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The Cumberland Islander Sep 11, 1920

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Full Text

 Provincial Library
THE
*    r. t l> ■-  UbW
tt    --• '*„
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 37.
With which It consolidated the Cumberland Hews.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMfllA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1920
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.'
FATAL ACCIDENT
AT LOGGING CAMP
Stanhope M. Peatt, a Popular Young Fellow in Cumberland, Met
With Fatal Accident at the Logging Camp of Bloedel,
Stewart & Welch at Union Bay on Tuesday Afternoon.
One of Cumberland's most popular young men met instant
death on Tuesday afternoon vvhile attending his duties at the logging camp of Messrs. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, near Union Bay.
Stanhope M. Peatt, 31 years of Hge, and a native son, being born
in Victoria, was attending as a "chaser," following a log out on
the hook, when the log hit a standing dead hemlock tree, some 70
or 80 feet tall, breaking it off at the root. It fell in three pieces.
Peatt ran up the log to try and avoid the falling tree, but was
unable to get clear, a large piece of the tree hitting him on the
head, killing him almost instantly.  .
Mr. John Baird, district coroner, and Provincial Constable G. C.
Mortimer, were notified and proceeded to the location of the accident. After viewing the scene of the accident and getting all particulars surrounding the accident, they gave permission for the
body to be brought to Cumberland, where an,inquest was held
on Wednesday. •
Verdict of Accidental Death.
The coroner's inquest was held in the Court House on Wednesday, the jury including J. Walton (foreman), A. B. Gatz, Wm. G.
Marshall, J. McDonald, S. Davis and F. Dallos. After viewing the
body the inquest was proceeded with, when evideffce was given by
K. B. Fraser, superintendent of the camp, Frank Dyer and Dr. G.
K. MacNaughton.   The jury returned the following verdict:
"We the undersigned elected as a jury to enquire into the cause
of the death of Stanhope M. Peatt, find the deceased met accidental death while following his occupation as a logger for Bloedel,
Stewart & Welch at 4:30 on September 7."
Funeral Held on Thursday.
The funeral was held on Thursday afternoon, when the beautiful burial service of the Anglican Church was conducted in Holy
Trinity Church by Rev. W. Leversedge, the latter part, of the
service taking place at the graveside in the Cumberland cemetery.
A large number of people attended the funeral, among those present being the mother and sister of the. deceased, Mrs. and Miss
Peatt, of Victoria. Mr. Peatt of Nanaimo, brother of the deceased,
was also present.
Many beautiful floral tributes marked the high esteem in which
the unfortunate young man was held. Much sympathy is extended to the relatives in their sudden bereavement.
Presentation To
Arthur Wilkinson
Popular Member of United Foot*
ball Club Presented With a
Beautiful Watch.
Happy Valley Five
Won Many Honors
Win All the Honors at the South
Wellington Tournament—
$250 in Prizes;
The "Happy Valley Five," consisting of Conti, goal and back*', Dick
Stubbart and Home, halves; Banner-
man and Hunden, forwards, and Alex.
Rowan, manager, won all the honors
at the soccer tournament at South
Wellington on Sunday and Labor Day.
The Island was well represented,
there being teams from Victoria,
Granby, Happy Valley, Ladysmith and
South Wellington, and two from Nanaimo.
In the final on Monday the local five
had to face one of the Nanaimo combinations and there was a good game,
the Happy Valleyites coming out win
ncrs by three goals to nil.
Great credit is due to this splendid
team, which Is Bald to be the best
five-a-side combination in the province
of British Columbia. They won out
after playing 13 teams. Hunden was
top scorer, he getting no less than 9
goals.
Bannerman won the 100 yards dash
and the hop, step and jump, and Conti
won the "boxing in barrels" and was
second in place kick.
Hunden   won   the   baseball   throw.
Altogether the winnings of the
team and individual members amount
to no less than (250.
Cumberland School
Is Overcrowded
—        *
Receiving Class Has No Less
Than 60 Pupils—Total En-
Rolment is 469.
Wedding
JOHNSTON-DUNBAR
Thc wedding took place yesterday
morning at ten o'clock In fr'omox. of
Mr. Harold Leslie Johnston and Miss
Jessie Dunbar, both well known and
popular residents of Nanaimo Of
late Miss Dunbar has been occupying
the position as Lady Superintendent
of tbe Campbell River Hospital, for
which position she left Nanaimo some
time ago. Mr. Johnston for the past
year has been engaged In the lumber
business, with headquarters at Vancouver.
At the ceremony Mr. Frank Randall
enacted the part of groomsman, while
Miss Nellie Gannon attended the
bride
The first portion of the honeymoon
will be spent at Cameron Lake, and
later on the happy couple will leave
for Vancouver and Victoria.—Nanaimo
Herald.
Mr. Chas. E. Burbrldge, principal of
the Cumberland Public School, announces that owing to the crowded
condition ot the Receiving Class, in
which no less than 60 are attending,
one half will attend tn the morning
session and the remaining half in the
| afternoon session. This arrangement
will be continued for one month.
It is said that the contract which
the government is advertising in out-
of-town papers calling Tor on addition
to the public school, will be let in tbe
near future. This addition calls for
four additional rooms, which will give
accommodation so urgently needed at
the present time. Another .teacher
will probably have to be engaged to
cope with the increased number of
pupils.
Two new furnaces have recently
been installed in the publlc school,
which wlll give more comfort to the
scholars In the cold weather.
The following Is* the number of
scholars in each division, together
with the name of the teacher:
Division 1, Senior Fourth, 14; Chas.
E. Burbrldge.
Division 2, Junior Fourth, 44: Miss
L. Hood.
Division 3, Senior Third, 40; Miss
O'Connell.    ,
Division 4, Junior Third, A3; MIsb P.
Partridge,
Division 6, Junior Third, 37; Miss A.
Potter.
Division 6, Second, 38; Miss M. C.
Bannerman.
DivlBlon 7, First and Second, 41;
Miss A. Ruse.
Division 8, First and Second Primer,
43; Miss, M. Coleman.
Division 9, Second Primer, 40; Miss
H. Harrison.
Division 10, First Primer, 39; Miss
J. E. Robertson.
Division 11, Receiving Class, 60;
Miss H. Watson.
Total, 649, being an increase of 33
over the June number.
On Thursday evening'the Cumber
land United Football Club and Its sup
porters gave a supper and presenta
tlon to Mr. Arthur Wilkinson, the cele
brated full-back of the local team, the
champions of British Columbia, who is
leaving the district to take up dental
| studies at the Portlaud Dental Institute.
Some thirty enthusiasts sat down to
supper, which was greatly enjoyed and
every credit ls due to Mr. Jones of the
Union Hotel, who did the catering.
After having satisfied the Inner man
Mr. John Quinn of Bevan. the chairman of the evening, called thc assem
bly to order and Intimated the occa
slon for the meeting. He then called
on Mr. Charles Graham to make the
presentation to Mr. Wilkinson.
Mr. Graham, in a few well chosen
words expressed his regret and voiced
the loss that Mr. Wilkinson would be
to the football team. He also spoke
very highly of his ability, his sportsmanship and loyalty to the team. He
expressed the opinion of all who have
had the pleasure ot Mr. Wilkinson's
acquaintance when he said that on or
off the field, Mr. Wilkinson was always a gentleman. He expressed also
that the good wishes of all would go
with him, and that he hoped that we
had not lost him for good, and that be
would return to the city and again
take his place in the team. Mr.
Graham, in presenting Mr. Wilkinson
with a handsome gold watch, asked
tbat the token of their appreciation
would in a like measure express their
esteem in which he was held, and
hoped that it would form a connecting
link with pleasant recollections of his
old associates.
fyr. Wilkinson, in rising to reply
amid loud applause, expressed his
heartfelt appreciation ot the token
| and spoke highly of the sportsmanship
1 ot the team and its supporters, stating
that he never wished for a better
crowd ol associates In th*> game. He
regretted having to leave the district,
but duty called. The rememberances
he was taking away were the most
vivid and pleasant of his life. He
wished the team every success iu the
coming league games, trusting they
would have less draws, less losses and
more wins. He said he would play In
the initial game on Sunday, and hoped
they would register a win. He expressed the hope that the people's
shield for which tbey fought so hard
to win, would be retained, and that
should they be so unfortunate as to
lose it, they would have to give account to him for so doing. Mr. Wilkin
son said that he, though absent, would
watch the activities of the team with
unabated interest and that he hoped
some day to return and extract more
pleasure out of the game and not a
few teeth out of the players. He again
thanked his admirers tor their kind
words aud valuable token of their
esteem, and gave utterance to the
value he put upon It,
Loud cheers were given Mr. Wilkinson, the crowd singing heartily, "For
He's a Jolly Good Fellow."
Songs, recitations, jokes and football gossip occupied the rest of the
evening until midnight was reached,
when the company broke up after
singing "Will Ye No Come Back
Again?" and "Aul Lang Syne."
Songs were contributed by Messrs.
J. T. Brown, V. Shearer, Bobby Brown,
Jock Clark, Dicky Stubbart, Hec
Smith, Andy Home, W. Klnnlnmont,
R. H. Walker; ventriloquist, Colin
Campbell; recitations, A. Wilkinson,
Chas. Graham, Ted Jackson and Bob
Walker.
Autoists Fall    p
Into Police Trap
Sunday Night  17 Were Found
To Exceed the Speed Limit
of Thirty Miles an Hour
COURT OF REVISION
SITS ON MONDAY
It is not anticipated that there will be many—if, indeed, any—
objections to the new voters list  as  compiled  by  the district
registrar, when the Court or Revision opens at the Court House,
Cumberland, at 10 a.m. on Monday next.   So far there has been
no appeals lodged against the six thousand odd names on the new
list.  Any person claiming to be entitled to be registered as a voter
in this district may apply in person to have his or her name
entered on the list at the sitting of the court, notwithstanding the
fact that his name lias been omitted from the list of applicants for
registration, or that he has omitted to apply for registration at
the time or in the manner provided by the Provincial Elections Act.
This is the last chance for persons wanting to get on the voters'
list to do so.   Under the new act the government has given people
the doctor was going 37 to 38 miles the privilege of getting on the list at the court of revision, a course
an hour on Sunday night.   The de-|not heretofore granted—in fact it is regarded by many as a very
unsound proceeding. But then, the warmest supporters of the
Oliver government could hardly credit them with being a business
administration.
On Sunday afternoon Constables
Mortimer aud Dawley arranged a
speed test over a measured mile on
the Sandwick road, and as a result
found that seventeen curs were exceeding the speed limit of 30 miles
an hour. Action wlll be taken with
tne Canadian motorists later, but Dr.
Lyons of Seattle pleaded to be dealt
with summarily so that Magistrate
Hames heard his case on Monday. The
police evidence was to the effect that
fendai.'t pleaded that he speeded up In
order to pass another car and did not
know how fast he was going. It Is a
: curious commentary on this statement that the owner of the car be
passed was also "stepping on her" aud
will probably appear In the police
court a little later. The doctor also
Said that he was a tourist and It would
be a very bad advertisement for British Columbia over the other side when
he reported that he had been fined for
speeding. His worship did not see the
force of the argument and fined Dr.
Lyons 119 and costs,
(JAPANESE DONATE
$244 TOWARDS THE
MEMORIAL HALL
BIRTHS
DERBYSHIRE—At the Cumberland
Hospital, September 5, to Mr. and
Mrs. J. Derbyshire, a daughter.
GORDON—At the Cumberland General Hospital, September 8, to Mr.
and Mrs. F. Gordon, a daughter.
FALL MILLINERY
ON DISPLAY TODAY
Mr. John Sutherland announces
that he received a big shipment of
Fall millinery by express last evening,
and that these beautiful models will
be on display in his store today.
Ladies are Invited to step ln and look
over these latest creations of the
milliner's art.
TAX SALE
The Tax Sale of lots situated in the
Comox Electoral District will be held
in the Court House, Cumberland on
October 1, at 10 a.m. This sale affects lots for which taxes due for 1918
and years previous have not been
paid.
Rocky Mountain goats are plentiful
around Ocean Falls this year.
Mr. Y. Takahashl, secretary of the
Comox District Branch of the Canadian Japanese Association, has forwarded to Mr. C. J. Bunbury, secretary
of the G. W. V. A., a cheque for the
handsome sum of $244, being the
amount subscribed by the Cumberland
district Japanese towards the Construction Fund of the hall. Great
credit is due the Sons of Nippon for
their generosity. Mr. Takahashl says
further amounts are yet to come from
I the Japanese at Courtenay and Comox.
A list of subscribers is published
herewith:
Froi« No. 1 Japanese Town.
& Iwasa, $7; S. Masuda, J5; K.
Yasuda, $5; M. Tanaka, $5; I. Yoshi-
kunij $3; I, Nakano, $3; M. Ampl, $3;
Y. Sarayama, {3; K. Suyama, $3; K.
Yasui, $3; K. Nagai, $2; G. Wanl, $2;
K. Nishl. $2; K. Okuda, $2; K. Sarayama, $2; 8. Kimoto, $1.50; T. Sato,
$1; G. Suyama, $1; H. Sadafusa, $1;
T. Katayama, $1; H. Yanianaka. $1;
K. Miyamura, SI; A. Okuno, SI; M.
Mori, SI; S. Tatekawa, SI; K. Eguchi,
SI; Y. Oda, tl; Y. Tsucbida, SI; Y.
