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The Islander Jun 3, 1916

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Array ii
Izliinhw
The Newspaper with the Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
-tegisUtion Library
VOL. VII., No. 10
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 1916.
Subscription price, $1.50 per
ON THE SUBJECT
City Lighting Problem Comes up
Again for Consideration and
Referred to Committee.
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held in the Council
Chambers on Monday evening.
Present, His Worship, Mayor
Parnham, and Aid. Henderson,
Bate, Brown, MacDonald, Banks
and Carey.
The minutes of the previous
meeting were read and adopted.
The Sanitary Inspector reported that he had inspected certain
drains and served notice to repair
within six days.
A communication was received
from P. P. Harrison stating that
he was instructed by William McLellan to ask for payment of
claim amounting to $75. The
particulars of Mr. McLellan's
claim is that he is entitled to the
sum of $35 for board and lodging for Leigh Palmer while he
was suffering from diphtheria
during the year 1911 and a farther sum of $40 covering attendance and nursing by Mrs. McLellan. The communication further states that Dr. Hicks, acting
as city health officer, instructed
Leigh Palmer to board at the McLellan residence until he recovered from an attack of diphtheria.
The Council was somewhat astonished at the increased amount
of the account from $35, which
was previously rendered to $75.
Some of the aldermen thought
the account was out of place and
four or live years old. If Palmer
hail been ordered by the city
health officer to the McLellan residence it was thc duty of the
health oflicer to notify the Council, 'lhe citv clerk was instructed to write the city health officer
and ask him for a report on this
matter.
The city clerk read a communication from the manager of the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Company. Ltd., in reply to the
Council's request for a meter to
he placed on the new 350 Nitro
light outside the City buildings
lor the purpose of ascertaining
thu cost per month. The letter
read as follows:
ln reply to yours of the 23rd.,
inst., we wish to state that we
think it would he a needless expense to install a meter at the
City Hall for the purpose of
measuring the power consumption of the Nitrogen light in front
thereof, since we know the rated
wattage of the lamp and also
the number of hours the City
lighting system is in use per
night, these two factors giving
the Kilowatt hours consumed in
any period you may wish.
We are prepared to offer a
straight seven cent water rate
for city lighting. If such a
change should be made it will be
possible to install a switch on our
pole near the post office so that
the night watchman may regulate the lighting hours of the
city, thereby saving considerable
consumption over the present
method."
Aid. Bate then read reports
from other cities concerning a
350 Nitro lamp, and said if the
city were to install the lights
now and go on a meter system
the Council would save enough
to pay for the winter lighting,
and again moved that eight large
lights lie placed on Dunsmuir
avenue. He further stated it
was time the Council woke up
on the question. Our lighting
system was an eye sore within
the city limits, and on the main
thoroughfare.
Aid. Carey stated that during
the last two weeks he had given
the matter considerable study,
and hoped the editor of The Is
lander would not misquote him
this time as in a previous issue.
He said the party who drew up
the present agreement with the
Cumberland Electric Light Co,
made a good bargain, and read
off a number of figures of a pos
sihle new agreement which was
the result of Aid. Carey's two
weeks study on the new Electric
lighting system.
Aid. Banks, falling in line with
Aid. Carey's remarks, Aid. Carey
contended that the system to be
adopted by Aid. Bate for the
main street would cost the city
about $50 per month, and taking
the back streets into consideration would make it a possible ¥90
per month.
' Aid. Bate wanted to cut out
the Hat rate altogether and pay
for what the city used. Put on
a meter at a seven cent rate and
pay for what we use and further
said: "We are today paying for
more power than we are consuming. If we can't pay a little more
for light we might as well close
up and sell out or get out of town.
With a meter we can govern the
light according to our means,
and suggested that half the lights
be cut off at 11 o'clock, the balance to remain burning all night.
Aid. Henderson was in favor
of a committee being appointed
to deal with the Electric Lighting Company and get down to
facts and figures so that the
Council would have something
before them. The result was
that the Council as a whole was
appointed a committee to deal
with the new lighting system.
Another communication from
the secretary-treasurer of the
Boy Scouts read as follows:
"City Clerk, Dear Sir: I have
been instructed to ask you to
convey to Mayor Parnham and
the City Council the deep appreciation of the Boy Scouts Association for the use of the City
Hall and for the use of the drums
as well as other privileges granted the Boys. The Association
feels that with the help and sympathy of the Mayor and Council
the scope of the movement will
be extended and Cumberland will
have every reason to be proud of
the Boy Scouts. Again thanking
you for what has been done for
the cause, 1 am, Yours truly,
JOHN SUTHERLAND, Sec.
This, on motion, was received
a^d tiled.
Thomas Conn. City Road Boss,
handed in a report of the ratepayers who had worked off their
taxes, amounting to $100.75. This
was ordered to be received and
the city clerk instructed to issue
tax receipts for the various amounts.
