BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Islander May 20, 1916

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068451.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068451.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068451-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068451-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068451-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068451-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068451-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068451-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068451-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068451.ris

Full Text

Array il
telmhw
The Newspaper with the Largest Circulation in the Comcx District.
-tegwlai
lion I.'brsry
VOL. VII., No. 8
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, MAY 20. 1916.
TENDERS RECEIVED
FOR GRADING
Maxwell's Tender Accepted and
Work to be Completed
Without Delay.
The regular meeting of the
City Council was held in the
Coun il Chambers on Monday
evening with his Worship Mayor
Parnham in the chair. Aid. Mc
Donald, Banks, Carey, Brown,
Henderson ancl Bate were present.
The minutes of the previous
meeting were read and adopted.
A communication from the Vancouver General Hospital enclosing
copy of statement showing patients treated during the year 11)14
and amounting to $225.00. It
was pointed out by the city clerk
that all the petients names that
were in tie statement had resided outside the city limits with the
exception of Mrs. F. Berara, de-
ceased whose account was$60.50.
The cily clerk was instructed to
notify F. Berara, concerning the
account. The secretary of the
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Ltd. sent a communication objecting to the assessment of five
miles of pole lines stating that
tbe company had only two miles
of pole lines within the city limits.
The Council decided to assess
tbe Telephone Company for their
actual mileage of pole lines and in
structed the city clerk to forward
a corrected statement.
'I'he Sanitary Inspector in his
health report informed the Council of the unhealthy conditions
prevailing in the vacant lots opposite the residence of Mr. P. P.
Harrison. This was referred to
the Hoard of Health.
Chief of Police James Ward
handed in tbe following report
of collections for the month of
April:
Police court lines $ 61.50
Dog tax •>      4.00
Trade license. .-  "50.00
Total $115.50
Aid. Hanks, Chairman of the
Hoard of Works reported that the
the city workmen were making
good progress with Fourth Street
and connecting with main Comox
Road. Aid. Henderson again in-
t'roduced the McLellan account
of $35.00. After considerable
discussion the Council decided to
allow this matter to remain
until the Council heard from Mc
Lellan.
On motion the tenders for
grading Windermere and Mary-
port Avenue were ordered to be
opened. The following tenders
were received.
From Thomas Fawkes and
John Westfield.
For grading Block one and two,
Maryport Avenue, $300.00
Foi1 grading Block two and
Hire,'. Maryport Avenue $300,00,
For grading Block one and two
Windi rmere Avenue $175.00.
For grading Block two and
three Windermere Avenue $125.
with the usual guarantee that
the work would be satisfactory.
From William McLellan: for
grading and gravelling from 1st
street lo 3rd street on Windermere Ave. $575, For grading of
Maryport Ave., $175.00.
From Robinson Young: for
gi ading Maryport Ave., satisfactory to the Board of Works, $200,
From Alex. Maxwell: —
For grading and ditching Windermere and Maryport Avenues
from 1st to 3rd streets. $287.
The council decided to accept
the- tender of Alex Maxwell and
instruct him to proceed with the
work and complete it without
any delay.
On motion the tenders for
painting the city buildings were
ordered to be opened. The following tenders were received:
From John R. Westfield; for
painting City buildings with two
coats of good lead ancl oil, $267.50.
From H. Parkinson; for two
coats of white lead and oil with
colors to suit, $275.
From Wm. McLellan; for
painting the Chambers, City
Hall and Fire Hall with one coat
of paint color to be subject to
the approval of the Board of
Works, $150.
On motion the McLellan tender
was accepted, the color to be a
dark brown with white trimmings, work to be completed to
the satisfaction of the Board of
Works.
The following accounts were
referred to the Finance committee for payment if found correct :
C. Mussatto   $19.00
Dept. Printing & Sta.  —    4.50
British Columbia Telephone   1.40
RESTORING BELGIUM!
Total _.   $24.90
The Board of Works was instructed to replace the broken
windows of the City Hall with
new glass before painting the
City buildings.
Ihe sanitary condition of the
City in various places received
consideration which was left in
the hands of the Board of Health.
