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The Islander Apr 15, 1916

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'**
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VII., No. 3      THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, APRILS. 1916.      Subscription price, $1.50 per year
RED CROSS TEA
During the past season several
ladies have given their homes
for special afternoon tea on behalf of this worthy object and
goodly collections have been
raised. On Tuesday afternoon of
next week Mrs. D. Piket has
consented to give her home for
this special occasion. If energy
and ambition count for anything
this should be a great success as
Mrs. Piket has spared no trouble
to make this a special event. The
Band of the 102nd Battalion
Comox will be in attendance and
those who have heard the band
vouch for them giving a good
account of themselves. Specially
large baskets of home made
candy are to be raffled. Tickets
10c. each. One has been sent
to Union Bay, one to Bevan and
one is in Mr. Peacey's window,
and the lucky winner will have
a fine treat. There will be a
very large number of baskets of
candy for sale, all home-made,
and no one should miss being
present.
Should the day be fine, Mrs.
Piket has made extensive arrangements for the accomodation of
the crowd expected, in her garden, which of itself, is worth seeing. There is usually a splendid
spirit shown in these Teas which
is worthy of emulation especially
when it is considered that every
dollar secured is for a worthy
cause. Be on hand Tuesday afternoon and so help the boys who
are doing their bit, by doing your
share.
Nothing succeeds like success,
and the success which has been
achieved by the ladies who have
already given their homes and
services will, we hope, be more
than realized on Tuesday.
The an/iual Hospital Ball will
be held in the West Cumberland
Band Hall on Wednesday, April
26th. The Ladies' Auxilliary
have made arrangements and the
Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir
Ltd., have kindly consented to
carry all holders of dance tickets
free on the regular passenger
train from Union Bay and way
points. A special train will return
after the ball.
Mens' Oxfords, 200 pairs regular prices to #6.00 a pair, will be
offered at Simon Leiser & Co.'s.
on Saturday for $3.95 a pair.
THE "CURTAIN OF FIRE."-Carter in New York Sun.
EASTER MUSICAL CANTATA.
Remember Tuesday night at
8 o'clock sharp in the Presbyterian Church, book yourself for
that date and let nothing keep
you away from hearing this musical production. Time and patience has been given to the arduous practice required forthe
giving of the Cantata to make it
worthy of delivery a- this special
Easter-tide. Music has a high
value in the life of any church
or community, and Cumberland
has shown in the past its appreciation of genuine effort to
achieve the best in events of this
nature, and we have no doubt
the Presbyterian Church will be
crowded to its full capacity for
this occasion. The ladies are devoting their special attention to
putting on the finishing touches
on the few remaining nights be-
for the 18th.
The sale of tickets in advance
is splendid and you would do well
to secure your ticket as early as
possible.   In the getting up of I
such an event there is always ai
lot of hard work to be done in
gathering the members and locating singers for the various parts
as well as seeing they attend the
many practices, or in other words,
we have the man behind the Gun.
For untiring, effort and ceaseless
labor in bringing this to a success, the man behind the Gun
has been our good friend. Dr.
Hick:., who has never spared
himself from work to get the
best results. In the church life
the Doctor is ever on the alert
for recruits for the choir and all
his work is done for his love of
music. We feel his efforts put
forward for Tuesday night are
worlhy of appreciation and the
best appreciation is a crowded
house as well as an appreciative
audience.
Girl Guides.
The Daffodil Patrol of the 1st
Cumberland Girl Guides will be
the orderly patrol for next week.
H. -Stewart, Secretary. By order
A.J. Taylor.
CUMBERLAND TENNIS CLUB
A meeting of the above tennis-
club was held in the offices of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir),
Ltd., Monday eveninglast, forthe
purpose of making final arrangements for the carrying on of the
Club during the coming season.
The offer of grounds near the
old sawmill site by the Canadian
Collieries was accepted, and two
cinder courts will be laid out
thereon. Work is now proceeding rapidly on these and they are
expected to be ready for play
early in May.
