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The Cumberland Islander Feb 27, 1925

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 THEA CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Provincial Library     Janl|23
With which In consolidated the Cumberland News.
V
FORTY-FOURTH  YEAR—No.  9.
^ma
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA     FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27. 1924.       <g^|^^> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
CUPS AND MEDALS ARE
PROMISED FOR SPORTS
To further arrangements for the
Up-Island Inter-School Sports Day,
which ls to be held in Cumberland
probably on June 3rd, a meeting of
the executive was held last evening
In the Council Chambers with Mayor
Charles Parnham ln the chair and a
large number of enthusiastic members present Including Inspector Patterson, who made a special visit to the
city for the occasion.
The meeting decided to have cups,
shields or pennants presented for per-
petual competition and medals presented to winners In certain events,
such as races, each year. Already
two cups have been promised by R.
C. Lang and R. Kaplansky and the
following eight gentlemen have each
promised a silver medal: Messrs C. J.
Parnham, A. J. Taylor, T. H. Carey,
O. W. Stubbs, F. R. Shenstone, G. E.
Apps, H. E. Murray and Inspector
Patterson. Here ls a good chance
for wholesale houses and others to
get in some good advertising for any
prizes that they see fit to contribute
will be advertised in every school,
aud thus every home, ln the district.
Any cups or medals will be thankfully received by the committee.
All Bchools (50 in number) will be
Informed of programs and rules and
each must give notice to Program
Committee by May 1st of list of events
to be entered. Where the number
of entries Ib too large to allow proper
handling at Cumberland the Commit-
13th Fight
Unlucky~For
Other Chap
It Ib less than two years ago that
Roy Cliffe was matched against Johnny Morgan, in his first fight as a professional, and though he lost a decision, he Justified the faith of his
trainer, Max Blunt, by making a wonderful showing against his experienced opponent. He fought the full
ten rounds with one arm omy, his
left being put out of action In the
first round.
Since then he has fought twelve
fights, against opponents weighing
from 160 to 190 pounds, and has won
ten by the K.O. route, and lost one
decision. The other fight was a draw
His victim ln the 13th fight was Gene
Nolan, at San Fernando, U.S.A., whom
he knocked out in the first round,
last Wednesday.
It is hoped that local fans will
soon have a chance to see Roy ln
action again ln his home town.
Will Reside in Vancouver
Mr. Alex Denholme and Mr. Jack
Hatch, well known In Cumberland
sporting circles, left for Vancouver on
Thursday last. They intend to reside
In that city in future.
...
Messrs R. Hindmarsh and Chas.
Trawford of Nanaimo visited Cumberland on Thursday.
Miscellaneous
Shower For Bride
On Monday evening last the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Graham was
the scene ot a delightful miscellaneous shower given In honor of Mrs.
Roland Graham (nee Alice Lackala).
The rooms were tastefully decorated in a color scheme of mauve and
pink. A daintly decorated wagon
containing many beautiful gifts for
the bride was drawn in by little Miss
Hazel Gordon and Master Billie Walker, both being effectively dressed In
pink and mauve Pierrot costumes.
With the wagon load of gifts were extended the best wishes of a host ot acquaintances and friends. The evening was pleasantly passed ln cards
and Mah Jongg, followed by the serving of dainty refreshments.
Among those present were: Mrs. T.
Graham, Mrs. J. H. Graham, Mrs.
Charles Graham, Mrs. J. Marsden,
Mrs. T. Malpass, Mrs. R. Yates, Miss
Gallivan, Mrs. J. Newton (Nanaimo),
Mrs. J. Smith, Mrs. J. Bond, Mrs. J.
L. Brown, Mrs. C. Hitchens, Mrs. B.
Brown, Mrs. A. Thompson. Mrs. Ronald, Mrs. J. Quinn, MrB. Wm. Gordon,
Mrs. L. Frelone, Mrs. H. Parkinson,
Mrs. A. Kay (Union Bay), Mrs. H.
Docherty, Mrs. F. Covert, Mrs. R.
Goodall, Miss Brown, Mrs. William
Walker and Miss Helen Gordon. I
tee will arrange to subdivide the district and have the winners of eacli
subdivision come to the contest proper. In all races each school is restricted to one entry and only the
"cream" of each school is to take part
In each event. Among the spectacular events will be the Tug-of-War,
from pick of Nanaimo, Harewood,
Cumberland and Courtenay Schools;
the Drill Prize for best 10 pupils
(open to all) and the Rope Climbing,
20 ft, open to all. Following Is the
complete list ot events and the pupils
to whom they are open.
75-yd. Dash for junior boys and
girls (under 12 years); 100-yd. Dash
for senior boys and girls (over 12
years) and for Higli School boys and
girls; 200-yd. Race for senior boys
and girls and for High School bojs
and girls; 440-yd. Race open to ditto;
Half-mile Race open to ditto; Relay
Race, 220 yards for junior boys aud
girls; 440-yd Race for senior boys
and girls and 440-yd Race for High
School boys and girls; Sack Race for
juniors only; Wheel-Barrow Race for
Junior boys only; 3-legged Race, mixed; Egg and Spoon Race, 25 yards
return, for junior, senior and High
School girls; Nail Driving, 6 2%-inch
nails for senior and High School girls
Throwing Ball, open to junior, senior and High School girls; Skipping
Race, 50 yards for junior girls and
100 yards for senior and High School
girls; Rope Climbing, 20 ft, for junior, senior and High School boys;
Standing Hop, Step and Jump for senior and High School boys; Running
Broad Jump for senior and High
School boys and girls; High Jump
for senior and High School boys;
Tug-of-War, open to schools of seven
rooms or more, also for High School,
Greasy Pole, open; First Aid (S*.
Johns Ambulance rules), open; Best
Clown boy or girl, open; Best Ail-
Round Athlete, girl or bay; Physical
Drill, open to group of ten mixed, for
Strathcona prize.
R. H. Hicks
Appointed New
City Policeman
PORT ALBERNI,—At tlle mecttnu
of the Board of Police Commissioners,
held last Tuesday evening, 49 applications for the position of patrolman
were received.
R. H. Hicks, of Union Bay, received the appointment at a salary of $100
per mouth with uniform supplied. He
will take up his duties on March 1st.
Mr. Hicks Is a native of Toronto and
has served two years with the Military
Police and five years with the R.N.
W.M.P., during three of which he was
stationed In Cumberland with E. J.
Cronk.
An Editorial
THE MISSING CYLINDER OF A COMMUNITY
The progressive town is like a fine eight
cylinder car, purring along evenly as it carries its
passengers, the residents of the community, over
the hills that stand in the way of prosperity.
But sometimes a good looking town, like
many beautiful cars, will roll along evenly while
the roads are level, but upon reaching a hill of
business adversity, will slow up, knock and jerk,
and finally come to a dead stop before it reaches
the crest.
A missing cylinder, you say? Yes, and that
missing cylinder is the man or woman who shows
no interest in home town business or in the welfare of the community.
Ask yourself the question: "Am I the missing cylinder of this community?"
COMOX CREAMERY ASSN.
IN PROSPEROUS STATE
The annual meeting of the Comox this way business would lie shown
Creamery Association was held at j very similar to that of a department
j Courtenay    yesterday,    Mr.    William   slore.
| Duncan occupying the chair and all j Auditor Porters statement was ad-
,' directors In attendance. The retir-: opted as read, Mr, Andrews making
■ Ing directors for the year are Messrs a motion to the effect aud Mr, Grieves
; G. W. Clinton, L.  R. Cliffe, H. Hoi-   being   thc  seconder.      The   meeting
lins  and  R.   U.   Hurford.      Each   of   then adjourned for the serving of an '
| these  directors   was    re-elected   tor  appetizing lunch by the women's aux-
<!>
Badminton Club Visited
Comox On Monday Lad
A very pleasant evening was spent j and .Miss McKinnon beat Nunns and
by the members of the Cumberland | Mrs pollock 11-5; Shenstone and Mrs.
Badminton Club on Monday evening j jI(.Lellall beat James alld Mr8 Lev.
last, when they journeyed to Comox
and enjoyed some excellent games
with the elub from the farming community, ln most of the games played Cumberland and Comox players
were pitted against Cumberland and
Comox Instead of having, as formerly, Inter-club contests. About 10:30
refreshments were served and after
all had been catered to play was
again resumed, the following being
the scores:
Mr. Ball and Mrs. Spicer beat Mumford and Mrs. Finch 11-8; Tarbell and
MrB. E. Cliffe beat Cliffe and Mrs.
Apps 11-0; Osier and Mrs. Shenstone
beat Shenstone and Miss Wood 11-10;
Vernon Jones and Miss Lyche beat
James and Miss McKinnon 11-3; Murray and Mrs. T. Cliffe beat Pollock
and Mrs. Bryan 11-3; Leversedge and
Mrs. Steel beat Steel and Miss Richardson 11-0; Downing and Mrs. Leversedge beat Symons and Mrs. Fair-
balm 11-6; E. Cliffe and Mrs. Spicer*
beat Nunns and Mrs. McLellan 11-3;
Tarbell and Mrs. Ball beat Pollock
and Mrs. Finch 11-5; Ball and Mrs.
Apps beat Nunns and Miss Wood 11-5;
Murray and Miss Lyche beat Vernon-
Jones and Mrs. Shenstone 11-5; Leversedge and Mrs. T. Cliffe beat Downing nnd Mrs. Bryan 11-10;  E. Cliffe
' the current year.
Assets .Much Higher Thun Last Year
Mr. Frank Porter, auditor. BUbmlt-
I ted the llnancial  report.     It Bhown
| assets ot $1.50 for every $1.00 liability; this after all taxes [or the coming
year and other liabilities had been attended   to.      In   1923   the  Creamery
owned property amounting to $!!0,5iin
I and It now owns property of various
! kinds   amounting   to   $93,074.      This
shows an  increase of approximately
$2.5110.00.      Liabilities   on   the  other
hand have decreased $3,000.00. Total
liabilities   to  the  publlc  amount  to
$34,379 as against $27,147 last year.
This Includes a mortgage of $10,000
to the Land Settlement Board and a
bank loan of $10,000.      Paid up capital now amounts to $39,000.00.
The Dominion Government has refunded to the Comox Creamery the
sum of $604.00 in connection with lbc
ersedge 11-4; Symons and Mrs. Steel I over-payment of income tax some
beat Ball and Miss Richardson 11-8; ' efghtee,, months ago. A decrease of
Mrs. Falrbalm and Mrs. E. Cliffe heat j $13,000 was noted In gross sales, and
Mrs. Apps and Mrs. Finch 11-7; Mur- a decline ot $12,000 in gross profits.
ray and Mrs. Shenstone bent Pollock A net profit of $7,848 was shown,
and Mrs. Ball 11-6; Downing and Miss j A considerable shrinkage in the ice
Wood beat Tarbell and Mrs. Spicer I cream profits was questioned by Mr.
11-10; Mumford and Mrs Bryan beat Harrigan, but this was explained by
Steel and Mrs. McLellan 11-4; Nunns the fact that the product was being
and Vernon-Jones beat E. Cliffe and j sold at ten tents per gallon less;
Ball 11-9; Symons and Miss Rich-! there were also more demands in the
ardson beat Pollock and Mrs. T. Cliffe '■ way of service delivery and soforth.
11-10; Leversedge and McKinnon beat! Kepurtiuclits to be Charged
Downing and Mrs. Pollock 11-4; Mur- j A resolution was made by Mr. W. A.
ray and Mrs. McLellan beat Shenstone j B. Paul and seconded by Mr. Hugii
and Mr3. Shenstone 11-10; Mrs. Bry- j Morrison to tbe effect that in future
an and Mrs. Spicer beat Mrs. Apps | the various departments of the As-
and Mrs. Leversedge 11-S; Miss Wood i sociatlon be charged interest on the
and Mm, Steel beat Mrs. E. Cliffe and j money tied up by them. Tills was
Miss Lyche 11-7; Vernon-Jones and i carried. Mr. Porter explaining that in |
Miss Wood beat Murray    and    Miss |
lllary of the Comox Agricultural and
Industrial Association.