The following  accounts   were
referred to the finance committee
for payment if found correct:
Cum. Electric Light Co.     $54.00
Cumberland Waterworks        .50
A. McKinnon  13.80
Marocchi Bros.    30.95
A. R. Kierstead     7.50
C. H. Tarbell     3.25
Wm. McLellan __ 20.00
Total  $130.00
Aid. Hendtrson, chairman of
the Finance committee, handed
in an extended report of receipts
and expenditures to 30th., June.
The Finance committee suggested to stop all street work upon
the completion of the present
work in hand. Aid. Banks,
chairman of the Board of Works
reported that the ("ity employees
were making good progress with
Fourth street and the permanent
highway was nearing completion.
The council, on motion   made
WHAT DO YOU THINK OF IT?
"We fight for the protection of life and liberty.'
in New York World.
-By Kirby
application to the City School
Trustees for a public holiday for
the school children on the 30th.,
of May to take part in the sports
that were being arranged to welcome a company of the 102nd.,
Battalion. Aid. Carey, secretary
of the Board of School Trustees,
said that he would do what he
could to meet the wishes of the
Council.
R. W. Hunter, of Buttar &
Chiene, of Vancouver, auditors
for the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., arrived here Sunday.
It is understood that the next
Red Cross tea will be held at the
residence of Mrs. J. R. Lockard
on the afternoon of June 20th.
Particulars later.
Mr. John Coburn, manager of
the Ladysmith Sawmill Co., of
Nanaimo, accompanied by Mrs.
Coburn, spent a few hours in
the City Friday, having come up
by auto.
Mr. John McGregor, manager
of the South Wellington Coal
Mines, paid a short visit to Cumberland Sunday, by auto, returning the same day.
TheCumberland Masonic Lodge
will attend divine service at Holy
Trinity Church on Whitsunday,
June 11th, at 7 p.m. The preacher will be the Venerable A. H.
Collison, M.A., Archdeacon of
Quatsino.
William Griffiths, an employee
of Comox Logging Railway Co
at Camp one was accidentally
killed on Monday by the moving
of a log from the pile to the car.
The deceased was struck
in the back and died an hour
later. Upon investigating the
accident the coroner decided
that an inquest was not necessary
Promotion to Serjeant M. Brown
Battalion orders effective
Thursday May 11th, 1916, by
Lieut-Col. J. W. Warden, officer
commanding 102nd Battalion, C.
E. P.i— In the Provisional School
of Musketry and Machine Gun
Course, the undermentioned
officers have passed the final
test, Lieut. J. M. Whitehead and
Sergeant M. M. Brown. In promotions, effective May 5th 1916,
703085 acting Sergt. Brown, M.
M., (M.G. S.) to be Prov. Sergeant.
The Sergt. M. M. Brown referred to who has passed so highly and received promotion is a
brother to J. C. Brown of No. 2
Tunnelling Co. and Corporal
Willie Brown of 7th Battalion
Infantry.
Tenders are invited for shingling the roof of Holy Trinity
Church. Particulars may be obtained from Rev. A. Bischlager.
Robert W. Waite and Josiah
Thomas, Attorneys and Council-
lors-at-law, of Seattle, arrived
on Wednesday evening and left
this morning. They were here
in connection with an action be
fore the Superior Court of King
County, Washington, in which
Chris Provitch, at one time pro
prietoi of the Nanaimo Hotel, in
this City, appeared as defendant.
Several local business men are
interested in I he case now before
the courts in Seattle,
The Gander- "Try this sauce; you'll find its use
Isa splendid thing for Goose."
The Goose:   "Certainly, darling, AFTER YOU:
For it's good foi Gander, too. - Reynolds, Lond in,
COMPANY OF 1021
VISIT CUMBERLAND
Col. Warden Awards Shields to
Winning Teams of Boy Scouts
and Patriotic Girls.
The visit of Co!. Warden with
i full company of his warriors to
our city on Tuesday afternoon
will he something to be remembered. It is not often we have
the privilege and honor to witness such an imposing turnout
is a full company of soldiers in
full uniform march through our
'ity. We are more than proud
it the magnificent response made
by our citizens in such a short
time for the occasion. On Monday evening Mayor Parnham received a phone message intimating that a company of the 102nd.
would arrive in the city at 2
o'clock on the following day, and
immediately the Council, the
Band, the Teachers and Children
were invited to join in the welcome, while chief honors were
left in the hands of Scoutmaster
Taylor to make the arrangements
for the Grand Parade, as well as
the entertaining of our guests
while with us, and it is our duty
to give the Boy Scouts and Patriotic Girls great praise for the
masterly way they looked after
this part of the program.
School was dismissed early on
Tuesday, when the officers of the
Boy Scouts and Girls sent their
many patrols all over the city
soliciting donations of cakes and
sandwiches and such dainties as
would be appreciated by our sol
dier boys. Needless to say here
is where the good citizens of
Cumberland shone, as evidenced
by the great array of baskets,
with all the necessaries being
carried to the West Cumberland
Band Hall.