The following officers were
elected: Hon. President, G. W.
Clinton; President, F. J. Dalby;
Vice President, A. J. Burnside:
Secretary-Treasurer, CD. Hobbs.
Executive committee, W.E. Lawrence, G. C. Baker, J. H. Stevens,
A. Nunns, and H. Holling.
The fees decided, on for the
season are as follows: Gentlemen,
$4.00; Ladies, $2.00; Social Members, $1.00. Intending members
are requested to communicate
with the secretary, Mr. C. D.
Hobbs.
MILITARY CONCERT & DANCE
A grand military concert and
dance will be held in the Ilo Ilo
Theatre on Wednesday, April 19th
in aid of the 102nd Battalion
C. E. F. Band Fund. The concert will consist of band selections
moving pictures, orchestra, vocal
and other items. Dance in the
Ilo Ilo dance hall. Admission,
concert 25 cents, dance 75 cts.
Ladies free. Refreshments will
be served at the Star Restaurant
and Waverley Hotel for which
there will be an extra charge.
It is estimated that 300 troops
will receive permission to attend
the concert and dance and for
their transportation the Canadian
Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., have
generously granted a special train
from Royston to Cumberland,
returning after the dance. All
those in possession of concert
tickets will be allowed to travel
free. Tickets are now on sale at
Peacey's Drugstore.
The annual meeting of the Directors of the Union and Comox
District Hospital will be held in
the City Hall, Cumberland, on
Saturday, April 22nd., commencing at 8 p. m.
E. L). PICKARD, Sei y.
Union and Comox Dist. HospitaL *m***s*
TWO
ili.Ii   lkiijiiill-.ii..|        Uo..-.-.--—v-Jl-i"-l     -■•     W.
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
"Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3*5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, APRIL 15th, 1916.
Eastertide.
Easter is the Emancipation
anniversary of the Christian
world—the one day of all the
year, next to the advent that is
the most glorious and worthy of
signal remembrance. It brings
with it a new inspiration of faith
in God and of perfect assurance
in His love for the children of
men.
Every swelling bud and sprouting leaf reminds us that the life
which conquers death in nature's
realm has its parallel in the Resurrection—that great central fact
of Christianity—in which we
have the assurance of our reviv-
ifaction. Christ in us becomes
the vitalizing force which lifts
us from the darkness of sin and
death into light and life everlasting.
This old world of ours needs
more Easter cheer. It needs to
realize that the risen Christ and
the empty tomb have for the
whole race a grander and higher
significance than any other event
rsince time began. It needs to
,grasp the imperishable truth that,
when the Son of God burst the
bars of death and the grave, He
revealed the way of life eternal
to all who accept Him and follow
his footsteps. His resurrection
was the divine pledgeof our own,
and the soul that rests upon Him
has already risen from the dead-
ness of sin and began the life
everlasting. For such, the grave
is not an abiding place, but the
vestibule of the greater and nobler life beyond.
_ Therefore, at this joyous Easter
time, when all nature is rejoicing,
let our hearts join in the songs
of praise and gladness. Around
us we see the woods adorning
themselves with the living green
ANOTHER EASTERN SHIPMENT of Ladies' Trimmed and Ready-to-Wear Hats now
•** on Show.
EASTER GLOVES in French Kid and Suede, in all the new shades, also White Kid with
black carded backs and black with white stitching.
EASTER NOVELTIES in Ladies' Neckwear, Chemisettes, Neck Ruffs, Collars and Collar
and Cuff Sets.
NEW SPRING STYLES in Ladies' Footwear in Gun Metal, Vici Kid; Patent with Cloth
Tops in Black, Fawn and Pearl, at popular prices.
Special Value in Ladies' Button White New Buck Shoes.
Laced and Button White Canvas Shoes.
Pumps in Gun Metal. Vici. and Patent, with Low and Medium Heel.