Mori, $1; S. Shigethomi, SI; K. Oda,
SI; K. Kiyonaga, $1; K. Wakagawa,
SI; T. Kiyono. SI; M. Nlshiniuro, SI;
M. Hashimoto, SI; B. Kiyonaga, $1; K.
Nagai, $1; H. Saito, SI; U. Saito, SI;
H. Shi; SI; S. Tahara, SI; S. Takaliita,
SI; K. Matsunaga, SI; H. Takahashl,
SI; H. Motomochi, $1; Y. Ampl, $1;
H. Suyamai SI; 0. Sakai, SI; I.
Kagiyama. SI; F. Nishlda. SI; Kagi-
yania. SI; H. Ampi, SI; A. Yamada, SI;
S. Mlyahara, SI; M. Tanaka. SI; M.
Oda..SI; K. Tsuchiflo, $1; F. Yama-
T. Numata, 50c; T. Shlino, SOc; K. Miyamoto. 60c—Total S97.50.
From Jio. 5 Jnpunese Town.
T-. Hiro, $10; S. Kawata, $5; K. Abe.
$5; C. Nishijlma, $2; T. Kitaniura. $2;
N. Okazakl, %2; H. Isonaga, $2; T.
Kadokuchl. $2; Y. Kasubuchi, $2; M.
Okazakl, $1.50; M. Matsumoto, $1.50;
M. Suglniori. $1; M. Tsuruoka, $1; T.
Tateyama, $1; Y. Hayashl, $1;,S.
Yumamuto, $1; H. Nlshlknwa. $1; '/,.
Eto. $1; N. Shlntanl, $1; K. Sora, $1;
U. Doi, $1; E. Kawaguchl. $1: T.
Izawa. $1; M. Kobayashl, $1; '/.. Tcro-
oku, $1; Y. Hlrose, $1; S. Kobayashl,
SI; R. Suga, $1; K. Nishl, $1; T. Oko-
mura, $1; K. Yamada. $1; D. Doi, $1;
T. Kato, $1; S. Ikegaml. $1; T. Matsu-
kura, $1; K. Harada. SI; J. Sora, $1;
M. Kukunaga, $1; M. Otani, $1; S.
Nlshlkawa, $1; K. Takokuma, $1; II.
Isobe, $1; E. Yonemura, $1; T. Suito,
$1—total $68.
From I'll) mid I'iiIiiii liny.
City—Y. Takahashl, $10; R. Shl-
ibayama, $1; Y. Isakn, $1; A. Isozakl,
(li Y. Nakagaml, $1; K. Hayashl. $1
—total (16.
Union Bay—Z. Nakamura, $1.50; N.
Nakamura, $1.50; T. Nakamura. $1.50;
Ikeda, $1; Z. Uchlda, $1; G. Kato, $1;
G. Hlgashi, $1; R. Matsuba, $1—total.
$9.50.
Contributed from Koyston.
K. Uchlyama, $10; I. Mlnato. $4; J.
Hori, $5; S. Nishlmura, $2; K. Nnka-
shlnia, $2; Fukakusa, $2; Y. Onagi, $2;
N. Onagi, $2; N. Okaniatsu, $3; C. Nis-
hihata, $2; Y. Imaoka, $2; K. Mlnato.
$2; T. Fujimoto, $2; T. Tsuchlhashi,
$2; R. Tateishi, $2; K. Kimura, $2; B.
Takezawa, $2; Arakl, $2; 1. Marilyn.
(2; E. Hatchlkado, $2—total $54.
Football Season Opens Tomorrow
The football season opens again tomorrow, September 12, when
the local team is scheduled to play the first game at Ladysmith.
The management have been busy during the past few weeks trying to get one or two new players to fill the vacancies caused by
! Sullivan, Stubbart and Wilkinson leaving the district.
The team starts out under entirely new management, and high
hopes are entertained that they will be successful in again winning
premier honors. The team for the initial game has been selected,
after a lot of deliberation by the men in charge; while it is a strong
one it does not meet with the approval of all fans. However, the
team is a good one, and they should have no difficulty in annexing
their full quota of points.
The team to represent the Cumberland United Football Club
will consist of: Goal, Clark; backs, Wilkinson and Campbell; halfbacks, Brown, Conti, Home; forwards, Bannerman, Wylie, James,
Boothman, Harrison; D. Wilson, manager; T. Jackson, trainer.
The team leaves by car on Sunday morning at 8 o'clock from the
Cumberland Hotel.
Dicky Stubbart, who played such good "football at centre half for
the Cumberland team during the Inter-City Summer League
series, has been signed by South Wellington. >
Pilling, the well-known forward, has been signqd by Manager
Clare to play for the Nanaimo team. The Nanaimo's forward line
I should be considerably strengthened by the inclusion of Pilling.
[He is fast, tricky and can shoot with either foot. He made a.great
name for himself in England and France whilst the war was on,
playing for the 1st Canadian Reserve Battalion team whilst in
England, and for the 29th Battalion after arriving in France.
Schedule For Upper
Island League
As will be noted by the schedule
there are six teams in the League,
each team playing home and home
games, for a total of ten games each.
The trophy to be played for ls the old
B. C. Challenge Cup, the handsome
piece of silverware purchased by the
contributions of Nanaimo citizens upwards of twenty years ago. When the
B. C. Challenge Cup was put up Tor
competition it was expressly stated
that the final game for the trophy
should be played in Nanaimo. Following the original regulations it has
been decided that iu case two teams
should be tied at the end of the Up*
Island League schedule, tbe final and
deciding game should be played in
Nanaimo.
At the close of the Up-Island League
season fhe two leading teams -hi the
League will meet two leading teams
In the Victoria League in n series of
games for the Island championship
which carries with it the Vancouver
Island Cup, thc winners of the championship meeting the .Mainland champions later for the McBride Shield,
emblematic of the championship of the
province, both of which trophies are
now held by the Cumberland Untied
Football Club.
The  schedule  of  the   Upper-Island
| Judges Chosen For
Comox Fall Fair
The judges at the Fall Fair at Courtenay, to be held on the 28th aud 29th
of this month, have been appointed as
follows:
Fruit, vegetables and field crops-
Mr. E. W. White.
Horses—Mr. O. E. Goddard.
Cattle, sheep, pigs and goats—Dr.
Knight.
Dairy produces, honey, domestic
science—Mrs. Carter.
Exhibits of women's work anil poultry—.Mr. E. Greenwood.
LADIES OF HOLY TRINITY
COMMENCE FALL WORK
The Women's Auxiliary ot Holy
Trinity Church lipid the lirst of their
Fall meetings in the Parish Hall on
Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
Plans for Kali work were discussed,
ami In addition tn providing refreshments for n Social Meetlug on September 21st,'the ladies undertook tn hold
a sale of work, etc., in tiie hall Oil
December 8th,
League lias  been drafted as follows
tlie game being played ou the grounds
of the first named club:
.September 11—
Ladysmith vs. Cumberland.
Nanaimo City vb. Nanaimo United.
Granby vs. S. Wellington.
September 18—
Cumberland vs. S. Wellington.
Nanaimo United vs. Granby.
Ladysmith vs. Nanaimo City.
September 26—
Nanaimo City vs. Cumberland.
Granby vs. Nanaimo United.
S. Wellington vs. Ladysmith.
October 8—
Cumberland vs. Nanaimo City.
Nanaimo United vs. Ladysmith.
S. Wellington vs. Granby.
October »—
Cumberland vs. Nanaimo United.
Nanaimo City vs. Granby.
Ladysmith vs. S. Wellington.
MINE RESCUE TEAMS
MEET TOMORROW
Members of Mine Rescue teams und
others interested in same are requested (o meet In tiie Mine Rescue Station
Sunday afternoon at 4.*M> o'clock.
October l»-
S. Wellington vs. Cumberland.
Nanaimo United vb. Nanaimo City.
Granby vs. Ladysmith.
October 28—
Cumberland vs. Granby.
Nanaimo City vs. S. Wellington.
Ladysmith vs. Nanaimo United.
October 30—
Nanaimo United vs. Cumberland.
S. Wellington vs. Nanahno City.
Ladysmith vs. Granby.
.November 6—
Granby vs. Cumberland.
Nanaimo City vs. Ladysmith.
S. Wellington vs. Nanahno United.
November 18—
Cumberland vs. Ladysmith.
Nanaimo United vs. S. Wellington.
Granby vs. Nanaimo City. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 11, 1920.
OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE
is a convenient KITCHEN CABINET. We have the
most up-to-date styles that will save the housekeeper
many steps and much time.   We specialize in
HOME FURNITURE
that adds to the attractiveness, comfort and convenience of every room.   Call and see our stock.
P. 0. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY  AND
ICE  CREAM  PARLORS
Try one of Henderson's
Special Banana
Splits
We make our own Ice Cream
and claim It to be the best on the
Island. We get the cream fresh
from the farm every day.
Comox Electoral
District
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakei a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Mght.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
NOTICE is hereby given that on
Monday, the 13th day of September,
j 1920, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, at
itlie Court House in Cumberland, B.C.,
| a sitting of the Court of Revision will
i be held for the purpose of revising the
list of voters for the above-named
(Electoral District, pursuant to the
| provisions of the "Provincial Elections
Act."
And notice is further given that any
person claiming to be entitled to be
registered as a voter in the above-
named Electoral District may apply in
person to have his name entered ou
the list of voters for the said Electoral
District at the said sitting of the Court
of Revision, notwithstanding the fact
that his name has been omitted, or
that he has omitted to apply for registration at the time or in the manner
otherwise provided by the "Provincial Elections Act.''
The list of applicants for registration Is now posted and may be inspected at the office of the undersigned
Registrar of Voters.
Dated August 4th, 1920.
JOHN BAIRD,
Registrar of Voters,
Comox Electoral District.
MOTOR CAR ACCIDENT
DUNCAN.—A nasty accident, which
might have proved more serious, occurred about five miles south of the
Summit road on the Malahat Drive,
when a Ford car, driven by Mrs. A. B.
Matthews, Westholme, and proceeding
to Victoria, fell over the side of the
road.
While travelling along the car hit
a large hole.on one side of the road,
which caused it to go over to the opposite side. There it hit a rock and
was shot back again to the other side.
This time the car fell over the side
of the road, which happened to be a
very steep drop.
Luckily the nose of the engine became embedded in the ground. On
Mrs. Mntthws leaning back hard on
the seat of tlie car, it righted itself as.
otherwise, It would have turned upside
down and fallen over the cliff.
"Have you been touching the barometer, Jane?"
"Yes'm. It's my night out, so I set
It to 'line.'"
ELIMINATING THE     '
INFERIOR COW
NOTICE TO
CONTRACTORS
CUMBERLAND SCHOOL
WIDE MOUTH
MASON-JAR
wrsnrnNiroEcoHMERirtHttr
SIMON LEISER
AMD  COMPANY,   LTD
Plans, specifications, contract* and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the l?th day of August, 1920,
at the ofiice of J. Mahony, Esq,., Government Agent, Court House, Vancouver; J. Baird, Esq., Government Agent.
Court .House, Cumberland; S. McB.
Smith, Esq., Government Agent, Court
House, Nanaimo; or the Department
of Public Works, Victoria, B. C.
mending tenderers can obtain one
copy of plans and specifications by applying to the undersigned with a deposit of ten dollars ($10) which will
be refunded on their return in good
order.
Each proposal must lie accompanied
by an acepted bank cheque on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honorable the Minister of Public Works, for a sum equal to ten per
cent. (109l>) of tender, which shall be
forfeited If the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon to do so, or if lie fail lo complete
the work contracted for. Tlie cheques
of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon tlie execution of
tlie contract.
Tenders wlll not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed witli thc actual signature of
the tenderer, and enclosed lu the envelopes furnished.
A. E. FOREMAN,
Public Works Engineer.
Publlc Works Department,
Victoria, B.C.,
August 12th, 1920.
The object of cow testing is to give
the dairyman accurate knowledge as
to the. production of milk and tat ot
each cow In the herd. It is readily
admitted that the average cow does
not produce as much milk as she is
capable of giving, and many dairymen
keep one or more cows that do not
even pay for their keep. Cow testing
shows which cows are worth keeping
in tbe herd and gives evidence against
those that should be eliminated from
the herd. "The Progress of Co\*» Testing," bulletin 58, Dairy and Cold
Storage Series, by A. H. White, B.S.A.,
shows that many farmers rely on
guess work to pick out their best cows
from which to save heifer calves for
the future herds. Frequently, these
guesses are not correct; cows which
have good conformation are not always the best producers iu the herd.
Dairy records will do away with guess
work, and the farmer can safely select
his best cows for breeding purposes.
The bulletin, "The Progress of Cow
Testing," may be secured free upon
application to the Publications Branch,
Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. In
addition to giving the essential objects
of cow testing it outliues the details
of organization aud gives some of the
results obtained, which shows that
many farmers have increased tbe
production of their herds from 30 to
75 per cent, and some have doubled
the herd average in a few years.
Wherever cow testing has been followed for a few years, a decided increase in the average production of
each cow will be found.
ALBERNI FALL FAIR
NEXT -THURSDAY
PORT ALBERNI.—The fall fai rot
the Alberni Agricultural Association
will be held on Thursday next, September 16.
Every effort has been made by the
association to make this year's show
one of the greatest in the history of
the district and it is expected that
there will be more exhibit entries than
ever before.
