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The Cumberland Islander Sep 23, 1922

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Array t<y
TI5EV CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
v CVUk    _kf.ni.    I.    .A.«IUatul    th*     rnnkMUml    V«a>
FORTY-FIRST YEAR—NO. 38.
With which Is consolidated th* Cumberland News.
CUMBERLAND.  BRITISH C0LUMB1 A, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1922
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLL ARS PER ANNUM.
Attorney General Gives Instructions
That Douglas Case Be Appealed
Magistrate Baird Threw rCase
Out on Strength of Det'en
dant's Evidence.—Case Be
comes Controversy Between
Government and Liquor Control Board.
A short while ago William Douglas,
ugcnt for the Sliver Spring Brewery,
was tried before Magistrate Balrd on
a charge of unlawfully having beer in
bis possession. Mr. A. Lelghton, of
Nanaimo, defended the case and adduced evidence to show that the accused was taking beer from the warehouse to his home and warehouse at
Courtenay, for the purpose of private
consumption.
The following letter was also placed
in evidence, purporting to be signed
by A. M. Johnson, chairman of the
Liquor Control Board:
Exhibit "A"
Liquor Control Board.
Victoria, Sept. 5, 1922.
Albert J. Merry, Esq.,
Chief of Police,
Cumberland, B. C.
Re William Douglas.
Dear Sir,—Referring to yours of the
1st lust., received this morning, no
ruling as such concerning gifts ot
beer has been made by the Board.
Some months ago Harry Maynard,
manger of the Sliver Spring Brewery,
asked me whether it was lawful for
breweries to make their agents gifts
of beer. I advlBed him that there was
nothing in the Act to prevent tho
v breweries from so doing. All that we
wished to know was the quantity ot
beer that had been so donated, the
date, and that a record of same be
kept for our Brewery Inspectors. 1
gave him then distinctly to understand
that the right to give beer to their
agents was not to be used by tho
agents as an excuse for selling beer
from the agency.
The brewers have also been in the
habit of sending their agents quantities of beer to replace shortages and
breakages in tho stores. We havo
found from experience that we cannot
check the brewery agents closoly, because they always come back with the
story, either that the beer was donated to the agent or was used for replacement.
In the case of Douglas, It occurs to
me that he told you the truth on the
evening of the 26th ult. He certainly
had the right to take the beer from
the Cumberland storage, for his own
use, and if the magistrate believes
that he is telling the truth in this
lespect, then he has committed no
offence.
Yours truly,
(Signed) A. M. Johnson,
Chairman.
After hearing tiie evidence, Magistrate Baird dismissed the case, stating
that there could be no charge made
under the circumstances.
Acting under Instructions from tho
Provincial Attorney General's Department, on September 16th, P. P.
Harrison entered an appeal in this
case, and same will come up for hearing on October 11th,
It would appear from the evidence
presented in the original hearing of
this case, that there could be no
charge against Douglas, but the Attorney General's Department apparently does not intend to accept the
ruling of the Liquor Control Board on
the question'fit a brewery agent taking
beer from his warehouse to his homo
for private consumption, and intends
to fight the case to a finish.
NO SUNDAY BOATS
IN FALL SCHEDULE
The Fall schedule ot steamship
service for Nanaimo and Vancouver
has been announced. The steamer
Princess Patricia will run daily, as
follows, except Sunday, when thure
will be no steamer service:
Leave Nanaimo at 7.0b a.m., arrive
at Vancouver 9.15 a.m.
Leave Vancouver at 10.00 a.m., arriving at Nanaimo at 12.15 p.m.
Leave' Nanaimo at 2.16 p.m., arriving at Vancouver at 4.30 p.m.
Leave Vancouver at 5.30 p.m., arriving at Nanaimo at 7.45 p.m.
The times of arrival and departure
will be followed as closely as possible
but are subject to tidal and weather
conditions and to change without
notice. This change became effective
on Tuesday last.
The Presbyterian Reducing Club
took their usual hike last Wednesday
afternoon, their goal being Allan's
I/Bke. Rev. Mr. Hood and Mr. L. R.
Stevens went along In the capacity of
welghraen. Speaking of weights, we
would like to know which of the
hikers is responsible for the damaged
scales?
Parent-Teachers'Association
Holds First Annual
Meeting; Elect Officers
Colin Campbell, New President
—Secretary Reads Report of
Year's Successful Work-Close
Year with Balance of $87.40.
At the first annual meeting of the
Cumberland Parent-Teachers' Association, held Monday evening last In
the High School, the following officers
were elected for the forthcoming yea •:
President—Colin Campbell.
First Vice-President-John Sutherland.
Second Vice-President — Principal
A. H. Webb.
Secretary-Treasurer — Dr.   E.   P..
Hicks.
Standing Committees—Educntlonnl'
Mrs. Jan. Hood convenor, Mr. C. B.
Wood and Miss Dalton; Library: Miss
Murguret lluiiucruiun convenor, Mrs.
U, 1). Kinney, Miss McFudyen; Buildings, grounds and equipment: Rev.
Juntos Hood convenor, Mrs. Pearse,
Mr. George Apps; Social: Mrs. Sam
Jones' convenor, Mrs. James Burns
and Miss Beckwlth.
llepnrt of Year's Work.
The following report of the year'R
work was read by the secretary, Dr.
B. R. Hicks:
"During the year" the P. T. A. held
seven regular and one special meeting, and four meetings of the executive. The membership for the year
was thirty-two.
"The activities of the Cumberland
P. T. A. have been' many and varied
During the year three valuuble papers
entitled "The Value of Moving Pictures," "Child Mentality" and "Cumberland School Problems and a Way
Out," have been read and discussed
ut  the   various   meetings.     Another
meeting was devoted to explaining and
discussing the "New System ot Examining the Entrance Class"; another
was given up to an explanation by-
Mr. MacKenzie, of Vancouver, on the
school system iu New Zealand. We
ure indebted to the Teachers' Association for Mr. MacKenzie's trip to
Cumberland. This association paid
halt the cost of his transportation and
helped lo entertain him while here.
"Tho library committee has pur-
ihiised the National Geographic Magazine and placed it In the library, and
Hie teachers have added two other
magazines to the library, of a type
suitable to ussist them in their work.
' One of the outstanding achievements of the year was the effort ot
this association to stimulate the student body to do better work. To do
this ihey offered two prizes to every
class In the school; one to be given
lo tho pupil mailing tiie highest
marks, and the other to the pupil that
made tlle must progress during the
year. The funds with which to purchase these prizes were raised by subscriptions solicited by various members of the association. Towards this
fund the Japanese gave $101.25; the
Chinese, $52.50, and the citizens ot
Cumberland, $56.50. Out of this
amount $124.50 was spent in purchasing prizes.
"The Canadian Collieries (Duns-
iiiuir) Limited wero solicited for a
special prize for the matriculation
class. Ab a result, a $20.00 gold modal
ivus donated, to be given every year
lo the student in the Junior Matriculation Class that makes the highest
marks. This medal Is to be given
only when the average of the student
Is above sixty-five per cent. The
medal this year was won^by Frank
(Continued on Page 8).
Literary and Athletic
Club's Splendid Home
Used by 560 Members
Library, Lecture Hall, Billiard Room, Reading and Writing
Rooms Afford Wonderful Educational and Entertainment
Features at a Minimum Cost Through the Kindness of
Company in Supplying Such a Splendid Building.
As a result of a vote by the employees that they would pay for tho
maintenance, the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited, erected the'
137,000 building in Cumberland known
as the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Club, and same has been at the
disposal of the company's staff since
January 20th, 1921. The club membership now consists of over 560 employees, all of whom make the best
possible use of the splendid buildings
at their disposal.
Some very interesting data in connection with the Literary and Athletic Club has been given The Islander
representative by the secretary, Mr.
J. W. Tremlett, who explained that the
club is managed by a board consisting of nine members elected by tha
employees from among themselves
and three appointed by the company.
Club's Activities.
The club is divided into six different
departments, or units, of which the
library Is one that probably entails
the most detail work, as about twelve
thousand books have been circulated
In the year and-a-half that the club
has been organized. The circulation
averages about thirteen per cent, non
fiction, and this percentage is increasing rapidly. The library membership
Is 410.
Newest Books.
The club, through its affiliation with
the Victoria Public Library, has an
arrangement whereby the club receives a loan of six hundred books,
three hundred of which are exchanged
every six weeks. This service has
proved most satisfactory and enables
the members to enjoy the newest
books shortly after - they are published.
Bending Room Facilities.
A very comfortable reading room
has been fitted up with a big fireplace,
easy chairs, and thirteen daily papers,
four I weeklies, eleven engineering
periodicals and fifty-four magazines.
Across the hall is a writing room
fitted up with two desks, stationery,
etc.; in fact, everything for the convenience of the correspondent.
Lecture Hall.
The educational benefits which the
members of this organization have re-
coived since the opening of the build- j
ing have been great, as the management was successful in securing last'
winter several lectures from the B.
C.   University  extension   course   on'
"Structural    Geology,"   "Astronomy" i
and "Palentology."   Aside from these,
a aeries ot lectures was given under
the auspices of the Department of
Mines with the idea of educating
prospectors. A large percentage of
these lectures were well attended, and
the management considers that they
were\very successful considering the
fact that It Is the first time anything
of th* nature has been attempted iu
this district.       , "
The lecture hall ts furnished with
card tables for all kinds of games and
facilities for the showing ot slide or
moving pictures. »
This Winter's Program.
During the forthcoming winter, the
club management Is planning to hare
similar educational lectures given
every fortnight, starting about December and continuing until April.
Amusement Facilities.
On the lower floor there Is a spacious billiard hall with three well-
lighted tables, two for English billiards and one pool table. The prices
to the members for playing on these
tables was placed so low—only ten
cents per half hour—that practically
every one may enjoy the games as
much as they like. The average number of games played per table per
month during the past year has been
nine hundred, which goes to show
that the members are ardent billiard
players. The tables have just recently
been recovered and are again in first-
class condition, and the club Is most
appreciative. *
Splendid Gymnasium.
It The gymnasium shares the lower
floor with the billiard hall, and contains .nil the. up-to-date apparati used
in gymnasiums. Starting in October,
the gym classes for seniors and
juniors will - be organised and will
meet three times a week. During the
spring and summer, the club takes,
its exercises entirely ln outdoor
sports,
In conjunction with the gymnasium,
there is a change room and shower
baths,, where a supply of hot water
is always on hand so that anyone desiring baths may get same at any
time. This room is fitted up with one
hundred lockers, which are just large
enough to place gym clothes ln, and
these lockers are greatly ln demand.
ThiB room Is also a great convenience
to viBitlng athletes to Cumberland, as
the club very kindly places it at their
disposal.
The management of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, as
well as the club management, 1b highly gratified at the splendid use which
is being made of the association
building.
Liquor Cases Predominate In
•Magistrate Hames' Court, Also
In The Campbell River Court
Wm. Luke Found Guilty—Case
Against Youth Adjourned for.
Week—Rex vs. J. Smith of I
Unlawfully Selling Liquor Re-'
manded till 25th—Pickpocket
Case to be Tried Same Date.
On Friday last, .William Luke, agent
'or the Phoenix Brewing Company at
Courtenay, was charged with having
beer for unlawful purposes. P. P.
Harrison prosecuted the case, and tbe
accused entered a plea of not guilty.
After a hearing before Magistrate
Hames, Luke was found guilty and
convicted, the magistrate Imposing a
line of (200 and costs, also confiscation of Luke's automobile and the beer
(und therein.—•
Young Cleland on Carpet
Following a charge of drinking beer
In a'llquor warehouse, a youth named
Cleland was up before Magistrate
Hames at Courtenay. P. P, Harrison
appeared for the prosecution, and T.
I'enrse for lhe defence. The case was
udjourned tor a week.
Campbell River Cases.
The case of Rex vs. J. Smith, of
Campbell River, on a charge of unlawfully selling liquor, which has
boon remanded a number of times,
will come up on tho 25th; J. A. Rus
sell appearing for the defnee and I'
P. Harrison prosecuting.
The case against two men arrested
nn board the steamer plying between
Vancouver and Campbell River, for alleged pocket picking, will probably
come up on the same date.
II. IV. V. A. Official Charged.
A case comes up the latter part ol
I his week wherein It. Aske, an official
of the Courtenay Great War Veterans'
Association, is charged with purchasing beer from a person other than a
(Iovernment vendor.
NOTICE
There will be no instrumental practise of the C. A. O. S. on Monday next
as the G. W. V. A. Hall will be en-
gaged,
A full recital of tho Halleluiah
Chorus will be held in the G. W. V.
A. Hall on Thursday evening next,
Sept. 28th, at 7.45 p.m. All ladles
and gentlemen willing to assist will
be heartily welcomed.
Copies of the vocal score may now
bo obtained from the conductor, Mr
Merry, at 10 cents per copy.
In love letters, iXXX" marks tho
spot where the man fallB.
The Comox District Teachers'
Institute Recently Organized
Will Hold Convention at Courte
nay in November to Discuss
Educational Poblems.
The Comox District Teachers' Institute came Into being ut an organization meeting held al Courtenay on
Thursday evening, with thirteen
teachers present iTom Cumberland
and eight from Courtenay; also J. M.
Patterson, school Inspector for Comox
and Nnnalmo district, As a result ol
Ibis meeting a convention will be held
Iliu second or (bird week ln November,
lliiB year In Courtenay, and the
teachers t hoio have charge of building
and social arrangements for this year:
Willie Miss C. B. Daltnn and Mr. A.
II. Webb, of Cumberland, are attend
lug to the program, obtaining speakers, and so forth.
Mr. Stubbs occupied the chair, ami
Mr. Patterson and Mr. Webb outlined
the object for whicli the meeting had
oeen called, namely, the organization
of n district teachers' Institute, to be
held the second or third week In November each year. A constitution
was udopted, outlining the objects ot
the organization: That the Institute
sVll exist for the reading and discussion of papei'B on matters pertaining
to the better organization and carry;
ing out of the work of the school and
the betterment of the pupils.
Institute Officers.
The orhcerB provided for In the constitution, were ejected as follows:
Honorary President: S. J. Willis,
Superintendent of Education.
President: J. M. Patterson.
Vice-President (who shall be president the following year): A. H. Webb.
Secretary-Treasurer: Miss C. B
Dalton.