Tailor-made
Suits,
Coats,
Skirts,
to your measure.
All Garments
guaranteed for
Style,
£ Fit, and
Quality.
Cents* Furnishings
0
Shirts In Silk and Silk Mixtures
in Black and White Stripes;
also Sport Shirts with large
open neck, convertible collar.
Neckwear Easter Neckwear in
flowing ends, Derbys, and
Batwing Bows, in Checks,
Stripes- and Self-colors.
Invictus Shoes In newest lasts in
Gun Metal, Vici and Patent,
with dull kid and fancy Vest
ing Tops.
Hats and Caps New Shapes and
Shades in Men's Soft Felt
Hats. Hard Hats in the
newest styles.
Newest Shapes in Golf and
Motor Caps in Tweed and
Silk Mixtures.
NEW SPRING SAMPLES of
Campbells Made-to-Measure
Clothing.
and the air is resonant with the
song of birds. Over all the earth,
wherever the name of Jesus is
known, it is the glad emancipation time:
'Tis the festival of all creation,
Christ hath risen, who gave creation
birth.
All the world over Easter is a
season of great rejoicing, as
everything begins to cast off the
dinginess of winter and nature
herself exhibit the spirit of resurrection. Palestine, the spot where
the resurrection we commemorate
took place, is supremely emblematic of the season, because there
the spring suddenly bursts forth
and all the verdure and flowers
spring up as though a magic
wand had been waved over tjje
land, for the excessive dreariness,
of winter is broken in the Orient
when it is still winter in the
western lands.
Of all the holidays of the year,
Christmas and Easter stand more
prominently on the page of history than any others. Throughout all the nutations and vicissitudes that have entered into the
world's history during the past
two thousaud years, the two festivals that commemorate respectively the birth and resurrection
of the Man of Nazareth, still
shine with a luster that remains
unfaded after a lapse of twenty
centuries.
There are many superstitions
connected with Easter Sunday
which are almost as imperative
as laws. One of these is the necessity of having something new
to wear on this day in order to
insure happiness for the coming
year. Hence the Easter bonnet.
The Easter festival of our fore
fathers covers a period of fifteen
days. The week beginning with
Easter Sunday was almost entirely given over to sport and
games and general merry making.
Remember the Military Concert and Dance in Ilo Ilo Hall on
Wednesday next. The concert,
consisting of selections by the
102nd., Battalion Band, and Orchestra, vocal selections, etc..
interspersed with moving pictures, will last for two hours, the
dance commencing at 10 o'clock
sharp. As a special train is being run from Royston and many
from Union Bay and Comox District will be in attendance, as
well as local music lovers it is
expected the S. R. O. sign will
be necessary. Concert tickets
25c. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
\r
TNE 8IRL GUIDES.
The Girl Guide movement was
founded by Mrs. Agnes Baden
Powell, sister of Lieut. Gen. Sir
Robert Baden Powell for the pur-,
pose of making girls useful and
self-reliant and of developing
those qualities of character which
make good women and good citizens.
The organization is a comparatively new one and very little
has been heard of it here in British Columbia, but judging from
the strides being made it is safe
to say it will equal if not outdistance any other organization run
on similar lines by either sex.
From week to week we read
of the development of the movement in Vancouver particularly,
and we have no doubt the ripples
will spread outward from the
centre to every corner in B. C.
as soon as the centre is struck
with sufficient impact, and already the vibration has struck
our city in a very practical manner.
The Boy Scouts, which has
taken such a solid hold, and has
gradually forged ?head has always been the envy of the girls
of our City, especially when they
march, in their smart uniforms
through the streets and then in
summer time enjoy themselves
at camp. They were looked upon with a kind of rather practical jealousy by the many girls
who were equally able to take
their part in something of this
nature, and when some of the
girls made overtures to-various
persons to see if they couldn't
get in touch with the Girl Guide
movement, the ball was set rolling in fine shape.