REPLAY DAVENPORTS
ON SUNDAY IN
CUP COMPETITION
The Cumberland United Soccer
team will journey to Nanaimo ou
Sunday morning lo replay the Nanaimo Davenports in a Brackman-
Ker Cup tic Last week's game was
stopped after 20 minutes' play in thu
second half had gone by, referee
Guineas deciding the field was unlit
for play. Why Outness refereed last
Sunday's game is a mystery. Thor-
burn was the ollicial appointed and
we believe wo are right in stating
that a change of referees could not
lie made without consulting the captains of Ihe teanis concerned. The
Cumberland management lias entered a protest against Guinesa refer-
eeing the game Sunday. The man b
Incompetent and Uie sooner he quits
football the better football will be.
What the outcome of Cumberland's
objection will lie, we cannot say at the
present, but here's hoping Guiness
does not handle the whistle. The
team chosen to represent Cumberland was Ulalr. .Mortimer. Stewart.
Monalian, Conti and Brake, Banner-
man. Heyland, Fowler, i'luiup and
Hitchens.
Tournaments at
Athletic Club
Are Completed
Lyche 11-9.
During the evening the executive ]
cuuiuiiliee of the last 0l)en touma-1
ment met. when it was decided to have
a social evening and make the presentation of the various trophies. We
understand that the Comox Club have
the honor of holding the social ami
it is expected that the affair will
take place as soon after Easter as
possible.
Basketball
Last week saw the completion ot
the tournaments in English billiards,
snooker and crlbbage, which are carried out every winter by the executive of the Cumberland Literary and
Athletic Association.     The total num
Basketball in Cumberland Is over I l)er of in,™s l*'l,m' l" "'"' l>*""lre(I
for this season at least. This wa, i and thirty-two. at 1 : :.•„:■ en-
delinitely  settled   last   Monday  even-
Trophy Won
By The Owls
CONRAD NAGEL HAS
ANOTHFR    RIfl   ROLE!*1 iMrA ls unnecessary, and all that j been awarded by the Hoard of .Man
/V11V/111IjlV   •**-*,lv**1   UWL*1! remains now is to present the Liter-. agement   to   the   following:   Engllsl
Ing when Hilly Whyte's star aggregation of sharp-shooters, the Owls,
defeated the Rangers in the second
game of the play-off by the close score
of 23 to 21. The lirst game was also
won by the night birds, consequent!)
tered whole-heartedly into tlie sport,
consequently producing many keenly
contested matches which were greatly appreciated by the numerous spectators.
Tlie   prizes,   which   wero   excellent
ones and well worth tr.ving for, have
Shure Its Pat himself, and he's all
dressed up for the Firemen's Masquerade Ball In the Ilo-llo Dance
Hall on
—TUESDAY, MARCH 17-
"A folne Irishman I'd be If I didn't
celebrate St. Patrick's Day," says Pat,
"and what would my bright-eyed colleen say If I wasn't after taking her
to the Ball?"
LOCAL COUPLE ARE
MARRIED AT NANAIMO
A quiet wedding took place last
Satuday afternoon, February 21st, at
Wallace Street Methodist Parsonuge,
Nanaimo, when Miss Llllias Glen,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Glen, at one
time of this city, but now of Vancouver, became the bride of Mr,
Thomas Henry Hudson of Union Bay.
Miss Nora Glen, sister of the bride
and Miss Elsie Young of Nanaimo
were ln attendance at the ceremony,
Mr. and Mrs. Hudson will make their
home at Union Bay.
Miss Anne Robertson of Shawnlgan
Lake, Is visiting Mrs, A. F. Brown-
soy for the next two weeks.
Conrad Nagel, Metro-Goldwyn-May-1 That was followed by "Three
er player, who has depicted almost: Weeks" ln which as Paul he portrayed
every known type role on the screen | the most coveted lover role uf all
from saint to sordid sinner, plays an ! times.
intensely Interesting part in "Mar-1 Then came "Tess of tlie D'Urber-
ried Flirts," the picturization of "Mrs.: villes" which too. offered a role un-
Paramour," the Louis Joseph Vance ! like any other he has ever been east
novel, which comes to the Ilo-llo The- j in and yet one to which he was ldeal-
atre this Friday and Saturday. I ly suited.
Nagel Is such a natural type person I In "Sinners in Silk," a Merto-Gold-
off screen that he has had to prove ] wyn picture offering, he had a light
again and again his tremendous act-1 part—almost bordering on comedy,
Ing ingenuity by enacting roles de- j and in "Married Flirts" he is given
cidedly foreign to his real nature. an opportunity to create a role unlike
In "What Every Woman Knows" he any ever before depicted on tho
was cast as a brilliant,   but   grulf  screen.
Scotchman, who took himself very > Besides Nagel the cast or "Mar-
seriously. That was a droll humor- rled Flirts" boasts of Pauline Fred-
ous part which he did delightfully. ' erlck, Huntly Gordon. Mae Buscn.
In "Fool's Paradise," as a blind Alice Hollister, Paul Nicholson and
man, he had the heaviest and most   Patterson Dial.
sympathetic role of his screen career. It was directed by Robert tl. Vlg-
In "Nice People" he was cast as a nola, the first of a series lie Is to make
semi-heavy, the first of that type, for Mctro-Goldwyn-.Mayer. and was
which established him ill a new field, adapted to the screen by Julia Craw-
Then In "Name the Man" he had a t ford lvers. Phil Cnrle was assistant
deep dramatic role-heavy and re-1 director and Oliver Marsh was chief
lentless. I cameraman.
present the Liter-, agement to tne roiiowmg: ungiish
ary and Athletic Cup to the winning Billiards. (Men Williams, first; John
team, along with the medals donated Walton, second; Snooker, Glen Wll-
by Ihe Basketball Association, and Hams, first; II. T. Brown, second;
then all players may put their logs Crlbbage, Charles Tobacco, first; Wm.
away until next season with the hope , Brown, second.
that it will  be as successful as the j 	
one just concluded. ltev. and Mrs. E, II. Nunns are pay-
Monday's game was different from I ing a visit to the ltev. Arthur Nunns
any that the Owls and Rangers have , of St. Mary's ('hureh, Victoria,
hitherto  produced,  Insomuch  that 'I ]
was too rough for one thing and for     ~,      . tit
another, the brand ot basketball dls-I Grtf/lfl/7?-.Lac/*-,C7/a
played was poor indeed.     Tlle referee
is partly to blame for this for he had
practically no control ovcr thc players
but the greater blame Is attached to ;
the spectators.     No two teanis In the
world   can   think   clearly   and   play I
cleanly  when there   is   a   crowd   of
partly cheering,  partly booing spec- 1
United In Marriage
A wedding of mucli local interest
is solemnized at the Swedish Lu-
therlan Church, Vancouver, last Saturday. February 21st when Alice Ell-
, zabeth. daughter of .Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
tators, shouting at them at the top of UMa Q, N(,w Weatm|n8t0ri U,C,
their voices, and until the latter learn
Rev. Vance Visits Church
St. Patrick's Tea
Rev. Vance, principal of the Anglican Theological College at Vancouver
presided at the evening services at
Holy Trinity Church last Sunda., and
was much appreciated by those in attendance. It is proposed In the near
future to erect a new college at Point
Grey, Vancouver.
to  control   themselves   the  brand  of
play will suffer In consequence. Their
excitement was genuine though, and
can be easily explained, for witli less
. than ten minutes to go tho Rangers
I were leading by several points anil It
| was almost a foregone conclusion that
I they had the game successfully tucked away.     The Owls hadn't arrived
{at this conclusion however, and witli
! one of the  finest whirlwind  finishes
became the bride of .Mr. Roland Graham of this city Rev, Ecklund officiating.
Tin' bride looked most charming
In a gown of tan georgette with hat
en suite, and carried a bouquet of
roses and carnations. Bhe was attended by Mlesefl lua Nelson. Mabel
Jaeoiison and fjunborg Israelson of
New Westminster, while the groom
waa supported liy Mr. Hawthorne, J.
Graham of this city.
After the wedding a reception was
The   Ladles'   Aid   of   St.   Georges
Prebyterian Church  wlll hold a "St., •■">< »'e have ever seen they managed
Patrick's Tea" at Ihe home of Mrs.;'0 I'ut '•*•» scorc at 21 with but two heW at thfl ,,„„.,,.,., ,,„,,,, „.,„,„ mme
D. R. MacDonald on Tuesday. March ! ■■■•■■u*<;s l0 »>• TI,ore » r«"»»*>» ■>»- j twentv-flve guests were Present. Mr.
17. from 3 to 6 p.m. : l" *** fcw sccomls  ]""""'    lhe    """' f and  Mrs.  Oraham   returned  to Cum-
A home-cooking sale will be held | whittle when "Peanut" Robertson put   |)0r|n|l(1   o|)   Su|]l|]n.   ,m(1   „,„   make
March 28, from 3 to r, p.m.
their  future home  here,  residing for
lhe  present  at  the  Union   Hotel.
TIDE TABLE, FEBRUARY 27—MARCH 6 INCLUSIVE
The time used
is Pacific Standard, for the 120
Meridian West. It
Is counted from 0
to 24 hours, from
midnight to midnight.
the    flnnl ,
whistle when "Peanut" Robertson put ,
in'the "church "basement on Saturday, j <■"■ same on Ice with a pretty, though
rather lucky shot.
Here aro the line-ups and the i
points scored by each player: Owls, Girls met In a closely-contested exhl-
H. Robertson s; Farmer; Don Wat-1 bltion game which was won by tho
son 2; Pinfold; Sommerville 12; Fos- j former team by tli.' score of .tl points
ter 1; Stewart und Stevenson. Total to 3. Heck Stewart handled the
2*i- ' whistle In both events and though he
Rangers; Aitken 7; Walker 3; Hun- j claims  to  have called everything as
den 3; Robertson 8; Dallos. Boyd and , he saw it, it was quite evident to the
1-8   Weir. Total 21. spectators    that    he    wasn't    seeing
i    Earlier lu  the evening    the    High ; much, especially It It tended to hene-
i School  Girls   and   the   Public  School ' lit the Hangers.
Date Time
H't.
Time
H't
Time
H't.
Time
H't,
27....I    2:19
6-2
8:37
12-9
15:22
4-3
21:34
10-7
28....I    3:03
6-4
9:11
12-4
16:00
4-1
22:11
10-6
1....I    3:52
7-0
9:47
11-9
16:69
4-0
2....I    0:01
10-6
4:51
8-7
10:27
11-1
17:54
:|.'.i
3....J    1:22
10-8
6:16
9-4
11:17
10-9
18:51
:i-s
4....I    2:44
11-3
7:54
9-6
12:10
10-6
19:47
3-6
5....I    3:39
11-71
9:14
9-4
13:18
10-4
20:38
3-!l
6....!   4:16
12-1
10:04
9-0
14:16
10-1
21:20
3-1 PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
a   News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, U.C.
NEW FOREST RANGER
COURTENAY, Feb. 19.—Mr. L. B.
Webster has taken over the duties
of Mr. Benson, the former forest ranger of this district. Mr. Benson has
left for Lund, B.C., which was formerly under the care of Mr. Webster.
ART CLASSES HELD
IN PUBLIC SCHOOL
COURTENAY, Feb. 21.—The art
classes that were formerly held ln the
Booth Hall by Mr. Gamlin are now being conducted at the Courtenay Public school. The cost of paper and
Incidental expenses are being borne
by the Knights of Pythias.
m
Tfif-**-  --.       .,.; t* —- -,    .    ■-   -*.-_-    ,-*.~r    I
'.  ■ v~~-^----.~'> it- -I -     "--.*-::-  -M
"  ■' '«!il-»-;!g*jt!«iiJ,l-*k- -
FINEST PRODUCTS OF THE BEST LUMBER
MILLS  ARE  ASSEMBLED  IN  OUR YARDS.
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
COURTENAY 'Plume 17
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
Tht White Store Tht WhIU Bakerr
Eat McBryde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that driv.B
th. poison from the system.     He that is hailed as tht greattit
writer on hsalth says, "Patent foods should be shunned Ilk. th.
d.vll and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Braad."
fkit Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for breaa Mriag
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
25
USED CARS
At Guaranteed Prices
«-!>*•**•***
STANDARDIZED PRICES
On Cars, Parts and
Labor
*******
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Phone 46 Courtenay, B.C.