A bigger prize list than usual has
been provided, there being about $600
to be distributed among the exhibitors.
PROVINCIAL ELECTION
BEFORE HOUSE MEETS
It Is current report that the Oliver
Government will appeal to the people
before the next session of th House.
While Premier Olivr may not yet have
decided that he will act on the advice
ot a majority of his ministers, it Is
rumored that the prevailing opinion
ot the cabinet is that the verdict of
the people should not be delayed too
long.
The active hurrying to and fro ot
the cabinet ministers during the past
few months would Indicate that there
Is more than a mere referendum vote
on prohibition bfore the winter season
starts in. After the premier was north
the announcement was made that a
certain minister would run In his old
riding, then came the hurried visit to
the north of Premier Oliver and Hon.
Pattullo. . . . Taken.in all, now
that the prominent members of the
cabinet wish an election and the actions of the ministers, it would be well
to be prepared.—Ex.
FORD COVERS 1«00 MILES
WITHOUT ADJUSTMENT
OR CHANGE OF TIRES
TAKE HOME A BOX OF KELLY'S APPETIZING
AND DELICIOUS
FISH AND CHIPS
When you feel the need of a nice dainty meal, drop into
our Cafe and try this popular dish.
See our Special Window
Display of
HOME-MADE CANDIES
"CUMBERLAND, B.C.
1LLYS
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Offlce: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - ■* B. C.
OPAL VALUED AT £50,000
An enormous, absolutely flawless
black opal, proclaimed as the largest
uucut precious stone in the world, has
been recently discovered in the States,
and is now iu the offlce of a government official in Washington. The gem
contains approximately 21 cubic Inches
and is valued by the owners at a
quarter of a million dollars.
PRIVATE CAR "IMPERIAL"
(From a Swedish Newspaper.)
ALL DROWSED
"I want one of those dogs about so
high, and about so long. A sort of
greyhound; but It Isn't quite, because
Its tall Is shorter and Its head's bigger,
and the legs aren't so long, and the
body's thinner. Do you keep that
sort?"
Dealer; "No, sir, I don't. 1 drowns
'em!"
A bachelor girl Is one that has had
a chance and refused. An old maid is
one that never had a chance, but is
willing to take it.
My auto, 'tis of thee,
Short road to poverty;
Of thee I chant.
I blew a pile of dough
On you two years ago;
Now you refuse to go,
Or won't, or can't.
To thee, old rattlebox,
Came many bumps and knocks;
Fur thee I grieve.
Badly the top is worn,
Frayed are the seats and torn,
"Flu" has attacked thy horn,
1 do believe.
Thy perfume scents the breeze,
Willie women cough ond sneeze
As we pass by.
I paid fur thee a price
'Twould buy a mansion twice;
Now you're a nest for mice—
Oh me, oh my!
During the recently completed Michigan Pikes Tour, a Ford car taken out
of the assembly line covered the whole
of the 1600 miles without the slightest
mechanical adjustment or tire change.
The car carried the famous Ford
Quartete, none of whom could drive
nearly as well as they can sing, but
who nevertheless maintained their
place in the line throughout the entire
trip, and came through with flying
colors.
A powerful Cadillac 8 acted as pace
maker, and set up a smart, clip over
every type of road from loose sand
and gravel, plain dirt, muck and
swamp to rocks and corduroy.
Throughout the whole of the gruelling run where in places the going was
over 43 miles an hour, the Quartette
in their indomitable Ford hung on, and
established a wonderful record under
the most exacting conditions.
Woman believes that true marriage
is a matter of give and take. She
gives a look into your pocket book—
and takes all there is in it.
AJi OPTIMIST IS—
An optimist is a person who buys an
article from a Scotchman, then tries
to sell it to a Jew.
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
AUTO
PAINTING
General Woodwork, Auto Bodies,
Trucks and Wheels b'lilt u order
Repairs Promptly Attended to.
Jas. C. Allan
Cor. Prldennx & Fltzn llllam Sis.
NANAIMO, B. C.
r\Yfot Mocih^
Mason Jars'
"Stelf ffesdina brand
TWn^EOX-Al^ncHT
V**D*C MOUTH OARS
KEEPMLTWrtTOK' I
NORUORERTtlUCS
SOLD BY
SIMON LEISER & CO, LTD.
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and  Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a SoeclaUr.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
A PESSIMIST IS-
A pessimist is a man who wears suspenders, also a belt, and carries a
couple of big safety pins ln bis waistcoat pocket.
Special   Display   of
FANCY WORK
including some beautiful Nightgowns, Pyjamas
Combinations, etc.
"THAT'S YOURS!"
An extraordinary story of how a
man had a child thrust upon him by
an unmarried mother comes from
Bridgend, England. The man was in
a public-house when a young woman
came in with a.three-months-old-baby
boy wrapped In a shawl. She placed it
on his lap, saying "That is yours!"and
rushed out. The man has since been
saddled with the child. He has been
unable to get anyone to take care of
it, and has been refused admission for
It at the workhouse. He lias been
spending his time wandering about the
streets and haunting the police stations, carrying the child in his arms
still wrapped in the shawl.
Georgette and
Crepe de Chine Blouses
A splendid display of very charming and
becoming models     - .
Come in and view our showing,of
New Fall Millinery
RIDEOUT'S
-±_a*J September 11, 1920.
•m   CUkBl8ttLAMI>   ISLANDEft
flu
ree
A
MacKinnon's Special
SALE OF
FURNITURE
Is Now in Full Swing
Furniture prices are steadily, advancing. This sale
will give you an opportunity of securing big value for
your money, and you will serve your own interests by
taking advantage of the values here offered.
Special sale lines include pining Room Suites, Easy
Chairs, Walnut and Fumed Oak Dressers, etc.
A good line of Fir Dressers and Chiffoniers marked
at specially low prices during this sale.
SALE PRICES ARE FOR CASH ONLY
ft. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aflluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring _
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet, Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize  in  REPUBLIC  TRUCKS and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
Can The Elwell Mystery Be Solved
Many More Baffling Murders Have Been Cleared Up—Some Sensational Crime Riddles From Modern Life to Which Clever
Detectives Have Given Adequate Solution
So far as tbe public knows, tbe New
York authorities have made no progress in clearing up the murder ot
James B. Elwell. recognized authority
on auction bridge, who was found
slain in bis apartment there. It may,
indeed, prove to be one of the inscrutable mysteries the detectives have
never solved, for there are such, but
It has presented no more baffling Incongruities, no more puzzling twists
and unexpected turds, than many
others in which they have successfully
dwelt. At least in this case they have
the advantage of picking up the
scent while tbe trail was warm. In
other famous cases this has not always
been so.
A (onvlct Kevealed « Plot
The discovery of the body of B. F.
Perry in bis borne at 1316 CallowhiU
street, ln Philadelphia, did not cause
any sensation at the time—September
4, 1894—for the coroner's Jury gave a
speedy verdict of "death from accidental causes."
There was clear evidence that some
sort of an explosion had taken place.
A shattered bottle, which had manifestly contained some sort of inflammable material; a broken pipe filled
with partly burned tobacco and a
charred matcli lay beside tbe body. An
autopsy showed tbat Perry had died
from congestion of the lungs, caused
by the inbaling of flames ot chloroform, tbe latter having presumably
formed the contents ot the broken bottle. So, as there was no claimants for
the body and no estate—so far as was
known at that time—Ferry's remains
were interred at the potter's field.
There they would have remained undisturbed had it not been for the evidence of a convict in the St. Louis
prison—evidence which not only Indicated tbat Ferry had been murdered,
but that his death was only one ot a
series committed by a man totally devoid of conscience or human feeling.
Shortly after Perry's death the
Philadelphia branch of the Fidelity
Life Insurance Co. received a letter
from Jephtha D. Howe, an attorney ln
St. Louis, stating that "B. F. Perry1
was really Benjamin F. Pltezel, who
had carried a (5,000 life insurance
with the Fidelity Company. The only
person who could be found to identity
the body was a man named H. H.
Holmes of Willamette, 111., who willingly came on to Philadelphia to superintend the exhuming ot the body.
Holmes and Howe met in the office of
the company, presumably as strangers,
and the former clearly identified the
body of the dead'man as that of his
friend Pitezel.
The First Hints of Fool Play.
Satisfied, the insurance company
paid the insurance to Howe, Pitezel's
attorney, and reimbursed Holmes for
his expenses. Up to this time there
was, of course, not the least suspicion
of a crime.
The details of the case were reported ln the St. Louis newspapers and a
few days later Marion Hedgspeth, a
convict serving a sentence for train
robbery, informed the governor of the
prison that he would like to give him
some very important Information.
"If you will examine the records of
the prison," said Hedgspeth, "you will
find that there was a man there last
summer by the name of H. H. Howard.
He was ln for fraud, I believe, but was
released on bail. While he was here
Howard asked me it I knew any lawyer whom I could recommend In connection with a swindling scheme
which he had in mind—a plan which
he said ought to net him at least
$10,000 without any trouble. He
promised me 1500 for my Information,
and I gave him the name of a lawyer
who I thought would fill the bill. But
I never got tbe $600."
"All of which," remarked the gov
ernor of the prison, "Is interesting
enough, but why is it so vitally important?"
"Don't you read the newspapers?'
retorted Hedgspeth. "The name of
the lawyer I recommended to 'Howard'
was Jephtha D. Howe, and 'Howard' is
undoubtedly the man who calls himself Holmes—the one who is mixed up
in that insurance case in Philadelphia.
The details of the case dovetail exactly
with the scheme tbat Howard outlined
to me last summer."
A House Built fer Crime.
As soon as this information reached
Philadeplphia the Insurance company
detailed an experienced detective
named Geyer to arrest Holmes and
investigate his antecedents, for it was
clear that Pltezel had not met his
death through accident but as the result of a carefully laid plan. After a
month's search Holmes was traced to
New England and finally arrested in
Boston.
This, however, proved to be virtually the beginning of the case, for the
further Geyer dug back Into Holmes'
history the more gruesome dentils he
discovered.
It was tn the course of his search
through Indiana and Illinois that
Geyer came across the most startling
discovery of the entire case, the mysterious building in Chicago known as
"Holmes Castle."
The prisoner had personally superintended the erection of this structure,
and investigation showed that it contained an air-proof, sound-proof vault,
communicating with the cellar' by
means of a secret staircase. Buried in
the cellar floor and half consumed by
quicklime were found the remains of
at. least five persons who had been
lured to tbe castle and murdered.
Inquiry developed that a Miss Minnie Williams had entered Holmes' employ tn 1893 and had lived with him at
the castle. In the latter part of tbe
year she had invited her sister Nanule
to be present at her wedding with
Holmes. Nannie bad come to Chicago,
but the two sisters had never again
been seen alive.
Had it not been for the tact that
Holmes overlooked tbe promise which
he had made to a convict in the St.
Louis prison, it is quite possible that
he would have remained at liberty
But Detective Geyer returned to Philadelphia with enough evidence to secure conviction, and Holmes, tbe
master murderer, who confessed to
having committed no less than twenty-
seven crimes, paid the penalty for
them on the gallows.
Found No Motive for Murders.
Differing radically from the Holmes
case in tbe method by wblch the mystery was solved, but resembling it in
the cunning and callousness displayed
by the criminal, was "The Mystery ot
the Frozen Death" In Buenos Aires a
few years ago.
A number of men who were prominent in the life of the city—bankers
aud lawyers and doctors—died within
a few weeks of each other. But in
every case the attending physicians
had given certificates of death from
natural causes, either cholera or yellow fever. Autopsies had been performed iu three of the cases, but even
these post-mortem examinations disclosed nothing out of tbe ordinary,
though many persons wondered at the
deaths in the entire absence of any
epidemic.
Manuel Porteras, one of the detectives connected with the city police
force, made it his business to dig back
into the history of the fifteen prominent men who had died during the pre
vious six months. In no case could
he find any reason which would explain their murder, or any motive for
removing them. They were all fairly
wealthy, but their properly descended
to their families and no single heir
appeared to be councted with even
two of the cases—much less all of
them.
What Porteras did find, however,
was a rather puzzling coincidence.
Each of the dead men had been a guest
at the home of Dr. Albert Beaurlgard.
Great West Tea
WE ARE SOLE AGENTS IN CUMBERLAND FOR
Red, Green and Blue Labels
65c.     75c.    90c.
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
IlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
| Luxury Tax Removed I
I from Electric Heating j
I            Appliances j
§§       You will be interested to know that the efforts of ||
H    manufacturers of Electric Heating Appliances and of g
H    others interested, have been successful in securing the §|
m    removal of the 10 per cent. Luxury Tax on nickle- j|
s|    plated Electric Heating Appliances. §|
H       We quote herewith a recent letter from R. W. Bread- sf
H    ner, Commissioner of Taxation, to a manufacturer of S
3=   appliances: S
§§       "In reply to your letter of the 15th inst., I may state gj
jH    that the luxury tax applies to articles plated with gold j§
§1    or silver adapted for household or ofiice use.   Nickle- =
§§   plated electric heating appliances are exempt." |§
S       Some of the more important arguments used were: Jl
1st—In almost all communities of the Dominion of ||
Canada it is actually more economical to iron, toast, jg
cook, etc., with electric appliances than by any other S
method. §§
The proposed legislation, therefore, would be taxing §j|
an economy rather than a luxury. §§
2nd—Appliances made from steel and iron require §§
a covering of something to protect them from the =
!    action of rust. §|
Nickle is the best and most  economical for this §§
!   purpose. m
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered with the valves ou the mains ot this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount ot water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It Is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to tbe
very fullest extent of tbe law.
lllllllllliiliilliliiiiiiOIiiilll
BALLOONS FOR ALL
(Continued on Page Seven)
UK KEPT ANOTHER WOMAN.