Usually the mode of procedure
is for some prominent ladies to
become responsible for the institution of the movement in the locality, then get in touch with
the head office in Toronto and so
organize their company of Girl
Guides, but in our City the girls
themselves have organized one
of the finest, if not the largest,
troupe of Girl Guides in British
Columbia and are all ready for
some committee of responsible
ladies to come in and assume responsibility and so get linked up
with headquarters. The rapidity
with which the girls have lined
up and joined will certainly be
hard to beat for a city the size of
Cumberland. It is only a matter
of weeks since the first meeting
was called and the various patrols formed, and now there are
about sixty girls, which is certainly a credit to them. Until
the Girl Guides get in touch with
head office and appoint their
committee,  Mr. A. J. Taylor has
t
■■■■■MMa^MMtMM^iMMMMMWi^^iM^aaMMMteJM !■! nr  inm*a******m********i**%aax*a^
traduction arcflhrift
CANADA from her abundance can help supply the Empire's needs,
and this must be a comforting thopght for those upon whom the
heavy burden of directing the Empire's affairs has been laid. Gain or
no gain the course before the farmers of Canada is as clear as it was
last year—they must produce abundantly in order to. meet the demands
that may be made and I believe this to be especially true ih regard to
live stock, the world's supply of which must be particularly affected in
this vast struggle. Stress and strain may yet be in store for us all
before this tragic conflict is over, but not one of us doubts the issue,
and Canadians will do their duty in the highest sense of that great
wotd."-HON. MARTIN BURRELL, Minister of Agriculture.
" 1V/TODERN war is made by resources, by money, by foodstuffs, as
J.VX wen as by men and by munitions. While war is our first business, it is the imperative duty of every man in Canada to produce all
that he can, to work doubly hard while our soldiers are in the trenches,
in order that the resources of the country may not only be conserved, but
increased, for the great struggle that lies before us. ' Work and Save'
is a good motto for War-time."-S/fi THOMAS WHITE, Minister
of Finance,
THE CALL OF EMPIRE COMES AGAIN IN 1916
TO CANADIAN FARMERS, DAIRYMEN, FRUIT GROWERS, GARDENERS
WHAT IS NEEDED? these in particular-
wheat, OATS, HAY,
BEEF, PORK, BACON,
CHEESE, EGGS, BUTTER, POULTRY,
CANNED FRUITS, FRUIT JAMS,
SUGAR, HONEY, WOOL, FLAX FIBRE,
BEANS, PEAS, DRIED VEGETABLES
We must feed ourselves, feed our soldiers, and help feed the Allies.   The need is greater in
1916 than it was in 19IS.   The difficulties are greater, the task is heavier, the
need is more urgent, the call to patriotism is louder—therefore be
thrifty and produce to the limit.
"THE   AGRICULTURAL   WAR   BOOK   FOR   1916" is now in  tlie press.   To be hud from
The Publications Branch, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
THE   GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 2
THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
willingly stepped into the breach
and is giving them various drill,
exercises and impressing upon
them the exacting nature of the
obligations they have taken upon themselves, and upon the Carrying out of these depend their
future success as an organization,
because their laws are very
strict In the short time they
have been organizing their
achievements are marvellous
when one considers what they
have done.
The parade to the Methodist
church on last Sunday was an
eye opener to the good citizens
of Cumberland, to see about sixty
girls, with their officers, in full
uniform, led by the Boy Scouts
and their officers, march through
the City to Church to the music
of the Boy Scouts Band, was inspiring and makes one hopeful
for the future of the boys and
girls of oui city. A great number of people went to Dunsmuir
Ave. to see the procession and
the comments were very flattering especially for the neatness
and uniformity of the girls.
