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The Cumberland Islander Jun 30, 1923

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Array Jamil,
CUMBERLAND
With which U consolidated tke Cumberland News.
ISLANDER,
h
* i
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR.—No. 26.
CUMBERLAND, BRITI8H COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 80th, IMS.
ADVENTURE, ROMANCE,
DRAMA IN "KINDRED
OF THE DUST'
Gripping drama, produced by a
masterhand and enacted by a cast
the strength of which could not have
been Improved upon, collectively or
Individually.
That ls "Kindred of the Dust," an
Associated First National attraction
produced by Raoul A.
Walsh from the famous novel by Peter B. Kyne, whose readers are numbered In the hundreds of thousands
It comes to the Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and Saturday.
Seldom have we beheld a picture
which ls so grlppingly effective,
thanks to the skill of the author and
producer, and the talent of the cast.
The suspense which Is quickly developed at the start of the tale Is carried without diminution throughout
the six reels, and the gathering momentum results in a climax which literally brings one out of his seat.
Especially noteworthy are the spectacular Incidents of the story, such
as a rescue on the log jam. The Imminent danger of the two actors who
Imperil their lives before the camera
ls so apaprent that the spectator
leans forward with bated breath,
fearful that one or both will slip
through the logs and be drowned.
Throughout the tale there Is a
thread of romance which has a particular appeal ot its own, with Miriam Cooper as "Nan of the Sawdust
Pile," and. Ralph Graves as Donald
McKaye, playing the part of the lovers. Others in this exceptionally capable cast are W. J. Ferguson, the veteran actor; Eugenie Besserer, Pat
Rooney, Lionel Belmore, Maryland
Morne, Bessie Waters, Carolyn Rankin, Bruce Guerln and John Herdman.
If you love romance, adventure and
thrills don't fall to see "Kindred of
the Dust" at tbe Ilo-llo Theatre.
Record Crowd At
Elks' Dance On
Wednesday Last
Over Five Hnndred People At
Opening Dance on the New
Royston Tennis Court.—Proceeds  go to Kiddies' Fund.
What waa undoubtedly the largest
crowd that ever attended a dance in
Comox Valley tripped the light fantastic at the Royston Tenuis Court,
on Wednesday evening. This *as
Elks night and they and their friends
came from far and near to enjoy
themselves, and were not disappointed. There were six hundred people
present and the moon shone ln all
Its glory, making conditions Ideal for
an open air dance. A nine piece orchestra had been brought from Nanaimo Elks'. A committee comprising
Messrs. Joseph and Harry Idiens, L.
D. Piket, Gordon Thomas, H. Bramley and Jimmy Denholm had charge
of the parking of the cars and it was
no mean job. The dancing pavilion
was decorated with the Elks colors,
purple and white and with Mr. Horace
Everett as Master of cremonles everything went off smoothly. Possibly
there has not been such a successful
dance in the history of the Valley and
the next entertainment under the
same auspices will be eagerly looked
forward to.
List Of Promotions At The
Courtenay Public Schools
SUPERB ARE
THESE TOURNAMENT
SCENES
Marion Davies Central Figure la
Pageantry of "When Knighthood Was in Flower."
Those who like musical comedies
or circuses will especially enjoy the
tournament scene in the big Cosmopolitan production "When Knighthood Was in Flower," a Paramount
picture starring Marlon Davies which
opens at the Ilo-llo Theatre Monday
Tuesday and Wednesday, for a three
days' run. Tiers of fancifully decorated boxes fluttering with flags and
pennants and draped with garlands of
roses; beautifully gowned women;
court attendants; knights In armor,
and court jesters make of this brilliant scene one of tbe most sparkling
events imaginable. The glitter and
the splendor of It all remind one alternately of a circus of musical comedy.
In the central box sit King Henry
VIII and Queen Catherine while Princess Mary Tudor leans over Uie railing, enraptured at the vision of the
gallant Charles Brandon, clad ln armor, as he stops his coal black horse
directly In front of the royal party
and bows low. Miss Davies plays the
part of Princess Mary and her charm
was never set olf to greater advantage
than in the regal jeweled robes of
the princess who was willing to tor-
sage a throne for love.
Robert G. Vlgnola directed the impressive production. Lyn Harding
plays King Henry VIII. He Is one of
Knglands foremost actors and he has
played the part over two hundred
times on the legitimate stage. Theresa Conovcr Maxwell Is cast as the
queen. "When Knlghtood Was tn
Flower" is one of the most elaborate
screen productions ever made ln this
country. Three studios were used In
the filming and the costumes cost a
small fortune.
Pleasant Picnic
Held By Ladies
Members ot the Ladies' Auxiliary
of Holy Trinity Church held a delightful picnic to Boston Bay, Comox
Lake on Wednesday afternoon last,
and from all accounts the Ladles had
a most successful time, not even relying on "mere" man to light fires
etc. for them. Boating and fishing occupied the good ladies (or the greater part of the afternoon: The stren-
ous exercise of boating probably gave
a, good appetite, as at the dinner,
served on the beach,, everyone appeared to be thoroughly enjoying it. A
community sing was indulged in after dinner.
The ladies arrived back In Cumberland about 8.30 after a most delightful picnic.
FINED $75.00
J. MacAUister, of the Woverly Hotel Cumberland, was fined $75 during the past week, when he was
charged before Magistrate Balrd with
having liquor In a public place.
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. G. W. Clinton, who ts leaving-shortly for England, entertained
a number of her friends at Bridge on
Thursday evening last.
OMITTED
In the list of floral tributes published last week tor the late Annie
Tilbury O'Brien, a heart 'given by the
Women's Benefit • Association was
omitted.
Promotion lists at the Courtenay
Public School which closed yesterday
morning tor the summer holidays
follows;
Division One
Promoted (rom Grade 6 to grade 8.
Kathleen Moore. James Hurford,
Willie Bell, Margaret McKenzie, Annie Crawford, George Hutchings, Dorothy Hames, Clara Tippet, Christine
Millard, Austen McLeod, Andrew
Crawford, William Curtis, Catharine
Beattle, Constance Heric, Honor
Fechner, Fred Stephens, Orol McNeil.
Division Two
Promoted from Orade 6 to grade 7.
Ernest Coure, Muriel Lelghton, Stewart McQuillan, Bernadlne Shannon,
Andrey Hannay, Moran Brethour,
Thelma Munroe, Stanley Williams,
Hazel Warren, Eileen Moore, Nora
Lloyd. Allan Dingwall, Maurice
Smart,' James Perez, Betty Lucas,
Jack McKay, Arthur Quinn.
* *     *
Promoted from Grade 5 to gade 7.
Marjorie Finch, Agnes Sutherland,
Gordon Robertson, Kathleen Beasley,
Sylvia Ewards.
* *     *
Promoted from Grade 5 to grade 6.
Eileen Grieve, Dorothy Fletcher,
James Rushton, Dorothy Hayman,
Addle Plercy, Sydney Smith, Nona
McNeil, Ihciyo Ashikawa, Annie
Rushton, Harold Hames, Claude
Smith, Willie Morson, Barbara Mc
j Bryde, Warwick Revie, Wallace Webb.
Division Three
To continue in 4th grade:
Leslie Taylor, Jack Boomer.
Promoted to 5th grade (1st term):
Harold Herd, Wilfred Anderton,
Beth Mutrie, Lloyd Quinn, Jack Mc
Kenzie, Lola Quinn, Mlchuslki Ashikawa, Helen Lee, Arthur .Plgott, David Smith, Norman Tribe, John Morrison, John Perez, Alice Gwllt, Gordon Bell, Osborn Bell.
* *       •   - m
To Continue in 5th Grade (2nd term)
Francis Plercy, Donald Haas, Jack
Stephens, Mabel Dack, Myrthle*Smlth
Morley   McQuillan,   Charlie   Quinn,
Malcolm  Morrison.
* " *     * *"
Promoted to Grade 6 (1st term):
Alice Hurford, Thomas Hughes,
Ruth Pldcock, John Green, Jack
Hames, Jean Dingwall, Evelyn Catch-
pole, Evelyn McKenzie, John Praln,
Mary Bell, Mlrren Thomas. Daisy
Kerton, Nina Lloyd, John Tribe.
* *     *
Promoted to Senior First:
Bessie Saunders, Douglas Thomas,
Amy  Quinn,  Elsa  Farmer,    Stanley
Douglas, Pat Hannay.
* •     *
Promoted to Junior Second:
Drewle Revie, Eric Dingwall, Alice
Pldcock, Audrey Booth, Elspeth
Green, Marcil Heric, Edward Tar-
llng, Evelyn Blackball, Marjorie
Clarkson, Dorothy Smith, Peggy
Kirby, Florence Hagarty, Dou-
glaB Smith, Eunice Tippet, Dick Lucas
Hugh McKenzie, Munroe Dingwall,
Leona Aston, Phoebe Walls, Shegi
Ashikawa, Philip Hardy Le Mare,
John Hardy Le Mare, Melvln McLeod,
Reggie Plercy, Ralph  Richards.
COURTENAY APPOINTMENT
Victoria, Jnne ti. — Premier
Oliver today announced Ike appointment of P. Leo Anderton
of Courtenay, as the official
udmlnlstraljor for the County
ot Nanaimo, Comox Electoral
District.
Nanaimo Soccer
Team Will Be
Lucky To Win
Cumberland United Again in
the Running for Connaught
Cup.—Several Stars to be in
Locals Lineup.
STARTS CUMBERLAND
—NANAIMO STAGE
Mr. S. C. Sangster, of Nanaimo, has
Just Inaugurated an automobile stage
between Cumberland and Nananmo
and way points. This is indeed welcome news, and it Is the Intention of
Mr. Sangster to adhere to a regular
schedule. The stage leaves the Cumberland Post Office every morning at
8.30 and on the return trip leaves
Nanaimo at 2 p.m., starting (rom the
Windsor Hotel.
ANNUAL PICNIC OF
ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH
Some surprise is in store (or the
Nanaimo Soccer team when they stack
up against the locals on July 7th.
Several well-known stars have arrived in town—and more are expected—the beauty of it all Ib, that these
G. W. V. A. NOTES
Reunion Week Information
In this issue we present a tentative programme of the (eatures
of Reunion Week Encampment at Hastings
Park, Vancouver, B.C.,
June 30 to July 7.
1923.   Entries (or ath-
mado without delay to Walter Drin-
nan, Provincial Secretary O. W. V.A.
901 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver. A
flue range of cups and prizes have
been secured for the various compe-
"stars" are all eligible to play for i titions. including a solid silver cup
Cumberland in tbe Connaught Cup j presented by Lord Byng of Vlmy,
SerieB. : Goveruor-Geenra! o( Canada, as ag-
Tommy Dickenson and his pets, gregato for ex-Servlce Men's events,
will have to do some tall training to The ceht-a-mlle rate (rom all stage! over this next game-not that, tions In Canada has been definitely
we don't think much ol Tommy and | granted to members o( the Great War
his team, we do.   The Nanaimo boys j Veterans' Association. Certificates en-
have a dandy team, but we figure
we have one just as good, and they
are all keen (or a game. The management are ln a quandry though.
There Is such a galaxy of stars eligible at the present time that the actual composition o ftbe team will not
be known until just prior to the
game, but you, dear reader, can take
it trom us, it will be some team. Better save your dimes and take a trip
to Nanaimo July 7th.
The Sunday School o( St. George's j PrPCPTltntion    TYl
Presbyterian church, will hold their rlCOCIIlaUUil    IU
annual picnic at Millard's Beach on
Monday July 2nd. All parent's and
(rlends are asked to join In, and
make this a congregational rally.
Cars will be at the church at ten
oclock to convey people to the picnic
grounds. AH are urged to come and
bring a good (ull basket of good
things to eat. The Intention Is to
have all dine together in the good old
picnic style. Tea, Milk, sugar and
dishes will be provided and lemonade
(or the children. Please have baskets at the church at 0.30 a.m. Come
and have a good Ume on Monday,
July 2nd.
Popular Members
Ladies' Aid and Choir Lose Two
of Their Prominent Members.
CUMBERLAND GIRLS DO
W&     WELL AT SCHOOL
■•' The two young daughters o( Mr.
ond Mrs. Thomas Bate, Shirley and
Marvel, o( Vancouver, formerly of
Cumberland, who attended school
here until a year and two months
ago and were pupils of Miss Beckwith have done extremely well in
passing their examinations at the
public school ln Vancouver. Out of
thirteen passing into the Entrance
Class, Shirley age eleven passed
first and Marvel age thirteen seventh.
These two children have "skipped"
a term which shows that the Cumberland schools are well advanced In
their work.