SCOUTS HOLD PARTY Messrs Bradley and T. H.  Meredith.
j Several plays were discussed and
I parts of them read over. Some difti-
i culty was experienced in selecting a
I suitable play but It was decided to get
; copies of the very amusing comedy
I "It pa..s to advertise". It is the intention of tlie association to present
this screamingly funny comedy short-
! Iy after Easter.
I Others present last night were: Mr.
and Mrs. T. H. Meredith, Mr. and Mrs.
' T. Pearse. Mrs. Bradley, Miss Ryan
and Mr. Martinlch.
COURTENAY,—There were some
fifty boys present at a B. P. Scout
party held tn the school on Friday
night. Cross word puzzles and other
games were the order of the evening.
George Edwards was the star cross
word artist.
GREAT BUILDING
ACTIVITY NOTICED
IN COURTENAY
COURTENAY, Feb. 21.—A good
deal of building activity ls at present going on along the water front.
Tlie Edwards Lumber Co. Ltd., has a
gang of men employed on its property at this part of the city. The
work being undertaken is the construction of the company's new whan*
tlie erection of a two-storey lumber
shed, 20x115 feet, warehouse 80x40,
and ofiice 20x24. Mr. Wallace McPhee has just become a partner ln the
firm and will take an active part in
the business. He is a native of
Courtenay and a son of Mr. Joseph
McPhee, one of the best known pioneer residents of the valley. Since
Ills three years service overseas Mr.
Wallace McPhee has engaged in farm
ing In the Merville district and later
entered the mercantile business in
South Vancouver. Th egrowth of
the Edwards Lumber Co. has been
steadily maintained. It is only eighteen months ago that tlie firm which
was started under the name of Edwards and Orr, came into existence.
At that time a commencement was
made with a small hand wood working shop and a small capital. They
were practical men however and goojl
results were obtained. The entrance
of Mr. McPhee to the business will
do much to put the lumber company
on a still stronger basis. Since coming to Courtenay some three years ago
Mr. Geo. W. Edwards has done much
towards building up the business of
the company. He has taken an active Interest in many local enterprises
and can be counted as one of Court-
enay'B most progressive business
men.
THEATRICAL SOCIETY
WILL BE KNOWN AS
COURTENAY PLAYERS
NEW CHEVROLET
BREAKS RECORDS
Chevrolet Motor Company broke all
January records in 1925, delivering
and taking orders for iOfc more cars
in January of this year, than in January 1924,_or January 1923. The first
months In the two years showing the
highest production and sales years In
tlie history of the automobile industry.
At the Chicago show, 1,107 Chevro-
lets were sold—establishing a record
never before equalled by any car exhibition at Chicago, The new Chevrolet line was shown for the first time
at tile New York show and here five
times as many orders were taken as
at any previous New York show.
Similar high sales records were
made at shows in Detroit. Philadelphia, Cleveland and other centres of
population. In many cases, before
dealers could secure models, purchases were made from specifications
and photographs only.
The new models are now On display
at Courtenay, and Messrs Blunt &
Ewart have already received very
satisfactory advance orders for new
cars.
WANTS DIRECT ROAD
TO CROSS ISLAND
commended to the Chamber.
Mr. White pointed out that if this
road of 43 miles about 20 miles were
already constructed. Of the remainder the greater part was through
territory that was open and lent Itself to easy construction. There was
only a short distance of about six
miles along Comox Lake that would
be difficult of construction.
$200 IS REALIZED FROM
JUMBLE AUCTION SALE
COURTENAY, Feb. 26.—About sixteen residents of the district who are
Interested in amateur theatricals, met
at the home of Captain and Mrs. F. G.
Liddle last night and formed themselves into an association that will lie
known as the Courtenay Players. The
preliminary business, which resulted
in the election of Mr. Win. Booth president, and Mr. Felix Thomas See-
Treas.
It ls probable that Mrs, Liddle will
he responsible for the first production
| to be put on by tlie newly formed
; Courtenay Players, and that the other
| positions will be as follows: Stage
| Manager, Mr. Bradley, Scenic .Manager, Mr. G. W. Stubhs; Advertising
Committee, Messrs Bradley, Starks
and   Booth;   Property   and   Lighting,
VICTORIA.—The necessity ol* the
Provincial Government completing
tlie road to connect Alberni with tbe
east coast at Cumberland was explained to the Tourist Trade Group
of the Chamber of Commerce by Mr.
E. M. Whyte, president of the Alberni
Board of Trade. He pointed out that
the completion of this road would
give not only direct connection for
tourist travel but would cut off a long
trip for commercial men. In addition to tliis the road would come within easy reach of Strathcona Park
which could thus he made a grent attraction for visitors.
The group will consider this matter
at  its   meeting   with  a  view   to  de-
jciding upon what action should be re-
COURTENAY. Feb. 26.—The Jumble Auction Sale in aid of the Comox
Agricultural and Industrial Association, held in the Agricultural Hall
yeslerduy was a marked success. For
some days prior to the Bale the Directors had been soliciting donations
of articles to be sold at this auction.
Tlie response to the solicitations was
good particularly in thc City of Courtenay ami some very good articles were
donated by the merchants and some of
the farmers. All services were given
gratis On this occasion and the very
useful sum of $200 hus been placed lo
the credit of the Association as a result of this effort.
Mr. B. Felix Thomas, who Is secretary of the Association, conducted the
Bales; Mr. M. B. Tribe, the Aassocla-
tion's treasurer, acted as cashier aud
Mrs. Felix Thomas kindly gave her
services as clerk. During the afternoon, tea was served by Mrs. Walter
Brown, Mrs. Walter McPhee and Mrs.
D. Bell for the ladles auxiliary of the
Association.
The following are the names of
those who contributed to the Jumble
Auction: Mrs. J. McQulllam. W. J.
Andrews, Booth & Sons, Busy Bee,
J, Crockett, P. Whelau, C, Yockney.
Sun Drug Co., Malpass & Wilson, W.
Beard, H. Cooke, W. Marshall. Blunt
& Ewart, Bell-Irving Motor Co., Cor-
field's, C. W. Worthlngton, Piket Electric, E. T. Ellison, G. R. Mutrie, G.
Pidcock, Red Front Variety Store,
Prltchnrds Bros., Builder's Supply,
Edwards Lumber Co., Graham & Mon-
crleff, Miss Dency Smith, Laver's
Store, A. W. Stark, C. W. Slllencc. R.
E. Ault, J. N. McLeod. F. R. Blscoc.
W.. A. W. Paul, R. U. Hurford, Mrs.
Phelps, Comox Creamery, H. V. Collins, Comox Co-operative Society.
Venables Bakery, G. Weaver, Farmer's Produce, A. G. Slaughter, McBryde's Bakery, C. Butchers, Mrs.
Cowan, D, Isenor. Mrs. Shepherd.
Brackman & Ker. Mr. Gurney Sr., F.
Childs, Messrs Flinton & Allberry.
H. Marrlson, W. R. Perry, Mrs. L.
Cliffe, H. Scales. A. Knight. E. Whel-
an, T. Knight, II. Brnmley, W. J. Gunn
W. J. C. Hannah. Butler Bros. Mr.
Surgenor, C. W. Leedham. G. Thomas,
W. A. Urquhart. T. Pearse, Vancouver
Milling Co.. W. S. Hunter, Mrs. A M.
Smith. Tarhcll's Ltd., Brown's Furniture Store, W. Stalker and others.
The value of Canada's exports to
Australia has now reached $20,000,-
000 annually, trade wilh that country
having increased rapidly In recent
years; and continues to expand stead-
Ily.
ESSEX-6-COACH
$1595.00
F.O.B. COURTENAY
mm i   ■ ■
tZ'T'-i
Wmf,
You would like the greatest
value for your money??
Then invest in a Hudson, Essex, Star or
Durant.   100% Car value for your $1.00
Bell-Irving Motors, Ltd.
Courtenay, B. C.
Phone 182
Some Good Values in Second Hu nd Cars That it Will Pay You to Look Over.
LUMBERING ON
ISLAND CONTINUES
ACTIVE INDUSTRY
Lumbering activities on the island
are reported to be good, although
with most of the mills having resumed
operations during the last few weeks,
there Is little to announce relative to
the return ot dormant industries to
production.
A new mill ls shortly to open at
Brechin, near Nanaimo, which will restore prosperity to a district which
has been quiet since mining operations were suspended in the neighborhood.
From Cowlchan Lake it ls reported
that the logging companies are shipping to Crofton, the same lumber uf
tralps being engaged as has been the
case for several days.
Logging is reported to be resuming
on Hornby Island, tbe firm ot McGee,
Robinson nnd Embleton having plans
for extensive work at Phlpps Point.
At Courtenay the Edwards Lumber
Company is building a wharf, lumber
shed and olllce. The chief proprietor. George W. Edwards, left Victoria
some thee years ago to go into the
woodworking business there, and has
since much Improved his connection.
Inquiries for limits are chiefly centred now on the Alberni area and Nanaimo River. Cruising parties are In
the field for the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway lands department, and
Inquiries for timber are quite active
from outside points.
NIGHTWATCHMAN INJURED
COURTENAY, Feb. 26.—Mr. Wm.
Hyde, night watchman at the Owllt
Lumber Mill met with a nasty accident last evening. Getting his arm
cnught in one of the belts, hi was
dragged over the pulley, receiving a
broken arm and other serious Injuries. He was conveyed to the Cumberland hospital where he Is progressing as favorably as can be expected.
Cumberland Volunteer Fire**
mens' Masquerade Ball St. Patrick's Day, March 17th, Ilo-llo
Ball Room.
GOVERN MEM LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Boer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 27th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license ln
respect of premises being part of the
building known as Merville Cash
Grocery, situate on the West aide of
the Island Highway, at Merville,
Comox District, County of Nanaimo,
Province ot British Columbia, upon
the lands described as subdivision of
Lots 27 and 42, being part of Block 19,
Map No. 2270, Viotorla Land Registration District, in the Province of
British Columbia, for the Bale of Beer
by the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated this 26th day of February,
1925.
R. H. SHAW,
9-12. Applicant.
NOTICE
"The   Narlgnblo   Water's   PretMtlM
Act" R.S.C. Chapter lit
The Royston Lumber Company Limited hereuy gives Notice that It haa
under Section 7 of the said Act deposited with the Minister of Publlc
Works ot Ottawa and ln the Offlce of
the Registrar of Titles at the City of
Victoria, in the Province of British
Columbia, a description of the site and
plans of Its proposed wharf, booming-
grounds, piles and works appurtenant thereto to be constructed on the
site known as Lot 161, Nanaimo District and which site is situate ln front
of the Marine Drive which Ilea between *.,i,'h tide mark and the North
Easterly boundary of Blocks "C", "D",
and "E" of Section 4 In Nanaimo District Province of British Columbia,
Plan 1478.
AND TAKE NOTICE that after the
expiration of one month from the date
of the first publication of this Notice
the Royston Lumber Company Limited will under Section 7 ot the said
Act apply to the Minister of Public
Works at his ofllce at the City of Ottawa for npproval ot the Bald site
and plans and for leave to construct
the said Wharf and to drive, place
and erect the said piles and works appurtenant thereto.
DATED nt Cumberland,  B.C., this
26th day of February, A.D., 1925.
THE ROYSTON LUMBER CO. LTD.
Per G. K. Uchlyama,
9-12 Managing Director. -/"I
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
THE   GUMMRLANB   ISLANMIt,   CUMWMILAND, B. C.
THE JUDGE:" '■ Who'll Collect the Reward. -• b Mti
 * — 1 / :—  s  I i— . — 1 | : ___r=rrr==:
PAGE THREE
HE TUCK AtV LEF'V
OE CHICKEN COOP DO'
OPEM AM' OE Cl
CHICKENS AllTWSAWW
well i wouldn't worry
about that. you knov*. how
'chickens we "vwey all come back
^ HOME/ST   rnqHT
I
IJ
COME SACK. HON.E, HUhT^
Dey'lu QO sack home.     [   I
EF DEY HASh'TALREOOY WEHT
fit
Frelone's   Grocery  Store
CORNER 5th ST. AND DUNSMUIR AVE.