In cross-examination it is always
well to be sure of your facts before
you dig too deep, as tbe following case
proves.
A lawyer was grilling the respondent in a divorce case.
"Is it true that you are supporting
another woman?" he asked.
"It is." replied the respondent.
"And she lives in the same house,
does she not?"
"Yes."
"And you were never married
to her?"
"No, sir."
"That will be all."
"Just a moment," broke in the man's
attorney.   "Who ia this woman?"
"My mother," calmly replied the
respondent.
HOUSE BUILDING IN
WESTERN CANADA
Western Canada should not be In
convenience!! through lack of bousing
facilities next year If the number of
building permits granted means anything: In Winnipeg ten times
many dwellings were erected in the
first six months of this year as were
erected in the same period last year
Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary and I'M
uionton are also carrying out large
building programmes. The report
shows that by far thc greater number
of buildings are being built of brick.
This Is probably due to the lumber
shortage, which has stimulated thc
manufacture of brick to such an extent that It Is now more easily available,
The makers and vendors of toy balloons are having the time of their
lives Jut now in England. Formerly
these fragile colored globes, filled with
ordinary air. were merely playthings
for children.
Some little time back, however, some
genius hit upon tlie happy Idea of Inflating them with hydrogen gas. thereby rendering them, of course, very
much more buoyant. As a result, they
have developed Into something of a
society craze. No up-Io-dato river girl
lolling in her punt thinks her get-up
complete unless she is dangling one
aloft at the end of a string.
The cruze has been laken up avidly,
tuo, by bolidny-miikers at the seaside,
where it has become quite the thing
to have one attached to one's deck-
chair on the sands, while many fair
bathers take them with litem when
going for their morning dip.
There Is one disadvantage, however,
attached to them. Once tbey are accidentally let go. there is no recovering them. They go soaring aloft like
a rocket.
"There's Mrs. Nuptials with tbe twin
she divorced live years ago."
"Same old husband, eh?"
"Yes, same old  husband,  only
vamped."
KILLED IN A TRUNK
A gruesome discovery waa made by
working-class couple living In an
outlying district of Paris when they
returned home from work one day.
Alarmed at not (lulling their two children, both of whom tbey had locked in
room of their house that morning
w-'ien they went out to work, the parents made a careful search of every
room Without result, till it occurred to
them to look In n large trunk. Tbey
were horrified to find their eldest
laughter, a girl of nine, inside tn a
state of almost complete asphyxiation.
Tlie child was rushed to a chemist,
where efforts were mode to revive her,
but she died soon afterwards. The
other child was also In the trunk deed.
Tho theory Is that the girl climbed
Into the trunk with her brother, in
play, and. the lid closing automatically, tbey were suffocated.
Recently a footballer was "brought
up" on a charge of riotous conduct
The magistrate inquired what position
the defendant held.
"He's n football player, your worship," said counsel. "He plays outside
right for his team."
"Yes—ail! He does does he?" re-
piled tlie magistrate. "Well, then, we
must change his position. He'll be left
I Inside for the next month," Pour
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Member 11,1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H.'GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY', SEPTEMBER 11. 1920.
PROHIBITION AND TEMPERANCE
Before Prohibition, as it now exists, was given a trial
it was a difficult matter for a new ipaper to take an absolute stand on what it believed was in the interests of the
people as a whole, The establishment of new conditions
affecting the habits of a community always possesses an
clement of the unknown, and it must be recalled tbat Prohibition under different guises, elsewhere, as well as in
British Columbia, 1ms been and Is still on trial. Here, we
believe, from the mass of evidence that is ou record, and
because for every one violation of the law which is discovered nt least ten go unpunished, thut Prohibition, as It
Is practised in fills Province, lias been weighed in tlie balance and found wanting. In saying tills it should be added
that many of those who voted for this law did so with the
best moral intentions, and, perhaps, because they believe
its benefits outweigh its defects, will do so again. They
consider, for instance, quite unaware of the conditions
which prevail throughout British Columbia, that Prohibition, as we have It, has meant the abolition of the saloon.
The army of officialdom to bring about tills result has
never been created, and the very character of the law
leaves loopholes for evasion.
Prohibition in tills Province, and In other Provinces of
tlie Dominion as the dispatches relate so often, has brought
into existence a new industry and n new trade. Liquors,
very often of a poisonous character, are being manufactured In un Illicit way and dispensed through secret Channels. The ramifications of the trade ore so multiform, and
the secrecy investing illicit manufacture is often so profound that tlie police themselves admit the task of enforcing the law is beyond their powers. II is for the reasons
enumerated that the Premier of this Province has been
driven to the conclusion that the law cannot "be enforced
More rigid Prohibition, if brought about, would not make
conditions any better, for It would only tend to embitter
still more those who are unalterably hostile to such encroachments on liberty of action. In a country like British
Columbia, where public opinion is about equally divided
on this issue, it would be the part of wisdom to reach a
decision that can be enforced.
The present Prohibition law is openly and secretly violated every day by thousand's of people. If it is approved at the
forthcoming plebiscite Britisli Columbia will have perpetuated a condition with which the Government admits it
cannot cope. The alternative is control of the sale of
llqpor by tlle Provincial Government. The Province is
asked to vote on the principle of government control, and
we admit there should be an official statement of what such
control will mean. Presumably, however, if government
' control Is approved, the whole question will go before the
Legislature, and it will be the elected representatives of
the people who will decide on the safeguards to be applied.
Since Prohibition has failed, inasmuch as it has proved
inoperative, the conclusion Is the State should control
whatever liquor traffic there Is Instead of leaving it ln the
hands of those who, in plying it, are daily violating the law,
aud are enabled to do so unpunished. This does not mean
there should not be a measure of temperance, so that much
more moderation than In the pre-Prohibition days will be
set up as the law of the people. It does mean, however,
that the present conditions, which constitute a travesty on
government, will he removed to a very great extent, for a
new experiment tn connection with the issue will, at least,
give the authorities an opportunity In the light of three
years of experience, of framing a law yhich can be enforced.—Colonist.
HOW TO BE A FINANCIAL WIZARD
Some years ago George Ade wrote one of his "Fables In
Slang" about the Big Business Man and the Financier who
came into his office with a Perfectly Sound Proposition
paying about eight per cent. The Big Business Man rose
up in righteous Indignation and threw him out. Then a
Slouch-Hatted Person, all dressed up like a Tin-Horn
Gambler, slipped into the office and with mysterious
emphasis produced a Brightly Glided Brick. Immediately
the Big Business Man went into a trance. His eye grew
glassy and cold perspiration broke out on his brow. And
he handed tlie Gink who claimed to come from Dead Man's
Gulch all the money he had in the place.
One is reminded of this fable by the career of Ponzl, the
Boston "Wizard," who is now trying to explain to the police
what be did with all the money that people, presumably
sane, forced on him so thnt lie might make fifty per cent.
profit for them in forty-live days. His game was not new,
in spite of all the fiuh-dub be talked about his enormous
dealings in international reply coupons, it was the same
old trick of paying one row of depositors out of the money
handed in by another row. And yet thousands and thousands of people entrusted to liim their savings in tlie
pathetic belief thut he was going to make fifty per cent, for
tliem uml Heaven only knows how much more for himself
in a month and a half inlying and selling postage-stamps.
It wasn't ns if they had not had many previous schemes
of the sorl lo serve as u warning to them. Examples seem
to be of Utile avail lu cases of tlilB character, Nor were
tho#v deterred by the various Investigations which were
started Into 1'oiizl's nffalrs. In fact. It Is stated that most
of the money lie received was paid in uftcr the glaring light
of publicity hail been turned on him and his operations.
And the Investors were not Ignorant foreigners with wild
Ideas as to the ease with which money could be made in
America, but hard-headed New Englanders whose native
caution had passed into a proverb. Surely there are no
mysteries like the mysteries of money-making psychology.
The fisherman who drops his line into the by-waters of
finance does not need even to bait his hook. All he has to
do Is to put a little gliding on it, and the silly gudgeon rise
to it in shoals. But if you wish to raise a little money on
sound and sufficient collateral—well, that's quite another
story.
WHEN WILL YOU START TO SAVE MONEY?
By S. W. Straus, President American Socity for Thrift.
If you are not saving money today, when do you expect
to begin?
If you are one of the misguided thriftless ones*** your
answer doubtless will be "when I begin making more
money," or "when I get out of debt." or "when I get married and settle down," or "when I get through having a
good time."
It always is easy to find a good excuse for not saving
money, lust as It always is easy to put off until tomorrow
what should be done today. The man or woman who cannot save money under adverse circumstances will not save
under prosperous ones.
The experiences of thousands of men have shown that it
is just as hard to save money out of a large income as it
is out of a small one. Even though the savings amount to
only a few pennies a day or even n few pennies a week,
the start has been made In tlie right direction and the more
difficult It Is to effect these savings the greater will be the
value In added will power and stability of character.
Many and many a man who has begun to save money
in the midst of great hardships has been surprised to find
how quickly good fortune began to smile upon him. We
cannot foretell the future nnd the mere act of saving oven
though tlie amounts be Insignificant, often lias so chauged
one's mental attitude and viewpoint that immediate progress has been inspired.
No mutter what your circumstances may bo, save money.
The amount saved does not matter nearly as much as-the
fact that you save something, for If you cannot lay by a
small portion of your earnings when your income is small
you will not be able to do so if it is Increased.
Thrift is a matter ot mental force and stamina, rather
thun a function of mere monetary accumulation.
MUSICAL ROCKS
A few miles south of Pottstown, Pa., or about forty-five
miles from Philadelphia, are to be found the only musical
rocks In this country, If not in the whole world. They are
strewn over half an acre on the top of a hill overlooking
tlie Schuykill Valley, some lying loose, some being embedded deeply In tlie ground, some weighing several tons,
and some small enough to be picked up and carried away
In the hand.
They are of a uniform dark brown color, showing unmistakable traces of iron, and never collect either moss or
lichens as most rocks do; neither do any wild plants or
weed grow near them, nor will any ivy grow over them.
When struck with a hammer or other metallic Instrument
they respond with a clear ( resonant note like a bell. Tbe
larger the rock struck the louder and clearer the bell note,
the ringing of the big rocks being heard quite plainly
across the valley.
A musician after a littlb practice is able to produce the
notes uit the scales on them in a manner similar to the
xylophone. When small rocks are carried away and struck
elsewhere they refuse to ring, and this fact leads many to
believe that the ground underneath the rocks is formed like
a huge sounding board, while the loose masses of granite
have been sunuingly arranged by the hand of nature to
refract sound in such a way as to produce the ringing notes.
IRELAND IN AMERICA
How is it that the Irish have such a voice in America,
people are asking.
Few realize that since 1776 more Irish have emigrated to
America than have remained behind, and, apparently, they
are an expert ln airing their grievances as those who did
remain behind.
It seems astonishing that in a century and a half little
Ireland has sent America a population equal to that of
eleven of her states covering an area as large as the United
Kingdom, France, Germany, and what was Austria-Hungary
lumped together.
Four and a half million Irish have crossed the seas
within the hundred and fifty years, but it would be difficult
to say how many have become Americans. Irish-American
seems to be as far as they get, and the memory of tbelr
motherland and resentment of their wrongs is cherished to
the second and third generations.—Saturday Night.
The thought grows upon the world .that advertising pays.
The Polish army was offering 1,000 marks for horses, and
caused the fact to be known to the Red army cavalry by
way of aviators, with the result that the market was fully
supplied by Red soldiers, who thought more of food and
a thousand marks than they did of Mr. Lenlne's uncomfortable philosophy.
The real hazard of the States has passed safely; the
prune crop is practically out of danger from frost.
WHY ALL THIS?
Using the figures of the last four months as a basis, The
Ottawa Journal, a staunch friend of the Dominion Government, ventures tlie prediction that this year the Minister
of Finance "will lind himself in possessimi'of the unparalleled sum of at least $700,000,000 to carry on the business
of the country."
The Journal regards this as a magnificent prospect. It
is altogether too magnificent. The Canadian publlc is being
taxed to tho very eyebrows to raise this enormous total,
which is more than twice ns much as thc Government
should require for legitimate expenditures.
The country would be much better off witli less revenue
if It meant an appreciable reduction in that particular form
of taxation which bears most heavily upon the country's
production. It Sir Henry Drayton is not careful he will
discover that he lias taxed this Dominion into the economic
doldrums. He certainly can do witli much less than $700,-
000,000 and still divert a healthy sum to the reduction of
the national debt.—Times.
THE HOUSEWIFE'S PRAYER
Dear Lord, give us patience to dust, once more,
Tilings dusted a hundred times before.
Give us tlie calm that naught can shake-
Not broken chinu or fallen cuke.
Give us the patience that won't "see red"
When Johnny puts eels ln the guest room bed.
When the cook elopes with the chauffeur's brother,
Then give us patience to hunt another.