At 1.30 the Boy Scouts, Girls,
Teachers and Children, led by
the Band, marched out to the
Court House to await the coming
of the Boys in Khaki. No sooner had the Boys and Girls lined
up on both sides of the road so
that the Warriors could march
right on, than the sound of the
Bugle Band was heard at the
turn of the road. Prompt to the
minute marched the boys of the
102nd., Comox Battalion, led by
their Bugle Band, with swing and
rhythm that was splendid, right
up and through the City up to
the Sports grounds where the officers and men were received by
Mavor Parnham on behalf of our
city.
The men were then dismissed
until five o'clock and in the interval games were arranged for
the benefit and entertaining of
the Hoys of the 102nd, Football
matches, foot races, and an exhibition drill by the Boy Scouts
and Patriotic Girls filled in a very j
enjoyable afternoon, the latter
event proving tote of great interest to the soldiers, as shown
by the applause they gave the
exhibition. At five o'clock the
bugle call mustered the soldiers
together and the Patriotic Girls,
assisted by Mrs. Frame, made
splendid provision for the wants
of our guests, who were no doubt
ready for a hearty meal. Coffee,
cakes and sandwiches were sent
around to all, and more than an
abundant supply was left.   The
touch which was shown in all the
work of the day.
Col. Warden Inula duty In perform afler six o'clock, lhe judg-
ingof the Patriotic Girls hy patrols to.see who was lhe winner
of the Shield as donated by the
City. The patrols were evenly
matched and after keen competition the patrol of Miss Bessie
Stewart was declared winner,
the silver cupas won by the Boy
Scouts was then presented to
Capt. W. Mordy by   the Colonel.
The Ambulance Shield for lhe
best patrol in ambulance work
as judged by Drs. McNaughton
and Hicks was then handed
to P. -L. W. Mordy by Col. Warden.
The next event was a presentation of a beautiful wrist watch
to Scoutmaster Taylor by the officers of the Patriotic Girls as a
slight recognition for faithful
services. The presentation vas
made by Mayor Parnham. Photographs were taken of the Boy
Scouts and Patriotic Girls with
Col. Warden in the center.
The Colonel made a splendid
recruiting appeal for 100 more
men, and the masterly manner in
which our cause was put before
the people showed that it was es-
senlijjl that every man who could
be spared should join the colors
in defence of his home and country.
The men of the 102nd., gave
three cheers for Cumberland,
while just before falling in of the
men three cheers for Colonel
Warden and his Warriors were
given. The whole City lined out
to see. the march past of the
Company as they stepped out to
the music of the Band.
Fatal Fire at No. 1 Japtown.
A serious fire took place at
number one Jap town near
Cumberland at half past, three on
Tuesday morning when the home
of N. Hatchitsuke was burned
to the ground, causing the death
of his wife and child, a baby boy
18 months old. At 3 o'clock in
the morning the father left his
home for Comox lake on a fishing trip. Upon his arrival there
he found that he was short an
anchor rope/or his boat. Upon
returning he was met by two Japanese boys who told him thut
his house was on fire. On ••caching his home he found that his
house was reduced to ruins the
charred remains of his wife lying near the frame of the iron
bedstead where she slept and
his child in a neighbors house,
burned tn such an extent that
the boy died in the hospital the
same morning at !) o'clock. At
the coroner's inquest the father
stated that he had lighted a cigarette on lhe morning of the
fire before leaving for Comox
lake and threw lhe match nn the
floor. The jury in the verdict
censured the Japanese for nut
being more careful.
Election End of August.
Victoria, June I. The Legif-
, lature was prorogued lasl night,
I with ihe election writs made is-
|s lable on July 5, indicating that
the election can mil take place
much earlier than the end uf
August, as this year, on account
of the decision to take votes from
soldiers in Europe, six weeks
must elapse after nominations.
The exact date of the elections
will be announced when the writs
are issued on .Inly 5. It is presumed that a date early in September will he chosen.
There was little ceremony in
connection with piorogation last
night. At II o'clock His Honor
Lieut.-Governor Barnard entered
the House and received the formal icporton the passage of the
comments of the  bovs in kahki bills which still  required  his as
on the way they were received j^11,1-    VVIu'n that was given for
and' treated in Cumberland were
very gratifying.
Everyone was inten sted in the
parade of the 102nd Band at (i
o'clock, while the flag was being
lowered,   adding that   military
mal announcement ul prorogation was made, following a motion liy Hon. Mr. Taylor, and the
members sang "Cud Save Ihe
King.:' Dissolution uf parliament hy effluction uf time tool;
place at midnight last night. TWO
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
(The .Mantor
Published every Saturday by (he Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3*5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50,
Sin^H' copies, 5c, Foreign subscriptions
tn countries In I'ustal Union, S2.00
SATURDAY, JUNE 3rd, 1916,
Production and Thrift.
Sunshades:
Straw Hats:
Felt Hats:
In the second number of the
Agricultural War Book just issued under the auspices of the
Federal Department of Agriculture, there is much valuable information regarding the dairy
products of this and other countries. A significant conclusion
to be derived from the statistical
and other facts there supplied is
that Canada is not doing all that
she might in meeting the world's
demands for these commodities.