CUMBERLAND
When in Need of High-class Groceries,
Give us a Trial
^UR PRICES ARE RIGHT
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new. *
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
m
Simple Test For Acid Soil
For a number of years British Columbia farmers have been submitting
samples of soil to the Provincial Department of Agriculture for chemical
analysis. The object of this analysis has chiefly been to ascertain the
actual amount of plant food constituents contained ln the soil represented by the sample analyzed.- This
analytical work, which requires elaborate equipment end careful technique, as well as considerable time to
secure accurate results, has been carried on, free of charge, by the Analyst
of the Provincial Department of Mines
On completion of the analysis a report has been issued to the Soil and
Crop Branch of the Provincial Department of Agriculture giving the
amount of the various minerals and
"The Most of the Beit for the Least"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
and Grocers
—w■^^•t ■■■■■■  II ■■■■■■
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
T. Malpass
GENERAL  RAILING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part o£ City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at offlce
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
OR PHONE IS UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
lime present in the sample submitted.
On receipt of this report the Soil and
Crop Branch have ln turn written the
farmer advising him to the best of
their ability the kind of fertilizer and
cropping methods to adopt on the
land under consideration. For several reasons, however, this system of
receiving samples direct from farmers
themselves and then reporting on
same when analysis has been completed has not been altogether satisfactory. There are four main reasons for this: (l)The farmer has not
had a clear Idea of the reason for
submitting his soil for analysis. Many
farmers have the Idea that a soil analysis can be made ln a few minutes
and that It will solve all their soil
problems. This, however, Is not the
case. (2) The samples are often
secured at random by Inexperienced
persons who neglect to furnish any
data that is very essential if conclusions of value are to be reached. (31
Chemical analysis shows only the percentage of plant food present without giving an accurate estimate of the
amount available to the crop owing to
the numerous factors involved in
plant nutrition.  (4)  There are many
When you are ln need of a
Plumbing * Heath* Eiftawr, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 111
Courtenay
Phone 117
Cumberland
Your  need*   will  receive  immediate
attention.
Marcel Waver
Nine Reasons Why You Should Buy This Waver
1. Assures a beautiful  Marcel   Wave   in  five   (5)
minutes!
2. It will not burn or singe your hair.
3. It will save its cost many times in the first month.
4. A wave when you want it—No waiting for the hair
dresser.
5. After the swim, put a quick wave in.
6. Costs practically nothing to operate—Fits in any
socket.
7. A quicker and better wave than is possible with
any other appliance.
8. Your appearance depends   on   your   hair  dress.
Here is quick beauty.
9. Absolutely guaranteed.
PRICE $3.50
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLANDMONE IM
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
op Relief Valves, $7 each
SEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
Red Toi
TO KEI
This is a 1/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Above all—pure
Silver Spring
Best by Test
PURITY—STRENGTH
—WHOLESOMENESS—
GUARANTEED BY
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
ASK   YOUR   LOCAL  VENDOR   AND   DEMAND
English Ale, and Stout
Lager Beer
This advertisement is not published or displayed by  thu
Liquor Control Board or by th* Government of B.C.
other factors other than chemical
composition that largely Influence the
productivity of any soil. It is difficult, therefore, under such circumstances to impart information to the
farmer which will be helpful In deciding the best cropping' or fertilizer
method to practise.
In view of these facts the Soil and
Crop Branch ot the Department of
Agriculture feel that it is lu the interests of the farmers and the public service to curtail unwarranted analysis of soil. In making this decision it Is desired to point out tliat
this is identical with the decision
whch has been reached at some ot
the larger soil testing stations on the
continent where farmers have soils
which are unproductive due apparently to a deficiency of some plant
food material it would he decidedly
to their advantage to establish some
plots in their farms and try out sev*
eral types of fertilizer, for it Is only
in this way they can expect to obtain
accurate information. In this connection it is desired to point out that
the Soil and Crop Branch of the Department of Agriculture, Victoria, or
the nearest Agricultural Representative will be glad to outline proper
methods for conducting such tests.
If, on the other hand. It would appear
that lime was delicient In the soil
a simple test for any farmer to conduct himself is as follows: Take up
a little soil from half a dozen places
on the area to be tested for acidity
and mix well together with spade or
trowel. Put a few ounces of the
mixed soil into a clean cup and adil
enough boiled water to make a very
thick paste. Using a small stick or
the back of a knife press a piece of
blue litmus paper one half its length
into thc mud in the cup. After 1*3
minutes caerfutly withdraw the litmus paper and examine it to see if
the part In contact with the mud has
turned red. If It has become red the
soil Is acid and lime should be applied
to the land.
When handling the litmus paper or
the soil to be tested do not touch with
bare bands but use wood or metal
instruments because the sensitive paper may be reddened by coming lu
contact with the flgers. Keep blue
litmus "book" in olean bottle. Al-1
ways use boiled water for moistening
soil. I
SEALS START NORTHERN
MOVE EARLY THIS YEAR
SEWARD—Fur seals, which Winter along Southern California and
Summer In the Pribyloff Islands In
the Bering Sea, are moving North ln
full force and two months earlier than
Is usual.
News of the movement of the seals
was obtained here from the gasoline
boat Marchovie, en route from Seattle to False Pass, between the A1-.
aska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. The Marshovle observed the
seals In thousands off Icy Straits,
600 miles southeast of here.
Connaught Cup
Entries To Be In
By End Of March
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
cimittAXB, ac.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
VANCOUVER, Feb. 24.—The Lower
Mainland Football Association must
complete the .Mainland cup series not
later than April 4. An application
to have the time extended was turned
down by the council of the British
Columbia Football Association Saturday.
Entries for the Connaught Cup must
be filed with Secretary J. L. Armstrong not later than March 31. It
may lie decided to stage the B.C. section of tlie series earlier this year.
The provincial council is of the
opinion tiie Upper Island League has
shown discrimination between two
clubs, Northfleld and Davenports.
The former was dismissed from the
competition for falling to fulfill fixtures, while the latter was allowed to
remain in the league after a similar
offence.
North Wards of Victoria will be informed that ""'>' musl m" hold UD
players' transfers unnecessarily. The
secretary's action in transferring
Player Bell from North Wards to Veterans was endorsed.
The next meeting of the council
will he In Victoria, .March 21.
(oust Soccer l.c-.igiie To Meet on
Saturday
From information leaking out from
the meeting held Saturday night, it
develops that 'he proposed Pacific
Coast Football League is no "myth."
All of the Interested clubs were represented at the meeting. Ladysmith
was voted out when Alexander Mlchie
could not see eye to eye with the
other delegates in the matter of expenses and gate divisions. This leaves
Westminster United. St. Andrews,
North Shore United, Nnnalmo City,
Cumberland and probably another
team from Nanaimo as the league personnel. It i*> expected that at the
meeting next Saturday organization
plans will he completed.
PORK
Freah and Cured Flah
HOTELS AND CAMP8
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
THK  B.C. MINING (itZETTK"
Through   our   connection   with
the publishers of this up-to-date
mining  Journal,   we  ran   offer,
to  a   limited   number only,
THREE .MONTHS' FKEE
SI'IMHII'TION
without obligation on your part.
Call or write
GRANT MAHOOD & CO., Ltd.,
Members Vnncouvcr Stock
Exchange.
^^ Rogers  BIdg..
^^k Vancouver, B.C.
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   -  -    Proprietor
Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite   Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT ETAN8
Practical Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Slngtlng,
Massaging,    Scalp     Treatment
=23 PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
The Cumberland Islander!
THE MODERN PACE
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
CUMBERL.' ND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27. 1924.
We wonder why the world is so unsettled;
why our youth don't seem to understand us or we
them; why we cannot get laws to cope with crime,
and all that sort of thing.
Stop and think what changes have taken
place in the past twenty years, and then ask yourself the question, "what have we done about
them 1"    Let us see.
We have taken away the horse and buggy
and put on   the   road  speed-breeding  machines
that strike when no wrath provokes.     We call
nniu'T nmr'T A this progress.     It is, but it often leaves in its
uuiN i muri ;path the tracks of sorrow by killing somebody
Young man, get away from the crowd tor a; besic*es the fool driver. The liberty of speed is
while, and think. Stand on one side and let tho too often translated into untrammeled license,
world run by, while you g *t acquainted with your- j We have invented talking machines and rad-
self and see what kind ot a fellow you are. Ask j *og an(* sit pass*vely in our overstuffed cushions
yourself hard questions about yourself. Find out h*stening to the artists broadcasting culture from
whether you are drifting aimlessly along with the L waxed p*ate or through the static atmosphere.
stream or striving for i definite object. Ioj \Vhy iearn t0 play music ourselves? It is
surge along with the crov d requires no effort and g0 much easiel. to remain undeveloped and get our
will bring you no reward. Ask yourself il you i ullllure by dropping a nickel in the slot. The re-
are making progress, so that each tomorrow finds sujt is a conglomeration of jazz performances
you farther than today. i ami a jazzv-minded, dizzy minded nation of peo-
This applies not only lo material things, bul | ple     jazz is a)j we know because jazz is all we
to the shaping (if your whole character, to your heari
moral, ethical and intellectual side as well, and |    '    We h       taken the ^        but in ma,
they are often found to go hand in hand. instances we have failed to provide any substi-
One sure way of making progress is to start h^ t(j jn wholesome ma)lnel. the loss of
a savings account which is not only saving money i      , lel)owshi   which the flowing bowl implanted
but is also a character builder and is a sine way .    ft   excitement-loving posterity of the half-
ot getting out ol the rut of drifting along, hav-! d   k    multitude8 of a decade ag0.
mg no object in new and getting nowhere. ^ ^ prohibited ^ .g ^^ ^ ^
THE GREATEST GIFT have ')een t°° Prone **° st°P there and have not
gone a step further and provided the right things
And soon will come that annual miracle—the t0 take its place.     Here is the challenge to the
birth of spring. | church, the school and the home, and to the com-
The birds and blossoms will herald this fes- j munity's welfare workers,
tival of Nature, and the scarred old face of the
world will be wreathed in smiles.
For ages the   poets   have   sung   of   sweet
Spring's return, and weary humanity has each
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B.C.
IF IT'S BUTTER
ASK FOR
Comox
Creamery
Butter
Made
Cream.
From     Pure    Jersey
IF IT'S JAM
INSIST ON
Comox Brand
Jam
Made from fresh fruit in the
Valley. Pure cane sugar only
used in its manufacture.
 ,.—n
IF IT'S FLOUR—SEE THAT YOU GET
COMOX    WHOLE    WHEAT    FLOUR
We have mobilized the soap boxes to stand
j upon and tell what we think is wrong with the
j government, when all we want is a little more
,,, .,     , A domestic happiness, easily     procured  by   more
year take, on pew hope.     Philanthropists and Lharit   to our wi       chiWren  relatives and hu-
benevolent citizens those who love their fellow-    anit^ and some   1Ug to cure om. in(ligestion.
men, have sought to make cilies and towns more ,„' ,        , , ,•    .   . .       .      .
beautiful by the gift of stately buildings and the, We have taken away classical learning from
laving out of parks, but how pitifully small are j "W °* °ur «*°oUi; substituted tor the funda-
al'l of man's efforts compared with the Creator's m«ital "three Rs a host of strange doctrines
lavish beneficence when he garlands the land with !^lch sc?rcel*i.tw:i^4ra^ a?^. ?P0^.?!^
spring,
Men place their gifts on the broad highways |asPec**s
then wonder why crime, in its moral and economic
costs more than education itself.
Everything is specialized. We hire the
other fellow to do our working, our playing ami
our thinking.     Our children seldom shine their
own shoes, and for the modern girl to "do utf'j^^^S^l^k™
her own hair is getting to be a lost art.
Modernism and progress are a golden heritage
where others may see and applaud them. Got
spreads His blossoms to the uttermost parts of
the earth. A little blue (lower peeps from the
crevasse on the unsealed mountain and, the beautiful pond lily is born to blush unseen in an undiscovered lake.     Clinging to the side of a ditch
that may carry filth from a slaughter house, a:but we must watch it—keep abreast of it, and of
daisy nods in the breeze, and between the rails of ever-changing conditions—or they will get away
a railroad track, unmindful of the roaring mass from us and get away with us.
that thtmde s over it, a sunflower smiles up at' 	
the sky. In the silent places of the earth there, Some business men travel around so much
is the most beautiful verdure and garlands of, that when they do eat at home they look for a
roses.     For ages upon ages this lavish gift of: menu.