Not for riches or power do housewives pray,
But for grace—like manna—fresh each day:
For the greatest gift since time began—
Patience enough to manage a man.
—Jane Kay.
Bad news from Boston: the suburban bean crop has been
frostbitten.
The treaty with Turkey was signed at Sevres. Sevres is
noted as the place where the world's most fragile ware ls
manufactured.
A flying boat service accommodating five pasesngers on
each trip between Toronto and the Mukoka Lakes, has been
established, with Colonel Bishop, the famous Canadian filer,
ln charge,
V^VV»^*S^rVfrVSrV^VVV^V^VrVVVV<
Special
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
The balance of our stock of Middies, Middy Coats
a
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Misses' and Children's Muslin and Gingham
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wholesale prices
Ladies' House Dresses and Bungalow Aprons
at greatly reduced prices
The Balance of our Ladies' Trimmed  Hats
at half-price
300 yards New designs in fancy Dress' Muslins
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WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
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The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
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That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book.
The experience of veteran motorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
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Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
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Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
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These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
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Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
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NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay September-11, 1926.
THE   CtnVtdfiRUMft   lSLANDEli
Fi
ive
tf
William Fnrnum, who takes the role
of Jean Valjean in "Les Mlserables"
at Ilo-llo today, matinee and evening.
"IES XINKKAHLKS"
Victor  Hugo's  great  muBtcr-
plecc, a colossal production.
A story of sublime sacrifice by
one whom society wronged beyond reparation.
Tile greatest story of France's
greatest writer.
Thc epic of a soul transfigured
and redeemed, purified by heroism and glorified through suffering.
The grandeur of life's, turbulent tides, the sublimity of the
heroes of the centuries, welded
into a screen production of peerless effectiveness.
WILLIAM FARNUM, WHO
GAVE JEAN VALJEAN
TO THE SCREEN
William Farnum regards his Jean
Valjean, In "Les Mlserables," which
is the big attraction at the Ilo-llo this
afternoon and evening, as the greatest
achievement of his career. It is indeed a superb piece of character work,
on the highest histrionic level, etching a Valjean who lives forever in
memory.
For stealing a loaf of bread to relieve the hunger pangs of ills sister
and her little ones, Jean Valjean is
sent to the gallery for live years. He
writhes in his chains. Several times
he makes ineffectual attempts to
escape—his captivity being extended
in punishment for tills. In all he
serves .nineteen years, and when he is
liberated, in 1815, his soul is starved
and his heart embittered against God
and man; ills appearance utterly repulsive.
He tramps to the provincial town
of Duval. People shun him. He is
spurned, insulted, denied food. He arrives at the Bishop's house. The
Bishop, a man worthy of the God he
serves, gives him food and a bed to
sleep in. During the night Valjean
gets up and steals his host's silverware.   .
He is captured and brought back,
but the Bishop tells tlie gendarmes
that he had given the silverware to
Valjean. As Valjean leaves the Bishop
says:
"Jean Valjean, you no longer belong
to evil, but to God. Remember 1 have
bought your soul and have given It to
God."   »
Valjean departs, but Is falsely accused of another crime. The tender
. mercy of the Bishop sinks deep Into
ills consclenceness. He recovers his
manhood, prospers, is doing good
everywhere. He becomes a millionaire and mayor of the town of M. He
is owner of a big manufacturing plant.
Among his workers Is Fautine, who
has an unfathered child, Cosette. Unable to care for the child herself, she
entrusts her to the Thenardler family, a soulless group. Finally Fantlue
is discharged ln disgrace from the factory by the forewoman. She becomes
desperately 111. When Valjean, now
known as Fntlior Madeleine, learns of
this he seekB out Fantlue In the hospital and promises to get Cosette for'
her.
During all this time Valjean Is
hounded by Javert, un officious police
Inspector who recognizes him us former Convict No. 24601. In Paris,
Cosette, now grown to womanhood,
brightens tbe life of old Valjean. She
falls ln love with Marius, a young
aristocrat, and Valjean sees in tlie
love affair a threat to roll him of his
loved one.
At first he tries to thwart their love.
But the man ln him reasserts Itself
and In the revolutionary riots of 1831
he Baves the life of Marius, and the
young man marries Cosette. During
the riots, fate throws into Valjean's
hands his implacable enemy, Javert.
He spares the inspector's life.
Jean Valjean, old and worn, but
blessed by everyone who knows hini
for his goodneBS, dies. Cosette and
Marius bring sunshine to his last
hours. Cosette never knows that her
benefactor was a convict. Valjean falls
asleep with a smile ou bis lips.
WILL RODGERS IN THE
CHARMING GOLDWYN
COMEDY, "JUBILO"
Will Rogers comes to the Ilo-llo on
Monday evening In his Goldwyn photo-
pluy, "Jubilo," adapted from the Saturday Evening Post story by Ben
Ames Williams. Remember lovable,
human Will hi "Almost a Husband."
You'll Unci hltn even more, irresistible
and human In "Jubilo." He playB the
part of a dyed-ln-the-wool hobo—a
member of the ancient aud honored
Society of Worknots—whom love
transforms Into a Prince In patches.
It's funny what strange things a man
will do under the spell of a pair of be
wltchlngly blue feminine eyeB. Jubilo
had been a wondering Nabob from
Nowhere—in other words, a hobo.
Dodging work was his religion—and a
lino art in which he had no superior.
Then he met Rose Hardy, a rustic
beauty—and then the miracle of
miracles. Jubilo actually went to
work—washed his face—and combed
his hair! And he mglht have won
Rose if It hadn't been for a big train
hold-up to which lie pleaded guilty.
Work, Water and Worry. Three
things tllat were total strangers to
Jubilo. You can't blame him. What
self-respecting hobo would confess
his guilt to these three cardinal sins?
But even hobos are not masters of
their own destinies, und tlie day came
when Jubilo, to his everlasting shame,
actually went to work—splashed in
and drunk water and got something to
worry about. A girl and a big train*
hold-up did it! It's a bright, sunny
coinudy-drama of plain folks and rich
hearts.
.'*,"♦"♦
PAULINE FREDERICK IN
THE GOLDWYN PICTURE
"THE PALISER CASE"
Whose was the knife that stabbed
Monty Paliser? What hand had driven
through tlie black velvet curtains of
the opera box? You who have seen big
mystery pictures have never seen one
that might be said to approach "The
Palisor Case," Pauline Frederick's
Goldwyn vehicle wliieh Is to be shown
at tlie llo-Ilo Theatre on Tuesday
night. Tills is Indeed a drama of misplaced trust, deceived womanhood,
man's perlidy and historic justice.
Pauline Frederick rises to tlie very
heights of her emotional powers in
this great drama as a woman accused
of Invoking "The Unwritten Law."
"The Paliser Case" is an intense
suspense-ludeu mystery, drama which
deals with tlie life of a trusting girl
who is betrayed by a fake marriage
to an unscrupulous rogue and finds
herself in the toils of justice when the
latter is mysteriously murdered.
Suspicion rests also ou others and the
third degree is applied with merciless
determination until justice locates the
murderer. The elemental emotions,
the great moments of disillusionment
and despair of this moving drama are
portrayed by the star as only Pauline
knows how. See this Goldwn production and try to guess the end. We
don't think you will be able to do so.
*   *   *
WHAT BECOMES OF MOVIE
STARS' BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES?
What becomes of all the beautiful
clothes that the beautiful movie stars
garb themselves in for all of their
photoplays?
Each year there is spent a large fortune for wardrobe alone in the picture
business. It would bo lolly even to
estimate tlie amount, because tu do so
would mean taking the press agent's
word In most enses and—well, you
know press ogenls!
However, the fact remains that Innumerable costly gowns,arc worn by
slurs for one production only, all of
which leads us to wonder where the
beautiful clothes go when Miss Star
fades out ot the picture in the final
clinch.
There are several answers. First,
feminine audiences do not like to see
a star appear ln two different productions wearing the same costume. It
makes it seem us It she had only one
dress to her name. Ami men iu the
audience like to sun a beautiful star,
sixty per cent, of wliieh it ls said is
accomplished by clothes. But the
principal reason that elaborate gowns,
regardles of cost, are seen only once
on the screen ls because photoplayers
ure superstitious.
It Is believed by picture uclurs and
actresses that If they wear cast-off
wardrobe, some great harm will come
to them during the making of a production. Although often as high as
twenty thousand dollars are spent in
wardrobe on a single photoplay, yet
seldom is one of these costumes worn
again in another picture. The most,
lavish wardrobe purchasers for the
screen said to be Cecil B, DeMille, D.
W. Griffith and Allau Dwan.   For "In
the Heart of a Fool," a Dwan production which the Mayflower Photoplay
Corporation will present this month,
$20,000 was expended In clothes for
the feminene players alone.
But these garments are not thrown
away or wholly wasted by any means
—not at the prevailing price of dress
goods! When a photoplay is finished
the costumes are turned into the wardrobe department of the studio, where
under the direction of a high-salaried
modiste, they are recut Into garments
suitable for other productions. This
lifts the curse of the superstition from
them and results in a maximum of efficiency and a minimum of waste. But
even by this method there often is
bound to be great loss.
MELODRAMATIC LOVE
STORY FOR BLANCHE
SWEET—A BIG HIT
For those who like their entertainment served up in melodramatic
faBhion, "A Woman of Pleasure,
starring Blanche Sweet at the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Thursday next, wlll more
than satisfy. Adapted from James
Willard's famous melodrama that was
one of the record hits of the far-famed
Adelphl Theatre in London, 'A Woman
of Pleasure" has been given a lavish
and spectacular production by Jesse
D. Hampton.
The story centres about a girl who
marries for money and then falls ln
love with one of her husband's employes. Tbe action shifts from England to British South Africa, where
the husband's mines are endangered
by a Zulu uprising. These Zulu scenes
are remarkably well staged. There is
a battle between the Zulus armed
With spears and the British armed
with rifles. A huge observation balloon plays a thrilling part ln the rescue. The heroine is held captive, the
hero; sacrifices his life for hers—almost—and the villain ls satisfactorily
disposed of.
There were several reasons why
Alice Dane married Sir John Turnbull,
none of which was the one that she
loved him. She married him because
his wealth could give her Invalid
father the care his few remaining days
needed and because she craved the
luxuries and the pleasures that, were
her right by virtue of her breeding,
youth and beauty. «
Sir John, as Alice learned on the
night of their wedding, bad but one
object in marrying her. She had been
the sole witness-to his attempt to kill
a man by throwing him over a cliff.
The fail has resulted in the victim
losing his memory. As the law wilt
not permit a wife to testify against
her husband, Sir John married Alice.
Within a month after the wedding
Alice's father died. Then news came
from British South Africa that Sir
John's mining interests are endangered by a Zulu uprising. Bobby Ralston, Sir John's superintendent, visits
England on a hurried trip. While he
is conferring with Sir John, Alice asks
permission to adopt little Danny
Thomas, a mischief-loving youngster
who has ran away from the orphanage.
Sir John tells her that he supported
her father for appearance's sake, but
he'll not feed "that brat." Keenly
sensing Alice's humiliation and filled
with admiration for the boy's pluck,
Ralston offers to care for Danny. Sir
John objects and is told by Ralston
that bis employer cannot control his
(Ralston's) private actions.
A few weeks later find Sir John and
Lady Turnbull and Ralston in the
midst of savage warfare in tho heart
of Zululand. Alice's unbearable situation as the wife of Sir John is further
complicated by the fact tbat she and
Bobby Ralston love each other. When
provisions run low and the wagon
train fails to arrive, Sir John and Ralston go up In the observation balloon,
and sight the lost train.
Cetygoola, the chief of the Zulu
tribe, was educated by missionaries,
but reverted to savagery upon his accession to the "throne." Because of
his knowledge of tbe ways nt white
men he ls a dangerous enemy. He
sends his brother, Konl, to the British
eamp. Koni Is treacherously killed
by Sir John, who abuses the black's
Hug of truce. Cetylgoola swears vengeance. Alice and Danny are captured by Cetygoola, and Danny sent
back to camp with the message that
unless the murderer of Konl is surrendered for punishment, Alice will
die.
The stirring incidents and climax of
this love drama will be portrayed on
Thursday at the Ilo-llo.
"I saw your mother going to a
neighbor as I crossed the street," said
the caller to her friend's little son.
"Do you know wHen she will be back."
"Yes'm," answered youthful Jimmy.
"She said she'd be back Just as soon
as you left."
IL0-IL0 THEATRE
Saturday, September 11th
WILLIAM   FARNUM
— IN —
"Les Miserables
Victor Hugo's Greatest Masterpiece
Victor Hugo's great masterpiece, a colossal production. A story of sublime sacrifice by one whom society wronged beyond reparation. An epic of
life from the pen of a genius and prophet. The greatest story of France's
greatest writer. The acme of dramatic achievement—the life of immortal
Jean Valjean. "Les Miserables," the Gospel of the Poor, the Story of the
Ages. A story that runs the gamut of emotion—pathos, tenderness, hatred,
exultation. The story of stories, the struggle of man against mankind. A
story as imposing as earth's mountains, and as durable. The essence of
life—love, suffering and sacrifice—transferred to the screen.
»>
Monday. September 13th
Samuel Goldwyn presents
WILL RODGERS
— IN —
"JUBILO"
The Misadventures of a Soldier of Misfortune—A Hobo's Misadventure in
the Land of Work and Love—The Romance of the Lady and the Hobo—
The Miracle of Love, and the Vagrant it Touched—A Comedy-Drama of
Plain Folks and Rich Hearts.