The parents of the girls are to
be congratulated on the officers
chosen and When one considers
that "rnong them are every resident lady teacher of our schools
which is something to their credit
when we acknowledge that we
have seven of them, who have
devoted their time and talent to
the tuition of others. The other
officers are equally efficent but
one could hardly pass without
making a comment on such an
unusual number of the teaching
profession. The following are
the officers and, patrol leaders:
Miss E. McFadyen, 1st officer;
Miss O'Neill, 2nd officer; Mrs.
Franklin, 3rd officer; Miss J.
Whyte, 4th officer;Miss A. Frame
5th officer; Miss N. Kobertson,
6th officer.
Officers of the juniors: Miss H.
Watson, Miss E. Bickle, Miss L..
Cessford.
Miss C. Jaynes, 1st Patrol Leader; Miss J. Balango, 2nd; Miss B
Stewart, 3rd; Miss A. Watson.
4th; Miss F. Boffey, 5th.
Miss Bessie Stewart, secretary,.
Miss Hazel Whyte, treasurer.
To the officers for their verv
smart appearance we extend congratulations, and trust that they,
with the co-operation of the ladies of the city will do all in their
power to extend the Guide Movement in its scope and so build it
up.
The Boy Scout Movement, in
its scope, its leaders in our city
will be dealt, with fully in one of
our future issues and for what
has. been accomplished here to
what has been done by the 75,000
boys who are working, quietly
and courageously under their
leader, Sir Robert Baden Powell
in the Old Land. We are proud
of them. FOLH
TH   1SLAKDLR, CUiviBERLAKD, B.C.
THE RIGHT TO TOIL.
A man who lives in a glass
house cannot afford to throw
stones. The same rule holds
good in regard to an organization. If you demand justice then
you yourself must render justice.
If you would have democracy,
then your organization must be
run on democratic principles.
First, look to yourself, and then
after you have corrected the'faults
in your own organization you can
tell what is right for otlier men
and organizations, but not before.
We refer to the average labo-
organization. To the employer
they say: "We demand an increasing proportion of the surplus in business. You should be
glad to hand over more to us."
The unions want a voice in handling the affairs of the shop and
the business. They contend that
it is only democracy that they be
allowed a voice in the conduct of
affairs.
Yet the labor unions maintain
a system' of limited apprentices
whereby only a certain number
of young men may learn a trade,
no matter how many there are
who like the work and feel especially qualified. The unions do
this because they desire to keep
the number of workers in their
trade limited, then they can dictate the wage and the employer
will be obliged to give in because
there are so few workmen who
are forced to remain unskilful
-and draw a low wage. They do
not care that these are barred
from opportunity.
There is no special reason why
the "charter members" should
so profit at the expense of the
balance of the working men. As
long as a clique controls the organization of the unions they will
keep the number of apprentices
so low that there is never enough
to fill positions foi Competent
men, and as a consequence the
employer is forced to content
himself with the work of an inferior order, some of the inferiority in the work is due to the
fact that a number are careless,
and others are just naturally incompetent.
The Open Shop would destroy
this monopoly which the unions
are endeavoring to create. Under the Open Shop system any
who had a desire to learn a trade
would not be denied the opportunity. Furthermore, it would
not be necessary to employ careless workers. Instead of keeping the careless "worker on the
skilled payroll, he would be forced to pay more attention to his
work or else he would find it necessary to work in an unskilled capacity.   The men who are not
naturally qualified would be
forced to learn some other work
or else do the unskilled.
But the large number who under the present scheme are forced to do unskilled work because
of the limited apprentice system,
would take their place. Water
will seek its own level. Under
the open shop those best qualified would be skilled workers and
those who did the unskilled would
be the poorer class.
The closed shop works against
efficiency in business. Taking
business as a whole this works
against the true interests of labor
as well as against the interests of
the employer. It is an evident
fact that if there is efficiency, more
will be manufactured and the employer will be able to give mere
in the form of wages to everyone
working for him.