Nature has been given to humanity.     Man may '; 	
build submarines in which to dive beneath the Rejoice with the farmer if he succeeds in
sea; he may build airplanes in which to reach the making a few shillings this year. He has it
clouds, but he cannot make a seed that will unfold coming.
or a bud that will blossom. 	
Hail, gentle Spring, God's greatest gift to I       Blessed are the righteous for they do not
man. litter up the front pages.
IF IT'S POTATOES
DEMAND
Comox
Creamery
Potatoes
Grown in the District and
graded according to Gov't,
regulation. "Look for the
tag on the bag."
IF IT'S EGGS
OURS ARE
Strictly
Fresh Eggs
Candled  and  graded  ln  accordance with Uie New Egg
Act.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application (or Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
dersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part of the
building known as Willis --Hotel,
situate at Union Bay, adjoining Island
Highway, Nelson District, County of
Nanaimo, Province of British Colum-
bla, upon the lands described as Sec-
lion 32, Victoria Land Registration
District, in the Province of British
Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption ou the premises.
Dated  this  20th day  of February.
1925. I. C. WILLIS,
8-11. Applicant.
Canadian Big Game  For Austrian
QUAKE ATMOSPHERE
FILMED IN JAPAN
lltrv   ore   nun   mime   (ini*   Ipfcfmeni
•( in'' ii nt, i in ihtcp- photographed near
Itnnfi.   Alberta,      ln>et.   a   mountain
goat living nn iiira of tlic (im* j-uii
or rnmtTa trophlci thtie big saim*
animal-**-,  provide.
At Banff railway station re*
** cently a small official gathering bade goodbye to six
worthy members i.l' Nature's Own
Alpine Club. They had never before been passengers although irom
their lofty home in tlu- Canadian
Pacific Rockies they had watched
and heard the trains that day by
day -shuttle smoothly to nnd fro on
the world's greatest  highway.    In
Special scenes of tlie ruins of Tokio
and Yokohama following tho Japanese earthquake were taken hy two
cameramen sent to Japan for tliat pur
I pose, and incorporated as atmosphere
i in Maurice Tourneur's First National
! screen version of "Torment." coining
; to the Ilo-llo Theatre next Monday
and Tuesday.
Actual scenes of the earthquake
! while it was under way. however.
! were reproduced in a motion picture
j studio in Los Angeles for this spec-
j tacular film.
i    The effects that were obtained are
I described  as  most startling.      Some
1 of the most important scenes show a
hand of International crooks trapped
i in the vault of   a   Yokohama   hank
i while   trying   to   Bteal   a   fortune   lit
. gems when llie earthquake came.
j    Some of the players sustained mi-
' nor hurts  from  falling   debris,   hut
none seriously  hurt.      Among  those
j who   went   through   these   strenuous
'scenes were Owen  .Moore, Jean  Iler-
shot,    Bessie  Love,    George  Cooper,
Morgan Wallace nnd Joseph Kllgour.
become    acclimatized    and    would
thrive well in the highlands of his
native country.   Anxious to put his
the
deed so close to the railway trac"k 1 lluuIT to  thc test  he entered  into
did they oft times venture l! the '"'g-'tiationswith the Canadian Gov*
people   in   passing   train- the
unique   pleasure   of   ' eing these
hardy  mountaineers  ascending and
descending the cliffs and crags of
their native haunts.
For they were (he famous "Big
Horns," the wild sheep of Canada'
great mountain  region.    Lodged in
upholstered crates, accommo id in
a roomy Dominion Express car, tbey
were consigned to a large estate high
up in the Alps of Austria where
they will have liberty to roam in a
congenial environment and where, it
is hoped, they may in course of
time multiply and become as abundant us the flocks that feed on the
Alpine meadows near Lake Louise
and that wander upon the sunny
slopes of Yoho Valley.
Count Hohenloe, an Austrian nobleman,  who   had   travelled   in   the
eminent and succeeded in securing
two rams and four ewes for export
to Austria.
In the Canadian Pacific Rockies
where "Hig Horn" sheep are increasing enormously in numbers there
is yet a great plenty of other large
game animals. The territory westward of and convenient to Lake Windermere Camp is noted for Grizzly
Bear. A comparatively short trail
journey northward from Lake
Louise brings one into a regior
where white goats clamber on thi
cliffs and crags. In the open valley!
south of Banff there are many elk
and moose a-browsing, Too, out
there the Spray Lakes sparkle ii
the sunshine, the finest trouting
water in Nor' West Canada. And
whether you hunt with rifle or with
camera the sportsman will find trophies   worth   the   winning   in   this
; if all the husbands you knew were
j lined up—and you knew as much
i about each of them ns you did about
| your own husband- would you choose
j to take your own hack again? See
j what Mrs. Paramour did who nslie hud
her choice In "Married Flirts." show-
1 ing at the Ilo-llo this Friday and Saturday.
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   nml   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
Rockies nnd who had seen the wild t .
3heep of that region, believed that vast nnd  unspoiled land ot sporti.
given opportunity thev would easily I man's lure.
UOVERNMENT LIQUOR AIT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 14th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part of the
building known as the Bevan Hotel,
situate at Bevan, Comox District,
County of N'anaimo and Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Part of Sec. 4, Township 9,
Victoria Land Registry District, in the
Province of British Columbia, for the
sale of Beer by the glass or by the
open bottle for consumption on the
premises.
Dated this 20th day of February,
1925.
ALEXANDER J. McMILLAN,
8-11. Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
ou tlie 1 itli day of March next the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license ln
respect ot premises being part of the
building known as Baynes Sound Hotel, situate on the West side of Island
Highway, Nelson District, Vancouver
Island, County of Nanaimo, Province
of British Columbia, upon the lauds
described as Part of Four Acres of
Lot 12, Victoria Land Registration
District, ln the Province of British
Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated this 13th day of February,
1926.
JOHN R. JOHNSTON.
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board tor a license in
respect of premises Uelng part of the
building known as Eagle Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Avenue, City of
Cumberland, Nelson District, County
ot Nanaimo, and Province of British
Columbia, upon the lands described
as Lot No. 3, Block No. 3, Map No.
522, Victoria Land Registration District. In the Province of British Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated this 13th day of February,
1925.
JOSEPH ASPESI,
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned  intends   to  apply   to  the
respect of premises being part of the   Liquor Control Board for a license In
building known as Campbelltown
Hotel, situate at Townsite of Camp-
iclltowii, near Campbell River, on the
Island Highway, in Sayward District,
County of Nanaimo and Province of
llritish Columbia, upon (he lands described ns Lot No. 2C, of Lot 60 Block
Nn. C, Map No. 1058, Victoria Land
Registry District, in thc Province of
British Columbia, for the sole of Beer
by tlle glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated  this   20th  day  of  February,
1925.
JAMES ENGLISH,
8-11.
Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tbat,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license ln
respect of premises being part of the
building known as King George Hotel,
sltunte at Dunsmuir Avenue, City of
Cumberland, Nelson District, County
of Nanaimo, and Province of British
Columbia, upon the lands described
as Lot No. !), Block No. 7, Map No. 622.
Victoria Land Registration District,
in the Province of llritish Columbia,
(or the sale of Beer by the glass or
by the open bottle for consumption
on the premises.
Dated this 13th day ot February,
1925.
VICTOR BONORA,
7-10 Applicant.
respect of premises being pari of the
building known as Union Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Ave., extended
Westerly, In Nelson District. County
of Nanaimo, and Province ot British
Columbia, upon the lands described
as Part of Lot No. 24, Nelson District,
adjoining City of Cumberland, Victoria Land Registration District, In
tho Province of British Columbia, for
thc sale of Beer by the glass or hy the
open- bottle for consumption on tlic
premises.
Dated this 13th  dny of February,
1925.
ROBERT  YATES,
7-10 Applicant
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day ot March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part ot the
building known as Nelson Hotel,
situate at Island Highway, Union Bay,
in Nelson District, County ot Nanaimo;
and Province ot British Columbia,
upon the lands described as Lots No.
11, 12 13 and 14, Block No. 7, Map No.
438, Victoria Land Registration District, In the Province of British Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated this 13th day ot February,
1926.
JOHN ALEXANDER FRASER,
ALFRED RAPER HORNE,
7-10 Applicants.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect ot premises being part of the
building known as Waverly Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Avenue, ln the
City of Cumberland, Nelson District,
County of Nanaimo, Province of British Columbia, upon the lands described as Lot No. 2, Block No. 3, Map No.
522, Victoria Land Registrator District, in the Province of British Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated this 13th day ot February,
1925.
FRANK DALLOS,
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license In
respect of premises being part ot the
building known as Vendome Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Avenue, in the
City of Cumberland, In Nelson* District, County of Nanaimo, Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Lot No. 3, Block No. 6,
Map No. 522, Victoria Land Registration District, In the Province of
British Columbia, for the sale of Beer
by the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated this 13th day of February,
1925.
VIRGINIO MARENELLI,
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Bwr
License        .,
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice ef Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license In
respect of premises being part of the
building known as The Cumberland
Hotel, situate at Dunsmuir Avenue,
ln Nelson District, County of Nanaimo,
and Province of British Columbia,
upon the lands described as Lots No.
1 and 2, Block No. 6, Map No. 522.
Victoria Land Registration District,
ln the Province of British Columbia,
for thc sale of Beer by the glnss or
hy the open bottle for consumption on
the premises.
Dated this 13th day of February,
1926.
WILLIAM MERRIFIELD.
7-10 Applicant.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 10th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board tor a license in
respect ot premises being part of the
building known as Willows Hotel,
situate at The Island Highway, in
Campbell River, In Sayward District,
County of Nanaimo, Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Lot 09, Victoria Land Registration District, ln the Province of
British Columbia, for the sale of Beer
by the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated this 15th day of February,
1925.
CHARLES THULIN,
7-10 Applicant. i
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
THE   CUMBERLAND   1SLANDBR,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
1
Ladies' Hosiery
Art Silk Hose, in colors, per pair 60*r>
Art Silk Hose, in colors, per pair SO*p
Siik Hosiery, in colors, per pair $1.25
COTTON CREPES
Cotton Crepes, all the best colors, per yd 30-f>
TOWELS AND ROLLER TOWELING
Towles, a good large size, each 50<p & (*$0<p
Roller Toweling, per yard 40»?
MEN'S SOCKS AND HOSE
Men's Work Socks, per pair 25<*
Men's Work Socks, per pair  50*p
Men's Fine Cashmere Hose, per pair 80*r>
A. MacKinnon
MAKING MOVIE
EARTHQUAKE IS
THRILLING AND
RISKY BUSINESS
The walls trembled.
Plaster  dropped  from  the  celling.
The rear wall caved In.
Four tons of rock and earth came
tumbling down the stairway.
The chandelier fell.
A steel girder left its position above
and smashed the desk.
Then the eight cameras grinding on
a scene, with Owen Moore and George
Cooper, from Maurice Tourneur's
"Torment," halted for the earthquake
sequence was over for the minute.
Mr. Tourneur and his assistant,
Scott R. Beall, rushed fdrward to
where Owen Moore lay In the debris.
Though he had purposely stepped uu-
tremor halts their escape and for days
they are held prisoners in a vault adjoining that in which their victims
are slowly starving, separated only
by steel bars.
. The floor of the great stage of the
United Studios in Los Angeles where
"Torment" was made was reinforced
with heavy timbers for tho quake
scene and overlaid with an inch ot
concrete. In all more than ten tons
of material fell on it from a height
of twenty feet or more. Four tons
hit the floor in one crash In the first
and biggest scene of the earthquake
sequence. To get the spectacular effects obtained it was necessary that
more than $6,000 damage be done.
"Whatever they get, they earn It,"
was the remark that one of a group
of studio visitors made later in reference to the so-called "exorbitant"
salaries paid to picture folk.
STRONG CAST WITH
DIX IN NEW FILM
"A MAN MUST LIVE'
,...„,, ,    After seventy-five hours of "shoot-
der the falling plaster so  he  might  ,„g" Tourneur ordere(| 0we„
be struck and nave occasion to fall, | George
&
Candidly, Wouldn't
You Rather Talk?