Tuesday, September 14th
PAULINE  FREDERICK
IN —
"THE PALISER CASE"
WHO KILLED MONTY PALISER? Was it the Girl He Wronged? Was
it the Man He Betrayed? Was it the Father He Disgraced? Three confessed. Who was the guilty one? A thrilling, baffling murder mystery
with a climax that startles and grips. No greater emotional achievement
was ever scored by Pauline Frederick.
Thursday, September 16th
Jesse D. Hampton presents
BLANCHE  SWEET
— IN —
"A Woman of Pleasure"
A stirring drama of the outposts of the Empire, of the Great Zulu uprising
under Chief Cetygoola in British South Africa—Of a woman who married
to escape poverty, and of her callous husband who wed her to silence the
only witness of his crime—And of the handsome mine-superintendent who
fell in love with his brutal employer's wife—Depicting Savage Mashona-
land in the wilds of British South Africa, with the naked Zulu Impis on
the warpth—A pitifully small band of whites guarding the mine—And a
Hopeless Marriage Tangle Working to a Climax! Six
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
-September ll, 1920.
Auto Repairs
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We make a specialty of
CHILDREN'S
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Have a picture of your
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BARTON
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
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CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
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Dunsmuir Ave.
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PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
633 Hastings St., W., Corner of
Granville.      VANCOUVER, B.C.
We have received a shipment
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Including some very choice
FINNAN HADDIE
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UNION HOTEL
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WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
WHERE AMERICA WAS
FIRST PUT ON THE MAP
Suggests Publisher's House at
St. Die, France, Should Be
Preserved.
There Ib a fine suggestion which is
made by Dr. John H. Finley, the New
York state commissioner of education.
that tlie printers of America should
purchase and preserve the house in
which, colloquially but very literally
speaking. "America was first put on
the map."
It is tlie ancient house in the village
of St. Die, in France, iu which Martin
Waldseemueller—whom we know beat
as Illacomilus—in April, 1507, published the first map of the world that
bore the name "America," and with It
also that little Latin book ln which it
was first proposed that the continents
of the Western Hemisphere should be
thus named. "The fourth continent of
the world," he wrote, "which, since
\tnerlcus discovered it, may fittingly
be called America, or American Land."
And again in another chapter: "I do
not see why anyone can lawfully object to Its being called America, or Khe
Land of America, after the man of
genius who by his sagacity discovered
it."
Of course, we may debate until
ilocuisday the question whether Amer-
icus really did visit Panama with
Ojeda in 1499, and if he was the first
of all Europeans to set foot upon the
terra flrma" of the American continent. That does not affect the memorable fact that it was ln that little
house at St. Die, among the Vosges,
that the name of America was bestowed upon this western world.
Surely America might well acquire
and cherish the place ln which she
received her name.—Harvey's Weekly,
'NOBLER WORK
BEYOND THE BAR"
I know well that conversations with
tlie dear dead are the every day stock
In trade of the average medium, writes
Lieut. E. II. Jones ln "The Road to
En-Dor." It makes mcdiumshlp so
much easier. Besides, for all I know
the medium may be genuine. Alld far
be it from me to decry the efforts of
eminent scientists to forge the links
with tlie world beyond by any means
they choose. They want to "break
through the partition." In their effort, they have perhaps every right
to circularize tlie widows and mothers
of those whose names adorn the Roll
of Honor. To the scientist a widow or
mother is only a unit for the purpose
of experiment and percentage. To the
professional medium she represents
so much bread and butter. Assuredly
these bereaved ladies should be invited to attempt to communicate with
their dead husbands and their dead
sons! The more the merrier and
there is no time like the present. We
have a million souls just "gone over'
in tlie full flush of manhood. The
fodder of last year's cannon is splendid manure for the psychic harvests
of the years to come. Carry on!
Spread the glad tidings! Our glorious
dead are all waiting to move tables
and push glasses, and scrawl with
plancettes, and speak through trumpets, and throw mediums into ugly
trances—at a guinea a time.
Hurry up! Wake up, ye widows, a
guinea Is little to pay for a last word
from your dead husbands; many ot
you would give your Immortal souls
for it!   Wake up, before it ls too late.
I have seen men die from bullets,
and shell, and poison; from starvation, from thirst, from exhaustion, and
from many diseases. God knows, I
have feared death. Yet death has ever
had for me one strong consolation—it
brings the "peace that passeth all understanding." Like me, perhaps, you
have watched It come to your friends
and lay. Its quiet finger on their gray
faces. You have seen the relaxation
from suffering, the gentle passing
away and then the Ineffable Peace
And is my Peace, when it comes, to be
marred by this task of shifting tables,
and glasses, and chairs, Sir Oliver?
Am 1 to be at the beck nnd call of
some hysterical, guinea-grnhhing med
Inm—a sort of telephone boy in heaven
or hell? I hope not, sir. I trust there
is a nobler work beyond the liar for
us poor mortals.
VETERANS WANT TO
DISPLACE BARMAIDS
About two thousand ex-service men
in Liverpool are protesting against the
employment of barmaids ln the city's
hotels and public houses.
When a deputation waited on the
committee ot the Liverpool Brewers
and Spirit Merchants' Association one
of the men stated that if the barmaids
did not give place to service men action would be taken that would force
the women out.
Hobo; "Could you give mc two bits
for a bed, lady?"
"Sandy's Wife; "Yes; bring it In."
IS THE MAORI RACE
DISAPPEARING?
Interesting Reminiscences of a
Highly Intelligent and Very
Chivalrous Race.
The London Times correspondent
who is accompanying the Prince of
Wales, is despondent about the Maoris.
Commenting on the picturesque welcome they gave the Royal visitor, says
the London Observer, he speaks of Its
poignant interest as "evidently the
last distinctive festival of the Maoris,"
and he suggests that the race is in
danger of disappearing through change
of custom and intermarriage with the
white.
All, I think, he means to imply,"
said Sir Thomas Mackenzie, High
Commissioner for New Zealand, in an
Interview, "is that the typical Maori
is changing. The old warrior is passing away; but the race is not dimlnsih-
ing iu numbers. For some years it
has been just about stationary, from
forty to fifty thousand. And today the
conditions, from the point ot view of
the health of the race, are very much
better than they were. The Maori in
illness receives much more careful attention than was formerly the case.
He no longer goes, as he used to do,
to the Tohunga, or priest, for his medicine. He has either a Europeon doctor to attend to htm or a trained doctor of his own race.
Notable Half-Casts.
"Though the delegates who have
taken part In the reception to the
Prince of Wales would be fairly representative of the race, the Maoris the
Prince of Wales will have seen about
Rotorua are less typical than others.
They, it is true, have come much in
ct(itact with tourists and settlers during the last half-century, and have intermarried with the whites, but ln
other parts of New Zealand there has
been nothing like the same intermixture.
"In the early days of European settlement in the country a runholder or
sheepfarmer would marry the daugh
ter of a chief, and in no way lose caste
hy the alliance, his children being received on the same footing as those of
Europeans. These marriages, how.
ever, are not taking place now to the
same extent.
"Some of the finest families In New
Zealand are half-caste. Take Sir
James Carroll; he is a half-caste, and
one of the very ablest and most eloquent men in New Zealand. His
father was a whaler, and his mother
the daughter of a union between two
of the greatest Maori families ln the
North Island. He has enormous in
lluence with the Maoris, and he did a
very great deal to settle and maintain
peace between them and the Europeans."
Speaking of the origin of the race,
Sir Thomas said: "The Maoris are
supposed to have come from the uplands of Asia. Driven out by the
Ayran race many centuries ago, they
took to the sea in the Gulf of Persia
and navigated the Pacific from East
to West.
"They became great navigators from
Easter Island to New Zealand, and
peopled the Sandwich Islands, Tahiti,
Samoa, New Zealand, Raratonga and
partly Fiji. The first was about the
ninth century, but the great emigration was in the thirteenth century.
"The race was noted for its great
generals. Perfect sappers and engineers, the Maoris could run up fortifications sufficiently strong to defy
tbe British artillery, as the episode
shows in which they were followed up
the Waikato by British troops.
"Rawi Maniapato, a famous warrior,
was forced to throw up a pah, a forti
Mention, where he was surrounded by
British troops, some 1700 strong. The
Maoris numbered only 300, including
women and children. Their stock of
provisions soon became exhausted, and
Captain Gilbert Mair, an accomplished
Maori linguist, was Bent by General
Cameron to persuade them to sur
render.
"Rawi Manlapato's reply was: 'We
are fighting for our land and we in
tend' to continue to fight.' 'Then,
said Captain Mair, 'don't let us kill the
women and children; aend them out
before hostilities are renewed.' A
.Maori woman, overhearing this proposal, declared from the palisade, 'We
shall stand with our men, and we shall
light for ever, and for ever, and for
ever.'
"In the end the Maoris cut through
the British force. Many were killed
but Rawi Maniapato and a consider,
able number of bis followers escaped.
Their Chivalry.
"There Ib another incident worth reciting. At one time an armistice was
arranged between the Maoris and tbe
British force. The soldiers fraternized a good deal, and when hostilities
were resumed, much to the regret of
the followers of both leaders, who
were about to send a volley into the
British, shouted, 'Lie down, Hiktty-
fifth (their name for the 65th Regiment), we are going to shoot.'
"Another story, thoroughly authcu-
The Piiik of Promotion
LEADS THROUGH ONE OF OUR C0URSE8
Commercial    Higher Collegiate (University   ft
Stenography      Accounting Matric, Jr. and Sr.)      p
Secretarial      Retail Coaching  for  exams.    f\y
Wireless Civil Service of B.C.L.S.
Telegraphy   Line Telegraphy   Law Society
Dental School and Socitey.
BUSINESS    INSTITUTE
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES ARRANGED IF DESIRED
Send for catalogue, stating course desired.   Pup.ls accepted each Monday.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
YEARS ago a man, whose ideas may
have been somewhat in advance of the
time, when addressing a gathering of
school children, said, "Never say 'Hello' when
greeting a person. 'Hello' means nothing; it
is a silly greeting. Be considerate enough to
ask after his health; say, 'How do you do?'"
Of course, in answering the telephone you
would not say, "How do you do?" or even
"Are you there?" But such greetings are no
more out of place than "Hello." Proper
telephone practice is to announce who is
speaking.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
"1
Quality
Confectionery
GANONG'S
WILLARD'S
MOIR'S
The best in Candy of all kinds
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Cumberland, B.C.
tic (also Illustrates their wonderful
chivalry. A British force had been
much reduced by lack of provisions,
and the Maoris, knowing the low state
of the British larder, sent them their
breakfast, just before an engagement
was about to start. When they were
remonstrated with by their leaders
they replied, 'How can Pakeha (Europeans) fight on an empty belly?'
Three thousand Maoris went to
fight In the great war. Many died in
England from consumption; many
were killed in France. One man who
lost both legs a year or two before the
end was asked whether be was going
back to his people.
'He replied, 'No, I am not going
back. If I did, they would say, 'Well,
the war is over and you are victorious,' and I should have to tell them
that 'I lost my legs, but the war is not
over,' and then they would say, 'Why
did you come  home?  You ought to
have got other legs to continue fighting.' "
"The Maoris have always considered
it shameful either to return without
victory or to be taken prisoner of war.
No matter how high the rank of the
man, if he is taken prisoner by an
enemy he loses his status. A Maori
would rather, therefore, be killed than
captured, and if he should be captured
he would endeavor to goad his captor
to kill him by heaping upon htm all
sorts of insults."
UNCLE AND AUNTIE
"I say, auntie, uncle said this morning that there wasnt' another woman
like you in the world."
"Ah, the dear fellow! Did he really,
now, Freddy?"
"Yes; and he said it was a Jolly
good job, too!" September 11, 1920.
iliik)   CUMBfifiUND   ISLANDEft
Seven
P
■i
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Material
and
Workmanship
(iuni'untccd
Rubber Heels Fixed While V Walt
Phillips' Military Heels and Soles.
S. DAVIS   ■  Dunsmuir Avenue
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays-
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. OATZ, Proprietor
Can The Elwell Mystery Be Solved
(Continued from Page Three)
by selecting the shells that
hunters from coast to coast
have proved dependable
under all conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
nre a doub'.e assurance ol
success for the man who
prefers balHstite powder.
We also carry a full line of
J=z~ Canuck nnd Sovereign Shot-
flun Shells and Dominion
Metallic CartrldfteA
A. L. MIllInniH
A. V. Webb
COURTENAY
PLUMBING
COMPANY
SANITARY PLUMBING
— and —
GENERAL REPAIR
WORK
Corner Comox Road and
Lake Trail
COURTENAY, B. C
Telephone 127
NOTICE
Amendments to the Pound Bylaw
prohibiting stock of kinds from wandering on the public thoroughfares of
the city at any hour ..of the day or
night, will come Into force on October
1st, 1920. It Is the intention of the
authorities to have this Bylaw strictly
enforced. Owners of stock will kindly
ncept this warning.
C. J. BUNBURY,
4-39 Chief of Police.
TENDERS
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Canadian Collieries (Punstnuir),
Limited, not Inter thun Monday noon,
September 20th, for the erection of an
Athletic Club building to be built at
Cumberland, B. C, for which plans and
specifications may bo procured at
their offices at Cumberland.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
W. A. OWEN, C.B.,
Construction Engineer.