If the labor unions are working
for the benefit of the laboring
man they must abolish this mon-
oply, whereby a chosen few benefit at the expense of the balance
of the workers. If the labor organizations expect justice, they
themselves must render justice
to their class. If the laboring
men could only realize that the
open shops means the inherent
right of every man to toil; to toil
at that for which he is best fitted!
The unions endeavor to make
themselves a class which they
consider a little bit better than
the unskilled worker, foregetting
that a great part of the unskilled
are that way through no fault of
their own but only because the
unions (who look down upon
them) bar them from opportunity
When the men of the labor organization speak of the dignity of
labor and demand universal democracy they should look to the
undemocracy of their own system
The Open Shop stands for true
democracy, where every man
stands or falls on his own merits;
where his wage depends on the
quality of the work he does. True
democracy is not consistent with
the attempt of the unions to deny
to men the Right to. Toil.—The
Pacific Coast Mechanic.
ILO ILO ITEMS.
THE BROKEN COIN
Episode No. Tweaty-two-"An American
Queen,"
9
THEATRE
PRO. CHANGED MQN., TUES, THURS. & SAT.
9
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Frank Dainton, who was injured at Union Bay some time
ago by falling down the hatchway of a steamer, died at the
Union and Comox District Hospital on Monday.
Notice is hereby given that on the 29th
day of April next application will be made
to the Superintendent of Provincial for the
transfer of the license for the sale of liquor
by retail in and upon the premises known
as the Heriot Bay Hotel, situate at Heriot
Bay, British Columbia, from Albert Ross
to H, A. Bull, of British Columbia.
A. ROSS, Holder of License.
H. A, BULL, Applicant for Transfer.
Dated this 30th day of March, 1916.
TONIGHT   22ND. EPISODE
j "The Broken Coin"
MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
EVERY TUESDAY, One Number
- of the -
"BLACK BOX"
Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
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BROADWAY FEATURES
Every Thursday.
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Long Distance Telephone
Appointments.
You can make an appoint at any time to talk on
the long distance telephone.
Tell Central when it will be most convenient for
you, and she will arrange to have the party wanted at
that time.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd.
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.  Phone
95 L.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
CORPORATION  OF  THE  CITY  OF
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of
the Court of Revision for tha purpose of
hearing and deciding complaints against
the assessment as made for the year 1916
will be held in the City Council Chambers
on Monday, Aprit 24th, at 7.30 P.M.
Any person desiring to make complaint
against the said assessment must give
notice to the assessor in writing at least
ten days prior to the sitting of said Court
of Revision.
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 22nd
day of March, 1916.
A. MACKINNON,
City Clerk. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
i*.uk -».t i-nw*v-**<
lOOO-EOSOED-O-BOtS-CK
8
8
FIRE  INSURANCE
J Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford.
8
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO
EDWARD  W.   SICKLE
OFFICE;  THE  ISLANDER BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND
mat*:
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Palm Sunday:
8.30 a.m., Holy Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Services each evening in Holy
Week at 8 p.m. and on Good
Friday at 11 a.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS
White Heather Strain  (Finest
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pullets for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland,
Girl Guides.
The Girl Guides meet evtry
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Patrol Leaders and  Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM  MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
For Sale Now
SOLID OAK MISSION DINING
FURNITURE, PIANO, PICTURES, CARPETS, 2 BUREAUS,
DOUBLE BEDSTEAD, CHINA,
AND KITCHENWARE.
Mrs. E. Allen,
Happy Valley.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Books, Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
****************************
Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland, B.C.
tf
M     - ' —U
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
«
Class A, Number 6 COLUMBIA
IGNITORS for General Ignition
purposes. Absolutely fresh Stock.
Every battery tested before being
sold.
Price 45^ each.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75          Co., Ltd.           p. Q. 314
i'   ■
X
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P.O. Box 279 Phone 31 SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my   business  is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
[ small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No'games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
Phono.67
Agent (or the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex H'dersoii, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI PICS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Goal Mining Reflations}
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Tern
tories and iu a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term,
of twenty-one years at nn annual rental of
|1 an acre. Not more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Applioation for a lease must be made b»
the applioant in person to the Agent or suW*
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or loqal subdivisions •
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by,
theapplicaut himself.
