that he waited there He had wanted
to run away, as he wanted to run
now. And she hnd looked up Budden-
ly and seen him. Just as she looked up
now.
And botb had trembled. Just ub both
were trembling now.
And he had kissed her. Just as he
kissed her now.
For the rush of the yearB waB Bwept
away, and they were hoy und girl
again beside the rustic stile And
It was only afterward, when they
started guiltily away, that they remembered.
Bremerton remembered that he was
a mature man, verging upon middle
life, who bad lost all the happy aspirations and Ideals of youth And
she. . . . She had hardly changed
except that her figure had grown
mature and her face more thoughtful,
graver.
"You are—not married then?" he
stammered.
She looked at him coldly, the Hush
pt shame slowly fading out of her
cheeks.
"How can you ask me that, John?"
she said.
"But I heard—I heard—"
"That's why you ceased to write?"
He had never been able to deceive
Lizzie.   Now the old ImpulBe toward
confession burned ln him. '
"No," he answered, "I censed to
write before I was told. But still. I
am sure that If I had not heard so I
'Should some day have come bnr.lt,"
, "To redeem your pledge. John?
Well, I release you from It So let.
your conscience rest. My school occupies all my life and Is my whole Interest. While you—you are, or were, a
very busy man and a very famous
one."
"Then you have heard?" he aBked.
"Of course I've heard of you. John
Bremerton," she answered. "I—we
have all followed your career with the
greatest Interest," she continued, coloring faintly. "You know we are all
proud of you ln Framlngton."
"Were proud," he corrected.
"Are proud, John," she replied,
looking steadily Into hla eyes. "Re-
cause you fell fighting like a man.
and never did a single dishonorable
thing. And when they got you down
It was they who were disgraced, not
you. I am glad you came back for
this little while, John, so that I could
tell you this—-that we all believe In
you."
"O, If only I bad never gone!" he
cried. "If I could have life over again
I would stay here and live out my life
with you. I've been a fool, Lizzie,
and In searching for the pot of gold
under the rainbow 1 found the gold—
but I guess I missed tbe rainbow. Rut
now the gold is gone and the rainbow
ls Btlll shining. Lizzie, I've come back
to stay—with you."
"With me?" she repeated. "With
me, John?"
"I want you," he cried. "I have
never known what hnpplness meant
since I went away And even though
I ceased to write and—well, forgot
you—I always had a vision of timo
when I Bhould come back to you.
Rut you see I thought I hnd lost the
right to come. Lizzie, dear. I havo
found you again I wont to keep you
Will you be my wife?"
"You—you menu thnt. John?" Shu
stammered. "Hut- Oh, no. John, yo i
are Just chivalrous I am not for
you now; your place Is In the city
where you will again mako your mark
—while I-"
He drew her Into Ills arms, and she
lay there at last, happily Ho bent
bis face to herB.
"Tell me you love me." he whls
pcred.
"I havo ..always loved you. John."
she answered back "And somehow I
always knew that you would come
Oh!"
She disengaged herself hastily.
looking up the lane In' terror and.
following her glance. Hremerloe tier-
ceived the reporter approaching toward them He was walking blithely
and whistling He hnd evidently not
seem Ihem. but now, coming upo.i
them suddenly, he stopped short and
began apologizing nervously
"I was Just taking a walk-" he began. "1 thought I need not alt In that
station till lour    I didn't know—"
"That's all right, son." answeied
Rremerton "Never mind that ;ip.
pointment. but sit down on that stile.
I'm going to give you a real human
story." ,
iCoDvi-.i.'.. 1913, by W. (J   rtaimmiu FOl'h
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN'     TOPICS
The balance of our stock of
Millinery at reduced prices at
Campbells.
The members of tbe Harmony
Rebekah Lodge will hold a sale
of work and afternoon tea on
Tuesday, August 22nd, Particular:! later.
Special to-day, Ladies White
Pique Skirts and Middies and
Misses Middies and Middy Suits
at Campbells.
Sergeant Evans and Alex. King
of the Canadian engineers were
here on Wednesday on a recruit-
in"; trip. Intending recruits
should apply to COG View street
Victoria, B. C.
A late shipment of Ladies Silk
Sweater Coats just arrived
These will be put on sale at
Special Prices to clear. These
come in Melon, Gold, Kelly, also
in Combination Colors: Black&
White, Melon & White, Copen
hagen & White Etc. Caps to
Match.   CAMPBELLS.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd, left for
Ladysmith and Victoria on Wednesday.
M. Manson, Conservative Candidate for the district has been
visiting the southern half of the
constituency during thepast week
and he is very optimistic as to
the result of the coming election.
He has represented this portion
of the province in the Provincial
Legislature for the last 8 years
and resided in the district for the
past 30 years. He knows the
district and its requirements f>-om
end to end.
Tenders will be received by T.
H.Carey, Secretary of School
Board until Saturday, July 22nd.
6 p,m. for kalsomining two rooms
in the new school. For further
particulars apply to any member
of the Board. Key may be obtained from W. W. Willard, Esq.
Union Bay Notes.
The following steamers coaled
at Union Bay for the week ending July 15th:—
S. S. Selkirk took on bunker coal
enroute for north, S. S, Waer-
narim after taking on coal cleared for Powell River to load 2800
tons of paper, S. S. Mathilda,
Penrith Castle, Blue Funnel liner
Tuecer, coasting vessels Coquitlam, Prince Royal, Camosun, tugs
Dola and scows, Erin, Clayburn
and scows, Burrard and scows,
Gleeful, Defiance, Dreadful,
Naid, Dauntless, Artie, Nanoose,
Qualicum, barges Baroda and
Melanpo.