Probably you are like most people; you prefer a
personal conversation to letter-writing. That is why
we suggest: "Once in awhile between friends—Long
Distance."    Special low rates after 8:30 p.m.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
he was unhurt.
The quake, faithful In all Its details to the horror of the Japanese
catastrophe of last summer, ls the
climax of Tourneur's newest production f°r First National which wlll bs
shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre Monday
and Tuesday next week. It follows a
holdup In the vaults of the Yokohama
Specie Bank In which two American
crooks get away with millions of dollars  worth  of  jewels.      The   earth
A few drops of Shiloh brines quick
relief to throat irritation, hoarseness and coughing. Shiloh ia economical—a favorite remedy for
over fifty years. At all druggists,
SOc, 60c and $1.20.
Cooper, Morgan Wallace,
Jean Hershot and Joseph Kllgour
home for twenty-four hours of sleep
and rest. They had been under a
constant emotional and nerve strain
during the taking of the quake scenes
and at times were in personal danger
from falling girders, masonry and
marble pillars. Many of the big
scenes were staged amid tons of
debris from the demolished bank
vault in which the characters of the
play are entombed.
When the sequence ended the players resembled a quartette of tramps.
Their clothes were torn and dirty;
their faces covered with a week's
growth of beard; their eyes sunken
and staring from the strain they had
undergone.
"And some people think the life of
a movie actor is soft!" exclaimed
Owen Moore.
SHILOK
FOR.
0UGHS
Use Celery King
a gentle laxative"Tea"
that purifies the blood
Mann's 'Bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc.
Taste Teasing Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give us a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
Marriage ls a business and, like any
business, requires attention and
thought to make it successful. Is
your marriage a success? Are you
to blame? See "Married Flirts" .it
the Ilo-llo Theatre this Friday and
Saturday.
Hichard Uix ln his new Paramount
starring picture, "A Man Must Live,"
coming to tlle Ilo-llo Wednesday and
Thursday, is supported by a cast
which far outshines that which ap-.
peared with the new Paramount lum- i there  are
excite the interest of every sportsman
Staking All o„ Horse Sense, by E.
Dalton Tipping, Western Experiences
by Donald Oraham, The Tenderfoot
hy Hoderick O'Neill,, aro a few of the
entertaining stories contained in this
number. Canada's Wild Buffalo by
Maxwell Graham is an article brimful of interesting and valuable information on this subject. In addition
the  regular  stories—That
inary in his first production as a star 1 Tent and Thirty-Five Below by F. V.
"Manhattan." j Williams, Slightly Mistaken by Martin
Jacqueline Logan, who played op- j Hunter, Some Adventures With the
poslte Dix in "Manhattan," again has j Great Horned Owl by Bonnycastle
an Important role. She shares fem-; "ale, and Emporer Geese and Queen-
inlne honors with Edna Murphy In "A i b' Swans hy J. W. Wlnson, which
Man  Must Live,"  adapted  by  James ! ''over a variety of subjects and the
Creelman from the story, "Jungle
Law," by I. A. R. Wylle. Miss Murphy has appeared before in Paramount pictures and was recently seen
In "The White Moth."
George Nash plays a heavy role in
the picture, that of a yellow newspaper editor. Dlx's role in the production Is that of a returned World
War veteran who gets a job as reporter on Nash's paper.
Other big names in the cast are
Charles Beyer, Farnell's (Dix) buddy
of the battlefields of France; Dorothy
Walters, William Aicciardi, Arthur
Housman, Lucius Henderson and
Jane Jennings.
"A Man Must Live." produced by
Paul Sloane, is that director's first
work for the screen and Dlx's second
of Paramount's Famous Forty.
departmental editors, W. C. Motley,
It. P. Lincoln, C. S. Landls and M. U.
Bates have brought their departments up to their usual high standard, helping to make the March number one of the best yet. Published
monthly by W. J. Taylor, Limited,
Woodstock, Ont.
PEACE RIVER RAIL
CONSTRUCTION SOON
FIRE DESTROYS WHARF
OFFICE AT LADYSMITH
For Baby's Bath
More than that of any other
member of the family, baby's
tender, delicate skin needs the
greatest care aud attention. The
soft soothing oils in Baby's Own
Soap make it specially suitable
for babies, and its clinging fragrance reminds oneof tbe roses of
France which help to inspire it,
"Itsbttt for ytu and Baby too"  sr-ss
VANCOUVER.—"A beginning ot
construction ou the Peace River railway will be made this year—this Is
absolutely certain." declared R. H.
Gale on his return here from Ottawa.
"As to the nature of the scheme
that will be adopted, everybody seems
I most hazy ln the matter of hazarding
i a guess, and it is impossible to get
any clue to what is going on behind
] the scenes. Sir Henry Thornton and
Mr. Beatty, presidents of the two
. transcontinental railways, are ex-
LADYSMITH, Feb. 23.—A lire oc-1 peoted to make their joint report to
curred. about 2 a.m. this morning J the Minister of Railways very shorl-
whlch completely destroyed the whan* | iy, n0W| but of what they will re-
offlce of the Canadian Collieries Lim-1 commend nobody seems to have any
Ited, situated at the shipping wharves, j idea.
The orIgin of the fire is unknown, but j "However, the optimistic feature Is
It ls surmised it was caused by an j that the Hon. George Graham ls ab-
over-heated stove or a defective chim- [ solutely definite that if they fall to
ney The loss Is covered by Insur-1 agree on a proposal he wlll assume
ance. I the responsibility for recommending
  | a program to Parliament and of go-
ROD AND| GUN IN CANADA | ing through with it."
The stories In the March issue of
Rod and Gun in Canada are sure to
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike  terrta*.
21   rooms,  electrical^*  heatei.
Excellent aniline—
For reservations Phaae II.
ft. TATM, Manager
Car  For Hire
Four thousand four hundred bales
of hops were produced from 520 acres
on British Columbia hop farms this
year. The greater part of the crop
will go to Great Britain and the balance to Eastern Canada. If available
the market would absorb a much larger quantity of hops than are now
grown in Canada.
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING  AND  PRESSING
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Ladies' & Gent's Tailoring
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR PAGE SIX
THE   GVMMRLANB   I8LAN1HR,   CUMBBRLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
1
5 awm^wa ■.» —*-
FRIDAY   AND   SATURDAY
OF THIS WEEK
Married F
•
'
i j AScbei't G.Vlgnola &*&•
MARRIED
UL FLIRTS
At*%   Z.1J>i*i»« Arlanfa*]      Vi«       Tt*ll»     tf***»*—■
jldtyyn
i
ijpDUTTONJ
Adapted by Julia Crawford Ivers from the fasd-
nating novel, "Mrs. Para-
mor," by Lous Joseph
Vance. With Paulina
Frederick, Conrad Nagel,
Mae Busch and Huntly
Gordon    in    the    cast
With Mae Bush - Conrad Nagel - Huntley Gordon and Pauline Frederick
"A woman who can't hold her husband
doesn't deserve to have one.
WITH THESE WORDS OF HER RIVAL IN HER EARS, MRS. PARA-
MOR CONSENTED TO A DIVORCE, AND LEFT*FOR EUROPE. EVEN
ON BOARD THE SHIP SHE FOUND HERSELF ATTRACTIVE TO
OTHER MEN.  SHE LEARNED THAT
A woman doesn't have to be intelligent
to get a man's love—just unscrupulous
SHE HAD A CHOICE OF OTHER WOMEN'S HUSBANDS THEN SHE
CONSIDERED HER OWN.
■Jj.Ouis IV iVUiv
J Robert G.Vignold
MARRIED
IFLIRTS
ADULTS SOc CHILDREN 25c
 MATINEE SATURDAY 2:30 P.M.—'—
ADULTS 35c* CHILDREN 15?
Was a husband who had to be held worth while holding?
Monday  and Tuesday
2 MARCH 3
J
There's an
EARTHQUAKE
coming! prepare!
YOU'LL SAY SO WHEN YOU SEE
YES, AND IT'S A WONDER	
ADULTS 35c.
v      Maurice Tourneurs
GIANT EPIC OF THRILLS
"TORMEN T
WITH OWEN MOORE AND BESSIE LOVE
THE THRILLER OF YEARS BOUND TO GET
ANYONE MORE EXCITEMENT THAN EVER
THE THRILL-A-MINUTE
MILE-A-MINUTE ACTION DRAMA
Quake Atmosphere
Filmed in Japan
Earthquake revelations to gasp at; chases on land and sea
to thrill at ; romance to wonder over and a climax
that pulls you out of your seat.
-      -      CHILDREN 15c
Wednesday and
Thursday
4 MARCH 5
ADULTS 350 CHILDREN 15c*
AtlOlPH 2UKOI1 ... IE55.C I USKY
BROKE, starving,
desperate — was
jungle law — kill
or be killed—justified?
You see few pictures with the mighty
heart-punch of this
0. Qoramount (picture
Chapter Eight of
Friday & Saturday
(i MARCH 7
SMOULDERING
FIRES
I lo=Ilo Theatre,
Cumberland, B.C. 4
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
[D1AM@MB <** ©13 IF.'
BATTERIES
SPRING  IS HERE
You  are now  conslderlni; putting your car on the road again.
How about your Battery?
Have you ever given this most
important part of your car any
consideration?
You can't drive safely or comfortably with an undersized, underpowered, ordinary Battery
In your car. Sooner or later
It is bound to get you into
trouble.
The Phllo Diamond Grid Battery
Is purposely built for long, vigorous and dependable service.
Its tremendous Burplus power,
excess capacity and shock-proof
strength are margins of safety.
Come ln and let us show you,
or, If more convenient,
PHONE 182
and we will come and show you.
HOW THE PLAYERS
GOT INTO THE MOVIES
Bell-Irving Motors
LIMITED
Telephone 182—Courtenay
Every screen actor or actress of
note has been given his lirst film opportunity by someone else connected
with pictures—be lie producer, director or actor.
Take, for Instance, the cast and director of the Metro-Goldwyn picture, "Married Flirts," the gripping
and Intensely Interesting picturization
ot "Mrs. Paramor," Louis Joseph
dance's novel of marriage and di-
•orce, coming to the Ilo-llo Theatre
Friday and Saturday, Feb. 27 and 28.
Robt. G. Vlgnola, who directed promotion, says he owes his start in
clotures to Sidney Olcott, the famous
lirector.
I'lirt in Un* Slnrm
"I   was   an   actor.'   Vigno'ln   says,
Dr. HUGHES, DC. PhC.
CHIROPRACTOR
Bone, Spine and Nerve
Specialist
Lumbago, Sciatica, Rheumatism and Weak Kidneyu
are sure to give their usual spring troubles and misery, unless you start and
take a course of Chiropractic treatments, a sure, safe
and most permanent cure
known.
ROOM 1
CUMBERLAND HOTEL
"and out of a job. and it really was
a matter of any port in a storm for
me. The port In this case was acting in motion pictures, and, Olcott,
then directing for Kalem, gave me a
chance. He signed me for leading
and heavy roles and put me in the
regular stock company and was responsible for giving me the opportunity to direct."
Pauline Frederick, who plays the
title role, was a stage star and was
made a flat offer by a big producing
organization to star in a series of
pictures.
Conrad Nagel, was playing on the
stage iu New York and was induced
by William Brady, the theatrical producer, to appear on the screen. He
feels that he owes much in the way
of gratitude to Brady and also some
amount of thanks to Charles Maigne,
the director, who made his first long
picture contract  possible.
Iliinlly Guidon Thanks Two
Huntly Gordon gives thanks to
Ethel Barrymore for his first picture
opportunity. Ince made him his first
offer and gave him his first job, while
Ethel Barrymore encouraged him In
making the step from the stage to the
screen. ,
Mae Busch stumbled into pictures
from the vaudeville stage. She
played extra parts, but her l*r8t reai
chance was given her by Erich von
Stroheim, who rescued her from comedy and put her in dramatic roles and
to him she Is deeply grateful.
".Married Flirts" was adpated to
the screen by Julia Crawford Ivers,
and is a Louis B. Mayer presentation,
Announcement!