Each applioation must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if th*
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on tho
merchantable output of the mine at tho
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall;
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purohase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working; of the mine at the rate of
$10.00anacre.
For full information application should'
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorized publication of this,
advertisement will not be paid for.
W llington Colliry Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
I
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
.   READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri;
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.     P.M.
9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M
'7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10.
4.10
4.10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
, 7.25
1;25
- 1
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05     3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
,2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3,55 1 0-55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55    2.55
(f) Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
[ 3.56 \
]
6.50
3.50 i
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45 I
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45 |
3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50 '
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3.30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY 'I'M";    rvn  a ivr-pi.--.-    i-*->nir *.*,..,..  Jim,.*,
ij V i/l\
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O.. LLJX D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ats't General Mnnaeer
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FORD, {13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by tbe survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
r
Wa Una nave   Beauty may be only skin deeP;
" <*iipc*pci o   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
******
Queen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in itself.    It
supplies energy.    Is a
fine tonic.
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.    It aids digestion.    It is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed by thousands
of ardent advocates of real temperance.   Drink beer
and be temperate.    Always ask for Queen Beer.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Coffee Criticism j
A man entered a famous restaurant
and asked for coffee. After he bad
finished his repast he called the waiter, and said:
"Waiter, this coffee has its good
points and its bad points. One of its
good points is this—it has no chicory
in it."
"Yea, sir," replied the waiter, quite
gratified. Visions of a handsome tip
floated before his mind's eye, and he
rubbed his hands gleefull..
"But," resumed the customer, "Its
bad point is this—it has no coffee in
it"
"Pretty" Evident
Flatterer: "You look more beautiful
every day, dear,"
Gertie: "As you have been telling
me so for a good many years, what
a horrid fright I must have been to
start with!"
Visits to the Bottle
The new lodger had an idea that
the bottle in the far corner of the cupboard was suffering from sly visits.
"Mrs. Brown," he said, "my late
landlady was a most dependable woman.   You see that bottle?"
"I 'ope you don't 'int that I'd stoop
to touch It," said the irate lady. "I
come from honest English parents, I
do, and "
"Excuse me," answered the lodger,
suavely, "I am not grumbling at your
English parents; it is your Scotch ex
traction I complain of."   '
Handicapped
Reporter: "Are you willing to tell
me your  story?"
Convict: "Yes; but I'm not at
liberty."
j
run
"1
No Wonder.
"That practical lecturer is afraid to
idle hie subject without gloves.''
"What is it?"
■•Electrical work"
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters'for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses,  etc.,
and  in   fact  all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country.   Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
B'GOLLY THE KEY
TER  SUCCESS
MINT  TH'NIGHT
KEY !
I I) -3?*w«.4-
V/£-lwA»V.
Breaking Into Print
"My cousin once wrote something
and had luck—it was printed."
"What was it?"
"His marriage announcement."
Dead
Wifey—My flrst husband would eat
anything I cooked!
Hubby—Yes?   An' where is he now?
Given Away
The minister was calling upon old
Mrs. Wylie.
"I hops you read the Bible every
day?" he remarked gravely.
"Oh, yes," she responded eagerly,
"I'll Just show you the chapter I read
She produced the Book, and opened
tbe pages.
Between them lay a pair of spectacles.
"Well, I declare," she cried, "here
are my spectacles that I've lost for
the last fornight!"
Wonderful
"I made a lucky discovery today,"
•aid Doctor Bizz.
"That so?"
"Yes. I discovered a patient that
has never been operated on for anything."
Father's  Bald  Head
A little boy reached school with
very untidy hair, and his teacher
asked him:
"Why don't you brush your hair?"
"Ain't got no brush, sir," replied
the boy.