Executive Committee consisting of
three representatives from 'Cumberland: Miss Beckwith, Mr. Wood and
Mr. Apps; two representatives from
Courtenay: Miss Dougan and Mr.
StubbB; one representative each from
Bevan, Comox, Merville, Mlnto and
Union Bay. ■ -—
This Year's Institute.
The convention this year will probably be held on November 17th and
18th, all day Friday and Saturday
morning. A special point will be made
ot the discussion of local problems
and things that the teachers have
found helpful in their work. A public meeting will be held Friday even-
EVERYTHING READY
FOR BIG DAY OF
SPORTS, SATURDAY
The Sports committee have now got
everything arranged for a big day's
sports to-morrow iSaturday). All
the material Is now erected for tho
events, and with good weather tho
sports should be vary successful when
one consldejx the large and up-to-date
program, uud there will not be an
idle minute from tbe time, the sports
start to the finish, which Is from 11
a.m, tin r> 45 p.m.
The prizes for Ihe most Important
events will be presented by Mayor
Macdonajd at the finish of the sports
oil the grounds. Tlio Sports committee appeals to the patrons to keep outside the barrier while Hie sports are
','')ing ou, lu enable everyone to ses
ill the events, as all events will tako
nlace within the football playing area,
ihe G. W. V. A. have now got their
booth erected, and will serve lunches
and refreshments at a munlnal figure.
We hope the boys will be encouraged
In  tlielr efforts for the good cause.
The Cumberland City Band will pa-
ilide Dunsmuir Avenue at 10.45 a.m.,
marching to the sports grounds, and
will render selections throughout the
day.
' The drnw for the first round of the
FIve-Aslde Football will take place ,
on the grounds at 10.30 a.m., on the
morning of the sports. The judges
will make the draw .
The Junior Football Club are holding a dance in the Ilo-llo dance hall
this evening (Friday), Sept. 22nd.
Dancing starts at 10 p.m., till 3 a.m.
Plump's orchestra will supply the
music. We also hope the dance will
be well patronized.
Thanksgiving Day to be
On November 6 This Year
Thansgivlng Day this year will be
-November 6. The, date was fixed hy
'Parliament nftho 1921 session, being
designed to fall on the Monday of the
week containing Armistice Day, which
is November 11.
Ing, when one or more prominent
speakers will, be Invited to give an
uddress. This session will be followed
by a social.
Cumberland City Council
Receives Deputation For
Funds From School Board
Aid. Thomson Sings "Them
Days is Gone Forever" Regarding Lower Taxes—Lights
for Isolation Hospital — Accounts Passed on to Finance
Committee.
" If you had your way and built a
new tire hall, as far a's any prospect
.if lower taxes would be, ' Them Days
.s Gone Forever,' " said Aid. Thomson,
lo Aid. Bannerman at the regular
meeting of the Cumberland City Coun-
sll on Monday evening last, after Aid.
ilunnernian bad mentioned tbe importance of the Council reaching a decision In regard to the lire ball:
■vbether money should be spent re
pairing It or a new ball built.   No ac
Ion    was    taken,   however,   In    the
natter.
Lights fur Isolutlun llnspltiil.
Although $170 had been spent this
year already on the Isolation Hospital,
lie Council was agreed that this In-
tltutlon should have belter Ughttnc.
acilltles than oil lamps. Aid. Banner-
nun moved, and Aid. Pickard seconded, that the Council accept thi
offer of the Electric Lighting Com
pany to put up poles und wires to tin
Isolation Hospital al a cost of $140.ill!
uf which the Council Is to pay lift;
per cent, and the company the bal
nice. Aid. Maxwell asked that a ride:
lie added to the effect that In tic.
event of lhe company extending lti
lilies beyond tliat point, they will ab
sorb the entire cost. Tiie motion car
rled.
Tho offer from the Electric Llgh
Company stipulated that In the evenl
nl anyone wishing a connection wilh
Ibis extension to the line, a charge
til $5.00 would be made, which charge
would be turned over to the city.
School Requirements.
A letter was read by the City Clerk
from A. McKinnon, school trustee,
wbo with Trustee McFayden was present at the meeting, staling that the
lire niarshall had ordered that an additional lire escape be built on tha
school und that fire extinguishers be
ftlnced In the halls. He stated that aj
there was no shelter on the grounds
for the children In Hie wet weather,
tt was desirous that sheds be erected,
which, it was estimated, would cost
i round a thousand dollars.
The letter went ou as follows:
' Permit me in point out that during
1021 you received from school grants
und Government grnnls Uie   sum   of
-5,020.15. The school expenditures
'mounted   to   $25,364.50.   or   $336.35
sire than school and Government
grants received. You also received
Hie sum of $5,123 from poll lax colloc-
1'iiis. and a further sum of $705.89
from liquor prn'lts, whicli makes 3
total of $5.82o ,S0. This money, I millet stand, ts for Bchool and hospital
purposes, nnd If evenly divided, the
amount for school purposes would be
$2,914.44, of which amount $335.35 was
ipent last year, leaving a balance of
13.679.09 available for expenditure
this year. You have granted the board
Ibis to date, special grants amounting
to $1,7011, which leaves a balance of
$Si!l.09 available from last year's collections, together with what other
amount may lie due from the poll tax
and liquor profits received this year.
Also. I am Informed that the Government grants received this year exceeded your estimate."
The sentiment was voiced by several
of the aldermen that the school board
should have Included these Items
which they aro bringing In now, in
Ihelr estimates early In the year. It
was explained, however, (bat had the
board known there would bo no reduction In taxes this year, their cstl-
(Contiuued on page 8). TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1922
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    (leaning    •     Itepulrs
Telephone 1.    •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, II. C.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland end  courtenay.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Scotland's National Game
Is Coming Into Its Own
Cotu'tena.v  Golfers and Would-be Golfers Are Well
Away tor a tiood Autumn of the Grand
and Glorious Game.
Hoot, .Man ! The grand aid glorious game o' gowf Is in
sight for us a! once more.
A field hus been leased at Sandwlck; the fairways are
made; all that Is needed Is sufficient rain to get Ihe greens in
good shape, anil then some fine weather lo play In.
This has nil been done by a few enthusiasts at Courtenay.
who are cnlllng a meeting for 8 p.m., Wednesday, September
27th, in Frederick Field's office, when everyone in Courtenay,
Cumberland, and the entire district who Is Interested In the
game. Is asked to be present to air their vlewB and tell what
they would like ln connection with the formation of a golf club.
CmL Wood and Hoods of Any Kind
Delivered lo All Parts of District.
ASHES REMOVED
i MO' -jt'.TE CHARGES
TBLIFHONE  Pi) TELEPHONE
•r IiMT* Orders at Vendome lintel.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • • B. C.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY STORE
flood Selection ot Pipes, Clear and
Cigarette Holders.
OLD COUNTRY SOCCER
RESULTS, SATURDAY
James Brown
Cumberland
Ladies' and
Gent's  Tailoring
Alterations, Repairs, Finishing
and Pressing'
EDWARD ROBINSON
Phone 121 Box 33
Maryport Avenue, Cumberland.
TOU Wi.li BE READY
for those holiday rides after tht
necessary welding has been done
on your car. Why not employ
us to do the work? We have
the proper facilities and the skill
•d welders aud our costs are low.
Olvt   us   tho   chance.
CUMBERLAND GARAGE
A. E Xlerstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE BAH.WAY STATION.
Ilrtt Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
j  Cumberland, B. C.
Symphony Mawn
Loo\ for the Water Mar\
Ever pick up a sheet of writing paper so invitingly
beautiful to the eye and the touch, that it seemed
to say to your fingers, "You must write on me!"?
Symphony Lawn is just such a paper. It comes in
three exquisite finishes and several smart tints. Sheets
and envelopes in the newest shapes. Also correspondence
cards to match. May we show you Symphony Lawn?
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Rain Interferes With Local
Tennis Tournament Games
Q BALED   TENDERS   addressed   to
^   -the   undersigned,   nnd   endorsed
" render   for   repairs   to   wharf   at
iinlsino, 11. C," will be received at
Is olllce until 12 o'clock neon, Tues-
. y, October III, 11122, for repairs tu
liarf and renewal of float at Quat-
Ino, District of Comox-Alberni, B. C.
Plans and forms of contract can be
en und specification  and  forms  of
idcr obtained nt this Department, al
o offices ot the District Engineers
si Olllce Building, Victoria, B. C.
r.d   ill   tlio Post Offices, Vancouver,
inlslno, llolberg, Cape Scott, Uclue
lot, Port Alberni, Alberni and Camp-
i,dl Itlver, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
1 lie Department and In accordance
nill) conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
an accepted cheque on a chartered
I link payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, equal to
In p.c. of the amount of the tender.
War Loan Bonds of the DDmlnlon will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonds and cheques It required to
make up an odd amount.
Note.—Blue prints can be obtained
hi this Department by depositing an
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, which will
lie relumed If the Intending bidder
submit a regular bid.
By order,
II. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, September 11, 1922.
Presbyterian Club Wins Mixed
Doubles.—Miss Brown and
Miss Olive Bickle the
Ladies' Doubles.
Unfortunately Wednesday afternoon's games in the Cumberland tennis tournament were held up on account of tbe rain coming just after the
Indies' singles were started, although
Die tournament got away to a good
slart on Monday when the mixed and
Indies' doubles were played.
The results of Monday's games were
ns follows:
Mixed Doubles.
Miss Olive Bickle and Allan Nunns
vs. Miss Beatrice Bickle and J. Four-
acre. Score 6-2 and 7-5 for Miss
Bickle and Mr. Nunns.
Ladles' Doubles.
Miss Brown and Miss Olive Bickle
vs. Miss Strachan and Miss Beatrice
Bickle. Score 6-1 and 7-5 for Miss
Brown and Miss Olive Bickle,
Rev. W. Leversedge acted as referee.
Play will be resumed as soon is tha
weather clears up.
IN ION BAY AND ~
CUMBERLAND DRAW
CUMBERLAND INTERMEDIATES CONCEDE
JAP BASEBALL CUP
And Will Not Attempt to Lift
League Cup From Handicapped Japanese
Team.
"And they lived happily ever after."
Thus ends the story of the Intermediate baseball doings for the season
1922. The local Intermediates are the
district champions for the season nf
1H22, and the Japanese team will be
the Comox District Intermediate
Baseball League winners for the season. The Japanese team has been
itreatly handicapped lately, and the
Cumberland team Is the only squad
Came on Sunday at Union Bay
Ends One Apiece.
Cumberland Juniors and Union
liny ended their soccer fixture on
Sunday ut Union Boy In a tie,'each
team registering a goal apiece. The
local teuin had several "come-backs"
nn their line-up who had hitherto shod
ihelr studded shoes. In many cases
It was a case of dash and youth versus
the more experienced veterans. Any
player who has not registered with
a senior club or has not played lu
n senior cup tie Is eligible for the
junior ranks this year, and this was
responsible for a few old faces on
ilic Held again.
About ten minutes after the commencement of play, young Campbell
neat tbe Cumberland defence and
cured .with a driving daisy cutter.
The local crew were not to be beaten
and soon had the ball at the other
end. With a scramble In front of .the
i.onl-mouth, Milo Damonte did tho
trick.
Amos Farmer played a great game
for the locals, as did also Johnny
.Icnvardl and Mich Mitchell. While
lor the home team, Alex. Auchenvaule
and the Campbell boys played well.
The local team was as follows: Boffy,
I.. Scavardi, J. Scavardl, Bond, Mitchell, Glover, Damonte, Delman,
Fanner, Stevenson and Taylor.
Fete Held very capably handled the
whistle, and was assited on the sidelines by W. Clover, Union Bay, and
F. Potter, Cumberland.
CUMBERLAND WINS
E. G. PRIOR CUP
Romp Home With a Shut-out
Victory Over Bevan Ball
Team.
" You tell 'em, Cumberland Intermediates 1 The E. G. Prior Cup Is
yours tor the season ot 1922." Playing one of their most brilliant games
of the season, the local boys earned
tbelr lirst shut-out victory of the season Jn the finals for the E. G. Prior
trophy, emblematic of the Intermediate baseball championship of the
Coniox district. Bevan was the victim, and there Is no doubt that the
better team won. It was decided previous to the game that the game would
also be a league fixture, as these two
teams were due to meet here in a
postponed game.
Slant Fans 15.
Harry Stant was the hurler for the
visitors, and he certainly hogged the
work. Fifteen stickers whiffing at
his offerings. In this teat he shares
the strike-out throne with Dave Hunden, the opposing slab artist, who
has also fanned the same number in
one game. Stant pitched nice ball,
but weakened when hits meant runs.
Dave Hunden, who was on the mound
for the winners, pitched a line game.
He was mighty careful who he handed
out the hits to; only 5 safe hits being
collected.
Cumberland and Nanaimo
Played to 1-1 Draw
(From Nanaimo Free Press),
Nanaimo and Cumberland met on
the Central Sports Ground Sunday
afternoon ln a league game and divided the honors, each scoring one
goal! Both teams were out to win,
nud the game was fast from start to
finish. Zacarelll was off with an Injured knee, and Edmunds took his
place on the full back line.
Both goals were scored in the Ilrst
half; Nanaimo registering the first
shortly after the game started, when
Fowler took a shot at the goal, tho
ball bouncing back off the cross-bar,
Hlnes getting the ball on the rebound
and scoring on a well-placed shot.
The local boys continued pressing,
but missed several good chances by
poor shooting. Cumberland also did
considerable pressing, and were always dangerous. They evened tho
score when Home dropped the ball In
tbe corner of the net on a long shot,
which gave Routledge little chance.
After this goal, to the end of the
Ilrst half, the game was very even,
both teams trying in vain to add
another goal. Once Cumberland
seemed certain of scoring when Home
from a corner kick, placed the ball
In the mouth of the goal; for several
minutes the local defence were kept
busy keeping out the rain of shots
put In by the visitors, but eventually
In the league who can oust them from
the silverware, and they decided that
they would rather leave the cup tban
attempt to take It from the weakened
Japs.
9on£
size
batteries
Willard Batteries, of standard
Willard quality, may be had for
your Ford car—and at a price
you'd expect to pay for a lot
less valuel
SPARKS CO.
Auto Electricians
COURTENAY
Duncan
Nanaimo
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:  Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116. -
Our Motto:.
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   • •    Proprietor
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Also
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
cleared the ball from the danger zone.