Laver's Spring
Opening
Saturday, February 28
MILLINERY- COATS-SUITS
AND GENERAL DRYGOODS
LAYERS
COURTENAY
UNIVERSAL OFFERS
EXCEPTIONAL CHANCE
FOR THE RIGHT SPIRIT
Universal pictures is offering to
pay a salary of $1000 (one thousand
dollars) a week for a real ghost to be
used as part of the prologue to the j
New York presentation of "The Phantom of the Opera." If there is auy
spirit medium in America who can
make a real spirit appear on the stage
of the theatre In which "The Phantom
of the Opera" will be shown. Universal will pay him or her that amount
for the feat.
This i.s in no sense a challenge to ,
spiritualists or anything of that kind.
If spirits can be produced, Universal
wants one.      It  is  believed  that no I
moTe effective prologue to the picture
could be secured than the appearance j
of a real ghost.     "The Phantom" in
this enormous spectacle isn't really a
ghost at all, but very much of a man.
who  leads people  to  think  he  is a
ghost in order to work out his .strange
plots.
But are they really any ghosts nr
are they all like "The Phantom of the
Opera?" So many men of science
and learning have seen them that it
is possible a medium will be discovered who can produce one ior the
benefit of tliosu who see Ohaney'a
next big production.
In hopes of securing the names of
good spirit mediums whose services
may be Available Uuniversal will ask
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Sir Oliver
Lodge, Camilla Flammarton and several other scientists who have seen
spirits, asking for the names and addresses of mediums who may be approached with this tempting oTfer.
Dr. Walter F. Prince, president of tho
American Society for Physic Research
has been written to in hopes thnt ho j
will assist in discovering the right
person.
The essential stipulation of the offer is. of course, that the spirit niuHi
not be fraudulently produced, and
Universal demands the right to appoint n committee of experts to judge
of the medium's abilities in advance
in order to protect itself and the puh- ,
lie against dishonest persons claim- \
Ing to he mediums.
"The Phantom of the Opera," which
is Universale biggest picture, surpassing even "The Hunchback of
Notre Dame," is to be presented in a
regular Broadway theatre in the near
future with a full orchestra and an
elaborate presentation. Lon Chanoy
is the star in the role of "The Phantom" and Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry, Arthur Edmund Carewe and many
other notables are in a cast which
totals in all five thousand people.
Rupert Julian directed the picture.
which is from the famous novel by
Gaston Leroux. Carl Laemmle is
confident that it will be the outstanding production of l!t2f>,
All applications from spirit mediums who feel they can co-operate in
presenting a proper prologue should
be addressed to Universal Pictures
Corporation at 730 Fifth Avenue, New
York City.
LIGHT IS RECENT
INVENTION
The world has been variously estimated at from 50,00n to 50.000,000
years old, but It Ih comparatively recently that It enjoyed light other than
the sun. In the cave-man days the*-
used lighted splinters and pine knot.s.
and only as recently as 50 B.C.—the
other day speaking geologically—the
Romans invented the grease-soake 1
rush-light.
From then on, here is the chronological record of light:
300 A.D.—Phoenicians introduced
candles into Constantinople.
400 to 1700 A.D.—The candle, tallow or wax, vied with the lamps and
lanterns.
1700—Ofl lamps with wicks began
to be used.
1780—Oil lamps were equipped wiin
round wicks and glass chimneys'
1800—Gas lighting perfected, but
candles still most universal.
lSiWi- Discovery of petroleum, revolutionizing oil-lamp lighting.
1870—Edison, apostle of light,  pro
duced incandescent electric lamp.
1SS5—Auer Von Wei9bach produced
incandescent gas mantle,
18D5—Incandescent electric llghta,
made with carbon filament, in growing use.
1922—Incandescent electric light,
using tungsten filament, in high state
of perfection.
Today, i( would require 460 sperm
candles, all burning at the same time,
to produce a brilliancy of illumination equal to that of the average electrically lighted home.
H
ere an
m
ere
He tried to crow the railro»d track.
Before the rushing train;
They put the pieces in a sack,
But couldn't find the brain!
One hundred British farm famlllM
are due to reach British Columbia
early next spring. These art tht
fore-runners of 3,000 families that
are to come out to settle in Canada
on the land. Provincial and Britith
Government assistance is being given
them to get started.
A remarkable statue modelled entirely in Ice is to be seen at Quebec.
It represents one of the latest OI
2300-type locomotives of the Canadian Pacific Railway, about one-
fourth full size and is perfect ia
every detail. Ice statuary has been
brought to a fine art in the Ancient
Capital.
Skaters from New York, Boston,
Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa will
compete with Quebec champione in
a great international amateur fif-
ure skating contest, to be held in
Quebec city February 23-24, for
handsome trophies and medals donated by the Frontenac Winter
Sports Clubs. A record attendance
of spectators is expected.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Ofllce Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, D.C.
;■
CANADA'S NEW LINK WITH ALASKA
SYKISOF
LAiMTWDMENTS
Good-
always good!
and
U.B.C. Beer
There's quality and satisfaction in
every bottle, because they come
from B.C.'s greatest, most scientific
brewery.
AT ALL GOVT.
LIQUOR STORES
This advertisement is not published or displayed by
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
the
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant,       unreserved,      eurveyed |
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age. I
and by aliens on declaring luteusion
to   become   British   subjects,   eourtl- j
tlonal   upon   residence,   occupation, j
and    improvement    for   agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions It
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Serial,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copiea ol
which can be obtained tree of charge
by addressing the Department of i
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent
Recorda wlll be granted ooverlng
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which ia not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west ot the Coaat Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of Uiat;
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are (
to be addreaaed to tht Land Commissioner ot the Land Recording Di-
vision, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner
Pre-emptions must be occupied foi <
five years and Improvements made
to value ot $1U per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at leaat Are
seres, before a Crown Orant can be
received.
For more detailed lnfoimatlon see
the Bulletin "Ilo.v to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received lor pur-
cnase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
Ior agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land la IS
per acre, and second-class (grating)
land 13.60 par acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
ot Crown landa Is given ln Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease ot Crown Landa."
Mill, factory, or Industrial eltei on
timber land, not exceeding 40 aerei,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment nf
itumpage.
HOMESTEAD LIASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
seres, may be leased aa bomeettee,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulllled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   graiing   and   Industrial   yur- [
posts areas not exceeding 140 acres
may be leased by one person er a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Graiing Act the Province ls divided into grating districts |
and tbe range administered under a I
Grating     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued baaed on
numbers ranged, priority being given '
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially tree, I
permits are available tor settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
IT is not many years since Alaska
was    ono    of    those    countries
whose geographical location was
indicated   with   n   grandiloquent
sweep of tho arm northwards,   It
lias always been n hind of mystery,
romance nnd adventure.     It hnsi
provided the theme for the thrill-!
ing tales nf novelists nnd the stirring pnenis of northern bards,   Hut
evon though the days of tho cheoh-1
nko nnd the sourdough is done, tlie
Kricf hut active span of tho Dangerous Dan Magrews nnd the Lady
Lou's, mnttois of historical refer-j
enco, the lure ot" Alaska has notj
waned, but is ns appealing ns ever
lo the hearts of men and  women
wherein  a hi!  of  romance  lurks,
nnd that means to everyone.
Alaska is no longer a far off'
country, It is a very n rar neighbor to Canada. It will he even
nearer this summer. Mr, ,1. V..
I'nlrymple, Traffic Vice-President
ef thc Canadian National Railways, has announced that commencing on June 22nd, the com-*
pany will Inaugurate n weekly
Rtoamship service between Prince
Rupert and Alaska nnd that lhe
oll-liurnlng steamships, "Prince
Georgo" nnd "Prince Rupert,"
which have already established a!
roputatlon as being among the
best-appointed vessels on the Pacific Const, will lie engaged in this
new service.
Going northward the ships wil1 i
reach Prince Rupert nt HI..'10 on
Wednesday morning, following the
Monday of sailing from Vancouver,
and tourists will be given an opportunity to see something of this
new Pacific port, as the steamer
.Some of the scenes along this
magnificent sea voyage are
shown in thc photographs:
(1) A view of Skagway,
Alaska, where visitors will he
given ample time to see this
iiiiiMHis town and also tn visit
White Home and the Atlin Lake
district.
(2) A beautiful sunset scene
on the I.yun Canal, which the
steamships Prince Rupert and
Prince Oeorge will Ihrend on
their journey into thc Land of
Iho Midnight Sun.
(3) The Taku Glacier, one
mile wide and ninety miles long
—ono of the largest and most
heautiful glaciers in the world.
(4) The I'rincc Rupert,
which, with the Prince George,
will bo used in the Vancouver-
I'rincc Rupert-Alaska service
this summer. These boats are
oil-burners and are among the
finest appointed vessels in the
Pacific Coast service.
Inset is one of the curious
lutein poles to lie found in the
business section of Wrangell,
Alaska.
does not continue on its northern
trip until four o'clock that afternoon. After passing Old and New
Metlnktln nnd Pert Simpson, an old
Hudson's liny Post, calls will he
made nt Ketchikan, a typical Alaskan town huilt at thc font of the
mountains. Proceeding from that
point the steamships will touch al
Wrangell. beautifully situated near
the mouth of the Stikine River and
possessing many associations with
the period when Alaska was a
Russian possession. The next
point touched will be Juneau, the
capital nf Alaska, and a modern
city with good motor roads and
ninny points of interest, including
the Mcndonhnll Glacier nnd mines
which have made this country fnm-
ntis. On the way from Wrangell to
June.in there will be an opportunity tn see tIn* grandeur of Tnku
Inlet and tht famous Taku Glacier,
over a mile wide nnd 00 miles long.
The ships will arrive at .Skagway
at seven o'clock Friday morning
and w-ill remain there until seven
o'clock Saturday night, thus giving
nmjile opportunity to passengers
to see this famous town and to
visit While Horse nnd the Atlin
Lake District. On the south-hound
journey the steamers will reach
Vancouver nt nine o'clock Wcdncs-
day morning, making n complete
ten-day round trip.
Ill addition to tho Alaskan trip,
the tri-weekly service between
Vancouver ami Prince Rupert will
he maintained nnd also a semi-
weekly service tn Anyox nnd Stewart on the Portland Canal, which
service has been in effect for snme
time past. The establishment by
the Canadian Notional Railways
of this Alaska steam-boat service
will meet the demands of many
tourists, and will he a fitting climax to the fanmiis Triangle Four,
comprising Jasper National Park,
the Rnekies. the Cnnst Range and
the wnter voyage through the
"Norway of America." PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1924.
Corsets
Elastic bust.
Average  Figure.
Front 14"
Back 16%"
Canadlen  Coutil.
Pink.
Sizes 21-30.
D. & A. MADAME X
REDUCING  CORSETS
D. & A. MADAME X
GIRDLES
GOSSARD FRONT LACE
CORSETS
at
Sutherland's
Cumberland
Confined to Vancouver Hospital!
I Mr. John Baird, Provincial Govern-
i men! Agent, left on Tuesday morning
; tor Vancouver where lie will undergo
treatment at the Vancouver General
Hospital. Mr. Baird has been suffering an internal Illness tor some time
past, and It Is hoped that upon his
return he will he restored to his usual health. Mr. Robert Grant, Sr„
accompanied him on the trip.
Crossed   Atlantic
Unafraid
Social and Personal
* * *
Rev. James Hood left for Victoria
Tuesday morning.
Mrs. W. W. Anderson of Hazelton
spent a few days' visit with her father, Mr. Thomas Horbury, and returned on Saturday.
Mrs. Martin Brown of Vancouver,
ls visiting relatives in town.
Miss Hetty Bryden has returned to
Victoria after spending an extended
visit to her grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. C. H. Tarbell.
* •   •
Don't forget the Saturday Mght
Dance at the G.W.V.A. Hall. Good
time assured. Gents SOc. Ladies 10c.
Dancing 9-12.     Everybody welcome.
♦ *    *
Mr. W. Hassard Is spending a few
days in Vancouver this week.
Lieutenant Colonel Charles C. VII-
liers, General Manager of the Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., arrived in
town last Wednesday evening.
Mrs. Harrison and Miss Harrison
returned on Tuesday after spending
tlle week end In N'anaimo and Victoria.