Aid. Bate brought the new electric lighting system forward
for further discussion and moved
that a committee be appointed to
interview the management of the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Company and secure their lowest
rates on a meter.
Aid. Carey suggested that Aid.
Bate add to his motion that the
Electric Light Company place a
meter on the present 350 light
outside the city building to test
it out for a month ancl should the
Council think it reasonable install
Dunsmair avenue, the main thoroughfare, with 350 Nitro lamps.
Aid. Henderson said the Electric Light Company had already
offered an eight cent rate and
the estimated cost of lighting the
city on the improved system
would be about $75 per month.
The Mayor was desirous of introducing the clock system that
the light may be dimmed after a
given hour.
Aid. Carey: " I did not know
where the current went when
the lights were reduced. No one
seconded Aid. Bate's moi ion.
Aid Carey then moved that the
Electric Light Company be asked
to install a meter on the new 350
light outside the City buildings
for one month as a test to ascertain the cost of sixty such lights.
This was ordered to be carried
into effect.
Thc Mayor informed the Council that the Cily needed a new
flag for the 24th., and Aid. Carey
moved that the City Clerk be instructed to purchase a new flag
and the matter of a new Hag pole
was left in the hands of the
Board of Works.
The Council then held a further
discussion on tlie proposed new
electric lighting system. Aid.
Henderson said it was an easy
matter to ascertain the cost of a
350 lamp per hour without going
to the expense of installing a
meter. Aid. Macdonald wanted
to know what Courtenay did.
This brought Aid. Bate to his
feet, who said, "Yes, Courtenay
is on a meter. Courtenay is alive.
The lighting system of this City
is discussed from one end of the
Island to the other. One visitor
• has been known to ask another if
he found his way in and out of
Cumberland," Aid. Carey a-
greed that the lighting system
was no good but wanted to enter
By Weed.—In the Philadelphia Public Ledger,
into the best bargain possible
with the Electric Light Company.
The Mayor said, "we would all
like to se-* the front street lighted up." Aid. Henderson, "if
we want more light we must expect to pay for it,"
The Mayor suggested, and the
Council finally decided to call upon the Finance committee to hold
a meeting during the coming
week and make an estimate as
to the amount of money available
between now and the end of the
year and report at the next meeting of the Council. It was pointed out that conditions were improving in and around the City
to what they were a year ago.
When the Council was about to
adjourn Road Boss Conn asked
permission -to purchase a new
harness for the City team, which
was granted.
SAYS WAR CANNOT LAST
OVER ANOTHER WINTER
PARTY POLITICS
Attempt Made by Liberals to Disfranchise Men Who are Now
Wearing Canadian
Uniforms.
New York, May 15.—"Germany is beaten and the end of
the war is in sight. Peace will
come as suddenly as the great
war started in 1914. There will
not be another winter's campaign. Germany cannot struggle
against the overwhelming financial strain and the economic conditions prevailing.
"King Albert, whom I have
known personally for twenty
years, was in excellent health
and confident of having his coun
try restored to him at the end of
the war, which is regarded as a
certain  victory for the   Allies,"
Thus spoke Samuel Hill, son-
in-law of J. J. Hill, associated
for twelve years with his illustrious father-in-law in his railroad enterprises, who arrived
last night from Liverpool on the
American liner Philadelphia.
Mr. Hill has made the round
trip voyage on the Philadelphia.
While the liner was in port on
the other side, from Monday
morning, May 1, to Saturday af-
tesnoon, May 6, Mr. Hill traveled
to London, crossed over to France
dined with Albert, king of the
Belgians, at his headquarters,
visited the firing line in Western
France and Flanders, returned
to London by way of Boulogne,
met cabinet ministers, went to
Scotland, visited the fleet, saw
the harbor protection against
submarines' awt,'reached Liverpool some hours'before the Philadelphia sailed for New York.
Mr. Hill said he had made the
rapid trip to get certain information and had succeeded in his
mission, the nature of which he
could not disclose until he had
been to Washington, where he
is going today.
IMPRESSIVE SERVICE
AT ST. GEORGE'S
Col. J.S. Warden Unveils Roll of
Honor of Presbyterian Boys
Now Fighting at Front.