The second half started at a fast
puce, and for twenty minutes the
visitors had the best of the play, putting up a fine exhibition of combination work. Time after time they
worked the ball down, and shot on
goal, but Routledge stopped everything that came his way.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to pleas* my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
S. DAVIS, *—
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SOAP
SPECIAL
■
TOILET SOAP
Easter Lily and Carnation
3 cakes to a box, 35c. per box
WHITE WONDER SOAP
7 cakes for 50c.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON (0
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1922
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THREE
McLaughlin
Garage
Courtenay
World Famed
McLaughlin Cars
15 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM FOR 1923 SERIES.
PRICES AWAY DOWN.
Call or Phone for Your Requirements and Prices.
. GENERAL REPAIRS TO ALL CARS
BY AN EXPECT MECHANIC.
ALSO EXPEltT WELDING
AND GENERAL ACCESSORIES.
Geo. H. Pidcock
Phone 25.
Proprietor.
To most people, the connecting or disconnecting of a Telephone seems a simple
operation of installing or removing the
instrument. As a matter of fact, in every
case it necessitates changes in the cables
and wires overhead or underground. It also necessitates changes in Central Office wires and switchboard
fro mopen wires or cables. The problems of station
connections; in subscribers' accounts and directory
listings; and frequenter requires new "drop" lines
from open wires or cables. The problems of station
movement are among the large problems of telephone
service. Because of the double operation of disconnecting and reconnecting, the work involved is often
twice as great as in the case of new subscribers.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
AUCTION
SALES
E. FELIX THOMAS, AUCTIONEER
NOTARY PUBLIC
INSURANCE
Address: Box 53, Courtenay. - 'Phone 51-R Courtenay
SALES SOLICITED
CHINESE DROWNING
VICTIM IS GIVEN
MASONIC BURIAL
Jim Lee, Employee of Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
Drowned While Hunting on Saturday
Last.
The second drowning fatality within
ti week occurred on Saturday last,
when Jim Lee, aged 38 years, a
Chinese contractor at No. 5 mine, met
nls death at a point lu the river known
uh Hilton's Mill.
As far as can be learned, deceased
hud been In this country only a short
time. It Is understood that he was
married, l.ut that his family Is In
China.
Accompanied by.Mnw Sing, the late
Jim Leo wont hunting on Saturday
iiisrnitu;, They followed the river
pretty" well until they came to No. 7.
..here they started to cross the rlvor
ill Hilton's Mill o.i tho boom stick.
Snld It Was IhUUterous.
The pair had almost reached tho
i'ar side when they found tho logs
:',ciia,a!ed about four or live feet. Lea
suld he wus~EoiuB to jump the gap,
und Alow Sing told him not to try II.
as it was dangerous. Ho ..ever, he
jumped, but miscalculated tho distance urtd fell into iliu .vatcr.
Struck Ills Head.
The theory held by the police an.]
coroner Is that Lee stiuck his head
on the log us he fell, and oo was unconscious when he went down. As
tho water la about twenty feet deep
lit this point, being Immediately above
the Canadian Collieries' dam, and the
weeds and so forth are very thick on
the bottom, the body did not come to
the surface until it was dragged up
The drowning occurred at 8.66 presumably] as the deceased's watch was
stopped at that time.
No Inquest.
The Courtenay police were [(resent
when the body was taken out of the
river, and there being no doubt in the
mind of the police and coroner that
the drowning was an. accident, an inquest was dispensed with.
Jtasonlc Funeral.
On Monday afternoon 'the Chinese
Masons turned out in full force to
follow the late Jim Lee to his last
resting place, the funeral taking place
at 4.30 o'clock.
ONE OF DISTRICT'S FINEST
BUILDINGS-THE LITERARY
AND ATHLETIC CLUB
C. A. 0. S. HOLDS
MOST ENJOYABLE
CONCERT AT ILO-ILO
Since the above picture was taken
of the Literary and Athletic Club, the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
has   spent   considerable   time   aud
money in fixing up the ground ln
front, and the cement wall and walk
around the well-kept lawn, has Improved the appearance of the property  of lts Uni '" the province.
about  two  hundred  per  cent.    This
building is probably one of the finest
KAOLIN DISCOVERED
AT WILLIAMS LAKE
VERY NEARLY PURE
The discovery of a large body of
kaolin In the vicinity of Williams
Lake Is causing a mild mining thrill
about here again.   The kaolin is very
nearly pure, containing less than oue-
hall of one per cent of iron.
The mine is situated half a mile
weat ot the P. Q. E. railway track,
and about a mile south of the Williams Lake townslte. Kaolin is us-:d
in the manufacture ot porcelain and
also as a filler ln the manufacture of
certain textiles.
Everyone gets a holiday on Saturday for the Juveullle Day. It is hoped
that the Junior athletes will be given
good support. They are our own
lads. Let's patronize them aa we do
other " home products."
The new stamp taxes will assuredly
become a fruitful source ot revenue.
11 J.
Through Service to Europe or Eastern Canada
on the
CONTINENTAL
LIMITED
Alternate Route via brand Trunk Pacific Steamships
to Prince Rupesrt and Rail Line
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
Comportment Observation Cars, Standard aud Tourist Sleepers.
Leaving Vancouver 7.45 p.m. dally
For Full informatibn, Appiy to E. W. Bickle, Agent
Cumberland, B. C.
Canadian NahonalRailwaus
Theatre Crowded With Appreciative Audience When Orchestral Society Gives
Sacred Concert Sunday Evening.
An exceptionally well arranged program was rendered on Sunday evening last In the Ilo-llo theatre by the
Cumberland Amateur Orchestra Society before a gratifylngly large audience that proved most appreciative
of the efforts made by the artiste.
Orchestral numberB were Interspersed
with three community hymns and sev -
oral vocal solos, all ot which were
well received.
The numbers given by the orchestra included: Mendelssohn's march,
"The War March of the Prlets," Schumann's reverie, "Traumerie," intermezzo by Mascsgni from "Cavallerla
Rustlcana," "The Angels' Serenade"
by Q. Braga, "The Palms" by J.
Fnure, and Verdi's march triumphal
from "Alda." All were familiar and
popular selections well rendered and
attentively listened to. An Instrumental trio of Mrs. J. Carey, violin,
Mr. W TA. Owen, 'cello, and Mrs. F,
Oliver, piano, played "Told at ^Twl-
llght" by Charles Hucrter.
The vocal iiumKerB Included two
soprano solos: "A Song of Thanksgiving" and "Sleep, Baby, Sleep," by
Mrs. M, Tribe, A.R'A.M.; "Just for
To-day" and "The Prayer Perfect" by
Miss M. Beckwith; Mrs. Frost accompanying the latter singer.
Mr. Goodall'B baritone solos "Tlio
King's Own" and "Absent" were received with loud applause, and tho
singer was called buck for a aeconil
encore. A 'cello accompaniment was
played by Mr. Owen during the singing of "Absent." Mr. Sara Jones' contribution of "Anchored" and "Love
Eternal," accompanied by Mrs. Oliver,
also added greatly to the program and
proved very popular numbers.
The success of the orchestra was
largely due to the able leadership of
Mr. A. J. Merry, conductor, and Mrs
F. Oliver, A.R.A.M., pianisle; tbe
other artists being: Mrs. J. Carey'
Mrs. C. Dando, Dr. II. P. Christie, Mr.
Mel lines, first violins; Miss 0. Dando
Miss M, Oliver, M. R. Mlchell, Mr.
Robertson, second violins; Mr. S
Young, contrabass; Mrs. C. J. Fernance, Mr. W. A. Owen, Mr. S. Jones
'cellos; Mr.'Forrester, Mr. Potter,
clarinets; Mr. Saunders, Mr. Ingham,
cornets; Mr. Pilling, trombone; Mr.
A. E. Jeffrey, flute.
Comox
Valley
20 Acres, 4 Acres Cleared, 3 Acres Partly Cleared.
Small 2-roomed Cabin, Good Well and Barn.   Price
$650.00
20 Acres, partly cleared, Close to Courtenay, on .Main
Road, Good  Land, no stones, Electric l.ijrht.   Price
$2,000.00
Over 200 Listings of Improved  Farms, Bush  Land
and Small Holdings.
INSURANCE:
Fire - Life - Accident - Automobile -  Plate Glass
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY   PUBLIC
Phone 22.
-     COURTENAY, B. ('.
Res. Phone 15-X. F6UR
THE   CUMBERLAND   iSLANDfiR
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, Ml
f»—a
r
Shoes
Shoes
During the next Two Weeks we will offer
Shoe S'alues that you will find impossible to
duplicate either in Cumberland or with the
Mail Order House.
THE FAMOUS RED STITCH
The Shoe You Know
Little Gents, sizes 8 to 10'/,, ut $2.75
Boys, sizes 11 to 2 $3.50
Youths, sizes 1 to 5 $4.25
SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY
High-top Shoes for Boys at $5.00 a Pair
Misses' High-cut Brown Shoe, just the thing for school
(this is a Leckie Shoe) at  $4.50 a Pair
WE SELL FOR LESS
GORDON'S
Phone 133
NOTICE
S. SMITH (LATE OF ROYSTON GARAGE) BEGS
TO ANNOUNCE  THAT  HE   HAS  DECIDED
TO DEVOTE THE WHOLE OF HIS TIME TO
WELDING and BRAZING
(14 Years' Experience in England)
ANY METAL,  AND ANY  ARTICLE, FROM  AN
ALUMINUM PAN TO A DONKEY FRAME
If It's Broken—Send it to Royston,—or a Phone Message will Bring Me to the Job.
A Good Job at a Price as Low as is Consistent with
Good Workmanship.
WELDING IS A TRADE, NOT A SIDE-LINE
and can be either good or bad.   For the former, try
S. SMITH, Royston
Temporary Phone 134-M.
To Holders of Five Year
51 per cent Canada's
Victory Bonds
Issued in 1917 and Maturing 1st December, 1922.
CONVERSION   PROPOSALS
THE MINISTER OF FINANCE offers to holders
of these bonds who desire to continue their
investment in Dominion of Canada securities the
privilege of exchanging the maturing bonds for new
bonds bearing 5} per cent interest, payable half yearly,
of either of the following classes:—
(a) Five year bonds, dated 1st November,
1922, to mature 1st November, 1927.
(b) Ten year bonds, dated 1st November,
1922, to mature 1st November, 1932.
While the maturing bonds will carry interest to 1st
December, 1922, the new bonds will commence to earn
interest from 1st November, 1922, GIVING A BONUS
OF A FULL MONTH'S INTEREST TO THOSE
AVAILING THEMSELVES OF THE CONVERSION
PRIVILEGE.
This offer is made to holders of the maturing bonds
and is not open to other investors. The bonds to be
issued under this proposal will be substantially of the
same character as those which are maturing, except
that the exemption from taxation does not apply to the
new issue.
Dated at Ottawa, 8th August, 1922.
Holders of the maturing bonds who wish to avail
themselves of this conversion privilege should take
their bonds AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE, BUT NOT
LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 30th, to a Branch of
any Chartered Bank in Canada and receive in exchange
an official receipt for the bonds surrendered, containing
an undertaking to deliver the corresponding bonds of
the new issue.
Holders of maturing fully registered bonds, interest
payable by cheque from Ottawa, will receive their
December 1 interest cheque as usual. Holders of
coupon bonds will detach and retain the last unmatured
coupon before surrendering the bond itself for conversion
purposes.
The surrendered bonds will be forwarded by banks
to the Minister of Finance at Ottawa, where they will
be exchanged for bonds of the hew issue, in fully
registered, or coupon registered or coupon bearer form
carrying interest payable 1st May and 1st November
of each year of the duration of the loan, the first interest
payment accruing and payable 1st May, 1923. Bonds
of the new issue will be sent to the banks for
delivery immediately after the receipt of the surrendered
bonds.
The bonds of the maturing issue which are not
converted under this proposal will be paid off in cash on
the 1st December, 1922.
V   W. S. FIELDING,
Minister of Finance.
m
ST. JOHN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION
(Cumberland Centre).
ANNUAL
WHIST   DRIVE
AND   DANCE
WILL BE HELD IN THE
Ilo-llo Hall, Friday, October 13
Whist Drive to Commence Promptly at 7.30 p.m.
Refreshments will be Served.
First-class Orchestra Will be in Attendance.
Admission:   Gentlemen,   $1.00;   Ladies,   50   cents
HUNTERS SHOULD KNOW
WHAT IS UNLAWFUL
FOR THEM TO KILL
Use PURITY
FLOUR
ADVERTISE   IS   'tllK    ISLANDER.
A fat man has another advantage
War his thin brethren—he knows
oxaolly where his cigar ashes are going to land.
"Astoria Shoes" nre "tailor-made for
particular trade. Eight different
Htyles, nil the latest cuts, at Cavin's
Shoe Store.
The attention of hunters Is called
to the fact that It Is unlawful for
iliem to kill the following:
To kill the following migratory
name birds at any time: Elder ducks,
wood-ducks, swans, cranes, curlew,
hand-tailed pigeons, wlllets, god-wits,
upland plover, avocets, dowltchers,
knots, oyster-catchers, phalaropes.
■lilts, surf-birds, turnstones, and all
shore birds not provided with an open
season in the above schedule.
To kill the following migratory
non-game birds at any time: Auks,
suklets, bitterns, fulmars, gannets,
grebes, guillemots, gulls, herons, jae-
i.'urs, loons, murres, petrels, puffins,
shearwaters, and terns, and the following migratory Insectivorous birds:
lobolinks, catbirds, chickadees, cuckoos, flickers, flycatchers, grosbeaks,
illuming birds, kinglets, martins,
iiieailow-larks, night-hawks or bull
ium. nuthatches, orioles, robinr,
hriltes, swallows, swifts, tanagers,
lltmice, thrushes, vlreos, warblers,
.uxwiugs. whip poor-wills, woodpeckers, and wrens, and all other
perching birds which feed entirely or
chiefly on insects.
To take the nest or eggs of any
migratory game bird, migratory non-
game bird, or migratory Insectivorous
bird at any time. To buy, trade, sell,
or offer for sale any migratory game
bird, migratory non-game bird, or
migratory Insectivorous bird, or their
nests or eggs.
To use any automatic, swivel, or
machine gun or battery, or any gun
larger than a 10-gauge, or a pump
mm without a permanent plug.
To hunt game of any kind from one
hour after sunset to one hour before
sunrise.
To carry loaded firearms In or discharge same from an automobile or
any other vehicle.