About fifty-five people assembled at
the Presbyterian Hall on Monday
evening last for the purpose ot bidding adieu to two of their prominent
members, Mrs. Colin Campbell and
Miss Beckwith. Mrs. Campbell was
presented with a cut glass dish by
Mr. McLean on behalf of the Board
o( management, the Ladles' Aid and
the choir, all o( which Mrs. Campbell hai been a prominent member
tor a number of years.
Miss Beckwith, who has been a
metobir of the choir for the past two
years and who is leaving the district
(or her home in Victoria was the recipient o( a handsome Fountain Pen.
The evening was spent in games
and a musical contest and during the
evening songs were sung by Mrs.
Colin Campbell, Miss Beckwith, Miss
G. Watson and Mr. Robt. Splttall.
A most enjoyable evening was
brought to a close by the singing of
"For they are Jolly Good Fellows"
and "Auld Lang Syne."
Mrs. Campbell, accompanied by
her daughter Viola and young son
Lome left tor San Diego, California,
this Friday morning.
MR. T. H. CAREY
RECEIVES HONOR
PROCEEDINGS OF
CITY COUNCIL
HOLY TRINITY
CHURCH SERVICES
During July and August, evening
services at Holy Trinity Church will
commence at 8 p.m. Instead of 7 p.m.
There will-be no Sunday School
during the hot months, July and August.
Tho Annual Picnic
Thc Annual Picnic tor the scholars
of Holy Trinity Sunday school will
be held on Wednesday, July 4th.
The City Council on Monday evening with a (ull Board present, heard
the reading of the new license by
law, Introduced by alderman Maxwell
which will be finally adopted on July
9th and go into effect on the 15th
July.
A by-law respecting the streets
and sidewalks and traffic thereon was
Introduced by Alderman Mumford
and given first, second and third reading. Aid. Partridge Informed the City Council that Thomas Graham of
the Canadian Collieries, Dunsmuir,
Ltd* had generously consented to
donate Five Hundred dollars towards
the proposed expenditure on the Fire
Hall.
The Hon. The Premier of British
Columbia sent a request for the assessed value of the Cumberland Public Schools and the rate of taxation.
The Fire Wardens were Instructed
to call for tenders for the Plumbing
of the Fire Hall.
Promoted to Senior Second:
Dorothy Catchpole,  Mary  Stewart,
Alvln Loggie, Agnes Revie, Grace Dun
can.
*     *     *
Promoted  to  Third  Reader.
Ivo Walls, Olive McLean, Helen
Gwllt, Leslie Bravender, Normn Bravender, Joe Thompson, Eddie Everett, Herbert Quinn, Walter Tarllng,
Winnie Taylor, Ruth Saunders, Trevor Richards, Alex. Bell,
Rolls of Honor, 1923.
Division One
Proficiency, Sidney Williams.
Deportment:—George Hutchings.
Regularity and Punctuality:—William Bell, Honor Fechner,    Dorothy
At the meeting o (the Orand Chapter ot Royal Arch Masons of British
Columbia held at New Westminster
last week Mr. T. H. Carey, o( Cumberland, waB elected Orand Scribe N.
The report of the retiring Grand Master showed there were 21 chapters
with a membership of 2373 Arch Masons In B. C. including a new Chapter recently formed at Pentlcton.
CITY OF CUMBERLAND
RECEIVES $1,089.63
Cumberland's share In the profits
from the Bale of liquor amounted to
$1,089.63, whilst our nelgbors at
Courtenay receive $846.15.
SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MAKE APPOINTMENTS
With The
Churches
The Board of School Trustees at
their usual monthly meeting held in
the school room on Wednesday evening appointed Annie R. Gatz at a
$1,000 per year and Charlotte Carey
Vivian Aspect and Pearl Hunden at
$900.00 per year to the teaching staff
of the Cumberland Public Schools
and to fill the vacancies caused by
the resignation of the Misses Harrison, Beckwith, Bannerman and Colman.
The Board considered several applications for position of Principal
and assistant to the Cumberland High
School and after a three hours session appointed J. E. Hamilton of Victoria, Principal at a salary of $2,500
per year, and Miss Partridge, assistant at a salary of $1,600.00 per year.
Miss Mordy's salary was Increased to
$1,000.00 per year at the request of
Principal A. H. Webb, who was present at the meeting.
The Board will call for tenders for
Hames,   Christine   Millard.   Thomas   CUMBERLAND, SUNDAY  JULY  1st! the supplying of ten cords of wood
1 and the shingling of certain portions
of the School Buildings.
titling such members to the reduced
rote may be obtained from the secretaries of all Local Branches. See
your G. w. V. A. Secretary for fuller
particulars.
The Sixth Annual Dominion Convention of the G. W. V. A. will open
at Hastings Park on Tuesday, July
3rd. The Dominion Executive will
assemble for session on Saturday,
June 30.
A limited tent accommodation will
be available at Hastings Park for
visitors attending the Reunion from
a distance. Owing to Militia regulations, a small deposit will be required
from all who desire this privilege, also a small charge (or washing of
blankets. The deposit will be refunded at the close of the week upon
equipment loaned being turned ln to
the Orderly Room.
Colonel Jim McAra, Provincial President of the G. W. V. A. In Saskatchewan, has accepted the    rank   of
Camp.   Commandant.   Sergeant-Major
Mortimer, o tthe Vancouver Police, ts
expected to prove the moat popular
Town  Major that    ever    gave    the
troops the once over. While it Is not
Intended  to  maintain  military dls-^
clpline. every visitor is expected .to
uphold tbe honor o( his C. E. F. Unit,
and assist In every way ln   making
Reunion Week a success (rom every
angle. It Is hoped that as many men
as possible will bring along their old
uniforms and wear their medals aad
decorations during  the  week.    Thle
will add to the interest of the event
and enable old comrades to meet the
more easily.   Permission   has   been
secureil from the    Militia    for    this
right.
•     *     *
The Free Trip Numbers drawn in
the May sub-competition are as follows, and these timbers will be entered for the final drawing on July 7:
4624, 4065, 4838, 5170, 8865, 4146, 4530,
494,973, 7361, 3085, 842, 2077, 5182,
841, 5174, 832, 771, 5205, 7343, 2719,
468, 4072, 7672, 7610, 6316, 2107, 179,
912, 17, 1039, 7466, 6053, 3869, 387,
1363, 6219, 381, 7351, 1888, 3863, 2510,
2526, 939, 789. 5188, 8958, 7403, 7400,
6422. 7405, 489, 6757, 10697, 10214,
10202. 10062, 11916,
10040, 10254, 10075,
10833, 14528, 14566,
10054. 11319, 10320,
10385, 13876, 13493,
14488, 14491, 14303.
US02, 11706, 10139,
13228, 10253, 10924,
14668, 10491, 10710,v,10399, 10926.
The results of the Derby draw are
as follows: first prize, 11524; 2nd,
3864; 3rd, 10096; 4th, 11677. Thc following secured equal prizes: 9269,
8601. 10579, 14303, 7610, 10680, 334,
14683, 10683. 10309, 14611, 14105,
10548, 10823, 8672. These cash prizes
have been forwarded to the, respective
ticket holders.
The local Secretary has a number
of the June UBUe of "As You Were"
on hand.
All entries for the free trip to the
Battlefield must reach Vancouver hy
midnight, Friday July 6th.
11324,
14515,
11641,
11268,
13164,
11253,
14678,
13002,
14709,
14487,
10006,
11323.
11339,
11263.
14614,
14041,
Miss V. Nash of Nanaimo is on a
visit to friends in town.
Big Excursion to Powell River
Monday, July 2nd. Leave Union Bay
7 a.m.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Dallas, Miss L. Dallas and Miss F, Sehl are leaving on
Friday by motor tor a month's visit
to San Francisco.
McPherson.
Division Two
Proficiency, Stanley Williams, Mar
jprle Finch.
Deportment:—Sylvia Edwards.
Regularity  and   Punctuality:—Nora Lloyd, Muriel Lelghton.
Division Three
Proficiency:   Harold   Herd.    Alice
Hurford.
Deportment:—Beth Mutrie.
Division Four
Proficiency:—Frank Hurford.
Deportment:—Sheila Allard.
Regularity and   Punctualtty:—Gla-
dys Kerton, William McKay.
Division Five
Proficiency:—Walter Tarllng.
Deportment:—Elspeth Green.
Regularity and Punctuality:—Herbert Quinn, Alex Bell.
HOLY TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Eversong, 8 p.m.
Hr.
CUMBERLAND HIGH
SCHOOL PROMOTIONS
ST. GEORGE'S PRESBYTERIAN    j 	
Rev. James Hood !    The following Ib the  list of pro-
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. I motions    ln the   Cumberland    High
Bible Class 1.3(1. Sunday School 2.30 I School In order of merit:
Evening Service 7 p.m.
GRACE   METHODIST   CHURCH
Rev. J. R. Butler, Pastor
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sabbath School 10.30 a.m.
Subject 11  a.m. "A Threefold  Im
porativc' also Sermonette for children.] Keith McLean.
Subject 7 p.m. "Marks which Dis- j     From    Prellmary    Junior
tlngulsh". | vanced junior grade:
You are cordially Invited. I    Toshlo Kajlyama, Edward
From advanced Junior to Matriculation grade:
Florence Jones, Margaret McNaughton, Edward Hughes, Mildred Calnan, Fanny Strachan, Clifford Horwood, Constance Bird, Malcolm Stewart, Howard Carey, Willie    Jones,
GARDEN PARTY
Mrs. Thomas Oraham entertained a
number of friends at a garden party
at her home on Tuesday afternoon.
Those present were Mrs. Hicks,
Mrs. Lymn, Mrs. McNaughton, Mrs.
Mrs. Bryan, Mrs. Pickard, Mrs. Campbell, Miss Viola Campbell, Mrs. Burns
Mrs. Walton. Mrs. Clinton, Mrs. Newton and Miss Blanche Dando.
The afternoon was spent In tennis
and croquet.
Sadie Brown, Tom Abe, Lilly Mussatto,   Gwenneth    Emily,   Margaret
) Bunbury, Nellie Potter, Henry Wat-
to   ad- j son, Nora Olen, Charlotte Dallas.
I    Passed (algrotat) Chrissie Suther-
Blckle, ' land. TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W BICKLE
SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1923
THE HAPPY DAYS
"Those were the happy days."
Frequently we hear the foregoing
expression from the mouth of the
man who rides in his $2500 touring
car instead of a $150 buggy, as of
yore. He speaks of the days, perhaps,
when mother broke her back over the
old-fashioned wash-tub; when father
accomplished his morning ablutions
at the pump trough; when little sister suddenly contracted the djread
dlptheria and he had to ride four or
five miles to get the doctor who had
never heard of anti-toxin. Possibly
he referred to the time when it required days, even weeks, to Inform
loved ones of thc Invasion of the Angel of Death; when journeys were
made on horseback on a bouncing
stage. Days when the young swain,
after tolling weary hours with the
hoe six days a week, took his best
girl riding on Sunday and enjoyed it
—sure, they enjoyed themselves—they
were rugged and they were happy.
But today, the mother is none the
less happy in the possession of a power washer and an electric iron father
has had installed a modern hot-water
system, and at night, instead of straining the eyes in the dim light of a tallow candle, we read the news of yes-
terady of thousands of miles away, by
the bright rays of an electric light.
When little sister or brother is
taken ill, we call the doctor on the
telephone and he jumps into his auto and in a moment he is at the bedside ready to administer the serum,
which, in the great majority of cases
effects the cure and saves a life. Today we telegraph our loved ones in
emergency and in an hour or two.
even though the width of a continent
lies between, they have heard our
news—good or bad. They rush to us
on cushioned seats on fast flying
steam or electric trains. The happy
country boy flies over the well-paved
roads with his sweetheart, whose father now operates modern agricultural Implements.
Friends, these are the happy days.
| tlon to help them along. They play
| a lone hand all their days and never
get far. Other people have an intense feeling of loyalty binding them
to the home soil. It is partly sent!-
mental affection, partly a keen sense
| of the advantages of business unity '
and co-operation.
They feel united by a common tie j
to all the people who live in the I
town. Cumberland has a lot of people
of this kind, who have been tbe mainstay of all our progress. They feel
a keen interest in every person or
thing that was ever connected with
the place and any project tending to
work for its benefit has their hearty
and enthusiastic support.
In so far as all of our people acquire that point of view, we shall
attain our ideals as a community.