Sept. 4, 1920.
since ' i67o   *s&mJ/M
ILOH
30i58KCOUGHS
the most prominent physician in the
city, a few days before his death. Less
than tweuty-four hours after dining
at the Beaurigard house each of them
had developed symptoms of one of the
dread diseases.
How He < iinliriued His Suspicions.
Following this line of reasoning—
though it appeared to'be the height of
folly to suspect Dr. Beaurigard, a
member of the Ecole de Medicine, aud
a scientist who was mentioned as the
logical successor to Koch, Porteras
disguised himself as a book agent and
succeeded in warming himself into the
confidence of the servants in the Beaurigard home.
Less than a week later Buenos Aires
was startled by the news of tbe arrest
of Dr. Albert Beaurigard, the foremost
physician   in   South   America, on
charge of murder.
During the days which preceded his
trial, the scientist preserved an air of
total nonchalance, appearing entirely
oblivious to the fact tbat he was about
to be tried for his life and contenting
himself with issuing statements that
"the whole matter ls too absurd to be
considered seriously." So numerous
were his friends and so secure his position In the social life of the South
American capital that the majority of
the people claimed the affair was a
plot -on the part of the police, an attempt to cover their past failures by a
sensational prosecution of an Innocent
man.
It was not until the state had laid
the foundation for its case by introducing the testimony of physicians who
had attended the dead man, followed
by proof thnt each of them had dined
only a few hours before they had been
taken ill, that Porteras played his
trump card. At his direction the prosecuting attorney called Dr. Beauri-
gard's butler to the stand, and for the
first time the face of the accused man
showed the strain under which be had
been laboring.
The "Prying Servant."
'All preparations for the dinners
were left in my hands," testified tbe
butler, "with the exception of the preparation of a single glass of creme de
menthe. This Doctor Beaurigard invariably fixed himself, placing it on
the tray in the midst of the other
glasses."
"What was the difference between
this glass and the others?"
"The liquor was the same. The ice
came from a small test tube in Doctor
Beaurigard's laboratory."
Hardly had the butler finished this
sentence than the prisoner was on his
feet, his hand upraised to attract tbe
attention ot the court.
Yes," he exclaimed, "I am responsible for their deaths—but It would
never have been discovered bad it not
been for this prying servant. I desired to make experiments with
cholera and yellow fever baccili. Other
subjects were impossible to secure, so
I determined to gamble with death—
tor the fatal glass might have come to
me as easily as to any of the others.
The germs were frozen ln the Ice,
but," und here Porteras sprang forward. I' ' too late, "I will never live
to pay ollicial penalty for my experiment. The world may call me
mad.   I wlll not hear It."
A moment later he was dead. A
grain of poison, hidden in bis signet
ring had done its work quickly and
infallibly.
Quick Solution of a Chest Mystery.
One of the most startling bits ot
English detective work on the part of
Scotland Yard operatives occurred
when John Kane, chief inspector of
Scotland Yard, investigated the Epstein disappearance.
Epstein, who was reputed to be rich
and a miser, apparently vanished from
his home ono night, leaving no trace
whatever behind him. The bouse was
watched and thoroughly searched,
without a single clue, und Kune finally
took charge or tlie affair as a last
resort.
As he approached the place where
Epstein lived, his men informed him
that there were Indications of activity
within the house and that Mrs. Epstein appeared to be getting ready to
move. Shortly afterward a dray appeared and, from the driver, Kane obtained tlie information that the luggage was to be taken to Charing Cross,
thence to be shipped across the Channel. The tagB were on the various
articles and it was not until the last
piece was brought out of the house
that Kane noted anything out of the
ordinary.
"Take that chest Into the house," he
ordered.   "Let's see what's In it."
"What right have you to give such
orders?" demanded a voice from the
doorway, and the Scotland Yard man.
looking up, caught a glimpse of a tall
but beautiful woman looking down at
him from the threshold.
"The right of an officer of the crown
to Investigate suspicious circumstances," retorted Kane. "I happen to
be  the  chief  inspector  of   Scotland
Yard and, as your husband recently
disappeared, I desire to know what is
in that box."
Tlie woman said nothing and her
eyes flashed as Bhe directed the driver
to take the rest of the luggage to
Charing Cross.
'I'll ride down with you," she continued, but changed her mind when, at
a signal from their chief, two Scotland
Yard men lined up on each side of
her.   ■
It waB in the dim, barely furnished
parlor of the house that Kane directed
the cbest to be placed. The flickering
yellow light of a single gas Jet cast a
ghostlike Illumination over the scene,
and even Kane's iron nerves were
shocked when tbe lid of the box was
thrown back. The Instant the top of
the chest opened, what appeared to be
the ghost of a man sat up and leered
out into the room! It was the body
ot the mlssjng man, the upper portion
of^the trunk attached to the lid of,the
box in such a manner that, when the
top was thrown back, the body sprang
into a sitting posture, as if it were
alive again!
Even Mrs. Epstein, hardened as she
was, cried out at the Bight and then
tainted away.
"Quick," directed Kane. "Find out
how the man was killed!"
"A thrust of some long, thin instrument through the heart," reported one
of tbe detectives. "A drop of blood on
the chest Is the only Indication of foul
play—but that's what did it all right.
Not a stiletto or a dagger. Tbe puncture isn't large enough for that."
Clotted Blood Incriminating.
The chief Inspector examined the
wound for an instant and then, stepping across to where the fainting
woman lay, began to fumble with
something ln her hair.
"Throw some water in her face," he
ordered, "and stand back. I want to
find out something before she gets a
chance to recover her nerve."
As the woman's eyes opened she became aware, first, of the body of her
dead husband, staring at her with
sightless, accusing eyes. Then she
saw the chief inspector, standing ln
front of her examining something under a pocket magnifying glass—something that glittered and shone in the
light of the jet directly above it. An
Instant later Kane stood over her, his
lingers indicating the thing he held ln
his hand.
"Why did you kill your* husband?"
he demanded. "There's no use denying it. We know that he had a considerable sum of money concealed on
the premises and"—here his voice became the voice of doom—"I have here
the weapon with which the murder was
committed—your hatpin, with a tiny
clot of the dead man's blod close to the
head where you couldn't quite wipe it
off."
Some months later the woman was
sentenced, comparatively lightly on
account of certain revolting facts
which were brought out during the
trial and which tended to minimize
the enormity of tbe crime, while the
hatpin was added to that gruesome
collection which adorns tbe archives
of Scotland Yard.
PROVING HIMSELF ALIVE
It is not often that a man has the
chance to sign his own death certificate, but this has happened to a
French soldier named Bergot, of Bel-
fort, who, although In good health,
has been officially reported as "missing" and then as "killed." He recently received a visit from a gendarme
who asked him if he wero Bergot. and.
being told "yes," asked him to sign
his name. The gendarme left, and
Bergot then examined the folded
paper, and discovered it was his deatli
certificate. Bergot lias begun what
will prove to be a long legal process to
prove that he Is still alive.
HIS OWN DEATH PROPHET
A curious story of how a man fulfilled his own. prophecy that a deatli
would occur as the result of the breaking of a clock face was related at an
Islington inquest on William Frederick Peskett, aged 48, of Holloway
Deceased, who was employed at a
Higbgate Tavern, on entering the
house which was being repainted,
said: "Somebody is going lo die in
this house," "What makes you say
that?" asked the manager. "Because
the painters have broken the clock,"
answered deceased. Shortly afterwards Peskett complained of pains.
and almost immediately collapsed
with the remark, "I am done." He
died next day without regaining con
sclousness.     .    •
SUBSTITUTE FOR ICE
An interesting substitute for ice is
now provided in some parts of Syria.
Snow gathered iu the mountains is
packed in a conical pit dug in tlie
ground and provided at the bottom
with a drain to carry off the water
formed—for some of the snow unavoidably melts. The snow Ib tamped
firmly and covered with straw and
leaves. From these pits the solidified
snow is distributed to customers on
pack horses, and costs all the 'Way
from 10 to 25 cents per 100 pounds.
Old women have one good point—
they are tbe only kind one feels safe
with.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and endorsed "Tender for repairs to wharf at Koyston,
B.C.," will be received ut this otliee
until IS o'clock n Tuesday. September 2\. 1920, for tlie construction
of repairs to wharf at Royston, Coinox-
Albernl District, B. C.
Plans and forms of contract can lie
seen and specification and forms of
tender obtained at ibis Department, at
the olllce of the District Engineer ut
Victoria. B.C.. and at the Post Olllces.
Vancouver, B.C., and Royston Station,
B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and in accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank-payable to the order of (lie Minister of Public Works, equal to 10
per cent, of the amount of the tender.
War Loan Bonds of the Dominion will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonds and cheques if required to
make up an odd.amount.
NOTE.—Blue prints can be obtained
at tills Department by depositing an
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of tlie Minister of Public Works, which will be
returned if thc Intending bidder submit a regular bid.
By order,
R .C. DESROCHERS,
' ' Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August 14, 1920.
ROMAN TOMBS IN HOLLAND
Four .Roman tombs, built In the
third century and containing gold objects, urns, glass work, pottery and
bones have been found in a grave
pit near Heerlen in Dutch Limburg.
Many of the things are of great scientific value and further excavations are
being made.
FORESHORE LEASE
Kelson  District, Vancouver  Maud.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, of
Victoria, 11. C„ Colliery Owners, intend
to apply for permission io lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
hiKli water mark three reel (3 ft.)
East from Hie South-East corner post
of Lot 11, Nelson District, tlienee East
sixteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to the
approximate low water murk, thence
Southerly along the approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
the South-East corner of the North
Fractional half of the South-West
quarter ot Section 3-', thence West to
aforesaid corner of said fractional
part of Section 32, being tlie original
high water mark, thence " Northerly
following original high water mark,
being tlie Easterly boundary of Section 32 and D. L. 28 ill said Nelson
District to pofnt of commencement,
containing In all ninety-six (86) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Graham. Agent.
Dated June 22nd. 1920. 28-8
PAPIER-MACHE HOUSES
Papier-mache houses are the lafest
suggestion In view of the cost of
building. The idea Is that of a Bristol inventor, who proposes to make use
of waste cardboard. Tills Is converted
into papier-mache boarding of three
or more ply., and weather-proofed bn
the outer faces with enamel. A frame- .
work of iron oh ordinary foundation
supports tlie Abuse, and tlie walls are
made of a double casing ot papier-
mache sheets, disposed vertically,
with earth, dried and purified by fire,
rammed between as a non-conductor.
Tills, it ls claimed, ensures the house
being cool in summer end warm in
winter. The ceiling would he in one
piece, and there nre carved moldings
for the corners to avoid dust traps.
The inventor states that a papier-
papier-mache house can be erected'for
£360, compared with £000 for an ordinary house of tho same size.
NOT A PUSSYFOOT
"1 am not expecting any package,"
Bald the lady of the house.
"This is the number," persisted the
driver, looking at his book again.
"Name's Higgins, ain't It.".
"Yes."
"No. 74."
"That's our number."
"Then It's for you."
"I think not. It must be a case of
mistaken Identity." '
"No, mum.   It's, a case of beer."
"Righto.   Bring It In."
LAND ACT
NOTICE OK INTENTION TO APPLY
TO LEASE LAND.
In the Nelson Land District, According
District Nanaimo, and situate one
mile In a Northerly direction from
Union Bay on Baynes Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that A. E. Water
house, of Port Alberni, Merchant,-in
tends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 11, thence lu
a north-westerly direction following
the shore five thousand eight hundred
(5,800) feet more or less to the northeast corner; thence east five hundred
(500) feet more or less, thence approxl
mate low water mark; thence In a
south-easterly direction paralleling the
shore to a point east ot the point of
commencement, thence west five hundred (500) feet more or less to the
point of commencement, and containing forty (40) acres more or less.
ARTHUR E. WATERHOUSE.
Name of applicant.
K. B. Fraser, Agent.
Doted 17th August, 1920.
10-47-NV12
THIS trade-mark is branded
in red on one side of the
Still Better Willard—the only '
storage battery with Threaded
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136 passenger car and truck
manufacturers have selected this
battery, knowing from experience that Threaded Rubber Insulation is far superior to wood
or .any other form of storage
battery insulation.
136 Manufacturers Using Threaded Rubber Insulation
Acason
Colonial
Henney
Nelson ti
Selden
Acme
Comet
Highway
LeMoon
Service
All American
Commerce
Holmes
Noble
Shelby
Allis-Chalmera
Commodore
Holt
Northway
Signal
American
Cunningham
HupmobOe
Ogrcn
Singer
LaFrance
Daniels
Indiana
Old Hickory
Southern
Apex
Dart
International
•Olds
Standard 8
•Apperson
Dependable
(I. H. C.)
Oneida
Standard
Armleder
Diamond T
Oshkosh
Stanley
Atterbury
'Aubum
Austin
Dixie Flyer
Dodge
Dorris
Koehler
Lancia
•Paige
Parker
Peerless
Studebaker
Stuti
Sunbeam
Bacon
Fargo
•Liberty
Peugeot
Tarkington
Bell
Fergus
Luveme
Phianna
Tiffin
Belmont
Ferris
Madison
Marmon
Menominee
Mercer
Piercc-Arrow
Titan
Bessemer
FWD
Premier
Tow Motor
Beta
Biddle
Franklin
Fulton
Preston
Ronier
Transport
Traylor
Brockway
Buffalo
•Buick
Oarford
OMC
Giant
Mercury
Mettor (Phila.)