To hunt on game reserves, bird
sanctuaries, or other prescribed areas.
To kill golden or silver pheasants.
To use pit-lamps or lights of any
description at any time for the purpose of hunting game animals or
birds.
To carry firearms or traps without
a license.
To hunt game birds from any snll-
lioat, power boat or aeroplane.
To use any other person's license,
or to loan or transfer any license under any circumstances.
To trap bear throughout the province.
The Electoral districts mentioned
apply to the Provincial Electoral Districts, I
FRUIT VARIETIES
SUGGESTED FOR
BEST RESULTS ON V. I
The following lists of fruit varieties
are recommended for planting in the
different districts of British Columbia.
They are the results of careful observation by the staff of the Horticultural
llranch, as well aa by many prominent
growers and shippers throughout the
province.
There may be certain localities that
have secured excellent results from
varieties not mentioned In this list. In
such cases it may be advisable to continue with that variety, but a grower
must always keep in mind the market
requirements and plant varieties
suited to the market to which he Intends to ship, as well aa the varieties
suited to his district. It is believed,
however, that this list contains the
names of varieties best suited to the
various districts as a whole and will
he of assistance to the grower who Is
intending to plant new acreage.
Vancouver Island.
Cheerlcs.—Sour: Olivet, Morello.
.Sweet: Lambert, Blng (Black Republican for pollination), Royal Anne.
Plums.—Monarch, Black Diamond,
Pond's Seedling, Damson? Italian
Prune.
Quince.—Orange, Champion.
Pears—Dr. Jules Ouyot, Bartlett,
lloussock, Bose, Clalrgeau, Anjou.
Crabs.—Hyslop.
Apples. — Yellow Transparent,
Wealthy, Oravensteln, King, Ontario,
other commendable varieties: Duchess, Alexander, Wagner, Spy.
Small Fruits Recommended.
Strawberries. — Vancouver Island:
Marshall, Magoon, Paxton. Lower
Mainland: Marshall, Magoon, Paxton.
Salmon Arm: Magoon, Paxton. Oka-
niigan:*Qlen Mary, Magoon. Koote-
nuy: Parson's Beauty, Magoon, Dunlop, Glen Mary.
Raspberries.—All districts: Antwerp, Cuthbert, Herbert.
Loganberrlea. — Vancouver Island
and Lower Mainland: Loganberry.
Blackberries. — Vancouver Island:
Himalaya Giant. Lower Mainland:
Thornless, Evergreen, Taylor.
Currants: All districts: — Red:
Cherry, Perfection, Victoria. Black:
Naples, Boskoop Giant, Champion.
Gooseberries—All districts:— American: Oregon Champion, Pearl, Jos-
selyn.   English: Victoria.
Note.—Where plantings of Blng or
Lambert are to be made ln any district It is advisable to Include a few
niack Tartarian or Republican for
pollenlzlng purposes.
TO WED ANOTHER
WHILE BREACH OF
PROMISE SUIT ON
Brockvllle, Ont — Miss Mildred Mac-
Master, the Ganonoque nurse who recently entered suit for $7,000 damage)
for breach of promise to marry
against Dr. Archibald T. Eaton, of
Hamilton, Is to be married on Sept.
16th to William T. Cotton, of Ganonoque, according to an announcement
made by her parenta.
Good, Wholesome
Baking Powder
is never violent in action but is
perfectly balanced, leavening the
dough thoroughly and uniformly
—through and through.
Dr.PRICE'S
CREAM
BAKING POWDER
MADE IN CANADA
works so evenly and surely that it
insures the wholesomeness of your
baking.
It is made of Cream of Tartar,
derived from grapes, and adds the
quality touch to baking that no
other kind of baking powder
provides.
Send for FREE Cook Book-ToM. and Kitchen"
149 Notre Dame East, Winnipeg, Can.
Ll'l Gee Gee wears knickers when
she's hiking. Her breath comes In
short pants, too.
Royal Candy Co.
Comox Creamery Ice Cream.
Ice-Cold Drinks of all Kinds.
Home-Made Candies, Fresh Daily
Luncheons Served.   Open Day and Night.
RICHARDS & WAIN, PROPRIETORS uf
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1822
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
FIVE
Plant Home Grown Fruit
Trees, Shrubs, Roses
and place your order with
The British Columbia Nurseries
Company Limited
who have a large lot of splendid Fruit Trees and other
Nursery Stock coming on for Fall Delivery.
OUR ROSES are especially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to plant.
All our Trees and Plants are the finest in the land, and
are sure to please you.   Write us to-day.
Address:
British Columbia Nurseries Co.,
Limited
SARDIS, B. C.
ENGLISH PRINTED
DINNERWARE
JUST IN.
52 Piece Dinner Set CI C 7K
Ut   	
97 Piece Dinner Set COR 50
At  	
CARPET SQUARES
A New Lot, in All Sizes, Ranging
in Price from $19.45.
WALL PAPERS
Our Stock is well assorted, and Prices range' from
12 '/2c. a single roll.  Now is the time to brighten up
A FULL LINE OF BEDS, SPRINGS,
MATTRESSES AND FURNITURE
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
DO YOU
K N 0 W
THAT WE ARE NOW CARRYING THE MOST UP-,
TO-DATE AND COMPLETE LINE OF
SHOES IN THE CITY ?
Shoes to fit both the Feet and the Pocket.   We guarantee satisfaction with every pair we sell.   Only the
most Reliable Brands of Footwear carried is the reason
we'are able to do that.
Leckie's are just the thing for SCHOOL WEAR.   We
can supply you with either the " Red Stitch " or the
"Skookum."
Weston's for Fine Footwear in Ladies and Childrens.
Boys' Shoes, sizes 11 to 13, Priced at
,. $3.25, $3.50, $3.90andup
Boys' Shoes, sizes 1 to 5, at
$3.90, $4.50, $4.90
Ladies' Strap Slippers and Oxfords from $3.50 and up.
Men's 6-eyelet White Rubber Boots at QtA QA a pair
A COMPLETE LINE OF MEN'S & BOYS' CLOTHING
The Model
Clothing and Shoe Store
F. Partridge
CUMBERLAND
P.O. Box 152
ATHLETIC CLUB
FOR PUPILS OF
THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
It was intimated some time agi
that the pupils of the Public School
a club of some kind. This' remark
were behind the times in not having
seemed to stimulate the desire to be'
on a level with other schools in the'
province. After considerable discussion it was very obvious Hint the suggestion of an Athlellc Club appealed
very strongly both to the girls and
boys. The proposal met with such i
keen enthusiasm that It was decided,
upon, and a meeting was called for
the purpose of organising tho club
and for the election of the various
ofllcers. |
•III the choice of an Athletic Club
much discretion was displayed on tho
part of the pupils. Apparently they
could foresee the advantages ot having u club of this nature; not only will
tlle pupils derive pleasures from thli
organization, but from a healthful
standpoint It will be Very bonellclnl
to the growing boys and girls. WJiIlu
the discipline will not be at all sevsre.
the rules and regulations to be compiled with will only tend to strengthen
the characters of our boys and glrla.
The following list comprises the
names of the officers appointed; The
Senior girls elected Olive Jones as
president, and Ella Bums as secretary-treasurer. Josephine Bono was
ulocted captain of the baseball team.
Leslie Merrilleld was elected schorl
captain or monitor by the Senior boys,
with Ernest MacDonald as deputy.
Mabel Jones was elected captain by
the Senior girls, with Drusilla Wilson
as deputy.
It Is understood among the pupil i
that the monitors will have certain
privileges conferred upon them, yet
they will also have to undertake certain responsibilities regarding the discipline of the school grounds.
Attendance for week, 98.6%.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' CLUB
Last Thursday evening at seven
o'clock the girls of Cumberland High
School resumed their activities for the
winter months. The election ot officers resulted as follows:
President: Chrlstena McKinnon.
Vice-President: Constance Bird.
Secretary-Treasurer: Chrlssie Sutherland.
A Literary, Athletic and Social Committee also were chosen, each consisting of three members who are going
to see that the club Is run in a practical style during the coming year
The girls expressed a wish to play
basketball, and the Athletic Committee were instructed to make inquiries
about the hall for practices.
PRESENTATION TO
MRS. ROBT. DUNSIRE
A presentation of $10(1 was made on
Tuesday evening by the Bevan Athletic Club to Mrs. Robert Dunsire,
whose husband was killed recently in
No. 4 mine. MrB. Dunsire wishes to
thank the club for their kindness.
Church Notices
HOLT TRINITY.
Rev. W. Leversedge, Vicar.
SERVICES.
Sunday School  2.30 p.m.
Evensong  7 p.m.
GIUCE METHODIST CHURCH.
Rev. Geo. R. B. Kinney, Minister.
SERVICES.
Junior Congregation  11 a.m.
Sunday School  2.30 p.m.
Evening Service  .7 p.m.
St. ..George's . Presbyterian   Church.
Morning Services   11 o'clock
Evening Services  7 o'clock
Naramata Adult Bible Class, „..  1.30
Sunday School  .T... 2.30
Choir Practice, Thursday.... 7.30 p.m.
Rally Day in the school next Sunday at 2.30 p.m., when a good program
will be' rendered. Instead of the
usual address, a "Missionary Pageant" composed of ten boys and girls
will be presented. A cordial Invitation to be present Is extended, not
only to the children, but to the
parents.
Every young man and woman is
heartily invited to the Bible Class at
1.30. Live questions are discussed in
Uie class.   Come and take part.
Car  For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
PRICES REASONABLE
From 8 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Phone 24.
From 12 Midnight to 8 a.m., Phone 22.
Geo. Mason
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
V
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, SEPT 22nd and 23rd
Three Greal-
Moment's in
a Beautiful «
Womaris Life /
EXTRA:
1st Round of the _^-
" Leather Pushers'
—and—
Fox Sunshine Comedy
Matinee:
Saturday, 2.30 p.m.
Youll see—
V3sfc=
1. The Terrible Awakening.
FftlntUf ln the arms of ihe mill loan Ire,
I*dy VWlrnne awake to flml htm lying
dead at ber feet Overcome by fear ihe
fled from England end ■ailed for South
Africa.
2. The White Captive.'
Trekloc across the African veldt she
wandered from her wagon and wai lout
ln the desert. After many hours under
the broiling mn ihe lighted a camp.
A few moments of reit and the learned
the terrible troth — she wat a captive
of a  desert renegade.
3. The Terrific Flood.
Then came tense, thrilling moments —
the escape, "the sting of wild honey,"
tha coward's confession, tbe plot, the
expiation of the dam, the terrible flood,
the rescue and, Anally •— happiness.
tai I I .vnruie presen
1st Show:
.Saturday, 6.15 p.m.
USUAL SATUKDAY
NIGHT DANCE
AT 9.30 P.M.
PRISCILLA DEAN
IN     HER    CPOWNiNd    SI  CCEsb,
A bTUPENDOUS   PICTJRIZATION  OF
WILD  HONEY
THE  WORLD-FAMOUS NOVS1L  by CYNTHIA STOCKLEY
UNIVERSAL- JEWEL.
MONDAY   & TUESDAY:
Betty Compron
—and—
Tom Moore
—in—
"ACROSS THE BORDER"
a Canadian
North-west Story.
WEDNESDAY
—AND—
THURSDAY
Tom Mix in
"The Fighting Streak."
FOR SALE
CHEVROLET   CAR,   BABY   BRAND
ill ilrst-class condition.   Apply
Mrs. William Jones,
Union Hotel, Cumberland, B.C.
SELECTED MARCH - HATCHED
White Wyandotte Pullets. Solly
Strain. $2.50 each. April Hatch,
$2.00.
IDIENS BROS.,
Phone 94-M. Coniox
RIFLE FOR SALE.
Apply to
H. McLEAN,
SparkB .Co., Courtenay; B; C.
COLUMBIA CABINET GRAMOPHONE
with 40 Records. Cost $200. for
$100.   Apply
THE ISLANDER OFFICE.
WANTED TO BORROW ON FIRST
Mortgage (Gilt edge), $1,000.00 at
10 per cent.   Apply
THE ISLANDER OFFICE.
These cool evenings the cosy open
fireplace is a great attraction at
The
MaplesTea House
Royston Beach
CHOCOLATES
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO, ETC.
LIGHT LUNCHES
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.M EKIUFIELD,    Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND! Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland. B.O.
Jersey Ice Cream
Are You a Real Judge of Food?
Can you tell by the taste of Ice Cream for instance whether the sugar
is sugar or glucose?
Can you estimate fairly accurately the percentage of real cream used?
If you are a real connoisseur you will appreciate the JERSEY ICE
CREAM — If you are not its trade mark will protect you.
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY. MCFTKMBER SSrd, 1922
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. UlL'KLE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1922
Co-Operation
We venture to sny, without fear of
contradiction, that there is no part ol
British Columbia where the principle
of co-operation in the matter of pub-
lif Interest Ib stronger than in Comox
Valley. We ba\i' been led to make
ibis nssertlou by tlie report emanating
Horn Courtenay that the Hoard of
Trade at that polm Ims pledged Itself
in come to the assistance of lhe Comox
Agricultural and Industrial Association iu order tbat the farmers of this
favorcil district may strengthen thel
organisation financially, industrially
socially. That the united efforts of
the two Indies will meet with succe
there Is little doubt. It means simply I
the strengthening of the ties that bind'
the city to the country and putting lu-
icj practice the idea that in unity there
is strength. We are glad to have the
i .pportuuity of commenting on the action taken by the neighboring Board
of Trade, because we have had other
evidence thai the leaven of co-opera-
tion has been working for man:-'
mouths. Ijeiilom does a meeting o>
dther the local of Cburtenay Board
occur without a manifestation of i
willingness on the part of the mem
hers of one to co-operate with tin
other In some matter of district-wide
Importance. To be sure, there is always apparent in dally life a friendly
rivalry between the two towns of the
district, but the time has long goii"
by when cither place will openly op
pose lhe other In a movement for ad-
we are encouraged by the action ot
vancement of the general welfare. S
the Courtenay Board of Trade who'
we realize what It will mean, not only
to our neighboring town, but also
through the sympathies of the two
llourds of Trade, to Cumberland.
DENMAN ISLAND FUNERAL
T. BOOTH & SONS
ONE OF FINEST
STORES IN WEST
Up-to-date   Courtenay Grocery
Emporium With Fine Offices
and Hall Upstairs.