"Why don't you use your father's
brush, then?" asked the teacher.
"He ain't got no brush either," was
the reply.
"No brush! Why hasn't he a
brush?" asked the teacher aga'n, in
astonishment.
"He's got no hair," was the gloomy
reply.
d EIGHT
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Henderson
and child left on Monday for Nanaimo.
John Dando has taken up his
duties as overman of No. 7 mine,
Bevan.
A Red Cross Tea will be held
at the home of Mrs. D. Piket on
Tuesday.
Frank Jaynes is now manager
of No. 6 mine and will move into town during the coming week,
Mrs. Thos. E. Banks left on
Monday for Port Angeles, Washington on a visit to her parents.
Edward W. Bickle left for
Granite Bay on Friday morning
to hold an inquest on the death
of Harry Freeman, who was
killed by a logging train.
FOR SALE CHEAP.-Black
Team in good condition. Apply
J. Shaw, Canadian Collieries,
(Dunsmuir), Ltd., Farm, the Y,
Cumberland, B.C.
The opening game of baseball
between the City .earn and Japanese Fugi Team will be held on
the Recreation grounds tomorrow
commencing at 3 p. m.
The General Delivery of the
Cumberland Post office will be
open from 9 to 10 a. m. only, on |
Good Friday and Easter Monday.
Mails will depart and arrive as
usual.
William Bryant of the 102nd.,
Battalion appeared in the Provincial Police Court on Saturday
charged with desertion he was
found guilty and sentenced to
nine months imprisonment.
A Red Cross Tea will be held
on Tuesday, April 18th, at Mrs.
Piket's house. Selections will be
played by the Band of the 102nd
Battalion, and during the afternoon home-made candy will be
or sale.
Desmond Dowdall, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Dowdall, of
Royston, left on Monday for Vie-
to. la, to join the Artillery Brigade of the Canadian Expediton-
ery forces that is being organized
in that city.
Messrs. M. Manson, M. P. P.,
William Manson, M.P.P., and
William Merrifield, are expected to arrive at Courtenay
this afternoon. In the afternoon
there will be a grand Conservative Smoker.
J. H. McMillan's resignation
as Manager of No. 6 mine of the
Canadian Collieries goes into effect today. Mr. McMillan expects
to leave for the north on Wednesday to take up his duties as
Inspector of Mines. [
l*****-..
*********
THE   BIG  STORE
Model 446. Medium Figure,
High Bust. A model of ease and
style, controls the figure and
produces the most stylish effects.
It is rare that such results can be
obtained at a medium price.
M ade of English Contil, with six
hose supporters.   Price $1.95 pr.
La Diva Corsets
SPIRALESUPER BONE-or Spring Wire
Boned Corsets, have been sold by canvassers direct to the consumers, at exhorbitant
prices, for almost ten years. The Spring
Wire Bone is the greatest success that has
ever been known in the Corset field. Wire-
boned corsets are worn, known, and wanted
in every section and corner of Canada,
down to the smallest village. Our first
consignment arrived a few days ago. Here
is a cut of the newest model. The spiral
boning is guaranteed to wear one year, and
the price of this model is $4.95 per pair.
Our next best Spiral-boned Corsets are
$3.50 pair.    Prove our claims for them.
D. & A. Corsets.
Model 540. The
incomparable Reducer which without
double straps by the
only aid of scientifically laid pieces will
give the ideal front
effect, and reduce
abdomen, hips and
back. Made of splendid quality, English
Coutil, with six hose
supporters. Price
$2.50 pair.
D. & A. CORSETS
Lead the  Way.
OUR LEADER-
Model 154, is a
splendid corset, and
the price is only 95c.
a pair.
Our SpCcial: Model 232, has all the characteristics of a high grade corset, while the price
will meet the purse of all.   Special Price $1.25 pr.
Northway Coats and Suits
are now on view
Cwv^vw,
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8

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