There is, however, some consolation in the statement made by
Professor Dean of the Ontario
Agricultural College, that 1915
showed an improvement. There
is additional solace in thc fact
that the western provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan are devoting special attention to the
products of the dairy. Last year
was the best year in this respect
that those proyinces ever knew,
and 1910 promises a great deal
better yet. Something that the
entire country needs to bear in
mind is thst if we continue to
turn out cheese and butter of the
standard attained to and recognized abroad, particularly in Britain, the market can hardly be
over-supplied. Canadian cheese
has earned a reputation that cannot be excelled, a gratifying fact
that is abundantly proven in the
market price, Butter is not so
much in demand for the one simple reason that it is not so easily
kepi, or, in other words, is more
perishable.
Statistical tables regarding
dairy products are given in the
War book that are well worthy
of study, being at once enlightening, instructive and encouraging. From these, for instance,
is learnt that in ten years our increase of values in dairy products
reached a total of $42,809,071, to
.'. hich the piovinces contributed
in the following manner:
Quebec   $11,455,394
Ontario   8,555,717
Alberta 7'309,275
Saskatchewan   6,836,4331
Manitoba    3,285,376
New Brunswick   1 738,205
Nova Scotia      1,732,111
British Columbia   1,460.502
Prince Edward Island     496,058
Some other information gleaned from the book 's that although
values increased in the older provinces owing to the greatly enhanced prices, the number of
milch cows in those provinces
decreased considerably. Ontario
fell away to  the tune  of .'.2784;'
Quebec 14,691, New  Brunswick'  ,	
to 2,522, Nova   Scotia  to 9,515 duction per  hundred of popula-
Special Showing this Week of
LACES and EMBROIDERIES
Embroideries:
Embroideav Edging in 3,3, 4 and 5 inch widths, with insertion to match.
New Designs in corset cover embroidery, from 25c. to $1.50
per yard.
Embroidery Flouncings, allovers, and 45 inch Skirting Embroideries, in newest designs.
Laces
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., 1X.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN A1RD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S150
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
IWa Una i-kove   Beauty may be on'y skin deep I
VY olipapero   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
Lace Edgings and Insertions in Valenciennes and Torchons.
Milanese, Oriental and Guipure Laces, in 3 to 6 inch widths,
in white, cream and Paris.
New designs in Allover Laces.
Special novelty patterns in Allover Shadow Lace.
Sunshades in plain self colours, also black and white striped,
and striped colour combination in the new mushroom
shapes.
Wash Skirts, Middy Blouses, Silk Gloves, Silk Sweater Sets,
Lisle and Silk Hosiery. Voile and Silk Waists, newest in
Silk Crepe and Muslin Collars.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
The newest shapes in men's Panama and Straw Hats. Specials
in Boater shaped straw hats.
Men's soft Felt Hats in Stetson, Fedora and Telescope styles,
in all the leading shades.
New shapes in men's Christy stiffs.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
1
THIS IS THE STOVE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY
The   New   Perfection   Oil   Cookstove   uses kerosene,—the
cheapest fuel to use.    Costs less than gas, coal or wood—5
10 cents a day is its fuel cost for the average family.
Besides, the New Perfection
no fires to build, no smol
burner sizes at these dealers
C. H. Tarbell
& Son
Cumberland
and
Courtenay
@
Q
ueen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in itself.    It
supplies energy.    Is a
fine tonic.
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.    It aids digestion.    It is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed by thousands
of ardent advocates of real temperance.   Drink beer
and be temperate.    Always ask for Queen Beer.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd,
Cumberland, B.C.
and
4,
Prince Edward I
a total decrease
bers of 113,871). On the other
side of the shield we have the
magnificent showing made by the
western provinces, in which the
aggregate increase of milch cows
iland to j tion, sharing the honor with
in num.-! France of being sixth in the rotation of nations. New Zealand
conies lirst with a percentage of
197, then Denmark with 83. the
United States 'with 69, Sweden
wilh 48. Switzerland with 38 and
reached close upon a quarter of a Canada and France each with 36
million in the decade. In spite
of the general increase in dairying it is not altogether Mattering
to ourselves to read that with all
our resources, thrift and industry, Canada holds a comparatively low place in the order of pro-
Austria 32, Germany 31 and  the
United Kingdom at 27.
If you can ride a bicycle and
talk intelligently about a Motor
to drive it, I can offer you a means
of making money. Write Fred A.
Caton, 611 View St., Victoria, B.C.
Don't Fail to see the Paramount
Program of Famous Players
at the
ILO ILO THEATRE
Once every week.  Admission 15c.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker -and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Books, Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Cumberland, B.C.
Get "More Money" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yoursection
SHIP YOIJH FUBS DIRECT l*> '-KIII>IIKIIT"lhe largest
house In tbe World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN HAH lllks
u reliable—responsible—safe Fur House witli an uiibleniislii (1 reputation existing for "more than at bird of a century." a lontt successful record of sendinK Fur.Shippers prninp'.N ATI SKACTI IK Y
AND PROFITABLE returns. Write f.,r"tlli«»fiiilitrt»lii»per,"
the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
Write for H-NOW-lf« PItEE
AR   ^HIIRFRT  In/-   25*27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.