Anyone who has taken notice of the
grocery stives throughout Western
Canada would not hesitate to slat?
that tlio new store opened a couple
of months ago by Messrs. T. Booth S
Sons at Courtenay is one of the largest, cleanest, brightest, best arranged
and mo. i up-to-date grocery stores
they havo seen anywhere. Courtenay
lias groat reason lo be proud of this
establishment, as it would be a credit
to a city the size of Vancouver.
Mr. Booth's sons, who are managing
the business, are sparing no effort or
expense to build up a high-class trade
In this district, and not only give thai
trade the best possible value hi goot's
and service, but also the most comfort.
A spacious room has been set aside
as a ladies' rest room, comfortably
furnished and placed at the disposal
of the feminine public .
A numbei of nicely furnished offices I
upstairs have been rented, and a hall
about half the size of the store ts In
great demand for lodge meetings, private parties, small dances, socials,
etc.
Niece of Mrs. Willis
Dies After Brief Illness
Dentil again visited the home of
Mrs. Willis, of Courtenay, formerly of
Cumberland,  when  her  infant  niece
\gnes Jackson, aged nine months.'
died on Saturday morning last, afto.
two days' Illness. The baby, tilt
youngest of four children, was the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jackson, who came- from England recently
to make their home in Courtenay with
.Mrs. Willis, who is Mrs. Jackson':
sister.
Father Beaton   conducted   the   fu
e.al service at 2'M) on Sunday afternoon iu St. John's Church at Comox;
burial taking place lu the Comox
cemetery. Many floral contributions
were sent by sympathetic friends of
Hie parents and Mrs. Willis.
The funeral of the late Mrs. James
I'iercy was held on Tuesday afternoon
from the family residence to the Deninan Island cemetery, the remains being followed to their last resting
place by a large number of sorrowing
and sympathetic friends of the family.
The late Mrs. Plercy came to the Island fourteen years ago with her
parents from the Orkney Islands. She
was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jas.
Corrigal, of Denman Island, and besides her parents Is survived by tour
sisters: Mrs. John Wood, Mrs. A. H.
Swan, Mrs. Francis Oraham and Mrs.
James Roberts, and two brothers. The
service at her late home and at the
graveside was conducted bjrthe Rev.
Mr. Roland, of Union Bay. A favorite
hymn of the deceased, "Lead Kindly
Light," was sung at the church. The
pullbearers were: Mr. James Mc-
Nuught, Mr. G. Russell, Mr. G. W.
Scott, Mr. Alfred Green. (Two other
names hot obtainable).
LODGE WHIST DRIVE
Tsoluin Lodge, Knights of Pythias,
held a whist drive on Wednesday
night In Booth's Hall, there being
twelve tables in the play. The winners
of prizes were: Ladies'— First: Mrs.
J. Westover; Second, Mrs. Nisbet;
Consolation, Mrs. A. B. Ball. Gentlemen—First: Mr. A. T. Beckensell;
Second, Mr. J. Westover; Consolation,
Mr. Fred Kerton. Mr. William Sut-
lir acted as master of ceremonies, and
a most enjoyable evening was spent.
This Is the firBt of a series of such
social evenings that will be held
hroughout the winter by the Knights
if Pythias.
WHIST DRIVE
AT DOVE CREEK
At Dove Creek school-house on Friday, the 15tb Inst., a whist drive and
social was held for the benefit of the
tuel fund. There was a good attendance, the winners of prizes being as
follows: Gentlemen—First: Mr. Jas.
Williamson; second, Mr. Lyn Laundy.
Ladles—First: Miss Christine Hogg;
second, Mrs. Lyn Laundy. A bean
,','uesslng contest was also held, the
winners being: Mr. A. Hogg and Mr.
T. Brazles.
Gaiety Theatre
COURTENAY, B. C.
PICTURES COMING
Friday and Saturday, Sept. 22nd and 23rd
Mabel Normand in "Molly Oh"
Friday and Saturday, Sept. 2Sth and 30th
Bebe Daniels in A Game Chicken
Charlie Chaplin in "A Dog's Life."
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 6th and 7th
William Hart in "Three-wo; d Brand."
Harold Lloyd Comedy
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 13th and 14th
"THE   FOUR   HORSEMEN"
New Fall Lines Showing
This Week
The Newest Exclusive Styles in Ladies'
Georgette, Crepe and Crepe
De Chene Waists
The Newest Creations in Fall Millinery
SEALED   TENDERS   addressed   to
the  undersigned,  and   endorsed
Tender   for   repairs   to   wharf   at
..)avis Bay, B. C," will be received st
his office until M o'clock noon, Wed-
lesduy, October 11, 1922, for the contraction of a pile bent   and   Umber
let-king wharf at Davis Bay, District
of Comox-Alberni, B. C.
Plans and forms of contract can be
een and specification and forms of
ender obtained at this Department, at
the offices of the District Engineers,
.'oat Office BulldlugiNew Westminster,
l'ost Office Building, Victoria, B. C,
and at the   Post   Offices, Vancouver,
Wilson Creek, Sechelt, Gibson Landing, and Squamlsh, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
iiy the Department and ln accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the   order   of   the
THE NEWEST CREATIONS IN FALL MILLINERY
EIDERDOWN COMFORTERS COTTON-FILLED QUILTS
ALL-WOOL BLANKETS IN WHITE, GREY AND RED
FLANNELETTE SHEETS : : BED SPREADS
SHEETINGS- PILLOW COTTONS : PILLOWS
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
The Newest Fall Styles in Men's Soft Felt Hats in all the Leading Shades.
Men's Regal Brand Dress Shirts in Newest Fabrics and Colorings, at Popular Prices.
New Fall Lines of Slater Shoes in the Newest Lasts.  Black and Tan.  Popular Prices.
-Special Values in Boys' Sweaters and Sweater Coats.   These are a lot of Traveller'
Samples Marked at Bargain Prices.
Special Values in Boys' Blue Serge School Suits.   Sizes 26 to 35.   At
$7.75
CAMPBELLS'
CUMBERLAND
Minister of Public Works, equal to
10 p.c. of the amount ot the tender.
War Loan Bonds of the Dominion will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonds and cheques it required to
make up an odd amount.
Note.—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, which will
be returned if the intending bidder
submit a regular bid.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, September 12, 1922.
OUR
Goods Sale
Bill
■II
=FOR=
City  Properties
Farm Lands
Insurance of all Kinds
IS  IN   FULL SWING
The following are a few of our Bargains:
Ladies' 100% Pure Wool Sweater
Coats.. All Sizes and Styles. . Sale
Price  tUM
Ladies' Lightweight
Underwear at
Actual Cost Prices
Flannelette Sheets, 12 ft. 4 In. site.
Sale Price   IU&
In Crib Sizes $L05
Girls' Pullover and Sweater Coats.
Sale Price   $840
Ladies' Pongee Welst. Sale Price
only   12.10
All Knitted Suits. Splendid Values.
Sale Price I1&50
Ladles' Crepe De Chene Waist, very
latest styles and colors. Sale Price
only $1*00
Ladies' Trlcolette   Blouses, all   sizes
and colors.   All Genuine bargains.
" Sale Price   15.76
Men's Stanfleld's Green Label Underwear. Heavy weight. Sale Price
per suit   $2.75
Men's Khaki
Wash Shirts, $1.90
Men's Overalls.   All kinds and sizes,
Greatly Reduced.
FREDERICK FIELD   1
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE AGENT
COURTENAY, B. C.
P.O. Box 253       ....       Phone 53
C. KENT AND COMPANY
Courtenay's Leading Dry Goods Merchants /
IP
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13rd, 1912
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVSn
Comox Assessment District
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that, on Thursday, the 12th day of October, next, at the hour
of 10.00 a.m., at the Court House, Cumberland, I will sell at Public Auction the lands in the list
hereinfater set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes, unpaid by said persons on the 30th day of June. 1922, arid for interest, costs, and expenses, including the costs for advertising said sale, if the total amount due for the period ending December 31st, 1920, is not sooner paid. '   .
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the following list where
the owner is a member of the Allied Forces and is entitled to the benefits of Section 29, of the
" Taxation Act Amendment Act, 1918."
LIST OF PROPERTIES
NAME OF PERSONS ASSESSED.
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY.
o f
8.1 J
COMOX DISTRICT.
Sub-dlvlslon of Parcel B, Section 29, and Part
(Unreel A, ol Section 64, Map K01.
Machtn, R. H„ & Soldiers' S. Board..
Lot 1         104.33
(Sub-dhlsion of Sections 88 & J9, Map 2115.
Yockney, C. E., ft Soldiers' S. Board...
Treherne, H. R., ft Soldiers' S. Board..
Lot 1 ..
Lot 2
49.31
39.47
Snb-dlTlslon of Part Section 62 end Part Lot 211, Map 2217.
Ault, T., ft Soldiers' S. Board   Lot A	
West, W., ft Soldiers' S. Board  Lot C of Section 77 	
Wright, Tom, ft Soldiers' S. Board .... Lot A ft B ol Section 77	
Carter,  R - Lot A~ot Lot 250, Map 2119	
Carter,  R  Lot 16, Blk. 2, of Lots 82 ft 86, Map
1878	
Mills, W. G  Lo'a 94 ft 95, of Lot 110, Map 410 ....
Weir, F. P., ft Soldiers' S. Board .... Lots 5 ft 6, Lot 119, Map 1409 	
Towler, Bruce   Lots 19 ft 20, of Lot 134, Map 1705 ....
Baker, W. T„ ft SoldlerB' S. Board .... Lot 137 "C"  -	
Lot 166, Map 1846.
North American Loan Co  Lots 1, 2 3 of Block C	
.Butonen, Attu   Lot 11, of Block H 	
Lot 194, Map 442.
Creech, Harry    S.W. 14 ot N. W. 14 Block E	
Jones, Mrs. Edith M    Lots 2 to 7, of Lot.221, Map 2547	
Wagstaff, George, Earlswood John ft 1
Mace, John   E 14 ol Lot 7 of Lot 227, Map 1289....
Plgott, Charles H.   N % A of Lot 8 of Lot 227, Map 1289
Township 1.
Greenwood, Job. P   S. E. % of S. W. 14 Section 4	
, Township 2.
Hagstrom. Mrs. Francis   N. % of N. W. 14 Section 25 	
i Township 4.
Powell.i R. H. ..., T„._...,....„...  Fr. N. W- M. Section 8	
i Township 6.
Powell, R. H *   Fr. N.W. 14 of .Section 33 	
Carlln, M. B  B. % of S.W. 14. W. % of S.E. 14 of
|        Section 84  :.....
Township 9.
Haughton, P. G  W. % of N. % of N.E. %, Section 17....
McKenzie, John W., Smith Percy, ft !
Eustace Smith   W. % of W. pt. of N.E. 14 Section 20..„
) Township 11, Nelson District,
Adventlst Church  '....„   N. pt. of N.W. 14, Section 30	
73.01
43.07
118.32
9.80
8.40
5.10
28.00
19.40
94.37
11.18
6.07
17.09
227.50-
21.00
21.00
60.00
120.00
5.94
2.60
4.28
2.88
10.98
.61
.53
.29
1.78
1.29
8.17
.47
.33
.98
18.49
1.14
1.14
3.60
7.20
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.76
3.76.
2.75
3.75
3.75
8.75
2.75
2.75
3.75
3.75
3:75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.00
.20
3.76
Sub-division ol Section 7, Dunsmuir Townslte, Map 488.
Carson, Jos. H  Lots 12 ft 13, Block 42   13.99
Halllday, James E   Lot 4, Block 44 ..'.  ,        7.33
Eccleston, Tom   Lot 10 of Lot 20, Map 1841   31.50
I
Newcastle District.
Booth, George   10 acres of Lot 49 .
17.00
1.09
Denman Island.
30 acres of N.W. 14 Section 12 .
White, Samuel 	
Denman Island Mutual Improvement ...
Co  Pt. of N.W. corner of Section 17	
Chalmers, Mrs. A. E  Pt. S. 14 of N.E. 14 Section 18, 3.72
,        acres 	
, Group 1, N. W. D.     '
Turnbull, W. D  Lot 1214 	
Stolterfoht, Ed  Lot 1420  	
Stolterfoht, Ed  Lot 1421	
Stolterfoht, Ed  Lot 1422  .'. .„.»	
McKlnnon, John, McL  Lot 1481, Mink Island	
26.85 1.72
6.33 .26
7.00 .34
28.50 1.69
79.00 9.33
116.00 13.48
87.00 10.11
561.25 36.73
) Sub-division ol Lot 3, of Lot 1527.
Christie, John ,\  Lot 4 	
Kermond, John D   Lot 1673 	
Osborne, F. P -   Part of Lot 1612, .302 acres	
Korpl, John   Lot 1640 	
Cook, Clarence   Lot 1978 	
Somerton, George   Lot 3039 	
Slater, B -  Lot 4186 	
Wasp, Geo. F  Lot 4905	
66.24
144.00
84.36
38.20
12.00
22.50
18.00
24.00
3.74
9.60
5.41
2.32
.80
1.50
1.20
1.60
Sayward District
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited    Lot 2, Duncan Bay 	
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited   Lot 26, Duncan Bay 	
Bull, Wm. P., ft Helm, Robt. M   10 acres of Lot 66  .%	
675.00       46.00
3,790.90     186.00
34.72        2.20
8.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
Fusahlchl, Ito	
Fusahlchl, Ito 	
Paterson, Alexr	
Shouldice, George 	
Renberg, V. ft Ostermark, Ole
Hardy, George J	
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited ....
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited ....
Davis, Fred 	
Teeter, Warren
Jones, Ella	
Heath, Andrew .
Cook, Chas. E. ...
Bush)', Andrew .
Sub-dlvlslon of Lot 69, Map 1070.
Lots 11 to 26, Block 1 	
Lots 14 to 26, Block 8 	
Lots 4 and 5, Block 17 	
Lot 17, Block 23 	
Lots 6 and 7, Block 24	
Lot 20, Block 24 	
Lot 109 	
Lot 120, Map 507-A, except Blocks 17
and 24  ,'. 	
5.02 acres of Lot 132  _'.	
N. 14 of Lot 217 	
Lot 672 	
Lot 730	
Lot  779   	
Lot 1089 	
12.29
12.29
6.17
6.10
6.17
6.10
750.00
802.50
15.00
60.80
120.00
60.00
27.00
15.00
X
.80
.30
.30
.30
.30
50.00
54.50
1.00
3.88
8.00
4.00
1.80
1.00
Hernando Island.