The Court of Revision of the
voters' list, recently held at Cum
berland, disclosed another attempt
by the Liberal Association of the
district to play party politics at
the expense of the large number
of men from Comox District now
serving their King and Country
with the various Battalions.
Advantage was taken of the
fact that the majority of these
men are not now at the former
addresses, although still in the
District, to file objections to hundreds of their names being retained on the voters' list; in other
words, an attempt was made by
the Liberal organization, and successful in many cases, to disfranchise the men who are now wear
ing a Canadian uniform and to
deprive them of a voice in the
government of the country for
which they are making so many
sacrifices.
This policy of "Party before
Patriotism and Country," which
apparently is the policy of tht
Liberals throughout the province,
is one which will not commend it
self to the thoughtful people of
this province, who realize that
every assistance should be given
the government in lhe difficult
task of guiding the country
through the present critical period
and that every consideration
should be shown those men who
have lett their homes and business
in order to do their share in thc
defense of our courrfry and person
al liberties.
Many complaints were made
to our member, Mr. Manson, of
the injustice that was being
done to these soldieis in depriving them of their right to vote
and he has taken the matter up
strongly with the Government
in an effort to have the soldiers
allowed to exercise their franchise in whatever part of the
Province they may be located.
At the regular meeting of the
Mount Hoieb L. O. L. No 1676,
on Thursday night R. H. Robertson and J. S. Bannerman were
each presented with a Past-
master's Jewel hv the County
Master W. W. Willard, on behalf
of the Lodge.
The special services in St.
George's Presbyterian Church on
Sunday evening were of such a
nature as to make them most
impressive to the very large
audience which were present.
The occasion was two-fold, first
the anniversary of Mother's Day,
or a day set apart for the remembrance of Mother, second the
unveiling of the Roll of Honor of
the hoys who have attended
the church in the past and who
now are honoring their King and
Country on active service. The
Church was decorated worthy of
the occasion and the emblems of
our nation were prominent, as
well as a lavish display of flowers
and plants. The Boy Scouts and
Girl Guides were out in full uniform as they knew the critical
eye of Col. Warden would easily
detect any flaws in their appearance, or march, and all were determined to show up worthy of
their respective troops. They
formed a Guard of Honor from
the Manse to the Church for Col.
Warden on his entry to the services, and then marched in order
to the places reserved for them
in front of the church.
The address by Rev. J. Hood
was very appropriate, the unique
manner in which he linked the
various debts we owe our mother,
the remembrance of what sacrifices a mother makes, the loving
touch of a smpathetic mother,
showed that in spirit he was in
perfect harmony during his full
address. No one who has any
kindly recollections of all that a
mother means could fail to enter
into that environment where all
that is best in one is drawn out.
The address although short was
full of genuine helpful thought,
and was reminding us of the fulness of a mother's love, and the
way the application was applied
to bring us into touch with the
One who gave His life for us,
showed the links were nicely and
harmoniously. The anthem by
the choir was well rendered. Mr.
C. Nash presided at the organ.
Mrs. Cessford sang a solo specially appropriate for the event,
which was well received.
The names of those on the Roll
of Honor wore read out by Mayor Parr ham, who made some
touching remarks about the boys
who had gone at the call of their
country.
Col. Warden, commanding officer of the 102nd, Battalion, Comox, was called upon lo unveil
the Roll of Honor, which wus
covered hy the Hag of our country.     *
After the unveiling Col. Wai-
den gave a short address, eulogistic of the address of the Pastor, and then gave special descriptive remembrances of the
conflict we are now engaged in.
In his short address he poi trayed
very vividly the heroic deeds ol
the Bi itish Soldiers when at the
Battle of the Marne they faced
such fearful odds, and many of
them blocked the path of the
Germans with their dead bodies,
thus ensuring our liberty in no
uncertain manner. In comparison the battle of Verdun was nol
to be compared with the Marne
for intensity, as at the Marne
the British had only one man to
every fifteen feet, while at Verdun the French had live for every  one  the  British had in the
Subscription price, $1.50 per year
; same space, also at Verdun the
, French have man for man, ami
in many cases two foi- one of the
Germans. The honor mothers
must feel who have given their
sons, and wives their husbands,
was also touched upon liy Col.