. D. anu BE.K 1, inc. Deol c „ Chicago, u.s.a!
I
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24. YEARS. J r\
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Get Your
Spring Sewing
Done NOW!
And let the
Singer Sewing
Machine   Co.
Help You.
We will sell you a Singer Sewing
Machine on very easy payments,
and no interest. We will demonstrate thoroughly each machine sold,
and will give the Guarantee of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co.
NEEDLES,   OIL    AND   ALL   ACCESSORIES
See Our Windows at
Mrs. Alex. King's
Ice Cream Parlor and Candy Store
IHKEh
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;  my  business  is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
L
UNION   HOTEL
Opposite the Railway Station
WM. JONES.
This Hotel has heen renovated throughout and is now a strictly first-class Hotel
in every respect.    The best and finest
supply of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Silver Spring Beer
Contains backbone and
stamina, and gives you
back the appetite that
you have lost. Drink the
Beer that's pure at the
UNION HOTEL
Cumberland,   B. C.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COdLniiuiug *iglita of thu I' -1111111111
in Manitoba, .Saskatchewan aptl Alberta.
?lie Vuknti Territory. thaN rth«eit 1'eir
rnries amliu a port inn ■ f the L'ruvinuo nl
British Columbia, may *-<a eased fur a tern
uf twt.rhiy-i.ne yeara a' nil auuu'ttl ■ t-n -»1 • *
$1 an acre. Not more li an li.nOO icrei-
* ill be leaned to one appl cant.
Application tor a lease must be nude b
In; -Applicant iii person to the Age- t • r»ul
-tgtuit of the district in whii.li the light
..(-[•lied fur aie HltilM'ed.
Lu surveyed fertitory ihe land must b
lexorihed bv Bt,utinU8.i-f lo^alsub li-iil tin
fMCimtiB, -nd in 1111 uifynl -wrtit^r}
he 1 race applied for nhall tie mak d < ut by
heapp icatit hmi-udt.
K n'li -ipplii.ition must he ace -lutii-tuHM
by a fee «.f $6 which will be refunded if iht
rikhta applied Inrare not av dlab e, but nn'
otherwise. A royalty shall he paid on ih<
merchantable ou'put of thu mine at ih«
n« nf live cent* (ier ton.
The person >p-rating the mine aha)
furnish the Agent with wn%*\\\ returnsnc
(muting for ihe full quantity of meroh
an table coal mined and p»y he royaltj
hereon. If the o< al in in lag lights an
not being operated, sucb i-eiuriisahatl bi
tun isbed at least'-ncea vear.
The lease »ill include i'e imal uijuiii
•igbtaonly, but hel sseomny h-< m riuit
i<td to purchase whatever <vai able nur
face tig'ts may ne ciuiaidered necessary
f r i he working ft he mine at the rate of
9L0.0Oanacie.
for full info niation application -jhoult
be made to the Secretary of the D. part-
ilielltof the Inteiior, Onawx,   ur to   any
Agent • r Sub-Av nt ■ fDominion Lauds
W. W. CORY,
Deputy MiuitJterotJhe Interior.
N.B- IJimu httrised publication of thii
idvi rtiMHinent will not be paid for.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
(CUMBERLAND, B,C
Agent fur the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex He(letson, Proprietor
Kstiimiti's anil Design* furnished
on Applk'iitinn
King George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop.
First Class in Every
Respect    :    :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland.B.C.
MAROCCHI BROS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
REWARD FOR HONESTY
Young  Politician  Who  Refused
Bribe Is Given a Coveted
Nomination.
By H. M. EGBERT.
It was to be a close election In Por-
teraburg—on that everyone was
agreed. Hlggins bad represented llie
city In the legislature for fifteen
years, but Hlggins had got out of the
game and gone to New York lo settle
there, and the opposing party hoped
to snatch the victory. Their candidate was Pleat, a man of reputed integrity nnd much wealth, the owner
of the huge eighteen story Pleat build
Ing. which could not have been matched for size within five hundred mllri
of St. Louis An,! Pleat had been the
most successful mayor Ihe city bnd
ever known He hnd cleaned up Por
lershurg; he hnd wiped out lhe slum
districts; he had forced through the
ordinance for resin veylng and regrad-
Ing the city streets in eplto of nn antagonistic city government. Hlggins'
party seemed likely tn nominate lien
ton In succeed htm. nnd Pleat hoped
to snatch the victory out of his hnnds
And It Beemed prohahle that he
would, fnr Renton would sfind little
chance against the forceful ex-mavor.
But there was no man of known at.ll-
Ity within Ihe party ranks to succeed
Hlggins. and Renton was a compromise candidate. Ronton would probably
be nominated the following week, and
Pleat'B adherents counted the victory
as won.
This was the situation as It outlined Itself to Roger Hewett. Hewett
was a surveyor by occupation, but until the passing of Pleat's ordinance
ho had only paid his office rent by
mortgaging the little home which he
and his girl wife had purchased with
their small capital when they were
married, a year before. The house
was mortgaged to the Indemnity company, and Pleat had a controlling finger In this, as in most other Industrial and commercial enterprises In
Portersburg.