McKlnnon, N. A .'.    Part of Section 3, 172 acres 	
McKinnon, N. A   N.B. 14, Section 5 	
McKlnnon, N. A .'.   Fr. N.E. 14 Section 7, N.W. % Sec.
129.00        8.60
120.00        8.00
81.00        5.40
,76
2.75
2.76
2.75
2.76
2.75
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
114.0:
56.29
45.82
81.04
49.70
133.06
14.16
12.68
8.14
33.63
24.44
104.29
14.40
9.15
i
21.82
249.74
j
25.89
25.86
67.35
I
130.95
48.00
3.20
S.76
54.95
4.50
.30
3.75
8.55
340.00
16.00
3.76
269.75
60.00
4.00
3.76
67.75
140.00
12.95
3.75
156.70
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY.
-j! Cortes Island.
Moore, J. H    Fr. S.W. M, Section 12	
Smith, Marion E    Lot 860 	
Meredith, Gwynne Lot 672	
Murphy, Rowland     N.E. 14, Section 49	
23.84
1.14
3.75
28.73
42.57
2.58
3.75
48.90
32.66
3.03
3.75
39.44
128.58
8.55
3.75
140.88
Rupert District.
Anderson, Sfr Robert ft McLaughlin,
Wm  io acres of Section 2	
Anderson, Sir Robert & McLaughlin.
Wm  Lot 360	
Hammond, Clifford O  n. 80 acreB of Section 27 	
Napier, Robert Ross  n.e. 14 ft NE. 14 of S.E. 14, Lot 928..
Brown, Ernest,   Lot 1313   	
Norton, Albert E.,   Lot 1445 	
Robertson, Emily J  Lot 1692	
I Township 4.
JoneB, Mrs. Emma    pr. S.W. 14, Section 20	
Williams, Mrs. Margaret    N, M of S. 14 of 8ectlon 22	
Township 6.
Kenyon, Floyd    Lot 6 of Block 112, Map 1667
Townslte of Hardy Bay, Map 810.
KnowIeB, Robt. E    Lot 6, Block 5 	
Currle, C. Ernest     Lot 6, Block 15, 	
Lewis, Henry,  ".	
Williams, MrB. Emma, ...
Burchell, Ada K	
Williams, Mrs. Emma, ...
Williams, Mrs. Emma, ...
Dunn, George I., Estate,
Williams, Mrs. Emma, ...
Townslte of Port Hardy, Map 700.
Lots 2 and 4, Block 6 	
Lots 1 and 2, Block 26	
Lot 8, Block 26, 	
Lots 11 and 12, Block 26,	
Lots 6, 8, 12, 14, 16, Block 33	
Lot 3, Block 37	
Lot 2, Block 38, 	
Dunn, George I.,- EBtate,  .....
Charles, Mrs. M. A	
Denver, Herbert, ft Barclay, Wm	
Hulke, W. B .'.	
Harper, John M	
Bayllss, Arthur W., 	
Jacobson. Victor	
Dunn, George I., Estate	
Hulke, Ethel G	
Berryman, Mrs. Hannah M„	
Czak, John,	
Harper, John M	
Jacobson, Mrs. Minnie, 	
Pettlgrew, F. P., 	
Raines, F. N.,
Rye, Lewis M„     .
Summcrscales, H„
Merkley, Colin H.,
Port Hardy Addition, Map 1629.
Lot 7, Block 18.  -	
Lots 6 and 7, Block 23	
Lot 11, Block 23, 	
Lot 16, Block 23	
Lot 2, Block 28	
Lot 8, Block 28	
Lot 16, Block 29	
Lots 1 to 16, Block 30	
Lot 13, Block 32	
Lots 2, of Block 37 ,	
Lot 16, Block 37	
Lot 16, Block 39	
Lot 1, Block 48	
Lot 16, Block 60, 	
V     Township 7.
Fr. S.E. 14, Section 5. 	
Township 8.
N.W. Vt Section 6	
Township 9.
Lot 20. Block 62, Map 810-A.
400 acres ot Section 16	
S.95
.93
2.75
17.67
.47
2.75
10.55
2.10
3.75
37.36
Township 28.
Bkinjier. Jephtha J .-.    Fr. S.W. %, Section 20, ..
Township 28, Map 2006.
Russell, Robt. G    Lot 28 ,	
Township 88.
Brassard, Mrs. M.,   8. % ft N.W. H Section 20	
Wilson, Arthur H„ _  S.B. 14, Section 21	
Sorge, Francis Pallant  H.E. % of N.E. %, Section 28	
Moran, Thomas  S.W. 14, Section 31	
Adam, Sidney H  S.W. 14, Section 32, 	
Holmes, Joseph  N. 14 of N.W. 14, Section 16	
Calhoun, Robt., ft Gelletley, Robert..... W. 14 ot N.W. 14, Section 33	
Township 84.
..   S.E. 14 Section 15	
21.81
32.lt
9.1
lti
33.94
92.08
133.23
100.86
691.73
73.73
157.35
93.62
44.27
16.55
27.75
22.95
29.35
723.76
2,979.76
40.67
I
15.84
15.84
8.22
8.16
8.22
8.15
803.75
860.75
19.76
68.43
131.76
67.75
32.55
19.75
141.35
131.75
90.16
Trust Company of Scotland, .
| Township 86.
Iloyem, Ole ft John '.  N.W. 14, Section 4,  	
Orskog, Andrew :.    S.E. 14 of S.E. 14, Section 9	
Larson, Annie A    N.W. 14 of S.E. 14, Section 9	
Herchlik, Alfred „'.'.    8 E. 14, Section 15, 	
Carlln, Joseph D  S. V, of S.E. 14, ft N.E. 14 of N.E. 14.
Sec. 11	
Robertson, Mary G '  Fracn. Section 16 	
Township 86.
North-West Canadian Investment Co.
Limited, ln liquidation    N
14 of N.W. 14, N. 14 ft S.E. 14 of
, _       N.E. 14, E. 14 ft S.W. 14 of S.E. Ii
ft N.E. 14 of S.W. 14, N. 14 of S.W.
Vt of N.W. 14 of Section 20	
Beech, Joseph    N.E. 14 ft E. 14 of N.W. 14, Sec. 28	
, Coast District, Range 1,
Southgate Logging Co  Lot 97, 	
Southgate Logging Co  Lot 98	
Southgate Logging Co.,   Lot 99	
Southgate Logging Co  Lot 100	
Southgate Logging Co  Lot 101	
Southgate Logging Co  Lot 102	
Townslte of Shoal Bay, Map 815
Hater, John    Part of Block 1	
Walker, Wm. J    Lot 955, 1487-A, 1488	
Stephen, John, Estate,
Stephen, John,
Malcolm Island.
W. 14 of S.E. 14 of Sec. 16, ft W. 25
acres of Fr. N.E. 14 Sec. 13 	
Snlntula Townslte, Map N1A-A.
Block 70	
7.60
.42
3.75
200.00       26.40
3.75
631.15     120.78
360.00       53.40
111.30
222.60
516.45
243.15
428.25
242.25
3.00
25.00
7.41
14.83
34.40
16.20
28.54
16.14
.20
1.45
49.76        3.25
7.49 .50
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
2.75
3.75
3.75
11.67
97.60
6.511
3.75
107.75
25.80
1.47
3.75
31.02
300.00
42.50
3.75
346.25
24.00
1.60
3.75
29.35
13.00
.66
3.76
17.40
388.50
53.51
3.75
445.76
97.50
6.30
3.76
107.65
100.00
6 80
3.75
109.65
3.0.0
.20
2.75
1
5.95
3.00
.20
2.75
5.96
3.00
.20
2.75
5.95
6.00
.34
2.75
9.09
5.00
'    .29
2.76
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
3.00
.20
2.76
5.95
7.60
.50
2.75
10.75
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
3.00
.20
2.75
6.95
3.00
.20
2.75
6.95
4.50
. .23
2.75
.7.48
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
24.00
1.60
2.75
28.35
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.64
5.00
.29
2.76
8.04
112.50
7.40
3.75
123.65
12.00
.88
3.75
16.63
3.00
.20
2.75
5.95
300.00
20.00
3.75
323.75
112.50        7.40        3.75 123.65
3.00 .20        2.75 5.95
720.00
106.80
3.75
830.65
18.00
1.20
3.75
22.95
30.00
2.00
3.75
35.75
13.00
.65
3.75
17.40
13.00
.65
3.76
17.40
50.00
2.90
3.75
56.65
120.00
17.80
3.75
141.55
230.15
48.00
3.20
3.76
64.95
30.00
2.00
3.75
35.75
30.00
2:00
3.75
35.75
13.00
.65
3.75
17.40
180.00
26.70
3.75
210.45
270.00
40.05
3.76
313.80
755.68
417.15
122.46
241.18
554.60
263.10
460.54
262.14
5.95
30.20
56.7d
10.74
Dated at Cumberland, B. C, this 20th day of September, 1922.
JOHN BAIRD,
Collector, Comox Assessment District.
SURVEYORS FINISH \
TOPOGRAPHICAL WORK,
Messrs. J. A. Macdonald and A. C.
T. Sheppard, ot Ottawa, who have been
working ln this district since last
May on a topographical survey for
the Dominion Government, are leaving
on Monday for Victoria after completing a map ot the country from
Campbell River to Bowser, up to an
elevation ot two thousand feet.
The Sunday School ol Grace Methodist Church will hold a Rally Day ou
Sunday, September 24th. A special
Rally Day program has been arranged
and parents are urged to come with
the children, as a good time Is expected.
Cavin's bave the largest stock ot
shoes In town to choose from. They
have just received a large shipment of
shoes from the East. All the latest
Fall styles.
W. A. OF THE G. W. V. A.
TO HOLD WHIST DRIVE
The Women's Auxiliary of the G.
W. V. A. will hold their first Whist
Drive and Dance of the season on Friday, Sept. 29th, In the Memorial Hall.
Whist commences promptly at 8 p.m.
Dancing 10 to 12. Refreshments will
be served, and a first-elms orchestra
has been engaged.   Admission 50 cts. Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1982
Government   Agent  Endorses
Cascade
BEER
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
Vancouver-made Product is put to acid test on most difficult
foreign markets in the world, and comes off with flying colors.
Plans Started For A Pulp Mill
At Lake Stetson On P.G.E. Line
Cascade Beer has made good
in India. This is the most trying climate in the world, and yet
Cascade Beer kept there i'or
more than a year had the same
pleasant tang and was just as
fresh and pleasing to the taste
as when it left the Vancouver
Breweries.
There is no less an authority
for this than H. A. Chisholm,
trade commissioner i'or the Dominion Government. Writing
to the Commercial Intelligence
Journal, published by the Canadian Government, under date
of May 13, this year, Mr. Chisholm says in part:
"The last consignment reaching Calcutta is said to have been
a shipment of 'Cascade' from
Vancouver, landed in March,
19*21.
"Ti .speaks well of this brand
of Canadian Beer that, although
it has been in store for over a
year in one of the most trying
climates in the world, its quality
has not deteriorated and none of
it lias gone bad. Its 'crown
cupj' seem to have protected the
contents better than corks have
the German lu^rs. The writer
was informed ihat this brand of
Canadian Beer, although not as
heavy as English Ale, produced
a pleasant stimulating effect on
the stomach that German lagers
could not produce. According to
many informants, this particular quality in Canadian Beer is
just what is demanded in the
tropics."
Can there be a better endorsement than this for a hot-
weather drink? Here is Cascade—a Vancouver-made product—that can be shipped to
India, held for more than a year,
and when upened prove to be
more palatable and better adapted for a tropical beverage than
beer manufactured right in
India or imported from other
famous breweries of the world.
Stick to "Cascade" this hot
weather.
Chicago  Financiers Would Use
Bridge River Power and
Government Railway
For Paper Manufacture.
Negotiations have been opened for
the establishing ol another largo
paper mill In this province by John
Held, ot Vancouver, president ot the
Bridge River Power Company, and tin.
Seaman Paper Company; ot Chicago
Mr. Seaman Is personally conducting
he negotiations and has already Inter
viewed Premier Oliver on the subject
The Bridge River Power Company
controls enormous waler-power right'
and the Seaman Paper Company Ic
known a:i one of the largest concern*
,il Its kind ln the United States. V.
I). Simons, of Chicago, Is also Interested In the proposed mill.
The Idea Is to erect the mill at Seton
Luke, a hundrod miles up the P. 0
10, railway from Squaralsh.   The Chicago financiers uie busy at presen.
looking into the water-power facilities
im,I pulp wood resources of the surrounding  district,  trom   which   they
will draw their raw material.
The Seaman Interests are now look-
j Ing to British Columbia for their ra>v
,' material, following the decision of the
yi'dlcate    formed    by    the   Chicago
Dully News and the Chicago Tribune
to   establish   their    $3,500,000   paper
plant at Elko, B. C.
r,r THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
For more than Thirty Years Cascade has been the Favorite Beer
of Western Canada.
FOR SALE BY ALL GOVERNMENT VENDORS.
i^miLWt&sfflg^^ffli^
Plan may he seen and specification
obtained ou application to the Postmaster at Courtenay, B. C.
J. P. PORDE,
District Engineer.
District Engineer's Office,
Victoria, B. 0,
September 18th, 1922.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS,
CANADA.
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to
the undersigned, will be received
at this office until 12 noon, Thursday,
September 28th, 1D22, for the construction ot Bunt Landing at Fanny
Bay, Comox-Alberni District, B. C.
When you think of Astoria Shoes, It
is not "How much," but "How Good."
Hut the price is right, too, only $!1.7r>
and $10 a pair. See them at Cavin's
The'value Is there.
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
What promises to be a most enjoyable event Is the annual whist drive
and dance-of the St. John's Ambulance
Association, Cumberland Center, to be
held In the Ilo-llo Hall on Friday
evening, October 13tH. The whist
drive will start at 7.30, after whicli
refreshments will be served and th
dancing commence. A good orchestra
has been engaged for the evening to
ensure a delightful program.
THE ELK HOTEL
TENNIS COURT
"The Shoe of Super-Quality." The
well-dressed man of to-day selects the
shoe of quality. The "Astoria Shoe,"
the tailor-made shoes, at Cavin's.
The board tennis court at the Elk
Hotel, Comox, Is now completely
erected, and tennis fans from all over
the district gather there at week-ends.