This involves giving a preference In
all our business relations to anything
that comes from the home town. If
a suit of clothes sold here is just as
good as one bought somewhere else,
we should buy the suit of clothes
sold here. We might well buy it, even
if it was not quite so good, but lt ls
not necessary In our good stores to
make that kind of sacrifice. When a
town fully acquires that unity ot
spirit and purpose and feeling, the pos
slbllities of its progress are enormous. It advances as a compact mass
of people, devoted to one end, not as
a lot of separate individuals all working for diverse purposes.
HELP YOURSELF
Fifty thousand dollars' worth (?)
of "securities'—cats and dogs, stocks
and "bonds," Including oil shares,
mining certificates, industrial and
movie stocks—were sold the other
day in one lump for $48.
This bunch of wallpaper represented a capital of nearly a million dollars of promises.
When the all consuming desire to
buy a block of some stock that Is being promoted by a wild dreamer of
dreams—when you get all excited
over some quick fortune, go to the
auction rooms and get half a million
dollars' worth of securities tor $50.
Apples and pears are so plentiful
on Vancouver Island that farmers
are feeding fruit to their cattle. The
The result is that, witth their several
stomachs, the cows are converting
apples Into hard elder so rapidly that
they are getting all tanked up.
THE HOME TOWN
Summer
Foot Comforts
Rexall Corn Solvent    25c
Rexall Corn Pads '.    20c
Rexall Foot Powder    25c
Foot Bath Tablets    25c
Phone 23 Phone 23
Lang's Drug Store
Send Us Your Mail Orders
The home town means a lot more '
to some people than to others. Some
folks never feel close ties to any
place. They move around without
feeling of regret or loss. They do
not feel badly to part with the
friends they make, because they do
not create intimate ties. They do
not acknowledge obligation to work
in co-operation with their fellow citizens and no one feels any obllga-
J. EMILY
AUTO HIRE
Leave Post office Daily except Sunday for Comox
Lake at 12.15 and 5.15 p.m.
Available for hire between 1 p.m. and 4 o'clock,
also aftev 5 p.m.—Phone 56 Cumberland.
Dominion Day Specials
THURSDAY      FRIDAY      SATURDAY
Special values in Billie Burke Summer Street Dresses, also Crepe and Sateen House
Dresses.
The balance of our stock of Ladies Voile Crepe and Silk Waist at a discount of 20 per
cent to clear.
All Whitewear and French Lingerie at a discount of 10 per cent.
Special values in Ladies Summer Lisle Under Vests at 50c. each.
The balance of our stock of Ladies Misses and Childrens White Canvas footwear at
a discount of 20 per cent.
MENS DEPT.
Special Values in Mens Clothing, Light and Dark Tweeds and Striped Worsted.
$15.00,   $17.50,     $22.50    $25.00
Grocery Dept—Egg
Nice Juicy Oranges, 3 doz $1.00
Bulk Dates, 2 lbs. for 25
Lemons, per doz 50
Florida Grape Fruit, 2 for 35
B. C. Granulated Sugar, 20 lbs. cotton sacks    $2.40
Porters Salad Dressing, per bot 50
Royal Salad Dressing per bot 50
Lemonade, Crystals, per tin 25
Kkovab Lemonade Powder per tin .35
Sherbet Lemonade Powder per tin .25
Mont. Limes Juice, bots. 60c and   .95
Raspberry Vinegar, bots    50c
Assorted Meat Pastes, tins, 3 for   .25
Eagel Lobster, tins 35c and  65
Canned Shrimp, tins  35
Special, 25c. per dozen
Canned Crab Meat, tins 45
Horse Shoe Salmon, tins 25c and 50
Sardines, 10c, 20c and 25c per tin
Imported French Sardines per tin   .30
Corn Beef 30c per tin, 2 for 55
Lunch Tongues per tin 40c and   .65
Assorted Biscuits per lb 30
Christies Asstd. Biscuits per pkt.   .25
Ginger Snaps, 2i/2 lbs 50
Pineapple, tall tins  25
Del. Monte Pork and Beans, 3 tins .25
Preserving Strawberries — Fruit
Jars, Jar Rings, Mason lids, Econqmy
Lids and Clamps. Screen Doors, Window Screens, etc.
Bananas, Cherries, Cucumber, Tomatoes, Plums, Green   Onions,   Lettuce,
i New Potatoes.
■mn
Scientists say that every atom haa
its own miniature solar system revolving around it. And many a human
atom has a similar Idea of hla own
importance.
A man who is reported to have
tound a button in bis salad, with
great presence o( mind remarked:
"I suppose it dropped oft while the
salad was dressing."
ICE CREAM
IF IT'S COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM—IT'S GOOD
MADE FROM PURE JERSEY CREAM—Cane sugar and the highest
grade flavorings possible to procure. You want the Best when ordering
refreshment for your Best Girl,
COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER
— THE   STANDARD   OF   QUALITY —
Our Strawberry, Raspberry and Loganberry Jam can be obtained at the
Best Stores
COMOX POTATOES IN A CLEAN BRANDED SACK
Graded to Quality—"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
FORESHORE LEASE
Nanaimo Laid District
District   ol Newcastle,   Vancouver
Island, B, I1.
TAKE notice that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited of
Victoria, B. C, occupation Mine
Owners, Intend to apply tor permission to lease the following described
land:—
Commencing at a pott planted 374
(eet North (Ast) (rom the South
West corner of Lot 1, Newcastle DI.
strict, Vancouver Island, B. C. at the
approximate high water mark and
point of beginning, thence North
(Ast.) to low water mark, an approximate distance o( 752 (eet more or
less, thence meandering along the
said low water mark, northeasterly,
northerly, northwesterly and southwesterly to the Intersection ot a line
produced North (Ast) (rom the West
boundary of said Lot 1, thence North
(Ast.) to approximate high water
mark, a distance of 1(8 (eet more or
less, thence northeasterly, easterly,
southeasterly and southwesterly
along said approximate high water
mark to point o( beginning, and containing in all 42 acres more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED.
Date, May 14th, 1923.
Albert Crompton Lymn, Agent.
Jy. 21.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • • B. C. SATURDAY, JUNE 30tb, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE
r
v
CAVIN The Shoe Man QUITS
Every pair of the $15,000 stock to be sold at just
a fraction above COST. Bargains to be had for every
member of the family. Every pair of shoes fully guaranteed.
We cannot begin to quote you all of the bargains,
we are offering.   But here are a few examples:
200 pairs of Mens Welted Dress Shoes, Brown and
Black Calf—round and recede toe. (fir rt\
To clear at per pair    tjjO.OV
100 pairs of Mens Work Shoes, Leckies and other
good makes. (fiA  PA
To be sold per pair     «Pr4etjU
Hundreds of bargains to be had in Ladies' Shoes —
Pumps and Oxfords (fin nr
from          *b£i.&D
I   and up.
laiEEMaSEJSIBMBEHaiaJ^^
I
HERE IS ONE OF THE REAL BARGAINS—LADIES CHOC KID OXFORDS MEDIUM HEEL—A
NICE DRESSY OXFORD OF GOOD
QUALITY ONLY—a pair	
$4.25
The largest stock of good shoes in the Comox
district to choose from. Comprised of
SLATERS, ASTORIAS, DERBY'S, LONDON LADY'S
AMES HOLDENS and other good Brands
See the new Rope sole Shoe. Just the thing for the
beach. Rope soles, Duck uppers. Size 2 to 8. Boys or
Girls, Ladies or men. d»-|  fjr
Price per pair
All Tennis Lines Greatly reduced. — Bargains by the
hundreds in Children Shoes.
Example, Lackies Youths School
Shoes, only   	
$3.75
Boys Elk Solid all Leather Grib Shoes
Size 1—51/2 only	
$4.75
IT WILL PAY YOU GREATLY TO LOOK OVER
OUR STOCK BEFORE YOU BUY ELSEWHERE—
DON'T LISTEN TO THE OTHER FELLOW.—COME
AND SEE FOR YOURSELF.
Mail Orders carefully and promptly attended to.
Cavin's Shoe Store
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Ol
Along the Line of the Canadian National Railways
(1) Mount Robson, 13,069 feet.—(2) Climbing Mount Robson
—(3) Main Glacier, Mount Robson.—Emperor Falls. Mount Robson Park.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leaving Cumberland at 8 a.m.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.M ERRIF1ELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Correspondence
Editor of Islander.
Dear Sir:—
Kindly allow me space in your paper for fhe following statements
which 1 consider necessary to defend
my reputation as a law abiding citizen, the parent who is responsible
lor the conduct of my nine year old
son, my moral Influence In the Community as School Trustee, and other
positions of respect and honor which
I am closely connected with In the
city.
On June 22nd, my husband received
a letter from Chief of Police A. J.
.Merry stating my son Irvln had entered lhe Vendome Buildings In Company with another boy named Cos-
ser and stole a box of cigarette papers, a small bandage and three
bottles. Sir. Merry adds: "Mrs.
Banks took the papers and burnt
them, and put the bandage on the
window sill without asking how they
came in his possession or qestlon
him at nil about them. He also
slates: "Owing to his extreme youth,
your son wns not charged, but It Is
clear that proper supervision Is not
being exercised over his movements,
or he would not be permitted to bo
In Hie company of boys of doubtful
reputation late In the evenings, etc.
Mr.   Merry  writes:
I am directed by the Board of Police Commissioners to point out your
responsibilities as a parent. Had your
son been charged under the Juvenile
Delinquent Act, you, ns a parent
would also have been brought before
the magistrate and, on his being convicted you would have been liable to
a heavy fine and costs, or in default
to a term ot Imprisonment, etc, etc.
Now on consideration of the fact,
that the affair is by no means a secret, I take this opportunity ot expressing my opinion regarding Mr.
Merry's letter. Altho the letter was
addressed to Mr. Bonks, I consider
the mother is absolutely responsible
for the conduct of a nine year old
hoy, and, In my defence, I ask any
mother If I were much to blame, as
1 undressed my boy that night, and
found parts of three or four packages of clgarotte papers in his pocket.
I lifted thc lid oft the stove, and
threw them ln. I did not even wonder
where he got them, ns I have two
smokers m my home and supposed
they were some he had gathered up
in the house. As I threw them into
the stove Irvln said: "Here! these are
for Harold and I remarked he gets
new ones with every package of tobacco. The small roll of bandage I
placed on the window sill as Mr.
Banks has scores of yards of bandages, and I bave them in all parts of
the house.
Now I claim my children are properly supervised and I deny the
charge that my boy ls out late at
nights on any occasion. He positively is not. Since the new apparatus
was Installed In the school ground
he went up at times after supper, but
if lie were not home by quarter to
nine, Mr. Banks or one of the family
went and got him (rom there before
thc Curfew rang. I might also add:
A short while ago Mr. Merry laid information against Mr. Banks (or not
renewing his car license. Good, he
deserved It. Mr. Merry was only carrying out the duties the city hires
him for. Mr. Banks was summoned,
and paid his fine, which was published in the Islander. But, at the
same time and for live days afterwards, I saw a Sedan, and a big truck
without a new license, and they stood
for hours at a time on Dunsmuir Ave.
Why the discrimination? Home
months ago I had the audacity to refuse to carry out the demands of Mr.
Merry as Choir Leader, since that
time the members ot my (amlly seem
to he the victims of him who haB the
enforcements of the law in his
charge.
Now, your worthy Board of Police
Commissioners I emphatically state
as a (amlly we aim to be law-abiding
citizens, and a credit to the Community In which we live. My children
are properly and well looked after
and taught to respect and obey the
laws. Should any of us be guilty of
an Intringment of the law, we will
willingly stand trial, and pay the penalty, but, kindly refrain in future
from directing your chief o( police to
send a letter of warning, lt would be
fairer to us, and we would prefer a
summons and the verdict of a (air-
minded magistrate.
Thanking you Mr. Editor (in anticipation) for the valuable space In
your paper,
I am respectfully yours
MRS. T. E. BANKS.
Dear Mr. Editor:— 1
As this Ib the (rult growing season,
an incident occurred a (ew days ago
that might be of Interest to people
owning fruit trees. I
in this particular case tbe tenants
of this property were away (rom their
home In the evening and advantage
was taken of their absence by young
miscreants, who evidently considered
them of secondary consideration and
took (rom one of their cherry trees
the amount of fruit they thought they
were justly entitled to; leaving the
remainder out of pities sake (or the
blrdB.
It Is not only the taking ot the (rult
which in itself Is a desplsable action,
but tbe damage done to the trees in
which the boys are not in the least
concerned.
During the course ot this season
there will be the usual number or
complaints of a similar nature as in
past years.
It is about time that something
exemplary was done to prevent these
marauding excursions; threats and
moral persuasion are of no avail,
and In almost every case of complaint, there has been no action taken, further than the case being reported to Chief Constable Merry
whose hands are tied owing to thc
(act that the interested parties will
not usually proceed with thc case,
and ends with a warning (rom the
Chief to thc hoys which means nothing to them.