Warden. He spoke in no uncertain manner on the way the
slackers would be treated when
those who had fought the fight
would come home again, He said
it was a disgrace lo the single
men that so many married ones
had to go, in fact be said !>> per
centage of married men al the
front was 84, which is certainly
very high. The Mothers and
Wives of those on the Roll of
Honor would certainly be pleased
at the way the Colonel spoke to
them, and it must have been a
great comfort to hear one who
had passed through part of the
fight, giving praise to the women who had made the supreme
sacrifice of life.
After the services were over
Col. Warden inspected the Boy
Scouts and Girl Guides and he
highly complimented Scoutmaster
Taylor for the smart appearance,
splendid discipline and efficient
attention to order displayed-by
both troops. His comments were
very high on the splendid standard attained, in fact he said he
had never witnessed such a complete combination of girls and
boys in full uniform, so well regulated, and showing such good
qualities.
FRANCE WILL NOT CEASE
UNTIL PEACE IS SOUGHT
Nancy, May 15.— President
Poincaire, in an address here today responded to Germany's declaration regarding peace contained in the German reply to
the United States note.
France does not want Germany
to tender peace," said the President, "but wants her adversary
to ask for peace."
The President then added "this
is the only kind of peace which
would be acceptable to France."
The address was delivered before
a large number of Lorraine refugees and to whom the President,
after expressing his sympathies
and renewing promises for solic-
tude and protection, said:
"France will not expose her
sons to the dangers of new aggressions. Thc central empires,
haunted by -emorse for having
brought on the war, and terrified
by the indignation and hatred
they have stirred up in mankind,
are trying today to make the
world believe tbat the Allies are
alone to blame for the prolongation of hostilities   a dull irony
which will deceive no one.
Neither directly or indirectly
have oui' enemies offered us peace
But we (Iii nol wani them lo
offer il lo us; we want them to
ask it of ns. We do nol wanl lo
submit lo iheir conditions; we
want lo impose ours on Ihem.
We do not wanl a peace which
will have imperial Germany with
Ihe power to recommence ihe
war ami keep Kurope eternally
menaced. We want peace which
restores from restored right
guarantees of equilibrium and
stability.
"So long as that peace is not
assured to us, so long as our enemies will not recognize themselves a;-, vanquished- we will not
cease to light."
II. W. Fox, of New Westminster and recently ft om London,
England, has accepted a position
as chief clerk in the dry goods
department of Campbell Brothers. Mrs. I'ox and family are
due to arrive in a few days and
take up their residence in this
cily. TWO
1HK 1SLANDKR,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOltOWS
THE FLAG.
Published every Saturday by tli** [slander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3*5.
Subscription: One year in advance, SI.-id:
Singlecopies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2,00
SATURDAY, MAY 20th. 1916.
PRACTICAL     KESULTS    Ct
TOWN   PLANNING.
In giving his experience as a
resident of a town-planned gai-
ilen suburb, Mi. Geo. Phelps,
now of Toronto, at the preliminary conference to form a Civic
Improvement League, said: 1
had the privilege of living in a
garden suburb a few years ago,
ami from having lived in it antl
taken part in the life there, that
very fact lias inspired me with
an enthusiasm for town planning
and housing I cannot get rid of.
1 know the project from the inside, and I also know that the
place where I lived was one of
the most beautiful places anywhere the Hampstead garden
suburb in England. Anything 1
ean do to forward a movement
to improve conditions in the way
that the town-planning movement has been carried on there 1
will do tu my very utmost ability,
simply because I know, from living in it and being connected
with the movement, what a tremendous benefit it is, not only
in beautifying the town but in
uplifting the people who live
there.
Forest planting has been carried on by the Japanese for probably a much greater period than
400 years, and it is this work
that gives Japan credit for having practised forestry before any
other nation. As a matter of
fact, however, the forests of Japan have been under real forest
management less than thirty
years.—Ex,
^m*
Ladies Dept.
SUNSHADES Afine assortment in all the leading
shades and stripe effects,
from $2.00 to $3.50.