The convention which was expected
to nominate Benton had been In session some days and would not complete Its labors until the following
week. Although he knew the folly of
antagonizing Pleat further. Hewett
had been assuming a leading part In
Its deliberations. Pleat had. Indeed,
openly conveyed his sense of dlspleas-
he
pause.
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Spcsialty
West Cumberland
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sal.    Fri.
Thur.
1
Wcd.| Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,    Sat.
P.M.     P.M.
4..15   7.:ir>
P.M.
4.35
P.M. ! P.M.
7.35    4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35    3,35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10|30
A.M.
7:00
4.10     7.10
4.10
7.10    4.10
4.10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05 •   7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.05
Puntledge
'7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00     7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00    3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55     6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55    2.55
(f) Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50     6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45.    6.45 .
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45    2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30     6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3.30.
8.30    2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
Can't Buy Me
Pleat."
ure. He had used more subtle measures also, That morning the managers of three banks had refused Hewett an Increase upon hla mortgage,
although the value of the property
warranted this. He muat wait till
after election, they told hhn. And
Pleat's company could nnd probably
would foreclose within a week.
"Mary," said Hewett lo his young
wife, "the situation seems to bp this
If I crawl to Pleat and set nut of poll
tics he'll probably let its stay on In
our little home and perhaps throw rue
some work later. If he got? into th*
[legislature he can undoubtedly turn
tthe Bcrew In either direction If I
!don*t crawl—well, we'll have to look
Ifor another home."
"I want you to do what Ih right.
dear," his wife answered, and put her
arms lovingly about his neck. "Just
do what fs right, linger, and—never
mind the home."
That had happened yesterday. Now
Hewett sat In his barely furnished
office fronting on thR city tupinre.
studying somo hltio draught sheets
that lay on tho desk. But he was
thinking harder than he wns sludvlng
Nobody but Hewett knew that the
great Pleat building encroached a foot
and a half upon the city sidewalk. No-
body else cared. Nobody else would
ever have dreamed of resurveylng
that section of the financial district of
PorterBburg. Yet this error meant
that Pleat would have to shear off a
foot and a half of his great building
down a vertical line of eighteen stories.
He would merely have to remain sl
lent. If his report went In It might or
might not pass unnoticed. He knew
that the chief surveyor, a creature or
Pleat's, would at least withhold the
discovery for a few weeks, until Pleat
had carried the municipal and state
tickets to victory. Then the ordinance
would either be repealed or never anted on, and Heweit's report would be
bo much waste paper.
He had hardly reached his office the
neit morning beforo tho telephone
rang. Hewett took down the receiver.
Pleat was at the other end.
"O, Mr. Hewett," he said, "would
you be so kind as to step over to my
\fflce at once?"   The tones were suav«
nnd bland -tno suave for one nf
Pleat's overbearing disposition, u e
surveyor thought. Hewett stood cu.'.
sidering.
"I .1   t»p  over  In   five  minutes."
answered, after a    moment's
"You can see me at once?"
"At once ami alone," plpat an
gwered.
He was as gfod as his word, despite
his manifold interests, for Hewett was
agreeably conscious of being ushered
past a dozen or more men of ,l|
kinds, f.nancial magnates, political
leaders, business men into P'f it's
fine office with Its mabesany fittings
nnd oriental hies. Pleat rose and -x-
tended his hand.
"Sit down. Mr Hewett." he said.
"The Indemnity company has. I understand, advanced yon *,, oon on mortgage Upon your home nt TO K strepi""
"Yes. Mr. Pleat." the surveyor replied.
"And ynu have applied for sn increase of fl.noo The matter was onlv
brought to mv attention yesterdav |
have expressed the wish thai tbln ho
granted, making the amount $"• ono,
with Interest at t per rent Instead of
4%. Rut. Mr Hewett. pardon mv
question, but how do you propose to
pay this sum? The Tn-te-'.r.tv company does not like to foreclose Have
you any work In view after your present taBk Is completed?"
"No, sir." said Hewett. looking full
at the smiling visage of the financier.
"Too bad!" sighed Pleat. "Of course,
your unfortunate affiliation with lhe
opposing party would preclude me if
f should win tho election, from considering your interests. IT you wer*
offered the nomination as state surveyor, now—you wouldn't change your
coat? No, of course not. But. Mr.
Hewett, I understand that Mr Blake
Ib resigning from the water commission, a strictly non-partisan body.
Suppose you were appointed to succeed him at once by Governor
Brlggs?"
Hewett'a heart leaped. The salary
was $5,000 a yearl
'That would Involve no sacrifice of
principle on my part?" he asked, moistening his dry lips.
"None  whatever,"   answered   Plent
"You would simply lay    down    vour
present office forthwith and step Into
your new one during the course of ei
day or two.   Of course your successor
would take over all your duties"
Hewett knew what was coming
"For Instance, you would  probnb'v
be willing to recall your report ef ves
iterday  upon  the  survey    of    WhPe
'street,   which  will  not  be  acted   nn
officially until the next meeting nf the
survey board?"