There are probably few basements
in this town that have not been visited where possible by members of
this gang, who have stolen other
things than fruit and who seem to be
making out of this a renumcratlve
business.
Apart from this I know of several
log cabins recently built In this district which have cost considerable
money, being now in a disreputable
state through absolute wilful damage,
everything of value carried away and
anything that could not be conveniently carried away destroyed.
A new cabin at Allen Lake very
recently was mysteriously destroyed
by Are.
In one case at a beach near here
the owner of one of the houses at
the end of the season left a note on
the unlocked door asking anyone to
make use of what there waa inside,
but to kindly retrain (rom destroying
anything. I will leave this to the
readers imagination how this was appreciated to break stoves to pieces, to
take away windows, doors and to
make the house look like a cyclone
had struck it. is the apparent enjoyment that the late season visitors derive from them,
You can expect mischief In any boy,
but one who loves destruction tor destructions'sake is nothing else but a
moral pervert and degenerate.
Passing over complaints will not
lessen these depredation but Increase
them.
A RATEPAYER.
St. Josephs Hospital, Comox, B. C.
June, 26th, 1923.
To the Editor
"The Islander"
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Mr. Editor!
We shall appreciate very much if
you will kindly thank Mr. and Mrs.
McLeod ln your next Issue, (or their
kindness in conveying our daughter
from the scene of the accident at
Oyster River to Comox Hospital on
Sunday thc 17th inst. It was Indeed a
very regrettable accident, but we ere
hoping (or the best.
Many thanks are also due to Dr.
Christie and Mr. Bridges In doing nil
they could for us, also the Sisters and
Nurses at the Comox (St. Joseph's)
Hospital (or their very kind, considerate and untiring efforts they have displayed on behalf nf our girl during
her painful suffering. Also lo Dr.
Butters for his very skilful handling
of so serious an injury.
Wo are extremity grateful too for
the many offers ot kindly assistance
and sympathy from the surrounding
residents of Comox, Courtenay and
Cumberland which we feel very deeply.
We are pleased to say Ihat under
such good care our daughter Is making as rapid progress towards recovery as it Is possible to make under
such Injury.
Thanking you In anticipation,
believe me,
Yours faithfully
EDRED E. HARDISTY
(For self and wife.)
A business organization must resoluble a cobweb; a straight and direct connection must lead (rom each
point to the center.—Edward (told-
beck. FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY', JUNE 30th, 1923
Where World's  Record Speckled Trout was Taken
THE BANFF-WINDERMERE OPENING
COR  a  distance  ot
„„  „  . ,   nut)  miles,   between   Sudbury,
the junction of the two niuin lines of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, and the Manitoba boundary, there
are only twelve points with a population of over
200. This means that for 880 miles there are only
twelve points at which civilization has to any extent
encroached upon what is one of the last few remaining accessible wilderness regions of the North American continent. From the French River, north of the
Georgian Bay and Lakes Huron and Superior to
west of Kenora. a tract of land 880 miles long and of
unknown depth is practically unexplored, und yet
thia part of Northern Ontario is one of the most
richly endowed sections of Canada in natural beauty.
Sylvan lakes, streams and larger waterways form
a network through the country and almost incredible stories are told of the size and quantity nf fish,
particularly red and speckled trout to be found there.
It is a well known haunt of big game.
That this country is sparsely populated is alone
responsible for the fact that it is not known to more
tourists and sportsmen. Each year hundreds more
are absorbed by the country, but the lack of accommodation has kept many more hundreds away. Three
of the most fascinating districts of this glorious tract
will therefore be rendered more attractive than ever
by the erection this summer of comfortable bungalow
Aliove, Tht ntw bungalow camps arc built after thia atylc.
h»ow. Fettling ecenea; left, Nipigon; right, Lake of the Woods.
camps at French River, Nipigon River and Kenora
(Lake of the Woods). These camps will be similar to
those which have proved so successful along the line
of the Canadian Pacific in the Canadian Rockies. A
well built central club house, where meals will be
served and facilities provided for social diversions,
will be surrounded by cosy little bungalows, designed
for one, two or four persons, equipped simply but
comfortably with a camp bed and a few other accessories. The simple construction and low cost of
maintenance will enable the management to charge
much lower rates than are possible in the standurd
hotels.
The French River bungalow camp is located on
an elevation which commands a magnificent view of
the main channel of the French, within 200 yards of
the railway station. The scenery is characteristic of
the Georgian Bay region, rocky islands, deep waterways, and dense pine forests in which all kinds of
game abound.
The Nipigon is called the home of red and speckled
trout, and with some truth, for it is undoubtedly the
most prolific breeding place for these sporty fish in
the world. The world's record speckled trout came
from there in 1916 when Dr. J. W. Cook, of Fort
William, Ont., took one out weighing 1414 pounds and
measuring 31 Mi inches from head to tail and 1114
inches across. What need to say more, unless it be
that the scenery is equal to any seen at the French
River or Lake or the Woods.
Jenkins reflects that the time was
the office sought the man but that
now woman are after both.
Scarcity of rain reduces French
output of perfume. Can't they dilute
it ordinary pump water?
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS, MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up i'or Quotation at Our Expense.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
$4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159
Night—134-X  Courtenay
piraBIBJBIEIBI^^
EASTBOUND
SUMMER EXCURSIONS
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
,$72.00
WINNIPEG
MINNEAPOLIS'
ST. PAUL
DULUTH
CHICAGO   $88.00 LONDON   $113,7$
DETROIT $105.0!! TOItONTO   $113.75
NIAGARA FALLS. $120.62
MONTREAL   $182.75 QUEBEC   $141.80
ST. JOHN $160.30 HALIFAX   $166.9$
BOSTON, $16*50
NEW YORK, $147.40
$13.00 additional for ocean trip between Vancouver-Prince Rupert on sale dally to Sept. 15th. Final return limit, October
31st.    Choice of routes—stop-overs and side  trips
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PARK
$10.25 Return from Victoria
E. W. BICKLE, Agent c. F. EARLE, D.P.A.
Cumberland, B. C. Victoria, B. C.
PILES
No one but the sufferer knows the terrible awn?
or the Itching nature of Piles und how liopelesi
It seems to try for relief lu ointments. Injections
■ml dilators.
Genius produces
"PAX"
Internal Pile Remedy
Paz In tbe prescription of a well known physician
and has proved successful in huntlrcds of cases.
Paz is Internal distinct from any other treatment Applications from the outslcli> are futile.
No ointments, injections or dilators are nccofl-
sary. Paz Is complete and Is a vegetable remedy,
t'litiuins no drugs or alcohol.
If you have not hitherto found relief do not
despair, place your faith In Paz.
Except In unusually stubborn cases one box is
usually sufficient.
(Jet "PAX" from your Druggist or If ho cannot
supply you send One Dollar tnd "PAX'» will be
sent you In a plain package.
CROWN CHEMICAL
nosuoTB or Canada
1015 Dominion Building-
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and   Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Daily They Come To Me
Tattered and Torn
Back They Go Looking
Like New The Next Morn.
From The
Family Shoe Repairer
SnAVIS     Dunsmuir
•   I/rtVIO,     Avenue
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
Travel Over Canada's Great Motor Highway Through the
Central Rockies will Begin
June 30.
W. P. Symons  * •    Proprietor
The formal opening of thc Banff-
Windermere    highway    across    the
' central Canadian Rockies on June 3H
next will mark the completion of a
! notable achievement in  tlle    history
I of western engineering.
!     The   new   highway   opens   up   the
i glories of the    rich    scenic    region
j which lies within the Banff and Koo-
tenay    national    parks,    which    in-
i eludes the famous resorts of Banff
ami Lake Louise, to motorists of the
continent,    It is  also Important be-
, cause it forms the last link In the
great G.OOO-mlle system of National
highway Unking up the national
parks and great touring centres of
the Western and Southwestern United States with some of the national
parks of the Canadian Rockies. In
view of these facts the opening ceremonies will have a special Interest
to both countries and the occasion
will assume something of an international aspect. It is expected that
leading public men on both sides of
tbe boundary will be present and deliver brief addresses.
Opening nt Kootciiny Crossing
The original intention was to hold
the formal opening at Vermilion Crossing a point almost equally distant
from Banff and the Windermere valley. Owing to the indications of a
much  larger number of participants
than had been anticipated, it has now
been decided to have the ceremonies
take place at Kootenay Crossing, a
few miles farther west. The Kootenay valley is a wide and beautiful
one, with green and level meadows,
which will provide ample space on
both sides of the road lo allow for
thc parking of approximately 1,000
cars as well as for the convenient
bundling of traffic in both directions.
No one will be allowed to travel over
the road from either end before June
30, On the morning of that day cars
will leave Banff and Windermere and
proceed to Kootenay Crossing in
time for thc opening ceremonnies,
which will take place about noon.
After luncheon there will be a short
programme of addresses, following
which ribbons stretched across the
road will be cut and tbe new highway declared officially open for
traffic.
(limps  Along the  Howl
The new road, which was built by
the engineering division of the Canadian National Parks Branch of the
Department of the Interior, is 125
miles long nnd runs throughout Its
entire distance through wild and extremely beautiful mountainous country crossing two mountain passes
in its length. This is virgin country
where many of the peaks as yet have
not even been named and owing to
the absence of towns and other settlement, special provision for the
needs of the motorist has been necessary. Since the beginning of the
season workmen have been busily engaged clearing sites for camping
grounds along the highway and equipping  them  with   the  necessary  con
veniences. Camps will be located at
the following points: Vermilion Summit, Black's Camp, Hawk Creek, Vermilion Crossing. Kootenay Crossing,
McLeod Meadows, Sinclair Summit
and McKay Creek. The Canadian
Pacific Railway has under course of
construction a bungalow lodge, at
Radium Hot Springs and a tea and
rest house at Vermilion Crossing.
Other tea houses will also be avall-
, able at the western end of the road.
In addition, the existing public camp
site at Banff has been considerably
enlarged   and   Improved  and    when
' completed will be one of the best
equipped  on  the  continent.    It will
. be connected with the excellent Banff
water  system and  will be  provided
' with service buildings, shelters,
tables, stoves, benches and other conveniences, including a telephone system with long distance connections.
For the convenience ot travellers
on the day of the openelng special
repair trucks and gasoline supplies
will be stationed along the way and
the road will be in charge of a corps
of Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
who will see that all traffic Is carried
out In accordance with the regulations.
You can always find trouble If you
go about looking for lt. The man
with a chip on his shoulder always
liuds somebody to knock lt off,
B
fygSJfcr
Cascade
OR
U. B. C. Beer
PURE FULL-STRENGTH BEERS
They Wear Well
On the Market as long as the Oldest inhabitants remember and still the most
POPULAR    BEERS
Sold in British Columbia
Old Friends Are Best
Leave Your Order at any Government Store   —
WE   DO   THE   REST
The
Farmers, Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
For Results Advertise in The Islander
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price ot first-class land
reduced to $5 an acre; second-class
to $2.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which Is non-timber
laud.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary Improvements on
respective claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims
for five years and make improvements
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivation of at least 0
acres before receiving Crown Orant.
Where pre-emptor in occupation
not less than 3 years, and has made
proportionate improvements, he may,
because of ill-health, or other cause,
be granted intermediate certificate of
improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent
ot $.160 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make improvements or record Bame will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
in less than 5 years, and improvements of $10.00 per acre, Including
!> acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required,
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land ln conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory Improvements
made and residence maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as homesites,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may' be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate of one-bait of
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purchase price, ls made.
l're-Kiuptors' Free Grants Act.
The scope of this Act is enlarged to
include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act is extended from for one year trom the death
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege ls also made re-
trocatlve.
No tees relating to pre-emptions
are due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes are remitted for five
years.
Provision for return ot moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 1914, on account of payments,
fees or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions. ,
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 19J0.
Nuli-PiirclMwers ot Crown Lands
Provision made for Issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Applications
must be made by May 1, 1920.
(•rasing
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock Industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner Annual grazing permits Issued based on numbers ranged: priority for established owners. Stock-
owners may form Associations for
range management. Free, or partially free, permits for settlers, campers
or travellers, up to ten head  15Great Big Sale Days SM£ffi
$1.00
115 pairs of mens white canvas Oxfords—coming in all sizes
and fittings. Sale price, per pair	
^sffl
$3.95
$3.75
Ladies Shoe-Strap Slippers—Oxfords and Pumps—Everything cut
wide open and your money back if
you are not satisfied. $7.50 regular
ladies black fine kid skin shoes—all
sizes and fittings. Sale
Bargain pair 	
$6.50 regular ladies Oxfords in
both black and brown kidskin-yes
and all sizes and fittings—in the offering.