The Prince Albert put in at
Union Bay for repairs to her
stearing gear.
Messrs Barton and Burn ham
of the Special Custom staff were
visitors to Union Bay.
Charlie and Jack have issued a
challenge at Quoits to any team
in British Columbia including
Captain Kobarts.
Miss Johns of Nanaimo is on a
visit lo Mrs. Renwick.
»
The NEW
'EDISON
Diamond-Disc
Phonograph
Interest in the New Edison
Diamond Disc Phonograph
grows stronger daily. No
one hearing the rich, pure,
true tones of this perfect
instrument could do other
than long for one in his own
home. With this instrument
there are no needles to
change. The Diamond point
needle is permanent and never wears out. The records
used are double discs indestructible, lasting a lifetime.
In appearance the Edison
Diamond-disc lacks for nothing. It comes in a variety
of finishes and woods to
match any setting.
Write us fur Information About the
"EDISON DIAMOND DISC "
PHONOGRAPH
G. A. FLETCHER MUSIC Co.,
"Nanaimo's Music House"
ii Commercial St., NANAIMO, B.C.
THE   BIG   STORE
For Girls:
Girls' Middies in white drill, with blue collar; also in all white.    Price 90c. each.
White Muslin Dresses for girls from 2 years to 10 years,  daintily embroidered,
and very fine quality muslin.    Prices $1.75 to $3.50.
Girls' Summer Undervests in all sizes, from 15c. to 25c. each.
Girls' Summer Hats, a special knock-about hat for girls from 8 to 12 years, 25c.
Girls Hats, in letter quality, from 50c. to $1.50.
Girls' Parasols for the Little Tots, 25c. each.
(jirls' Corsets, new style, in sizes to suit every girl.   Price from 65c. per pair.
Girls' Rib Hose in all sizes, good quality, 2 pairs for 35c.
For Boys:
Boys' Summer Pants, splendid
weni ing quality, dark stripe,
the best pant for the least
money. All sizes, $1.00 pair.
Boys' Khaki Drill Shirts.heavy
quality, splendid for wear,
sizes 12 to 14, 95c. each.
Boys' Heavy Cord Pants, all
sizes.    Price $1.75.
Boys' Light Stripe Waist Shirts
of best washing material.
Price 65c. each.
Boys' Suits bought before the
great advance in price, all
wool, first-class values.
Boys' Belts 20c. each.'
Boys' Strong Cotton Hose, hard
wearing, and good color.
Price 25c. per pair.
Boys' Sneakers, all sizes in
stock, at right prices.
Boys' Caps and Hats in great
variety, at moderate prices.
Specials:
Ladies' Holland Skirts, medium
width, can't be beat for hard
wear, six only, regular price
$2.25.   Now 95c.
Ladies' Summer Dresses, regular, values to $6.00, medium
width in skirt, to be cleared
at $1.95 each.
Ladies' Pique Skirts, full width,
double flounce, wide rib, regular $4.50, for $2.35. Only a
few.
Ladies' Summer Undervests,
splendid values, short or half
sleeves, 15c. each.
Beautiful Voile, with large
dots, 15c. per yard.
Ladies' Corsets, our leader is
D. & A. Corsets. For a
cheap, popular line, try a
a pair.    Price per pair 95c.
Household Requirements:
We carry a very large stock of Kitchen Enamelware, including all sizes, pots and
pans, teapots, pails, etc.   We buy direct and can offer special prices.
A brand new stock of Flour Tins, bread tins,  wash boilers, in copper, tin and
nickeled.   Ask our prices.
For Crockery you will find we can show you a very good selection,  considering
how hard it is to get today, and the prices are right,
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
WHY
THE GREAT-WEST LIFE
Assurance Company
has for nine successive years written
The Largest Canadian Business
of all companies operating in Canada.
ITS -PREMIUMS JIRE THE LOWEST
ITS POLICIES JRtS THE MOST LIBERAL
ITS DIVID6NDS ARtS TH£ HIGHEST
Investigate for yourself before insuring elsewhere.
VANCOUVER ISLAND BRANCH OFFICE
J. Burtt Morgan, Manager.
109 Union Bank Building, Victoria, B.C.
THOMAS MORDY, Agent, Cnmberland, B.C.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Ccnet, of
the fines! quality,    very
pair guaranteed.
For-further information apply to
Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
LESLIE J. ASTON
DUNSMUIR    AVENUE
Shoemaker
REPAIRS NEAT and PROMPT
Prices in Line with the Times.
CHURCH NOTICES
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:   Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practipe, Friday, 7,30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society,- First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev, Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 5th Sunday after
Trinity:
11 a. m. Litany and Holy Communion.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.  Phone
93 L.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
m— i Mi~iii iii~r~iii 1 i-r~fcrr~fcn~r ■—tt—i 11	
I      FIRE   INSURANCE     i
0
I Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford. J
9
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY  TO ft
EDWARD   W.   BICKLE
Price $3.50
GUARANTEED  FOREVER
"Ask the woman who owns One."
For sale by
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison it Columbia
Graphophoiies
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
NOTICE Of CANCELLATION
OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given that
the reserve existing on Lot No.
1187 Rupert District, by reason
of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on the 27th
of December, 1907   is cancelled
for the purpose of the sale of
same to the Colonial Lumber &
Paper Mills, Limited. '
R. A, Renwick,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C.,
June, 22nd, 1916.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
THE PEACE KITE.
It is a sign of the times that Germany is again flying peace
kites,—From' 'Today, "London.

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