Hewett rose up.
"You can't buy me that wav nr nnv
way, Mr. Pleat," he answered, taking
his hat, and he saw Pleat's face grow
purple. For a moment the financier
hesitated; then he came forward with
the agility of a boy. He was trem
bling, too.
"For $20,000," he whispered, and
began plucking at his sleeve. "Come
here! lt'a In my desk! Don't be a
,fool and cut your own throat, young
!man. Who's backing you In this? My
Ood, It will cost me a quarter of a million If that report goes through. Your
last chance!—and I'll make lt $30,000.
$40,000, any price within reason. Look
'here! It's all In hills nnd gold. Come
and let me show you!"
Somehow Hewett escaped from the
room. His last view was of the old
man standing beforo his desk and
I tossing great bundles of hills hither
and thither like an Infuriated child.
I Men came to aee Hewett that after-
(noon and tho next day and the next,
!and, in guarded language, unfolded
j various propositions to the effect thnt
he should make peace with Pleat.
Hewett showed them to the door. On
the third day the indemnity company
served him with a foreclosure notice.
Then he told Mary everything.
"You have done right, dear," she
said. "You couldn't have dono otherwise. And I'm proud of you. 1 couldn't
live here happily If you had sold your
SOU] to Pleat. We'll make another
home somewhere—but one can never
mnke honor of dishonor."
They packed their things and engaged a couple of rooms In a poorer
part of the city.
It was the lat?t day of the session
and the nomination would be made
that afternoon. As Hewett mounted
the platform he became aware that
there was nn Indefinable unrest In the
air. Tho delegates were watching him
nnd whispering together, something
wns brewing, someone hnd mooted
something everyone In the hall knew
It except Hewett.
He did not know now bitterly he
spoke, nor the Impassioned nature o(
his plea for purer politics, n clenner
Civic spfrit. Ho thought that he wna
urging Kenton's election on these
grounds, but In reality he was pleading for his lost home and lhe homes of
all who had tn choose between dishonor and the happiness of those they
loved.
He did not wait for tlie nomination,
but, his duty done, left the hall. Outside the representatives of three papers were waiting for hltn. "Mr
Hewett!" one of lhe men began He
shook him off nnd left lilm. He tramped two miles through the rain went
up to his rooms, and sat down dismally upon the unpacked furniture
Men were tramping up tbe stairs.
The door was thrown open. Mary
stood there; with her were a half-
dozen men. He knew their faces; he
had seen them at the convention His
brain was whirling. Who were they?
The well known names escaped him
"Mr. Hewett," said somebody, "the
convention has tendered you the nomination for the legislature."
"He accepts." he heard his wife cry
triumphantly     she came toward hint
nnd kissed him In   he presence of all.
"M>   wife   has  answered   for   me ■■■
God bless lier   gentlemen," he said
(Copyright. WIS. hy W. o. Chapman,! POUE
THE ISLANDER, CUMBEKLANU, B.C.
LOCALS
For Sale 1915 Big Twin Indian motorcycle, fully equipped,
fine condition.   Apply Box 314.
Mrs. C H. Tarbell left for
Victoria on Fi iday.
John Frame returned from a
visit to Vancouver on Sunday.
Mrs. P. P. Harrison left for
Victoria on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Cko. Willis returned from a visit to Vancouver
on Sunday.
Mrs. Grieves and Miss Jessie
Macdonald arrived on Friday.
Miss Hannah Harrison, of
Cumberland, is relieving one of
the School Teachers at Bevan,
who is leaving for England.
Miss McDowall, stenographer
of the Canadian Collieries, ie-
turned from a ten days' vacation
on Sunday.
Joseph Hunter, of Victoria and
Frank Sawt'ord of Union Bay
were  visitors during the week.
Arthur Lee. of Bevan, will
leave on Monday for Victoria to
join the Canadian Expeditionery
Forces.
House to Rent- Six rooms with
bath room and hot water. Apply
to J. Foster,;Box 173 Cumberland
B. C,
Gnr. 1). R. Dowdall of the lath
Artillery Brigade left by Monday's train for Victoria after
spending a few days with his
parents at Royston.
MAKE YOUR OWN BUTTER
IN 3 MINUTES. * De King the
new wonderful Butter-Maker,
does it from milk or cream, sweet
or sour. A child can operate.
Price $0.50. Sold on 30 days
trail. Agent wanted for Comox
District. T. P. McCondell, Vic
toria B. C,
John Newton, Inspector of
Mines, of Nanaimo, arrived last
Saturday and left on Friday.
While here he conducted the examination for lirst, second and
third class certificates under the
Coal Mines Regulation Act.
Methodist Tennis Court.
With the arrival of the good
weather the Methodist tennis
club opened for the season last
Saturday afternoon. All those
who take an interest in tennis
are cordially invited to join.
Membership fee, ladies $1, gents
$1.50.