Sale Price	
$7.50 regular ladies patent Oxfords
and pumps both french and military
heels, all sizes and foot- d»Q Af
ings. Sale price    «PO«t/tl
$9.50 regular Ladies grey swede
strap Oxfords in all sizes and fittings
a nice height walking (fir PA
heel. Sale Price, pair ....   «Pv»tlV
$5.50 regular ladies brown calf
shoes—high cut uppers in all sizes
and fittings, per pair, (fin CA
Sale price    tpO.tlV
$6.50 to $7.50 regular ladies slippers, straps, etc. in both brown and
black kid leathers, all sizes and fittings, per pair d»J QJT
Sale price     *P"X.VO
25c
Hosiery, for Ladies, Men, Girls and
boys—Prices pulverized—a sale that
stands alone. Mens all wool heavy
sox,
Sale price 	
Mens all pure wool heavy sox all
sizes per pair Ati ~
Sale price  *rl/V
Mens fine black cotton
sox—5 pairs for 	
Ladies fine black cotton
hose. Bargain. Sale price
$1.00
25c
Childrens Stockings all sizes, either
black or brown O^O
Pair Sale price 	
Childrens cotton stockings white on-
20c
ly, all sizes
Sale price
pair
Childrens lisle roll top stockings, all
sizes, all colors. CA^
Sale price rep pair 	
Childrens cotton cutie sox, all sizes
$1.00
Sale price, 3
pairs for
FRANK
CUMBERLAND - The Mc
MAKE WAY  HERE COMES
The Entire Stock Dragged to the E
above anything and everything.
$2,000 FREE in SLASHED PRICES TO TF
Shoes, Clothing and
A Sale that will cement the entire district i
Bargain giving with MacARTHUR
HERE IS A
One bewildered
mass of
BARGAINS
The sale price tags mean m
150 pairs, childrens brocaded sli
the offer.  Sale Bargains, pair .
75 pairs carpet slippers for child
Sale Bargain pair 	
SALE  Commenc
THE. CROWNING EVENT OF
ALL  TIME
Mens    Fur
Greatest
Childrens and Misses One Strap mary
jane slippers. Sizes 3 to 7'/4 childrens
mary jane strap slippers. Pair sale
price     $1.50
Sizes 8 to ll)i/2 childrens mary jane
strap slippers. Pair. Sale price $1.75
Sizes 11 to 2 Misses mary jane strap
slippers. Sale price per pair .... $2.45
LOOK IIERE-
Ladles   house  dresses   all  sizes.
Sale price   $1.50
Another one— large slzo all wool
hlankets, reg. $15.00 values juat
5 pairs. Pair sale price .... $045
KAIXCOATS LOOK!! LOOKMI! -
THEN LOOK AGA1N-
Ladies rubber raincoats assorted sizes
Sale price   $840
Boys raincoats, all boys sizes, sale
price      $M6
MENS FINE DRESS SHIKTS-
Mens silk shirts well worth $6.60
all sizes assorted stripes. Sale
price        $4.50
Mens dress shirts line Imported
prints assorted stripes and sizes
Sale price  $1.45
Tennis shoes both ladles and mens,
all sizes. Sale price per pair .... $1.75
Childrens white or tan tennis or running shoes, all childrens sizes. Sale
price per pair   $5*
A. W. MacARTHUR
Flannelettes, 245 yards ln all, prices
slashed—36 Inch wide white flannelettes—nice fleecy weave. Sale price
per yards,  10c
Striped flannelettes good wide widths
ot fine weaves. Yard sale price 26c
4 yards for   $1,00
WE MUST RAISE $5,000.00
OR- YOU UNDERSTAND
The Bargain Giver selling
FRANK PARTRIDGE'S ENTIRE STOCK
EVERY SINGLE DOLLARS WORTH OF GOODS ON ABSOLUTE SALE, WITH MacARTHUR MAKING THE PRICES, IT IS A CASE   OF   NOW   OR     NEVER—Al
LIKE A MAGNET THE CEN
TRE OF ATTRACTION
THIS SALE
—PEOP1
MENT TO
VANTAC
OFFERS.
BRACIN
SINGLE
BACK. I
THE PR)
SAV Iff
SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
ARTRIDGE
Shoe Store ■ CUMBERLAND
IMBERLAND'S GREATEST  EVENT
tin Block.   A Sale Head and Shoulders
*—""*—-*» iSGreatBigSaleDav.&•£&
$1.95
LOPLE OF THE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
leady-to-Wear Goods
me opinion.   A teeming avalanche of genuine
lULL AND ABSOLUTE CONTROL
IAJ0R SALE
100 pairs ladies white canvas Shoes, assorted sizes—both low and
military heels.   Sale price per pair	
' words—You save dollars, NOW!
8iZM*     75c
ted sizes
98c
You dare not, you
cannot afford to
MISS THIS SALE
Mens Shoes—Up go values down
comes the PRICE—Profits ignored
—the battle cry is SAVE! ! !
$7.50 regular mens tine brown and
black first grade calf dress shoes,
Goodyear welted soles, all sizes and
fittings. Pair. (fiA AC
Sale price    fP^.VD
$7.50 regular mens imported pit
shoes, all sizes a great bargain men
here don't miss them— (fi A Ar
Pair. Sale price    tyl±»lxO
Miners nailed shoes good stout split
leathers, all sizes. Pair (fiA AP
Sale Price     «pfi««7U
$5.50 regular boys boots sizes 1 to 5
a good fine dress boot of brown calf,
Goodyear soles. Pair (fin AA
Sale price     *p0.v\J
CHILDRENS SHOES, BOYS SHOES
MISSES SHOES
$3.95 to $4.50 regular youths school
shoes in a strong well wearing black
calf, sizes run from 11 (fin AA
to 13. Pair. Sale price   V««»t/U
Boys red stitched school boots, sizes
1 to 5, an absolutely solid leather boot
in every sense of the
word.. Pair sale price
$3.90
$5.00 regular   misses   lace   boots,
either black or brown calf leather
the sizes are full 11 to
2. Pair. Sale price	
$3.45
SATURDAY,  JUNE  30th °"2KW«
MENS ALL LEATHER
WORKING     GLOVES,
ALL SIZES. — SALE
PRICE PAIR 50c.
{JEW     THE CROWNING EVENT OF ALL TIME
leited.
shirts  in  all
lie
CHILDS   KHAKI   BIB
Is all sdes, as- OVERALLS   —   SALE
(ilar values to PRICE 75c
Die
liirts the color
sites.    Sals
  $1J8*
i price, ea. Me
■/    underwear
Irawers.    Sale
$U0
nderwear,   all
■drawers. Sale
$1*11 	
,_ LADIES!
• NECESSITY m m*rm»-r**m*.
IZZ** 1   fW    This is Ten Ordinary
l«'E 'jsm ^^
he-       m W ^a^es roofed mto one-
iii navy serge ^m^^^m^m^m^^m^rT „»..!,„--  ...,— .;.i   „,«»..
whue they       ■ ■ j       prices run not, you
pto^: 1 SAVE   DOLLARS
fared germents
$2.1.(10
)D JUDG-
THE AD-
|THIS SALE
ALL EM-
I— NOT A
LE HELD
[«   MAKES
ARE THE
OVER
/
LY A ONE-SIDED AFFAIR ALL IN YOUR FAVOR—DON'T MISS IT!—
ABSOLUTELY    EVERYTHING
SALE NOT A THING RE-
SERVED--NOW!
Ladies sweater pullover style, It's a
genuine old time sale with the ltd
off—folks. All wool ladles pullover
sweaters In all the very newest colors, and shades, all sizes. Sale Bargain      $$,76
{5.50 regular ladles pullover sweaters the very latest goods, and a direct
(rom the factory price cut to $3.75
Ladles coveralls ,ln all colors, of blue
white khaki, all sizes. Sale price $14)0
GOODRICH HI-PRESSED RUBBERS
ON SALE MEN t I I
10 inch uppers 5 eyelet style, all pure
white, all sizes pair, sale bargain     $5.15
Rubbers, 80 Inch uppers, pure white
rubber soles, black uppers, all sizes
in the lot. Pair sale price" $SM
Random Bargain all around the store
a Profitless-sale all in the Pnr.
..       chasers Favor
1000 yards Ginghams In all the different plaids and checks. Sale Bargain
3 yards for  .'.  $1*0
Turkish towels full size 24 inches by
45 Inches sale price 55c each, 34 inches wide domestic prints absolutely fast colors, all the different designs included. Sale Bargain 27 Vfe
yard. Turkish towelling wide width
Sale price 2 yards for  55c
Mens felt hats all colors and sizes.
$4.50 regular values, all to go at Sale
price     $2.45
Boys tweed pants smaller sizes, sale
price per pair   $1.95
Mens tweed striped cottonade pants
sale price per pair  $2.25
Boys Khaki drill pants all Blzes. Sale
price per pair   $145
Hoys tweed pants all sizes, 28 to 33
sale price per pair  $2.45
BOYS-
LEATHER     BELTS
SALE    PRICE    50c
EACH
MENS—
LEATHERS BELTS. —
SALE PRICE 75c.
A. W. MacARTHUR
The Bargain Giver Selling
FRANK PARTRIDGE'S ENTIRE STOCK .     ■ '.-.raw™»»" SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
NINE1
Interesting News of
British Columbia
Along the Line o fthe Canadian National Railways, where the
Mountain Scenery is Beautiful along the Skeena River
The loss you 'oulc!
have to take on the
re-sale of a $2,000
to $4,000 car would
pay
for a
Ford.
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
Courtenay, B.C.
■ jfli MWK
in
li T'
The Superior Grocers"
Where  Most  People  Trade
Strawberries
Fresh picked Vancouver Island Strawberries arriving Every Day.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR PRESERVING
BERRIES
NOW
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
Following a luncheon of the advisory committee at Vancouver of the
Const Range Steel Company, at which
representative;! from various public
homes and municipalities were present to hear a report from Mr. H. J.
I.anilahl. a number of district convenors have been appointed to assist
lhe advisory committee. These include Mayor Busby of Nanaimo,
Reeve Proulx of Coqultlam, Major W.
II. Mills of Port Moody, L. B. Lusby
of New Westminster, J. A, Cunningham of Vancouver and Councillor D.
W. Grimmittt of South Vancouver.
Samples of cast iron made from
B. C. ores were exhibited at the meeting. Rome of tlle stuff Is being made
Into street manholes for the Seattle
street department, while u large cog
wheel made from 1) C. ore Is on view
lu London, England. Mr. E. K. Par-
ham, steel expert of Seattle stated
that one magnetite deposit on the
coast from which the samples were
made, Is big enough to supply nnd
keep n plant going for fifty years producing n thousand tons of steel a day.
* *     *
Repair work to a large number of
bridges have been ordered by Hon.
W. R, Sutherland, minister of Public
! works. Theso Include McLennan
| River bridge near South Fort
George, a new bridge to he called
Lamb Bridge at Vanderhoof; reconstruction of the Stewart Creek bridge
near Copper City on the Skeena; and
repairs to two bridges on Red Mountain road in the Slocau district.
On Vancouver Island the bridge on
the Canadian Highway outside Alberni is to be reconstructed, also the
bridge nine miles out on the Lake
Shore road at Sproat Lake, and the
bridge on the Ucluelet—Toflno road,
two miles from Ucluelet west wharf.
Repairs to the extent of $1800 have
been ordered for the Morrison and
Davis Creek bridges in the Newcastle
district.
* *     *
Extensive road work totalling
$30,000 tor the Fort George district
has been authorised by Hon. Dr. W.
H, Sutherland for hglhway and land
settlement roads.
Appropriations have been made as
follows: Land settlement roads ,
$5000; BcBrlde — Tete Jaune road,
$50,001 Fort George — Aleza road,
$10,000; Fort George -» Hazelton road
$10,000.
All the work Is to he carried out by
the government engineers, using day
labor.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
,-—-, ■»-■-■
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone 'hu Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
Attorney-General, Manson, estimates the cost of a plebiscite on the
export liquor house question. as ordered by the Senate, to be not less
than $75,000.
.     .     .
I    Despite the defeat of the    flreboat
by-law  at  Vancouver last Saturday,
I efforts are being made by Interested
property owners to secure the flreboat hy some other means and a com
mlttee of    business    men  is .  being
formed for this purpose.    The    fact
! that lt was proposed to purchase an
; American craft appears to have mlll-
j tnted against the success of the bylaw in many quarters.