Mr. R. C. Lang left 'or Nanaimo
this morning on a business visit, lie
was accompanied hy Mr. Liggett, of
the National Drug Company.
Tea Hostess
MrB. E. K. Hicks entertained a
number of ladies at afternoon tea on
Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. James Dick left for Vancouver
Thursday morning.
Llio*   Samutil   Moii'iK'ni  trnvtM
Avery pathetic figure, as he
stepped off the Canadian Pacific train, between the conductor
and an official of the department
of immigration, into the noise of
shunting trains, the confusion of
hurrying express trucks, and the
bustle thnt attends the arrival and
departure of friends, Samuel Moly-
neux, 393 Oakwood Avenue, Toronto,
as the label on his little bag proclaimed him, paused for a moment,
and then, overcome by a sense of
lonliness produced by the loss of his
friends of ship-Jioard and train,
burst into tears. A second later
he was seized by his mother, from
whom he had been separated for
one and a half of his four years,
and sobbed himself to contentment
in her arms.
Samuel came to Canada on the
Montclare, making the complete trip
from the old land to Toronto by him-
self. Samuel was a favorite on
ship-board, according to reports. He
became particularly attached to the
ship's nurse but was tho pet of all
:  the passengers and crew.
1
Hardy & Pearce
AUCTIONEERS
The Comox I ind milium Club will
visit the local Club on Monday evening, when play will start at thc
Court in tlie Anglican Hail about 8.30.
MASS MEETING
OF UNEMPLOYED
1
Auction Sale
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 AT 1:30 P.M.
AGRICULTURAL HALL. COURTENAY
ENTRIES SOLICITED
•Si
The unemployed of the city of Cumberland and vicinity held a mass
meeting in the G.W.V.A. Hall last
Sunday afternoon. The building waa
crowded to the very door with those
seeking relief. Tbe object of tiie
meeting was to ascertain if It wns pos
sible to persuade the Provincial Government to commence the season's
road work immediately and relievo
the distress of the unemployed of tho
district. Mr. P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.-
who had kindly consented to attend
was present and gave his views <n
the question. Mr. Thomas Armstrong
made an able chairman and .lames
Smith acted as secretary.
lfcoliilii.il Adopted
After careful consideration the
mass meeting of employees ami former employees of tlie Canadian Collieries (D) Limited unanimously adopted  the  following  resolution;
"Whereas the unemployed situation
has become acute in the City of Cumberland and district;
"Therefore be It resolved ihat this
meeting request Mr. P. P. Harrison,
M.L.A., to interview the Provincial
Government, to get the regular road
work started at the earliest possible
date to alleviate tbe unemployment
situation in this district."
The meeting tendered Mr. P. P.
Harrison, M.L.A., a hearty vote of
thanks for his kind co-operation, and
the gathering adjourned.
GOOD OLD
REASONABLE DEPENDABLE
Cod Liver Oil
Cod Liver Oil is still tho best remedy for eotighs and
colds and incipient and serious lung troubles. We are
selling the very purest grade of strictly Norwegian
cod liver oil with no appreciable advance in former
prices. We likewise compound this oil in a tasty
emulsion in which there is at least 50 per cent, of the
oil combined with hypophosphites and other valuable
i ,'redients.
NOTE
this store will close at 8:30 p.m. daily except Saturday,
when we will close at 10:30.
SUNDAY HOURS
Morning—10:30 - 12:30 Evening G:30 - 8:30
Closed Wednesday Afternoons.
Lang's Drug Store
—THE REXALL KODAK STORE—
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
PROF. R. W. BROCK TO
LECTURE AT CLUB
An illustrated lecture thai should
prove very interesting to citizens of
Cumberland will lie given iu ilie Lecture Hall of the Literary and Athletic
Association at 8 o'clock sharp tomorrow evening, (Saturday). 'lhe lecturer wlll he Professor R, W. Brock,
Dean of the Faculty of Engineering
of lhe University of D.C. and he has
chosen as his subjecl "Physical Features of British Columbia."
Here is nn excellent opportunity to
learn ahout the physical aspeots of
the province In which we live, aud il
Is ap opportunity wliieh no one should
fall to grasp.     Kvcryhody Is welcome.
SURPRISE PARTY
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
WANTED—A MAN TO HANDLE THIS
Sales and Distribution of The J. R.
Watklns Company's Products in
Cumberland and the surrounding
district. Apply The .1. It. Watklns
Company, 1160 Hamilton St., Vancouver, B.C. 8-9.
FOR SALE—4 ACRF.S IMPROVED
land, good fencing, pew house, outbuildings, new modern chicken coop
125 laying Leghorn Pullets, large
brooder. Furniture can lie had at
valuation, near Cumberland. For
particulars, apply Box 800, Islander
office. 8-9.
Ou Tuesday evening last a jolly
crowd proceeded to the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Walker and held
a surprise party. The evening was
merrily passed with singing and
dancing, after which dainty refreshments were served. Among those
present were: Mr. and Mrs. Cooper,
.Mr. and Mrs. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. S.
Robertson, Mr. Maxwell, Mrs. F. Martin, Mr. T. Eccleston, Mrs. J. Potter,
Mrs. B. Brown, Mrs. James Home and
Mr. and Mrs. Sulgler.
Tea Hostess
Mrs. Thomas Oraham entertained at
he tea hour last Wednesday.
FORMER CUMBERLAND
RESIDENTS CELEBRATE
NANAIMO, Feb. 28.—Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Bell, Strickland Street, were
tendered a surprise party Saturday
night on tlie occasion of their fourteenth wedding anniversary, Mrs.
Bell being presented with a berry
bowl and Mr. Bell with gold cuff-links
A most enjoyable evening was spent.
the winners at cards being Mrs. Broderlck, Miss Q. Towers, Mr. F. Broderlck and Mr. G. Frater. Mr. and
Mrs. W. Hunter and Mr. and Mrs. R.
Frater were the winners in the guessing contest.
DEATH CALLS OLD
RESIDENT OF COURTENAY
The death occurred on Sunday
Mr. Alexander Beaton at Port Coquit-
lam, B.C. Bom on the Isle of Skye
75 years ago, Mr. Beaton leaves many
friends and relatives ln the valley to
mourn his death. Two years ago he
suffered his lirst stroke and has been
ailing ever since.
Mr. Beaton came to Canada fifteen
years ago anil since that time has
made his residence In Courtenay
where for five years he held the position ot wood foreman. Mr. Beaton's
early life was spent as a mate on
boats sailing out of Glasgow. On
one of his voyages he was on the
same ship that brought Mr. Alex.
Urquhart out to Comox and it was on
tliat voyage thut he lirst became ac-
Week-End Specials
Fels Naptha Soap, per carton   85c.
White Wonder Soap, 7 cakes for .*. 55c.
Canned Tomatoes, 21/o's, 4 tins 85c.
Marmalade, 1-lb. glass 25c. 2 for 45c.
K. B. Red Plum Jam, 4-lb tin   75c.
K. B. Strawberry Jam, 4-lb tin 85c.
Special Blend Ceylon Tea per pound 75c.
Fresh Ground Coflee, por lb 60c. & 70c.
Red Arrow Sodas, per package 25c.
6-lb Wooden Boxes Sodas, each  $1.00
8-lb. Boxes Fairy Sodas, each $1.35
Fancy Mixed Biscuits per lb. 35c. 3 lbs. for $1.00
Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for 55c.
Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs for  45c.
Sliced Pineapples, 2-lb tins, 4 for 85c.
Del Monte Peaches, 3 tins for  85c.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
qualnted to that part of the country
where he later came and made his
home.
Three sons ot Mr. and Mrs. Beaton went overseas during the Great
War and two made the supreme sacrifice, the third returning wounded.
j In recognition of this fact when the
memorial culm was started at Sandwick Mr. Beato,, was asked to lay
the corner stone.
He leaves to mourn his loss Mrs.
Beatou, who was In Coqultlam with
him at tlie time of his death, Mrs.
Wright and Mrs. Henderson, both living In Vancouver, Mrs. Carwlthen,
Mrs. Praln, Mrs. Robt. McQualg and
Miss Flora Beaton, in Courtenay, and
Mr. Angus Beaton.
The funeral which took place Wednesday at tbe Presbyterian Church,
Sandwick, was conducted by the Rev.
J. W. Flinton in the absence of the
Rev. W. T. Beattie, was largely attended. The pall bearers were Messrs
R. McQuillan. Wm. Duncan, J. McKenzie, Jr., J. Catchpole. J. Matheson
and M. Rose. The chief mourners
were Mrs. MeCualg, Mrs. Henderson,
Mrs. Praln, Mrs. Chris Carwlthen,
Mrs. T. Wright of Vancouver, Miss
Flora Beaton and Mr. Angus Beaton.
There were many beautiful floral tributes.
MERCANTILE STORE CO.
CUMBERLAND — PHONE 133
BANKRUPT SALE
THIS GREAT BANKRUPT STOCK BOUGHT BY READ & OSBORNE OFFERS YOU
AN OPPORTUNITY TO SECURE HIGH CLASS MERCHANDISE AT 1-3 AND 1-2 OFF
REGULAR PRICES—A REAL MONEY SAVING EVENT
DRY GOODS
SOME OF OUR BARGAINS
$1.50 Silk Hose, per pair  98c
$1.25 Vests, each  ,  79c
65c. Silk Hose
Per pair	
47c
$1.00 Bloomers  _  69c
$1.50 Housedresses  98c
85c hanks Sweater Silk 55c
$2.00 Silk Crepe   $1.49
$1.25 Pongee  79c
30c Prints   19c
35c Ginghams
Per yard 	
27c
$12.50 Ladies' Coats   $6.95
$30.00 Ladies Suits   $19.50
$32.00 Silk Dresses   $19.50
BOOTS AND SHOES
SHOES AT LESS THAN COST
$5.00 Ladies' High Shoes   $1.95
$4.00 Ladies' Strap Shoes $2.45
$7.50 Ladies Stylish Shoes $4.25
$6.50 Men's Dress Boots
Per pair	
$4.45
$6.50 Miner's Rubber Boots  $4.45
$7.50 Men's Work Boots $4.95
$4.50 Boys' Boots   $2.95
$2.75 Girls' Boots
Per pair	
$1.95
$16.00 Christie Loggers  $11.50
$5^00 Gum Boots ...... ..■■■ $2.75
$7.50 Logger's "Pride of the West"
Bonedry Shirts & Pants tjljyl Ajff
Sale Price  tp4.H7U
$14.50 Mackinaws, leather trimmed $9.75
MENS' FURNISHINGS
MEN'S WEAR AT REAL SAVINGS
SOc All Wool Sox, 3 pairs for $1.00
$3.25 Dress Shirts  $1.95
$1.25 Merino Shirts & Drawers  79c.
$2.50 "Mechanic" Overalls $1.95
$27.50 Men's Suits
Sale Price 	
$19.50
$7.50 Men's Sweaters '.  $4.95
$2.50 Men's Wool Work Shirts $1.59
$3.00 Men's Caps
Sale Price 	
$1.95
$7.50 Steson Hats  $5.50
$1.00 Boys* Shirts & D^awers^,....^... 69c
$3.50 Boys' Sweaters
Sale Price 	
$1.95
$1.50 Work Gloves 95c
GROCERIES %±£Z
"SEE WHAT YOU SAVE"
CASH PRICES
Rosedale Tea, (Special) per lb  65c
Lanka Tea, per lb 70c
Empress Tea, per lb 75c
Braid's Best ColTee, per tin  65c
F. G. Coffee, per lb SOc
Quaker Strawberry Jam, 4's, tins .... 85c
Apricot and Plum Jam, 4's, tins 80c
Cooking Figs, per lb  10c
Layer Figs, per lb 15c
Prunes, 56-60, 2 lbs. for 25c
Macaroni, 1-lb pkts   15c.
Nestles Evaporated Milk, 8 for $1.00
Malkins Best Malde, 4's tins   70c
Quaker Pears, per tin  30c
Dates, per lb  10c
Dutch Cocoa, 3 lbs. for 25c
Potatoes, best grade,
100-lb. sack 	
$2.45
Bananas, Oranges, Apples, Lemons and
Lettuce for Week end.

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