MHC
•Reo
Republic
ReVer*
Ultimate
Velle
Cannon ball
Glide
•Mitchell
Riddle
Vulcan
Capitol
Great Western
Murray
Robinson
Ward LaFrance
•Case
Hahn
McFarlan
R m V Knight
White
•Chevrolet
HCS
•McLaughlin
Rowe
Wilson
Clydesdale
, Hurlburt
Napoleon
Sandow
Winther
Cole
Hawkeye
Nash
Bayers
Winton
Collier
Hsynea
Nelson
Seagrave
Wolverint)
•For Export
Sparks Co., Distributors, Nanaimo, B.C.
STORAGE
BATTERY Page Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 11, 1920.
FALL  ANNOUNCEMENT
New Coats-
-New Suits
New Dresses
Messrs. Scurrahs, of Victoria, will be here on
.  FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Sept. 24 and 25
with a most comprehensive showing of all
the latest styles in
Ladies' Coats     Ladies' Suits     Ladies' Dresses
THOSE WHO PAID US A VISIT DURING THEIR LAST SHOWING
WERE LOUD IN THEIR PRAISES OF THE MOST CHOICE SELECTION OF BEAUTIFUL MERCHANDISE AT REASONABLE PRICES.
CUSTOMERS DESIRING SOMETHING SPECIAL WHICH WE DO NOT
CARRY IN STOCK CAN HAVE A CHOICE OF SPECIAL GOODS BY
LEAVING THEIR ORDERS PREVIOUS TO THE VISIT OF MISS
MAVIUS, WHO COMES REPRESENTING MESSRS. SCURRAHS, AND
WHO WILL BE DELIGHTED TO BRING SUCH -GOODS.
PHONE  134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
LARGE SHIPMENT OF SHOES
At Prices that will surprise you
AT THE CORNER STORE
Big increase in Freight Rates does NOT affect these Shoes
The 40 per cent, increase
in freight rates which the
Board of Railway Commissioners has just authorized,
and which will materially
increase the cost of almost
everything, does NOT affect the price of this big
shipment of shoes, as I fortunately received them before the increase went into
effect.
MEN'S WORK SHOES
MEN'S LARIGANS with
heavy soles
MEN'S   WHITE   ELK
HUNTING BOOTS
MEN'S   BROGUE   OXFORDS
WOMEN'S BROWN OXFORDS
WOMEN'S BLACK KID
OXFORDS
GROWING GIRLS'
HIGH PUMPS
GROWING GIRLS'
MARY JANES
TWO-STRAP SLIPPERS
ONE-STRAP SLIPPERS
with low heel
Good selection of Boys/ Youths' and Little Gents' Shoes
INFANTS' SHOES   in   Patent
White,   Kid   Balmoral,   White
Moccasin, White One-Strap and
Patent One-Strap
Come and inspect my stock of new and up-to-date footwear, which is on sale at prices that'
will surprise you.   I advertise no baits, but endeavor to make every purchase satisfactory.
ENCOURAGE COMPETITION
THE   CORNER   STORE
TELEPHONE 133
W. GORDON
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Personal Mention
Mr. Henry S. Fleming, President of
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., returned on Tuesday from the
Mainland, and left for Victoria on Friday.
* •   *
Mr. Ben H. Gowen went to Vancou
ver Saturday for a few days.
* *   •
Miss L. Brocklebank left for 'Victoria Friday morning.
* *    a
Miss Lena Carey returned Monday
from Vancouver where she has been
spending two weeks' vacation.
«   *   *
Miss Agnes Potter returned from
San Francisco on Monday, after spending a month's vacation there.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Oraham returned from Victoria on Wednesday,
* a    *
Mr. Jas. Hough went to Nanaimo on
Saturday, returning Tuesday.
* *   *
Miss J. Graham returned on Saturday after spending a week's vacation
in Vancouver.
* .   .
Mrs. John Gillespie returned to her
home on Friday morning's train after
spending a few days' vacation with
Mr. and Mrs. R. Robertson.
* •   •
Mr. J. V. Jones went to Vancouver
on Saturday for a few days, returning
on Tuesday.
.   .   .
Miss N. Robertson returned on Mon
day after spending a month's vacation
in Vancouver and Seattle.
* •   *
Miss A. Reese returned to Cumber
land after spending a month's vaca
Hon with friends In Seattle.
* .   *
Mr. J. G. Millichamp, representing
John Peck & Co., of Vancouver, was In
town during the week.
* •    a
Mr. Charles Graham, Superintendent
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., left for Nanaimo on Friday.
* *   *
Mrs. C. H. Mackintosh returned
from Victoria on Thursday's train.
* •   •
Mrs. Peatt and Miss Peatt of Victoria, arrived tn town on Wednesday
to attend the funeral of Stanhope
Peatt.   They returned Thursday.
* »   *
Mr. A. Peatt of Nanaimo came up
on Thursday to attend the funeral of
his brother.
* •   •
Mrs. Allan Cameron of Vancouver is
visiting Mrs. Dr. G. K. MacNaughton.
* *   •
Miss Lillian Smith of Vancouver,
who has been visiting Mrs. Dr. G. K,
MacNaughton, has returned to the
Mainland.
* •   *
Dr. Hicks accompanied his mother-
in-law, Mrs. Rogers, to Vancouver on
Wednesday. Mrs. Rogers is on her
way back to her home In the East after
a stay on the coast since January. Dr.
Hicks returned Thursday.
* *   *
Miss M. Brown, matron of the Cumberland General Hospital, left Monday
on a month's vacation. She will visit
Seattle and other Coast cities.
* *   •
Among the guests at the Cumber
land Hotel this week were Mrs. Gardiner, Campbell River; C. McGimpsey
Campbell River; A. C. Lumsden, Vancouver; R. Bell, Kingston, Ont.; J. L.
Hodgson, G. J. Millichamp, A. Jones,
W. J. Heslip, Vancouver; Dr. J. H. and
W. M. LePage of Victoria; C. Leynord,
Nanaimo; Charles Barnes, L. O'Con-
nell, C. Dalton, W. Cook, Pete Swanson, W. 0*. Boyce, John Hylen, Mr,
and Mrs. Veg of Victoria, Miss Veg,
Mrs. T. Dickinson of Vancouver, Miss
B. Gray of Victoria, C. Clarke of Victoria, C. Vey, C. B. Woods, V. L.
Smith ofVlctorla, H. W. Goggin, B. R.
Coates, F. Beach, S. D. Graham of
Vancouver, J. P. Grant, H. B. McKel-
vio, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Goe, R. Kil-
patrick, B. F. Hill of Victoria, Mr. and
Mrs. R. Steeter and baby, Vancouver;
D. R. Mansfield of Vancouver, Mr. and
Mrs. A. K. Snider of Nanaimo, C. H.
Leicester of Ocean Falls, C. B. Wilson
of Vancouver.
PORT ALBERNI WANTS
i CONVENTION NEXT YEAR
PORT ALBERNI.—An effort is to be
made by the Port Alberni delegate at
this year's sessions of the Union of B.
C. Municipalities, which will be held
in Nelson the lirst week in October, to
secure the convention for Port Alberni next year.
•R. F. Blandy, city clerk, was chosen
by the city council to represent the
city at this year's convention, and waa
Instructed by the council to try and
secure the honor of entertaining the
municipal delegates at Port Alberni in
1921.
Several resolutions have been drawn
up by the local council to be' presented
to the convention in Nelson next
mouth.
SPECIALS
Sugar— 10's, $2.25; 20*s, $4.50; 50's, $11; 100's, $22.00
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD FLOUR   24's, $1.95; 49's, $8.75
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR  7's, 60c; 49's, $3^0
GRAHAM FLOUR  '.  7's, 60c; 49's, $8.50
SWIFT'S AND SHAMROCK PURE LARD,  3's, $1.15;   5's, $1.95
SWIFT'S AND SHAMROCK PURE LARD   10's, $8Ji5
SWIFT'S OLEOMARGARINE, per lb  50c
SQUIRREL PEANUT BUTTER... l's, 50c; 5's, #3.10; 15's, $635
MEADOWBROOK BUTTER, per lb  40c
CLARK'S PEANUT BUTTER, ln glass jars .... 85c Jar, 3 for $1.00
WELCH'S GRAPE-LADE, per tin   26c'
WHITE CREST APRICOTS, per tin  25c
LIBBY'S AND HONOLULU LADY PINEAPPLE—
Extra sliced  l's, 85c tin; 2's, 50c
MAPLE LEAF OR PACIFIC MILK   15c tin, 7 for $1.00
QUAKER TOMATOES, large size   2 tins 16c
LIBBY'S PICKLES—Sour Mixed, Sweet Mixed, Chow and Sweet
Chow, Sweet Gherkin and Relish; per bottle  25c
EMPRESS  JAMS  AND  JELLIES—Raspberry,  Crabapple  and
Apple Jelly; l's, glass jars   50c
HIP-O-LITE MARSHMALLOW CREME—Bottle 15c
KLIM—1-lb. tin is equal to one gallon of milk; each 75c
R1NSO LAUNDRY COMPOUND—Requires no boiling, no rubbing; per packet   10c
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
ORANGES   3 dozen $1.00
LEMONS, dozen   SOc
Plums for Preserving
POTATOES     „ _  30 lbs. $1.00
ONIONS   5 lbs. 25c
CABBAGE, per lb  7c
Dry Fruits will be much higher
this Season
Buy Now and be Sure of Getting Your Supplies
SULTANA RAISINS 35c lb, or 3 lbs. $1.00
SEEDLESS RAISINS, pkt  30c
SEEDED RAISINS  35c pkt. or 3 for 11.00
CURRANTS, per pkt !  SOc
BULK DATES, per lb  25c
PEELED AND DRY PEACHES ..' 35c pkt. or 3 for $1.00
MIXED PEEL, Cut. per lb. box 60c
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38. Limited
AMERICAN SKIPPER'S
MISTAkE AT UNION BAY
In the opinion of the skipper of the
U. S. S. Vicksburg, the warrant of the
republic runs at Union Bay; or rather
it was his opinion until he was disillusioned by the Canadian Immigration Department there in the person of
Mr. Glover. The Vicksburg ls a training ship and has a number of cadets
aboard. While cruising In Canadian
waters two of "his crew became convinced that their vocation was not a
life on the ocean wave, and. told the
skipper so. He, apparently, had the
same opinion, for he gave them their
discharge papers and put them off the
ship at Union Bay, a port which is
considered by the best authorities to
be in the province of British Columbia.
He also gave the discharged passes in
the name of the American government
which would take them over Canadian
railways back to their homes. Mr.
Glover pointed out to the skipper that
Union Bay was then, at any rate, with
in the realm of King George, alld that
any warrants he might issue would
have to bear the royal crown on them
before they could be honored. Also it
was highly improper for him to discharge Americans citizens in Cana
dian waters.
Finally everything was arranged
amicably and the good ship Vicksburg
went on her way, plus the two discharged, who are now taking a free
ride at the expense of the republic,
seeing that they are still in possession
of their discharge papers and cannot
therefore be called upon to carry out
their part on the duty roster.—Argus.
SITUATION WANTED
WANTED — BY YOUNG ENGLISH
lady, position as companion-help ln
good family; experienced; excellent
references. Apply "Companion,!'
c-o Islander. 6-42
HELP WANTED
WANTED—A MAID FOR GENERAL
housework and plain cooking; also
nursemaid for three, children. Apply immediately to Mrs. A. L. Smith,
Parksvllle, 38-1
FOR SALE
SEVEN HOUSES FOR SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
B. Bate. Phone 31.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
and
Sept. 2—Canadian, Wireless, coastwise; General Fairchild, Ocean Falls.
Sept. 3—Achates, Storm King, Daisy
Beatrice, coastwise; Redondo,
Alaska; Lowther Castle, New York.
gept, 4—Daring, Selkirk,' Prince
Albert, coastwise; Masset, Vancouver;
Katahdin and Scow, Seattle; Vicksburg, Seattle; Joyful, Royston.
Sept. 5—Hulk No. 100, Vancouver;
Thlepval, Victoria.
Sept. 7—Progressive, Shamrock/
coastwise; Valdez, Alaska.
LADIES* AID OF GRACE
CHURCH GIVING TEA
A tea will be given by the Ladles'
Id of the Grace Methodist Church at
_je Parsonage on Friday, September
24th; afternoon 3 to 6, evening 7.30 to
9.30. The object of the tea is to raise
money to buy new hymn bookB.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from (550 to $1200. T.B.
Bate. Phone 81.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If bo, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Sept. 12th, XV. Sunday After Trinity.
CUMBERLAND.
Holy Communion, 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
ROYSTON—3.30 p.m.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
WRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. ti. R. Kinney, B.A, F.1MJ.S.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
MUSIC STORE AT COURTENAY
* * *
Courtenay now has a music store.
The Geo. A. Fletcher Music Co., Ltd.,
opened a branch at Courtenay on Saturday, with Miss Good in charge. The
office ls ln the Pigott Block and there
are already a number of pianos and
phonographs here, while a large consignment of musical Instruments, records and sheet music are expected
soon from the East,

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