♦ *     *
The Lady Klndersley, Arctic trading
ship of the Hudson's Bay Company.
| will leave Vancouver this week for
Its long trip up north. It ls expected that the vessel will be away for
nineteen months. This Is her second
trip and this time will have the advantage of a powerful wireless set
which will enable her captain to
keep In touch with the outside world
during the long period during which
she is frozen in. The wireless is in
charge of a former Royal Navy operator which was with Admiral Bent-
ty in the big North Sen fight.
• *     *
Instructions were handed out today
nt Victoria to proceed with work ln
the Cranbrook district nt Fairy Creek
bridge, Lame Joe's bridge and the
Nicholson Creek bridge, the latter of
which will help to open up the Good
Luck and Radio mining claims.
Fifteen hundred dollars ure to he
spent on Nine Mile Mountain road
near Smithers to aid mineral development. A new approach Is to be made
for the South Kltsault Suspension
bridge. The work to be carried on
by District Engineer J. A. Stephen,
employing day labor.
* *     *
Attorney-General Manson announces that through the activity of the
government employment bureaux the
demands of employers have been met
ns never before and those seeking
employment have been assisted In a
marked manner.
Actions speak louder than words,
according to the old adage and the
wny business Is picking up In British Columbia ls the best proof that
good times hn»ve arrived. The annual report of the department of labour
shows   that   the   provincial   pay-roll
Ilo=Ho Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, June 29th and 30th
Now for a Big One —
MATINEE SATURDAY 2.30 P ,M.
"Kindred
of the
Dust"
Hy Peter B. Kyne
See this big story of
Nor'western Love.
Brought thrillingly to
the screen.
A picture as sweeping
as the league-long rollers, as strong as the forest giants that tang it.
Sweet poigant "NAN
OF SAWDUST PILE"-
the little outcast who
makes two mistakes in
life, when she leaves a
bigamist deceive her into marriage—and again
when she loves the man
she shouldn't.
Good comedies will be
screened with this big
feature.
Coming—3—BIG DAYS—3
MONDAY, TUESDAY W EDNESDAY, JULY 2—3—4
"When   Knighthood  Was in Flower"
The seasons dazzling sensation, you. will see gallant Knights clashing while hundreds of fair women applaud.
The thrilling elopement of the herione in boys clothing with her lover, including
the leap for life on horseback from a high bridge.
3000—People take part in this picture—3000
Children—25c Adults—50c.
Special Matinee, Tuesday, July 3rd, 2.30 p.m.
Children—15c Adults—35c
Coming, next Friday and Saturday, July 6—7th—Strongheart,   the   Dog   in
"BRAWN OF THE NORTH"
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    ■    Cleaning    -    Repairs
Telephone 1.    -     I*. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, II. 0.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.    Reg. by Examination for B, C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
Cumberland  Hotel  Parlors
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9 p.m,
NURSING HOME
Courtenay now boasts of a
private Institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attrec
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 VEAHS' liXl'KUIENCE
UNION   HOTEL
CDSTBEJtLAjil), It. ('.
Comfort   and  Homelike   service,
2(i   rooms,   electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone i">.
It. YATES, Manager.
The Cost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical installation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has lo be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with tho latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the BEST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
tor 11122 waB ¥86,193,190, an Increase I
over   1921 of $0,500,000.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered wllli llif valves nf the mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount ot water to run to waste, we
theretore wish to point out thnt lt Is a serious offence to tamper
with fnifli valves, and should the offending parties be appre-
hcndeil, ihey will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
tho law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED TEN
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1923
FREE
A 10'Shave Tube
Men who make this test
Find quicker, easier shaving
We want you to test a shaving cream which, millions
of men will tell you, gives quicker, easier shaves
It cust ua IS  months' time —130 experiments—to
perfect it.
But the result was a cream in S distinct ways better:
It softens the toughest beard in one minute—without
rubbing in.
Multiplies itself 250 times in rich lather,
THE I'ALMOUVE COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
Moinn-.il, Que. Toronto, Ont. Winnipeg, Man.
Lather will last 10 minutes on the face.
Strong bubbles hold hairi erect—tor easier cutting.
Skin is left toft and toothed by lotion-like effect of
palm and olive oils.
If PALMOLIVE SHAVING CREAM does all this
you will want to know It. If it doesn't—well, we are
the losers. Mail coupon for free tube today.
PALMOLIVE
SHAVING CREAM
10 SHAVES FREE
Just fill In your name and mail to
The Palmolive Company of Canada, Limited,
Dept. D-404 Toronto, Ont.
In every part of Canada it's the same
story: —"Dunlop is the 'boy' for Big
Mileage!"
DUNLOP TIRES
CORD and FABRIC
Resilient, Rugged, Reliable
Say to your garage man.—"I want the
Cord Tire all Motordom is talking
about."   He'll hand you a "DUNLOP."
See it on the sole
Say Fellows!
HAVE you heard about thosn
sneakers with the Boy Scout'
emblem on the sole?
They looked so good to me that I
got Dad to get mc a pair, and say—he
said himself thut hu had never seen
finer running shoes.
They're strong too—have to be,
you know, to stand the wear that
boys like you and me give them.
Lots more down nt
Gordon's
THE POWER OF
SUGGESTION
PsW
SPECIALS—
Children's Brown Leather Sandals, sizes 4's
to 8M> per pair 	
Children's White Canvas Yachting Oxfords
per pair 	
Ladies' Black and White Canvas, one Strap
Slippers, per pair 	
Ladies' Black and White Canvas Slippers,
Low Heel, per pair 	
Buy Your Shoes here and get Satisfaction.
GORDONS
GROCERIES — DRY GOODS — BOOTS AND SHOES
Phone 133 Phone 133
$1.25
$1.40
$2.75
$2.75
Travelling ls becoming more and
more of a fine art. Formerly it was
regarded simply as a process of getting from one place to another—most
tiresome but unavoidable. Now lt ls
looked upon as a joyful undertaking,
a delightful interlude in the regular
routine of life, especially when the
journey is over the lines ot the Canadian National Railways. The keynote of the Canadian National Railways is Service. That service alms
to make the passenger as comfortable as possible and to save him every bit of unnecessary effort. Thinking is a mental effort. Patrons of the
Dlnlng-Car Service will now And
themselves saved that trouble, by a
casual glance at the little dodger
that is distributed throughout the
coaches on all trains to which Dining or Cafe Cars are attached. Upon
the dodger, which is printed in both
English and French, are several suggestions for a suitable combination
nf dishes for the coming meal. Prices
for a complete menu for Breakfast,
Dinner and Supper range from 35
cents to $1.25. The traveller merely
needs to decide what he wishes to
pay, and upon entering thc Dinlng-
Car he will And himself served as
quietly and satisfactorily as he would
lu any well-appointed home.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C, B.A.
ARCHITECT
009 II.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONE 2B1II      VICTORIA, R.C,
Provincial Pars.
Hon. John Hart, minister nf finance
will visit Oreat Britain shortly, ln order tn make a study of financial and
Industrial conditions. He states that
British capital ls becoming more and
more Interested ln Investments In this
province and ls hopeful of stirring up
a wider Interest among Old Country
Investors In Industrial enterprises
here.
•     *     .
As  a result of  requests  and  ad-
j vice from all over the province, the
government has  decided  to proceed
with the construction of the new University of British Columbia library at
' Point Orey, the structure lo cost ap-
, proximately   $340,000.    Already    the
; science building Is well on the road
to completion and with 52.000    volumes to be accommodated, It Is considered advisable to proceed with the
work without delay. Hon. W. H. Sutherland, minister of public    works,
will call tor tenders on the project
as soon as the plans are completed
by the architects, Messrs. Sharp and
Thompson.
Modern Golf
^^<j(jjrank^hompsor\
NOTED CANADIAN GOLFERS
EASE vs. EFFORT
Very few players can associate
ease of effort with a long ball. They
feel that only a most violent effort
will produce a long drive. This Is
all wrong. Occasionally the beginner ls told to hit the ball easily and
sometimes he ls surprised to find the
ball has gone much farther than he
intended it to go. If he were wise
this experiment would cause him to
pause and ponder the cause of such
distance. Invariably he would find
it was because he allowed his muscles to remain flexible on the back
swing. Doing things comfortably ls
the keynote of the whole swing. It ls
what gives results, because the power
is being applied properly.
The difference between good and
poor players ls largely one of. flexibility. Usually the beginner stands
in front of the ball with every muscle
set. This only invites disaster. The
moment one has to brace his muscles
he is certainly drifting away from
the proper method. Comfort should
be the check on every style of play.
Moat Be Bold
I hope I shall not be understood as
advocating a "dolling" game. Far
from it. One must be bold and courageous If he would win matches.
Hard hitting is to be encouraged. A
spared shot is one of the hardest In
the game to play accurately. But the
added effort should come at the right
time. Most players when they wish
to drive a long ball grip the club
tighter and put the effort in too soon,
usually somewhere In the back swing.
As soon as the muscles become tense
they do not work smoothly, and the
reason why so many swings appear
jerky is because the player has put
on the force too soon which Is oftentimes before the back swing Is completed.
A good example of this is seen in
playing into the wind. More foozled
shots take place Into the wind than
with it and the reason is that the
player feels he must make a greater
effort. It would be wise counsel to
try to hit more accurately. When
we put In more effort we usually hit
too soon and "hitting too soon" ls
one of the inherent dangers ot the
game.
The beginner uses up as much
energy and more than the expert, but
most of it is dissipated maintaining
balance, whereas the latter gets most
ot it on the ball.
.Muscles Must Be Relaxed
In playing into the wind or ln trying for greater distances at any par
ticular hole, the player should be
sure that the muscles are relaxed.
The back swing should be made
smoothly and easily, and the effort
should not be put into the shot until
the down swing is well on its way.
Hold back and "take it easy" on tbe
back swing is one ot the few tips in
golf that is worth remembering. Hit
hard and fast on the down awing lor
the ball will not go far unless the
swing Is fast.
One should guard against straddling
ln golf, for the reason that it tenses
the leg and hip muscles and makes
equllibrum harder to maintain. Curiously one has the sensation of greater
strength when tbe legs are wide and
tensed, but considering the work required of the leg muscles in the up
swing the sensation is a fallacious
one, and not to be followed. Sensations
are notoriously unreliable. Sometimes pain ls felt In the orbital centre
which has its origin in some offending molar, or again In amputation
cases pain Is localized where the foot
used to be.
The Arm and the Club
Confusion Is continually cropping
out in golf. At the present time most
golfers try to obtain a straight left
arm. We have been taught from
time Immemorial that the left arm
and the club shaft are to be conceived as one continuous part This
Is quite right. Where the error
comes is ln consciously straightening
the left arm from the start, whereas
it is consequence of the swing. This
straightening occurs ofter the swing
has begun, and not before. One does
not straighten out the arm deliberately; it is straightened out by the
club Is the very last thing to start
moving. The Ilrst movements start
at the left ankle, up through tha leg
and hip muscles which causes the
shoulders and body to turn; the
hands move last. The Inertia of the
club must be overcome and the turn
of the shoulders and left arm cause
a strain at the wrist joint The hands
are dragged, so to speak, for a few
Inches and then the club head follows
The left arm and club do not get ln
a straight line until the club has
gone some distance. When the club
gets going its own momentum causes
it quickly to become the leading
member.
But as pointed out before, the left
arm becoming straight, Is only an
Incidental of the swing.   When one
consciously makes the left arm
straight there ls the greatest danger
ot causing the swing to loae Its flexibility and whenever this happens it
means a loss ot distance.
Flexibility Desired
Rigidity is the negation of power.
In playing approach shots or spoon
shots where accuracy and not distance I sthe great factor the swing
certainly becomes more compact But
where distance la desired the more
flexibility one can get into the swing
the better. This is why one who ts
anxious for length should be very care
ful about adopting blindly the
straight left arm.
The golf swing when effective is
performed naturally. When one attempts to consciously build It up or
develop it, an element of effort Is Introduced which Invariably destroys
the whole thing.
sf**
RAPES
Rich, ripe, healthful grapes,
grown in the famous vineyards
of Southern Europe—produce
the cream of tartar from which
Royal Baking Powder is made.
The most eminent authorities
in the world say cream of tartar
makes the best and most healthful baking powder.