The lintel 1b charmingly situated, and
many Cumberland people are taking
advantage of the fine weather of tho
past few weeks and are making tin
hotel a rendevous. Afternoon tea is
served at the hotel from 3 to 5 for
the moderate sum of 35 cents, and the
tennis court can be engaged for 25
cents a 'corner.
A yard of crepe.
For Thomas Lear;
He cranked his Ford-
It was ln gear.
Cumberland & Union Waterworks Co.. Ltd.
NOTICE
S EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY ALL WASTE OF WATER MUST STOP.
Owing to the prolonged dry weather we find that it is necessary to restrict the use of
water, as if we allow the present enormous consumption to continue the town may, in the event
of no rainfall for the next two months, be faced with a water famine.
In YOUR interests and for the protection of YOUR property in the event of a fire, we
find it necessary to bring into tli'ect immediately the following regulations:—
(1).     Water must not be used for sprinkling or irrigating purposes except—FOR ONE
HOUR ONLY—from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m.
I
(2). The practice of using water for the purpose of watering sidewalks, streets, etc.,
must cease. Persons using water for these purposes.are liable to have their services disconnected until such time as we can install a meter  on their supply.
(IS). Leaking taps, toilets, pipes, fittings, etc., must immediately be brought into good
repair as any premises on which water is found wasting from these causes will be disconnected
without further notice.
There is absolutely no desire on the part of this Company to curtail the use of
water when same is used in a proper manner for domestic purposes, but in a large number of
cases we find this privilege beina abused and should the abuse continue we shall be forced to consider the installation of water meters, which would make the cost of water much heavier for the
same consumption.
We once more draw to your attention the fact that this is being done in YOUR
interests as every leaking tap or pipe or sprinkler used unnecessarily lowers the water pressure
and consumes water that may be needed in a few weeks more for household purposes or may be
needed TODAY to extinguish a fire on YOUR property.
Thanking you in anticipation of your co-operation in this matter, we are,
Yours truly,
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS COMPANY LIMITED.
>*.,,.,; G.W.CLINTON,
K' ' "'.' " Managing Director,
Cumberland City Council
Receives Deputation
(Continued from Page One)
mate would have been higher.
To Bring In Estimate.
His Worship, Mayor McDonald, suggested that the school board prepare-
an estimate of what the sheds, fire
•■scape, etc., would cost, and present
same to the City finance committee,
who will bring ln a report on same
.o the Council. Aid Pickard and
Thomson made a motion to this effect
and same was carried unanimously.
Accounts Passed I
The following accounts were passed
to be referred to the Finance committee:'
Cumberland Islander-
Stationery, supplies  $ 32.2.S
Comox Creamery-
Isolation Hospital supplies   43 15
Electric Light Co.—
Police acct. repairs  SO
Police acct. current       C.5ti
A. J. Merry, July acct	
City current     50.9^
Burns & Brown— /
Repairs        7.25
Stable acct      4.15
C. H. Tarbell—
Street supplies       3.51
lloyston Lumber Co.—
Police station       6.85
Can. Collieries-
Sidewalk  $262.08
Fire   department ....   17.08 279.10
B. C. Telephone-
Service       6.56
Royston Motor Co.—
Hydrant repairs     30.75
Church Taxes.
The City Clerk was asked what Information he had obtained from the
cities he had written to ln regard to
church taxes, and he reported that
Victoria had refunded to the churches
two years' taxes only. He had had
no reply from Ladysmlth. He said
that Father Beaton had asked for two
years' taxes, which would amount to
about, (30.00.
The Council asked that the City
Clerk figure up how much two years'
taxes on 'all the churches amount to.
and report back to the Council.
Mysterious Explosion.
Aid. Thomson, representing the
Board of Public Works, was asked-
about the mysterious explosion that
occurred at noon last Friday. He was
as much in the dark as anyone as to
the cause of the explosion, which had
gone about fifty feet Into the air.
One of the aldermen suggested that if
such things were likely to occur at
the city dump, same was a menace to
the city and should be fenced in.
Aid. Beveridge: "You can't fence in
a public park."
Aid. Thomson: "It Isn't used as a
park just now; but as a dump."
(Laughter).
Salvation Army Appeal.
% appeal was read from the Salvation Army for an annual grant. On'
motion of Aid. Maxwell and Thomson,
the Salvation Army will be notified
that the city cannot make a grant, but
they may make a canvass of the city.
Cuttle Impounded.
A report from the Chief of Pollco
stated that thirteen head of cattle had
been impounded during the previous
fortnight, eleven of which were the
property of Harry Lelghton, who
asked a reduction in the pound tees.
On the motion of Aid. Maxwell and
Bannerman, it was decided, in view
al the special circumstances in this
case, to charge Mr. Lelghton only one
dollar per head pound fees, with a
warning that if his cattle were taken
In again the entire fee would be collected.
LADY JURISTS ARE
SPECIALLY TRAINED
Oxford, EnglanB.—A summer school
for women, wherein they may be Instructed in the duties and responsibilities of voting, has been opened here,
and so many applications have been
received that no more students can
be accepted. The course specializes
in the duties of_magiatrates.
Lots ot people not In "Who's Who'
can tell you what's what,
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know how to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot ot tree advice on the subject It you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8
Cumberland
P.O. Box 349
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
 1   ♦   ■
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
Parent-Teachers' Association
Holds First Annual Meeting
(Continued From   Page One)
Potter, anil was presented to him last
Friday night.
"The P, T. A. was also Instrumental
Iu getting the old Y. M. C. A. fund,
which had been given to tho Boy
Hcouls' Association, transferred to the
School Board, who are already making a move to purchase suitable school
ground equipment.
"The P. T. A. also tried to stimulate members to attend, and others
lo join, the association, by giving a
prize to that room ln the school that
had the greatest percentage of parents
attending during a certain number of
months. This prize was won by Miss
Bannerman's room, but has not been
donated yet."
Financial Report
Dr. Hicks gave the following report
of the finances of the association:
Contributions and membership
fees $221.70
Disbursements   for  prizes and
Mr. MacKenzle's expenses.. 134.30
Balance, on hand  % 87.40
New Business.
The question of the transportation
of the children from the Comox Lake
district came up for discussion, but
it was decided to ask the parents of
these children to meet the association
and talk the .mutter over before anything is decided on.
Rev. James Hood extended a hearty
welcome to the new principal, who
made a suitable reply.
The meeting was attended by thirteen teachers and thirteen parents.
BREAD!
FOR BABY
"Safety First"
Four generations of babies
have been kept clean, fresh,
fragrant, and free from skin
troubles by the use of
BABY'S OWN
SOAP
/'My
ALBERT SOAPi 'LIMITED      ■     MONTNlAl
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or dp. you e •; other less nourishing foods ? (
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it;
HALLWAYS BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write tor prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
OIBce getJO Bridge Street, Victoria, B.G.
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of thai* high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all tha time.
Henderson's
WORK ENOUGH FOR ALL
ACCORDING TO C. M. A.
Toronto.—The report of the officials
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association Is that trade prospects are
considerably brighter than they were
a year ago. There Is no cause for any
one to go about, the country unem
ployed, says the report.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD
for 	
$6.00
FRED McKENZIE
Phone 92L Happy Valley
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTJURERS OF ..
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50 M
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1922
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
NINE
=■—,1
EIGHT DOLLARS
will place this Phonograph in your home, and
you can arrange to pay the balance at the
rate of Seven Dollars and Fifty Cents every
month.
This is a Full Cabinet Phonograph, exactly as shown
in the illustration. Three-spring motor, automatic
stop, and Full Price, $95.
Marshall Music Co
CUMBERLAND and COURTENAY
When you drink—
DRINK THE BEST
" WATAGOOD "
BRAND
TEA and COFFEE
Emrress Tea, 2% lb. packages  '"^<
Puffed Wheat, per package  20 ee'sW
Puffed Rice, per package  15 cents
White Wonder Soap  J for 25 cents;
Watagood Tea, per lb 70 cents
Watagood Coffee, per lb 60 cents
Watagood Pure Maple Syrup, per bottle $1.00
Watagood Pure Malt Vinegar, per bottle SO cents
Watagood Cocoa, per lb  35 cents
Prult Cakes, per lb  50 cents
Cheese, Ontario, per lb 80 cents
Oraham Biscuits, per lb. 25c.   Per box  tlM
Lemon Cakes, per lb. 25c.   Per box .\ SJ1.I0
Choice Celery, per bunch 15 cents
Fresh Tomatoes, per lb .'.  10 cents
r       .ill Kinds of Fresh Fruit and Vegetables.
T. BOOTH  & SONS
Courtenay, B.C.
News Of Courtenay District
COURTENAY CITY COUNCIL
A regular meeting of the Courtenay
City Council was held on Monday
night, when a considerable amount of
routine business was up for consideration. Chief of Police, Attree was appointed to act as lire marshall ln conjunction with Mr. John Thomson,
chief of the Are department. It Is
proposed to amend the traffic by-law
uy eliminating the clause that allows
only twenty minutes as parking time
Tor any car on the main street of the
city. This section of the by-law, It is
idaimed, worked a hardship on car
owners, and while not now in force,
Is still on the books. The situation
will be further discussed at the next
meeting ot the City Council. Tbe city
clerk was instructed to have the fire
truck Insured and to place additional
insurance on the City Hall.
SAVED HOME
FROM DESTRUCTION
Courtenay, Sept. 16.—Prompt action
by the Volunteer Fire Department at
live o'clock this morning saved the
home ot Mr. J. E. Taylor from complete destruction. Mr. Taylor had
arisen early to go hunting, and on
leaving the house, thought all was
safe. The first Intimation of danger
was when Mrs. Taylor became aware
of the presence of smoke ln her bedroom. She immediately turned In an
alarm. The ready response of the
lire department undoubtedly saving
the house. Most of the damage was
done by water.
Courtenay Visitors Entertained
A most enjoyable evening was
spent at the home of Mrs. M. E.
Hunter, 1054 Twelfth Ave. West, when
they entertained in honor of Miss
Muriel Flggott, who Is visiting from
Courtenay. The evening was spent ln
dancing and games, after which supper was served. The guests Included:
Mrs. M. Hunter, Mr. and Mrs. O.
Skinner, Mr. and Mrs. S. V. Smith,
Mr. and Mrs. W. Hunter, Miss Muriel
Piggott, Miss May Condell, Miss Mae
MacKinnon, Miss Irene Dunn, Miss
Marjorie Smith, Mr. Eddie Morgan,
Mr. Jack Sinclair, and Mr. Cleaves
Hewlett.—Vancouver Province.
APPOINT DR. H. P. MILLARD
Dr. II. P. Millard has received an
appointment as Hospital physician at
Campbell River, and will remove to
the northern point shortly. It Is understood his practice here will be
taken over by Dr. Briggs, who has
been associated with Dr. Millard for
the psst three months. Dr. Millard
has been a resident of Courtenay for
over thirty years, and his removal to
Campbell River will be regretted by
the host of friends he has made as a
practioner in the valley.' Although
severing his connection with Courtenay in a professional capacity, Dr.
Millard still retains a big Interest in
the town through his property holdings in and near Courtenay.
YOUNG MAN IS
CRUSHED BY LOG
A sad accident occurred at MenzicV
llay last Friday afternoon when Mr.
It. Illerbrun, aged twenty-four years,
lost bis life. The fatality occurred at
the logging camp of Messrs. Lamb
Bros. Illerbrun was standing beside
n car loaded with logs, when suddenly
and without warning, a big cedar
rolled off and crushed him to th?
ground. He died shortly alter the accident. The late Mr. Illerbrun wus an
extremely popular young fellow
among his camp-mates, besides having
many friends at Campbell River and
other points in the district. The body
was brought to Courtenay on Monday, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. J.
W. McLennan, the latter being a sister
of the deceased. The remains were
despatched east to Edmonton, where
the family of Illerbrun reside.
Personal Mention
Mr. and Mrs. John McKenzie, of
Comox, returned on Wednesday after
spending a pleasant holiday at Victoria and Vancouver.
MrB. Ken. B. Dalby arrived home
from- Vancouver on Wednesday's
train, after having spent a vacation
on "the Mainland.
McLEOD'S
GREAT SALE
Of Surplus Stock
Men's Boots, Raincoats, Hats and
Caps, Kiddies' Waterproof Capes
Misses' and Ladies' Raincoats
Shoes, etc.
EXCEPTIONAL VALUES IN HOSIERY
m
DONT MISS THIS GliiSAT OPPORTUNITY
TO SAVE MONEY
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
U    IMPORTANT—The Parking By-law is revoked—Stay
as long as you require.
Illlllllllllllllllllll
MEDAL PRESENTED
TO FRANK POTTER
Courtenay Assembly, No. 3, Native
Sons of Canada, held a regular meeting on Monday night last ln Booth's
Hall. Over twenty new members
were admitted. Intense Interest Is being taken in the organization, and already the local assembly has one hundred and twenty-live members, and
many applications are being received.
Being a non-political, non-sectartan
order, its membership is open to anv
Canadian-born citizen over eighteen
years of age. It is not antagonistic to
nny institution, organization or class,
but stands solely for the development
ot a true Canadian national spirit.
The most prominent men in the community have joined the ranks, and a
membership of several hundred being-
expected shortly.
Mr. M. B. Tribe left on Thursday
for Vancouver on business.
Last Friday evening a unique event
look place at the first High School
lance of the term, lu the presentation
to Frank Potter of the Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd. gold medal, awarded
to tbe student standing highest at the
matriculation examination. The presentation was made by Mr. Chas.
Graham, who ln a pleasing and effective speech pointed out the necessity
ot a High School education for all
those who wish to advance to positions of responsibility. The management ot the Canadian Collieries realizes the necessity ot education, and
hopes that the annual medal will be
n incentive to more pupils to remain
>t school until matriculation. In congratulating the recipient, Mr. Oraham
i'iimpllmeiited him for ills interest in
outside activities as well as for his
energy and ability in school work.
The medalist replied in his usual
Pleasing manner, and extended his
best wishes to the other members of
bis class, and to those who would
compete for the medal In succeeding
years.
Mrs. Hood, president of tbe P.-T.
Association, through* whose efforts
the prizes of the past year wore' provided, then presented prizes to Miss
Winnie Calnan and Jack Fouracre,
who tied for liighest standing in any
Individual subject in the examinations.
Mr. George Dalziel, of Denman Island, was a visitor to Courtenay on
Wednesday and Thursday.