LESLIE J. ASTON
DUNSMUIR    AVENUE
Shoemaker
REPAIRS NEAT and PROMPT
Prices  in Line with the Times.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WI .MAM   MERR1FIELD, Proprietor.
Canada's
Best
Piano
Throughout ibis wide Dominion
theGERHARD HEINTZMAN
stands pre-eminent. Behind its
marvellous popularity stands
half a century of unceasing
elioi'ts and unswerving loyalty
to the highest standard of design and workmanship.
I he Gerhard Heintzman
is made by Canadians with Canadian capital. If you want a
Piano secure the finest instrument procurable, which is undoubtedly the Gerhard Heintzman.
i
WRITE US ABOUT THEGERHARD
I IF.INI/.MAS.     WE ARE OFFERING   EXCEPTIONALLY   EASY
TERMS.
(i. A. FLETCHER MUSIC Co.,
"Nanaimo's Music House"
22 Commercial St.. NANAIMO, B.C,
THE   BIG   STORE
The Latest Summer Goods
Ladies' Skirts made in the very latest style, all new cloths, and the prices
are right. Every one is stamped "Northway," which is the " Hall-mark"
of fashion.
Ladies' Suits, "Northway" Garments, in some very smart designs, made
of beautiful cloth, and excellently finished.   Prices $17.50 to $30.00.
Ladies' Sport Coats, new checks, latest styles and moderate prices.
Ladies' Millinery. We have a very comprehensive stock of ladies' and
children's Hats on view. We specialize on Read-to-wear Hats from
$1.25 to $2.50.
Children's Smart Hats. A splendid variety to choose from. Prices 25c.
to $1.50.
Fancy Parasols for the Little Tots, at 25^ each.
" Oliver Twist" Suits for the Little Tots, guaranteed to give splendid
wear.    Price 85^ each.
Blue Stripe Overalls, from size 3 to 10, made from a good quality cloth,
Price 35/' a pair.
Khaki Boy Scout Overalls, with red band down each side, all sizes. Price
$1.00 each.
Infants' and Children's white Muslin Dresses, made of the daintiest sheer
lawn embroidery, beautifully worked.   Prices $1.50 to $3.50.
Middy Waists for girls and ladies, fast colors, 95^ and $1.50 each.
D. & A. Corsets. We are sole agents for this well known brand of
corsets. We can save you money. It will pay you to see our line of these
guaranteed Corsets.    Prices from 75^ to $6.50 a pair.
Groceries:
Our Grocery Department is crowded with the best lines obtainable of
choice quality goods. Price is not the only consideration; we put Quality
first and Service second, and on these you will find we excel.
In our Grocery Department we guarantee our goods; satisfaction or your
money back.   tt'-X3' Our aim is to please our customers.
EXTRA SPECIALS   Half cases of extra fancy navel oranges, large and
delicious, 81.70 per half case.
Boxes of small winesap apples, just the thing forthe
children, regular S2.50 per box. Special price $1.95
per box, 50 per lb.
SIMON LOSER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
WHY
THE GREAT-WEST LIFE
Assurance Company
has for nine successive years written
The Largest Canadian Business
of all companies operating in Canada.
ITS "PREMIUMS JRE THE LOWEST
ITS POLICIES JR6 THE MOST LIBERAL
ITS DIVIDENDS ARtS TH6 HIGHEST
Investigate for yourself before insuring elsewhere.
VANCOUVER ISLAND BRANCH OFFICE
J. Buktt Mono an, Manager.
109 Union Bank Building, Victoria, B.C.
THOMAS MORDY, Agent, Cnmberland, B.C.
"1
FIRE   INSURANCE
0
| Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and        \
National Fire of Hartford. 0
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY  TO Q
EDWARD  W.   BICKLE |
OFFICE;   THE   ISLAN   ER   BLG.. jj
DUNSMUIR AVE..   CUMBERLAND
HWWHOIWHOHOHO<)OHO!a«!.Ol«».-a<'0!<OHO><Oi«
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
Class A, Number 6 COLUMBIA
IGNITORS for General Ignition
purposes. Absolutely fresh stock
Every battery tested before being
sold.
Price 45f/ each.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS
White   Heather   Strain   (Finest
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laving pullets for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality,    very
• pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.   JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Kev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:   Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev, Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Sunday after Ascension Day.
11.00 a.m.,  Litany and  Holy
Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service   of    Intercession   on
Wednesday at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Grapliophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
0oi:>oiK»Hoi)OHoraHoi«mHO<io<iQt!oia
uououoncMd
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.  Phone
9SL.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
9      The telephone makes i
8 everyone your neighbor. |
Where is your neighbor ?    Your neighbor is where the »
J     telephone is, whether in the next block or the next city. (J
ONo matter how close or how far away they may be, you M
hear their voices as plainly as if they were in the same J
room with' you. jj
0
Every telephone is a long distance g
telephone.   Three times the day \
9 period for the regular charge be- I
|         tween 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. \
S                . s
g British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd §
fi 9
a«*oi.o(iO(iaiioiia«oiiatK3()oi)o»o(io(iosjc»!0!!0!£sx3ta

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