ROYAL
Baking Powder
MADE IN CANADA
Contains No Alum—Leaves No Bitter Taste
Specials This Week
26 inches Ginghams, in Check, Blue, Pink       OA/»
Brown and Mauve, per yard   *i\lv
32 inches Ginghams, special (fii  AA
3 yards for       «pl.UV
New Valencines Laces C ^      "I A/»
per yard       OV &  Ivv
TOWELS—
A good large Bath Towel, regular KA/»
65c, This week    Ovt
White Bath Towels, slightly f\(\t»
soiled, to clear, each    OUC
Bathing Suits, all sizes—
Bathing Caps, each
25c, 35c * 50c
Couches, Bed Lounges and Camp Cots and Mattress.
Kitchen Chairs, Golden finish (fi-t   PA
a—
Children's High Chairs, Rocking Horses and Kiddie
Cars.
Dining Tables, Chairs and Rockers.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
THE INCREASING VALUE OF YOUR
TELEPHONE
YOUR TELEPHONE is of greater value
as each month goes by. With a steady
increase in the number of new telephones
you are constantly able to talk with a
larger number of people. This applies
to different parts of the province.
It means to the business man that he is in close
touch with more people. As every telephone is a long
distance telephone, anyone on the Lower Mainland or
Vancouver Island may be reached at a moment's notice.   The conversation is direct the reply instant
Don't overlook the cheaper night rates. Between
7 p.m. and 8 a.m., you get three times the day period
at the same price.
British Columbia Telephone Co. SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1623
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
ELEVE.
d.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding  District
BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Preveni=
Forest Fires
The fires that start each summer might have come
from YOUR cigarette-stub.
The Forest charred and burned might have been the
result of YOUR camp-fire.
The wooded hillsides might have been blackened by
YOUR lighted matches.
The burned farms might be the wages paid by YOUR
thoughtlessness.
Idle logging camps might be the result of YOUR momentary carelessness.
If forest fires annually destroy our natural wealth, if
money is to be spent in fighting fires instead of
building up the Province, then the loss is YOURS
and that of the generations to come. Be careful.
IT   PAYS
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
WW
1
ELECTRIFY
FOR THE WARM WEATHER
— We Have in Stock —
RANGES, FANS, WASHERS, TOASTERS, TABLE
STOVES, IRONS, PERCOLATORS, ETC.
Complete Lines of SHADES and FIXTURES
— Radio Sets and Parts —
When
Courtenay.
We are Electrical Contractors
in need of Electrical Work, Phone 164,
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
I
Phone 164
Courtenay
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in for an estimate.
Prices rea»onable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at tlio Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
FOR
LOGGER FOUND DEAD
On Sunday morning at Camp 2, of
the Comox Logging and Railway
Company the body of William Stewart was found lying beneath the
blacksmith shop. The deceased had
evidently fallen off the walk after
having been drinking, as, when
found he was in a reclining position
with his head bent forward on his
chest. He leaves no people In this
country as far as known but the address of Mrs. Thomas Stewart, West
Mulr, Forfarshire, Scotland, was
found on some of bis correspondence.
The deceased was a man about fifty-
three years of age.
CUMBERLAND
DEFEATED AT
POWELL RIVER
Powell River defeated the locals at
Powell River on Sunday afternoon
last in the first game of the new
league series. There is not men that
con be sold of the game except that
the first four Innings were as closely
contested as the most ardent fan
could desire. Cumberland went from
home a crippled team, King ploying
first and .Mitchell taking core of the
hot corner while Marocchi wos moved
over to shortstop. Larson did the pitching for Cumberland and the loss
of the game connot be carged altogether to him although his offerings
were hit more thou frequently enough
to win ony gome. Errors galore were
registered against his teammates. On
the day's play it can be said that
Powell River put up a better exhibition and deserved to win. If the
visitors had been able to field their
full team the best game of the season would undoubtedly have been
the result. Richards behind the bat
caught his usual steady game and
Jimmy Dangerfield in right fleld
grabbed a liner that was labelled for
four bags if it had got away. On the
Powell River team Garneau pitched
his usual four Innings during which
time he had Cmberland at his mercy
at oil times. He was relieved ln the
fifth by Jeff Davis, whose balls are
thrown lightning fast. His teammates gnve him o few anxious moments in the sixth when they heaved
the ball all over the lot, giving away
three runs. Frank Flett behind the
bat mode a sensational catch of a
high fly but was a little bit off in his
throwing to the keystone sack. Stubby- Hanson in the left garden for
Powell River, and he certainly fielded his position in big league fashion
besides batting well. Mr. George Johnson acted as umpire and the entire
absence of baiting ls proof enough
that he gave satisfaction. The score
was eight to live with the paper makers on the long end. The team went
across to Powell River on the steamer Charmer, leaving Comox at one
o'clock and returned to the same
place at eight o'clock thus givnig a
great opportunity for an afternoon's
outing. The next league game also
takes place at Powell River when
Courtenay goes over the water, to
help their neighbors celebrate Canada's birthday next Monday. This
game will be watched with more than
passing iuterest because If Powell
River wins that team will have a lead
that will be hard to overcome.
PROMOTION LIST COURTENAY HIGH SCHOOL
High School Examination Results at
the Courtenay High School pupils
names appearing in order of merit.
Div. I.—Ena McLennan, Chester
Haas, Jean Beasley, Doris Beard, Marion McPherson, Madeline Swan, Cyril Beard, Margaret Duncan. Probation: Harry McQuillan, Mildred McQuillan.
Div. II.—First Class: Irene Smith.
Second Class: Harold Tull, Muriel
McPhee, Nellie Taylor, Beatrice
Catchpole, Helen Towler, Maud Ault,
Violet Trotter, Kathleen Williams,
Kathleen Pierce, May Moncrieff. Nora Forrest, Ann A. Moncrieff.
Probation: Charles Sutton; Lawrence Moncrieff, Percy Cliffe.
Last Saturday night Mr. John Sutton had as guests aboard his launch
Messrs. Wm. Hayman, L. R. Cliffe,
Len. Piket, Elmer Loggie, and Frank
Miller. They left Courtenay tor a
week-end cruise to Yellow Island
where they did some fishing and returning home Sunday night.
Excursion steamer Prince John of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Steamship
Co. will leave Comox at 6 a.m. and
Union Bay at 7 a.m. on Monday, July
2nd, for Powell River. Return fare
13.00.
PURCHASE PROPERTY
At a recent meeting of the Courtenay Golf Club it was decided to buy
the property of Mr. Whlttome of Duncan, containing about 80 acres, situated on the Island Highway for $8500.
The club will incorporate the members subscribing (5000.00 towards the
purchase price.
EDWARD HICKS IS
INSTANTLY KILLED
PREPARE YOUR CHILDREN
NOW FOR THE
Summer Vacation
WE STOCK
CHILDREN'S BLOUSES — CHILDREN'S SHOES
CHILDREN'S HATS and CAPS,
CHILDREN'S TIES
AND OTHER GALA-DAY WEARING APPAREL
We can also outfit adults and our Prices Are Right
t)pen Saturday Night till 10 o'clock
***.      Ir^ei      ^^       Ir^ej     Ir***]      ***.      ^"J      Ir^1!
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C. m
On Thursday afternoon between
three and four o'clock, an accident
occurred at Bloedel. Welsh and Stewarts Camp near Union Bay, that
robbed Edward Hicks of his lite. He
waB working near a train loaded with
logs, when one of the big sticks fell
from its place on a car and struck
him. He was, according to companions, killed Instantly. The late Mr.
Hicks is mourned by a father, Mr. A.
J. Hicks, Comox, a sister in Nanaimo
and a brother living at Courtenay.
He was a member of the Native Sons
of Canada. The body will be sent
this morning (Saturday) to Nanaimo,
for Interment In the. family plot.
ROYSTON NOTES
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Graham and
family have taken up their residence
here for the summer months.
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Dando of Cumberland have moved down for the
summer vacation.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNEK
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland and Courtenay.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
I PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
misBloners were admitted  by all to
be capable men and their reports were
accepted by the returned men as being fair and reasonable. The Minister
in charge of that Department    repeatedly stated In the House that lt
was hi slntentlon to bring down legislation to carry out those reports.
Today he did so, saying he had the !
various  amendments drawn  by the j
ablest and most experienced law officers obtainable, had submitted them
to the G.W.V.A. and also to the Royal
Commission both of whom   endorsed
them as satisfactory.                         j
He might have sought political capital by blaming the late Govt, for I
passing  defective  legislation  or  for j
appointing as Members of the Pen-1
sion Board, men whose   autocratic
and often unjust interpretation of the
law, caused a great deal of the dissatisfaction,—but he did not do so, i 	
merely  stated  the  facts  and  asked :
for the legislation to pass. And yet! Union Bay Road
the greater part of a day had to   be 	
spent by members of the Opposition,    m-f^n r\ A - -    ._..... .
cither ln moving amendments which   J(j5.       DAMONTE
might look nice to some   particular,        rvDivoki    nn
man  but  which  were  unreasonable j       GENERAL   DELIVERY
and unworkable for general applica- ; _
tlon or else in making long "patrlo- j Cm1> Wm< ^ flM|| #f ^ ^
Mr. J. W. Tremlett has taken a
a place at Royston beach and Intends
staying here for a few weeks this
summer. t
Mr. and Mrs. Geo Richardson are
now camping at Royston Beach.
The Public Schools closed yesterday
for the summer vacation.
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Ceurtenay, B.C.
Speaking
of Service
—Do you know that wc not on-
SHIPPING AT UNION BAY
List of steamers that has taken on
coal at the loading wharves of   the
• Canadian   Collieries   Dunsmuir,  Ltd.
nt Union Bay, during tbe past week.
Princess  Ena, Victoria;   Chehalen,
coastwise:   Stray ft  Scow, Victoria;
I Charmer, coastwise; Active, coastwise; Cheerful, coastwise; Hulk No.
j 100, Vancouver: Dole, coastwise;
ly make Delicious Chocolates [ Dauntless, coastwise; Beatrice, coast-
| wise; Coaster, coastwise; Faultless,
coastwise; Nitinat & Scow, Victoria;
Nelanope, Vancouver: Shamrock,
coastwise; Tuathtaskl ft Scow, coastwise:  Storm King, coastwise.
tic appeals" to the Govt, to pass the j
very legislation which tt had
brought down for the very purpose of
passing.
An outsider, listening, might have
formed the opinion that it was the
Opposition which was trying to pass
this legislation Instead of the Govt,
the  plain  facts  being that the  late
Govt, passed unsatisfactory measures dealing with these matters
which were made much worse by the
way in which the Pension Board mis-
Interpreter them, that the present
Govt, have made full enquiry and are
now following entirely the recommendation of the Royal Commission
which also has the approval of the
G.W.V.A.  The Opposition, by a tew
Delivered te All Parts of Dlitrlet
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHAROB8
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
•r Leave Orders %\ TMftM HeUL
D. Campbell's %
Meat Market 'j
and nil sort of Delicious Candy.
r
-But likewise we serve Light
Lunches and Ice Cream.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S
WEAR
Dainty Creutlniix at Musi Itcnsoimlile
Prices
Buy Here nnd Save Money
ARMSTRONG'S -Cumberland, B. C.
lOOVj. Dunsmuir Street
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
—BUT. This is a Confectionery
Store.   That is a Joy to all,
. who know it.
Busy Bee
Write For Prices to : „
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON | C O il I CCtlOTiery
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office tm Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
COUKTENAY, B. <:.
Next to Malpas & Wilson
OBSERVATIONS OF
A FEDERAL MEMBER
June 11th.—An Illustration of how
time and money ls wasted for political purposes!
Last year a Committiee of the
House which sat all Session and
went thoroughly Into all questions re
returned soldiers, pensions, Insurance,
etc., recommended certain reforms
which wero carried out and further
recommended Investigations by a
Royal Commission.
This Commission went all over
Canada, collecting Information and
made two interim reports.   The Com-
My endeavor ia te please my
customers, and that with beet
"Service,"    reasonable    pricee,
speeches spread in Hansard hope to i and best and freshest quality of
cover up their own failure in these   ,»00(ig
matters but the disabled soldiers will
not forget the conditions  prevailing i
2 to 4 years ago.
June 12th.—Long dlscussslon on
the dismissal of a postmistress for
political reasons. Subject introduced '
by a Conservative but proved rather
o boomerang, lt being shown that the
lady had allowed a political meeting to be held in the post office, had
removed names from the list of vot-
ers hung up In post office and had
been actively engaged in bringing
voters to the poll. Moreover It was
shown that this waB the only dismissal in that riding since last election
but that after the election of 1911,
the then Conservative Member and
father of the lady in question had
been responsible for the dismissal
of 23 postmasters, in the same area!
June 14th.—Finance Minister in
defiance of protests from Opposition
and Independent elements ln the
House passed the resolution limiting
the maximum stamp tax on cheques
to $1.00 Instead of $2.00 as formerly
so that all cheques over 12600.00 pay
no stamp tax on the amount beyond
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B. 0.