Mr. A. W. Idiens, of Nelson, is a
guest of relatives at Comox.
Mr. P. L. Anderton is at Victoria,
taking ln the exhibition.
B. C. EDUCATION COSTS
SEVEN MILLION FOR YEAR
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Announcement has been made by
Hon. J. D. McLean, Provincial Secretary and Minister of Education, to the
effect that the educational expense bill
for British Columbia tor last year
amounted to J7.ino.Oiio. Of this sum
forty per cent was paid by the province and sixty per cent by the municipalities.
The report of the minister shows
aproxlmately 2,750 teachers employed
in the schools In this province, and
80,000 pupils enrolled. In British Columbia tbe average cost of education
per child Is $83; In Alberta, (86; ln
Saskatchewan, $98; In Manitoba, $74.
Mr. Joseph McPhee Is building an
addition to his building on Union St..
now occupied by the Piket Electric
Co.
Madame Gareau, of the Merville
is contemplating establishing a class
In conversational French at Courtenay about two evenings a week. Madame Gareau spent many years teaching languages on the continent, and
the venture should prove a success.
Mr. W. J. C. Hannah and Mr. G. F.
Stephens, of Little River, attended thi
Cowichan Fair on Saturday.
Use PURITY
FLOUR
Hubby: "Well, If that gdsBlp about
MrB. Rush Is true, she's worse than I
thought she was. Where did you hear
It." Wlfey: "I heard it yesterday at
tho meeting of the Charitable Society'.'
Why Send to Vancouver?
When You Can Get Goods Delivered at These Prices ?
Potted Meats or Devilled Ham  8 tins for 26c.
Pine Apple, sliced, 2s, per tin 80c.
Pacific Milk, large tin  2 tor 25c.
St. Charles Milk, baby size   8 for 25c.
Nabob Spices, any kind 2 tins for 25c
Mrs. Porter's Salad Dressing, 8 oz  45c.
Pure Honey, ln glass  80c.
Heinz' Pure Olive Oil, 8 oz 50c.
C. & B. French Capers, per bottle  25c.
Heinz' Pure Vinegar, white or brown, per gallon  $1.15
Nabob Baking Powder, 12 oz. tins 26c.
New Orleans Molasses, % gal. tin  50c
Rogers' Golden Syrup, 6 lb. tin   60c.
Gold Medal Brand Plums, 1% lb. tin 25c
King Beach Jam, strawberry, 4 lb. tin  95c
Apple Jelly, 2 lb. tin  :  35c.
McCormlck's Jersey Cream Sodas, palls   65c
Llbby's CllngBtone Peaches, 2V& lb, tin 40c.
Our Motto: " Quality and Service.*'
Courtenay Cash Store
Pigott Block    -   Phone 56
CHEVROLET
O
COMPARISONS SELL CHEVROLETS
Consider the equipment of the Sedan: Standard Rear
Axle Construction; Strong, Quiet, Spiral Bevel Gears;
Standard Transmission; Three Speeds Forward and
One Reverse; Standard Electrical System; Starter;
Electric Lights; Itemy Ignition; Standard Cooling
System; Pump Circulation; Large Honeycomb Radiator; Demountable Rims, with extra rim; Cord Tires;
Speedometer; Armeter; Oil Pressure Gauge, Tunisia! Window Regulators; Dome Light, Kobe Kail and
Door Locks.
SOLD BY
THE
COURTENAY
GARAGE
BLUNT & EWART, LTD.
Phone 61
Phone 61
Commencing October 2nd, I his Garage will be open
from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Every Day Except Saturday.
Saturday: S a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday: 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. TEN
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2Srd, 1922
New Arrivals
ANOTHER SHIPMENT OF NEW SNAPPY COATS
ARE EXPECTED ON HAND FOR SATURDAY.
LATEST STYLES AND MATERIALS.   PRICES
ACCORDING TO MATERIALS.
WAISTS.—A Special Lot of 12 Waists in Tricolette.
Nicely trimmed and very smart.   Price $2.95
LADIES' SILK UNDERSKIRTS in good colorings and
well  made.    Silk  will  give  good  satisfaction.
Price $4.95
LADIES' FLANNELETTE BLOOMERS—White only.
Lace trimmed.   Very good value at 90c.
LADIES' WHITE FLANNELETTE UNDEHSKIKTS--
Different sizes.   Prices, each 85c.
KIDDIES' BLACK SATEEN COVERALLS—Trimmed
with red, yellow and blue.   Made of a heavy twill
sateen.   Price $1-75
FOOTBALLS FOR THE BOYS.
A specially hard-wearing h'de, with good rubber bladders.   Just what you want for the boys.   $2.50
Regulation Football, all hand sewn. Will give every
satisfaction.   Price $4.75
REEFERS FOR BOYS AND GIRLS.—Made of heavy
navy, Government serge.   Well lined, with emblem
on sleeve.   Prices $6.75 to $9.50
No better or smarter Coat could be desired.
BABIES' RUBBER PANTS.   Large size.   Pair ....45c.
DRY GOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
 Call at	
Mrs. L. Francescini's
To S*ee the New Stock of
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR
STOCKINGS, FLANNELETTES, NEW PRINTS
AND GINGHAMS.
NOW is the time to put in Your Christmas Order for
Fancy Pillow Cases, Scarfs, Tea Cloths, Doylies, Centre
Pieces, Etc., Worked on Ptre Linen or Strong Cotton
MRS. L. FRANCESCINI
DUNSMUIR AVE.      :     :       :      CUMBERLAND
u
"Astoria"
Shoes
Tailor Made for Particular Trade
You Buy Tailored Clothes^
Why Not Buy TaHored Shoes?  1
You choose a tailored suit, because it is made
from choice material, by skilled hands, and is
made to youi size in a style that suits you.
For exactly the same reason, you should buy
tailor-made shoes.     Asioria, All-Leather Shoes
are tailor-made-to your size, and in
styles that suit your foot.   Astoria
material is flawless.   Asl >ria Shoes
are made faultlessly.
Good Shoes, like Good Clothes,
•wear loiter—the Value iu mere
Cavin'sShoe Store
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
USED
CARS
If you are looking  for a Used
Car, don't miss these Bargains,
We   guarantee   all   our   Used
Fords for 90 Days.
0>/1QK AA—This Is a 1»2*0 Model.
•D'tt/U.VV wllh Seif-starter, de
nii.uiiialili' rims, one man top, goo,
battery, aud has been completely
overhauled. You can't beat this lor
a late model touring.
ffOQE flft—For(1 Touring. This
jWJOUeUU   car ha9 demountable
riins, very good tires, and has been
completely overhauled, but has no
itarter. Just the thing for those who
want something good but cheap.
CQKA Aft-For<1 L18nt Delivery.
®**""«W This is an exception
illy good buy for those who have lighl
hauling; completely overhauled, anil
very good tires.
(gnqjr AA—Ford    Truck,    com-
WmmOO.VV     plete   whn   D0X   „ody
Just the thing to do your hauling.
Easy Terms can be arranged oo any
uf these, If yea wish.
$1,123.00
Ford Sedan. Get
one now, and
drive In comfort this winter. You
need not fear the rain and wind if
you ride In one of these. Come in
and see about terms.
SERVICE
BULLETIN
&1 PA-This Is our price for
tPltUV washing and polishing
oiling and greasing Ford touring cars
Use PURITY
FLOUR
TRENT ROAD GIRLS' CLUB
Tlio sluiwl rallied for at the Whist
Drive and Dunce held on September
Uth, was won by Mrs. K. Jackson,
with ticket No. 59.
(P ■) AA—This Is our price for
«"-••"" washing and polishing,
oiling and greasing Ford closed cars
and all other makes and models of
cars.
If you need a New Battery, nee uf,
Wc have an absolute guaranteed pro
position, and you know what ou,
guarantee stands for.
Commencing October 2nd, this Oarage
will be open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.ir.
every day except Saturday. Saturday
8 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 9 am
to 6 p.m.
Corfield Motors Ltd
FORD DEALERS
FOR COURTESY—PHONE 40.
COURTENAY, B. C.
Personal Mention
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Ladysmlth
Friday morning.
Mr. S. Horwood left tor Victoria
Saturday morning..
Mr. and Mrs. D. Stewart left for
Victoria Monday morning.
Mrs. Earl Fletcher returned to Nn
.laiino Tuesday morning.
Mr. M. McKenzie returned to Port-
imd, Ore., Tuesday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham returned from Vancouver on Wednesday.
Mr. J. E. Marpole left for Vancouver
Tuesday morning and returned on
Thursday.
Miss Laura M. Robertson left on n
boil vacation to Victoria and Van-
■uuver Tuesday morning.
Mrs. F. Deane-Freeman and son, of
Ocean Falls, arrived ln town on Saturday on a visit to relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Jones have returned to Nanaimo after spending a
ew days visiting friends here.
Mrs. Hugh Mitchell has returned
from a week's visit ln Victoria with
Iter niece, Mrs. II. A. Moody.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Supt,
Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., left for
Vancouver on Friday morning.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien, Safety Engineer,
Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., left for
Ladysmith on Friday morning.
Mr. James Butterworth left Friday
morning for Victoria, after spending
the summer with the Dominion Government Burvey party In the district.
Mr. J. Westover, who previously was
iifflliated with the Wear-Ever Aluminium Co., Is now working in the interest of the Marshall Music Co., of
Ibis city.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF AT UNION BAY
Week Ending Sept. 21st, 1922.
Charmer, Vancouver; Newlngton,
Prince Rupert; Progressive, Coastwise; Point Hope, Vancouver; Faultless, Coastwise; Reliance, Coastwise;
Cheerful, Coastwise; Princess Ena.
••kaguny; Dola, Victoria; Sadie and
Scow, Victoria; Transfer No. 4, Vancouver; Glenboro, Coastwise; Coutll,
Coastwise; Peggy McNeil and Scow.
Vancouver; Hope, Coastwise; Teplc
and Scow, Vancouver; Active, Coast-
vise; Joyful, Comox; Superior,
Coastwise; Melanope, Vancouver; No-
noose, Coastwise; C. P. R., Vancouver;
Divinely, Coastwise; Gleeful, Coast-
vise; Cheerful, Coastwise.
TO COMMEMORATE
71st ANNIVERSARY
The Rebekahs will hold a Whist
Drive and Dance in the G. W. V. A.
Hall on Monday evening, Sept. 25th,
commemorating their 71st Anniversary. WWst, 8 to 9.30 o'clock. Dancing, 10 to 1 o'clock. Refreshments
will be served. Gents, 75 cents;,
ladles, 50 cents.
The Women's Auxiliary at their annual meeting elected the following
officers for the ensuing season: President, Mrs. A. Bird; Vice-President,
Mrs. Freebourn; Secretary, Miss L.
Bird; Treasurer, Mrs. W. Brown.
Courtenay Locals.
Mr. A. J. Gullmette, of the Boom
Camp, was the lucky winner of one
thousand dollars In the B. C. Veterans' football competition this week,
He paid one dollar for his ticket and
came out |999 ahead of the game.
Mr. William Douglas, while hunt
Ing up the Puntledge River just out ot
Courtenay, found the body of an old
near which had evidently grown too
old to take care of Itself, as Its teeth
were practically all broken and the
body very thin.
Our Personal
Guarantee
to All Skin Sufferers
You 'have our abtolute guarantee of
relief from the tint bottle of D. D. D.
Your money will be returned without * word
If you tell ui that the flnt bottle did not itop
that itch, did not Mothe and cool that eruption.   Yon atone are tbe Judge.
We have watched the action of thit standard
medical difcovery on the tick ikiu In hundred!
of caaee ond toe know. And if you are juit
craiy with itchinr or pain, you will feel toothed
and cooled the moment you apply thiiMoth-
lor, cooling wash.
We have made fait friends of more than one
family In reioniuiendint l>. D. D. to a skin
■ufferer here and there, and we want you to
try it now on our u»*itiv* no-pa j- guarantee.
Price. $i a botiie.   try O. D. 1). Soap too.
R. BR FROST
"Astoria Shoes" will appeal to your
tiiKto, You'll buy a pair, and then
you'll know how long they wear, and
how well they keep their "shape. We
sell them to Impress particular men
like you.   Cavin's Shoe Store.
Just Arrived
a Full Line of Semi-Porcelain, Manufactured by J. J.
G. Meakin, England.
Cups and Saucers, $1.95 doz.
Cups only   $1.35 doz.
Plates, 4 in 11.30 doz.
Plates, 5 in $1.50 doz.
Plates, 6 in $1.85 doz.
Plates, 7 In $2.50 doz.
Plates, 8 in $2.75 doz.
Plates, soup $2.50 doz.
Plates, fruit  90c. doz.
Covered Dishes ....$2.25 each.
Flat Dishes, 10 ...66 c. each.
Flat Dishes, 12 ....$1.25 each.
Flat Dishes, 14 ....$1.50 each.
Sauce Boats  75 c. each.
Scallops, 7 in. ......50 c. each.
Scallops, 8 in 65 c. each.
Scallops, 9 In. ...90 c. each.
Bowls, 30  35 c. each.
BowIb, 36  30 c. each.
Sugars  65 c.  each.
Creams  60 c. each.
Jugs, 30s   65 c. each.
Jugs, 36s 60 c. each.
Butter Pads  70 c. dozen.
Bakers, 8  65 c. eafch.
Pickles  50 c. each.
SPECIAL
ONE CAKE WHITE WONDER LAUNDRY SOAP
FREE
With Every Purchase of 6 Cakes White Wonder Soap
for 50 cents.   Regular Price, 10 cents per Cake.
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY TRY
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
We are complete House Furnishers.
No matter what you want in the Furniture Line,
come to us.  We have it. ,
You will And that we sell SUPERIOR things at'
PRICES that will delight you.
Jeune's Furniture Store
PHONE 144
COURTENAY, B.C.
COMOX
TAILOR
DYE WORKS
CLEANING      . .      PRESSING
fkt lUilirl Rimed; tor BAY-FEVER
lid Aittami. Soil by all good Dnifflitl.
F*r FriiTrlil wriltTiaplitoii.Toroite
Sold by Frost's Drug Store
T. YONEDA
COUKTENAY
Phone 64 Box 123
Fall Millinery
Showing
Mrs. Laver will be showing the Very Latest Models in
/    FALL MILLINERY.
NEW FALL GOODS ARRIVING DAILY.
Laver's Store
CUMBERLAND
Phone 115

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