$26000.0, a plain catering to the Big
Interests.
He adopted the suggestion made
early in the Session by the member
for Comox-Alberni, that the stamps
placed on cheques must be revenue
stamps and not postage stamps. This
will mean a considerable economy in
the cost of collection as vendors of
revenue stamps receive only l1-..
commission instead of from 20 to
W/i on postage stamps. It also
makes ft possible to know how much
revenue is obtained from the Post office Dept. on sale postage stamps
and how much accrues to the Customs Dept. from the cheque tax. TWELVE
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 30th, 1923
NEW RATINE
An express shipment of smart designs in Ratine
was delivered today comprising some of the newest
pattern and cloths.
Large check Ratine in Copenhagen, Pink, Marse,
Helio, old Rose and Blue, Price (fi"t   *jr
per yard         tpAalO
This is a really beautiful cloth.
i      -tit- ■•:_■•. •„..        . '■'■ ■"■/:.". i»"*~r~--"»s«wie*
RATINE in Oriental colorings, only_two dress
length, one lengtti'to a color. A very pretty design.
New colorings in Voile with floral designs, in Pink
and Helio ground, most suitable for dresses.
PLAIN RATINE in Orange, double   (fi-t   AA
width. Price per yard    «PA»vFU
NEW HOME SPUNS in shades of Blue, 54 inches
wide. A very desirable cloth at a really d»"| CA
cheap price. Per yard     tPXeVV
GINGHAMS for summer dresses in many new
checks and weaves.
GINGHAM'DRESSES in good quality and smart
styles, for the hot days.
NEW COTTON VOILE WAISTS, Oriental de-
signs.
Price
<p.6*«/5
WHITE VOILE WAISTS, well made and a good
quality Voiles. Prices—
<bl*«7«)j       tpZeZD*.       <&U.lD
DRYGOODS
GENTS ftJRNISHiiVOS
"Doctor, If there Is anything definite the matter with me, don't put the
wind-up me by giving lt a long Latin
name. Tell me what it is in plain
English."
"Very well, then; to be quite frank,
you are lazy."
"Thanks, doctor. Now tell me the
scientific name for it, as I've got to
report to the wife."
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—JERSEY COW FOR
sale—3 year old. Rich milker. Very gentle. Make good Family Cow.
$60.00. Apply R. Waddell, Mlnto.
J. 30.
7 HEAD YOUNG STOCK.—JERSEY
Pure Bred and all are from High
producing dams. 15 to 18 months
old. A good investment tor the
Dairyman. Apply K. Waddell, Mlnto. J. 30
FOR SALE—CREAM PERSIAN KIT-
tens, also a year old mole full
grown. A beautiful cat. Apply Mrs.
Waddell, R. R. 1, Cumberland.
FOR SALE:—FOUR HOLE ALBION
Cook Stove, suitable for shack or
camp. Apply 108 Maryport Ave.
J 23.
DRESSMAKING — CHILDREN'S
Clothes — Silk Dress Girdles and
Tassels, made to order. Reasonable prices.  Box 560, Cumberland.
WANTED:— A POSITION IN A PRI-
vate family for Light House work,
and care of children. Apply Box 15,
Courtenay, B. C.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor.  of  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite  Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
WONDERFUL
VALUE FOR $2.00
It is a cource of constant wonder
to publishers the world over how The
Family Herald and Weekly Star of
Montreal can be printed and mailed
to any part of Canada for the small
subscription price of two dollars a
year.
Some other papers may quote a
lower subscription price but they do
not contain one-fifth, nor In many cases not even one-tenth of the reading
matter published each week by the
Family Herald and Weekly Star.
People everywhere are now selecting
their reading material with greater
discrimination than in the past. Instead of being loaded with a lot of
second rate papers and magazines,
they are now. saving money by discarding the chaff and subscribing to
the Family Herald and Weekly Star
of Montreal—tho ono big all-round
journal that provides In its seventy-
two pages every week an ample volume and variety ot reading to satisfy
every member of the family.
In addition to being the best Informed, most practical and helpful
paper for farmers, the Family Herald
and Weekly Star provides the best of
serial and short stories, complete
departments for women and young
folks, powerful editorials on the most
important topics of the day, a complete weekly digest of world news, in
fact a veritable library of information, entertainment and inspiration.
On account of its clean, wholesome
and helpful character, Its pbenlmenal
value and powerful Influence tor
good, It Is not too much to say that the
Family Heraldl and Weekly Star ot
Montreal should be ln every Canadian
home.
Born:—To the wife of Mr. Percy
Booth on Saturday morning last, a
daughter.
Mr. Felix Thomas made a business
trip to Victoria tills week, going by
motor car.
Local Briefs
Miss Violet Graham arrived trom
Victoria on Saturday to spend the
summer vacation with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Graham.
Andrew Thomson left tor Victoria
on Wednesday.
Mrs. R. Ray and Mrs. R. Thompson, motored to Duncan on Monday.
Mrs. J. Newton of Nanaimo arrived
In town on Saturday and la the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham.
Miss Amy Dallas returned trom a
weeks vacation tn Victoria and Vancouver.
Mr. C. B. Wood, Principal ot the
Cumberland High School left tor Toronto on Monday on a twelve months
leave of absence.
Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries,
(Dunsmuir) Ltd. left for Victoria on
Wednesday.
A. J. Merry, Chief of Police, left
tor Vancouver on Monday and returned en Wednesday.
J. W. Cooke, PoBtmaster, left tor
Vancouver on Saturday aud returned
on Monday.
Donald Watson ot the local branch
ot the Royal Bank of Canada returned on Monday from a two weeks
vacation.
J. W. Patterson, Inspector ot
Schools, accompanied by Mrs. Patterson and children, were In the district during the week. Mr. Patterson
has been supervising the Entrance
and Matriculation Examinations.
Mildred Halcrow, for the past two
years nurse at the Vancouver General
Hospital arrived on Wednesday on a
visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Halcrow.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Mazzoline of Seattle and MrB. and Miss Mazzoline ot
Extension motored to Cumberland,
and were the guests ot Mrs. V. Ma-
rlnelli for the week-end.
Miss Lou Sheppard left on  Monday tor South Wellington.
MrB. Edward Jones and family left
for Portland on Saturday where they
will reside ln future.
A. R. Stacey of the Electrical
Dept. of the Canadian Collieries returned from a visit to Vancouver on
Saturday.
Mrs. Caleb Dando, Jr. left for Extension on Monday on a visit to ber
parents Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Mitchell.
Mr. and Mrs. James Dick spent the
week-end at Little River.
Charles Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries, returned from a visit to Vancouver on
Sunday. £„.
W. A. Owen, construction Engineer
returned from Nanaimo on Friday.
Miss Connie Bird left for Vancouver on Saturday.
Mrs. Charles J. Parnham was taken
to the Cumberland General Hospital
on Monday. Her numerous friends
will wish her a speedy recovery.
The Girls Club of the Cumberland
High School presented Miss C. B. Dalton, assistant Principal with a Cut
Glass Bowl as a mark of appreciation.
Miss Dalton has resigned her position with the High School and le leaving the district
MrB. Colin Campbell, eon and
daughter left on Friday for San Diego, California where they will reside
in future.
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wler arrived
home Monday after attending the funeral of their grandson Gordon Wler
Forsyth whos death occurred ln Los
Angeles on tbe 13th Inst. Gordon waa
sixteen years old and second son of
the late Rev. S. M. Forsyth B. D., and
Mrs. Darch. The remains were accompanied from Los Angeles to Gol-
dendale, Wash., where interment took
place In the family plot of the cemetery there.
Messrs. Sackl, Conti and Jack Mo-
nohan returned from Brule on Tuesday.
It Is reported that James Halllday
of the New Home Bakery, Dunsmuir
Avenue, Cumberland, has sold out
his business to John Mann ot Vancouver, who It Is said will take
charge on about the 1st day of August.
It ls the Intention of Mr. and Mrs.
James Halllday and family to leave
British Columbia in the near future
and return to Scotland.
The matron and members of the
staff of the Cumberland General Hoa
pttal entertained a few friends to a
Prlvat Dance on Wednesday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Savage and
party of Victoria arrived at Beaufort
House on Thursday afternoon and
will remain there for a tew weeks.
C. F. Earle ot Victoria, District Passenger Agent of the Canadian National Railway was here on an official
visit on Tuesday.
USED
CARS
CHEYROLET-Touring,  1918    model
Good tires. Top   and
flJQEA   upholstery.    This   car
»J)Ot/U    runs like new, and Ib
an exceptionally good
buy.
FORD TOURING—In good mechanical    condition.     Good
$180 TireBl e,c'
CHEVROLET—Touring. In good condition and pulls as
good as new.
$325
CHEVROLET—Touring.   Self  starter
ri»-| t\r    anu '" 8°0U shape, haB
tpAt/O    very good    tires    and
upholstery.
CHALMERS—7   passenger   Touring.
Good tires, paint and
ftfJBIJ upholstery. Runs and
JpU I D    looks like new. This Is
snap.
We bave several others under repair and they will be
priced equally low. If you
want a dependable used car
at a reasonable price, call
and ask for a demonstration.
Phone 81
Phone 61
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
THE  COURTENAY GARAGE
The Boys club ot the Cumberland
High School presented Principal C.
B. Wood with a club bag on Monday
evening.
The Teachers Staff of the Cumberland Public School gave a farewell
dance ln the Anglican Hall on Wednesday ln honor of the teachers who
have resigned their positions.
Miss  Brown    of the    Cumberland
General Hospital announces  with
thanks the following donations: old
linen, MrB. J. H. Graham; Mrs. Geo.
W. Clinton and T. D. McLean.
Baby clothes from Mrs. Colin Campbell.
Mrs. Gardener and Mrs. Palmer ot
Campbell River arrived on Friday
and attended the meeting of the Women's Benefit Association.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Scott
at the Cumberland General Hospital
on Monday, June 25th, 1923, a son.
WE HAVE BEEN
ROASTED TO A FINISH
Pity the poor editor or reporter,
their lot Is Burely a happy one—
eomettmee Last week we published
an account of a motor accident, and
have been told that our report was a
"pack of lies". Several "nice" things
were said about us, until finally we
were forced to ask for a written state
ment from the party or parties Interested. This they readily promised to
have for us for this weeks issue. Up to the time of going to press
no such statement has arrived at this
office. It looks as If we might have
been correct last week after all.
A CORRECTION
Owing to a printers error, the advertisement ot R. Kaplansky was
made to read that he would be ln
Cumberland on the 1st and 3rd Tuesday and Wednesday. It should have
read the 1st and 3rd Monday and
Tueaday:
LEAVE YOUR ORDER FOR PRESERVING
Fruits
Cantelopes
Bing Cherries
Table Berries
Peaches
Plums
Apricots
Hot House Tomatoes
Grape Fruit
Oranges
Lemons
Bananas
H
SPECIALS
Oranges, 4 doz. for  $1.00
Oranges, 3 doz. for   $1.00
Potted Meats, 3 tins for 25c
Potted Meats,  2tins for 25c
Del Monte Pork and Beans per tin 10c
JUST ARRIVED
Fall stock of Fruit Jars, Caps, Tops, Rings, Parrowax,
Etc.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
PHONE 38
TENDERS   WANTED
I. For ten cord of wood to be delivered at the scool.
II. For shingling around the basement ot old School Building and renewing front steps.
Tenders to be in by Tuesday, July
loth 1923. Lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
For further information apply to
the Secretary.
A. McKlNNON,
Sec. School Board.
Cumberland, B. C.
CORPORATION  OF  THE  CITY  OF
CUMBRERLAND
TENDERS WANTED
Tenders will be received tor the
plumbing of the New proposed fire
hall, all tenders to be In the bands of
City Clerk by 12 o'clock, noon Tuesday July 3rd, 1923. Plans can be seen
at the Council Chambers.
A. J. FOURACRE
City Clerk.
BREAD!
We could not get along without it.
It's the old "Standby"—
Why? Because it is all substance and nourishment.
Because it satisfies when
other foods do not.
Ours has a real bread flavor
and a good substantial slice-
Call up your grocer. He has
it.
Bread is your Best Food-
Eat more of it.
Eat
HALUDAY'8 BREAD
"The Bread that Builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
"Simply—
Delicious?'
Is the exclamation heard on all sides when reference is made to the
Ice Cream
served in the cozy Ice Cream and Candy Department
of
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL STORE
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Daintiest Dishes — Comfortable Booths
The Best Service
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's
Send us Your Mail Orders.—Phone 23.

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