WASH SHIRTS i» white rep, pique and white drill, from S1.23 to $3.50.
SATIN UNDERSKIRTS in assorted shades in good quality satin, from$1.75
WAISTS These are very attractive and come in voiles beautifully embroidered, also in fancy stripe silks, price from $1.50
Sit K GtOVES ladies' elbow silk gloves (if a very line quality, iir  popular shades, from 75c.
MlttlNERY in "P to-date styles at popular prices.
NECKWEAR A tine display in latest styles in eastern novelty neckwear
HCSIERY Supercombedsilk lustre hose, full fashioned,hlghgrade quality
^***Z--
>  Men's Dept.
For Summer Underwear  in   all  Styles.
NECKWEAR made of finest of silk in a big variety of good  colors and
designs,
TENNIS PANTS:- White Drill and Tennis Pants with  belt  loops, side
straps, and cuff bottoms. S3.50.   Tennis and Vacation shoes.
STRAW HATS and Belts in all styles, also a big range of Caps.
OUTING SHIRTS, Excellent quality cloths, neat fancy stripe, self-striped
and self-figured: also tlie new County Club shirt, with wide open neck.
SHOES- Invictus, "the best good shoe," in grey and black vestings.
SILK SOX These come in Oxford, Black, Steel Grey ami Tan,
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Silt EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O.. 1.I..D. D.C.L., rresiitmt
IOHN MAO, General Manner. H. V. J. JONES. Ain't General Mcnin-er
CAPITAL, 515,000,000    RESERVE FUND, 513,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits ot $1 and
Upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names ol' two or more persons, with*
irau.ils to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. i'M
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.
f
A. J. BURNSTDE, Manager.
lit in rmMHfcrtTFI a*****,
Children's
Dept.
Wash Dresses for Girls in smart novelty styles.
Middy Waists for Girls, with white drill shirts to match.
Wash Hats     Boys' ancl Girls' wash hats.
Wash Suits     Boys' wash suits and straw Hats,
One-Strap Slippers Boys and Girls patent boots and strap
slippers, barefoot sandals and vacation rubber shoes.
Sunshades Misses' Sunshades in pretty novelty patterns
sMi
** "iipa-pcl S but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15c a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, **,, C.
Phone 11
A. McKINNON
THE FURNITURE   STORE
****t****m***w**w*a '(.in. ——wi
The lu kre task of considering
nearly 18,000objectionsand 3,300
applications for new registration on the vot"i's' lists for Vancouver and Richmond, which is
expected in occupy Registrar
Jol ;i Mahoney's time for the
next month, started Wednesday,
when Registrar Mahoney opened
Uie Court of Revision.
Quite a motley crowd attended
tho opening. Scores of voters
who have been made the subject of objections came in the
flesh to show Hint they arc slill
alive ami entitled lo vole. Others objected toby the registrar
on tt suspicion II,al they could
not pass the literacy test appeared nnd read the prescribed portion of the act aloud to the regis-
trar's    satisfaction.      About   a
FIELD DAY SPORTS AT
THE GOOSE SPIT, COMOX j
Empire Field Day Sports will
be held at the Goose Spit, Comox, on the 24th., of May, consisting of a game of Baseball between the members of the 102nd.,
Battalion and Courtenay, including foot races and all sports lhat
go to make up a regular Field
Day. For the convenience of
visitors attending the sports arrangements have been made for
transportation between Comox
and the Goose Spit. The 102nd.,
Battalion extend a general invitation to all tbose who are desirous of spending the 24th., of
May at the  Goose Spit,   Comox.
RED  CROSS   DANCE
The Baffled Burglar.
A Red Cross dance will beheld
in tiie Ilo IN. dance hall under
the auspices of the Women's Patriotic Society of Cumberland on
Tuesday May 23rd 1910.
The    price     of      ailmisson
score of women appeared, not to will be Ladies 25cts., and Gents
demand   votes   for themselves, 50cts.    Holders of dance^ tickets, Women,g patl...
but  to demand  lhat their hus- from  Union   Bay,   Royston  and;   ,. '„   . ,      „ „....,_..,....., ...:,,
bands be not stricken from   the Bevan will he allowed  to  travel
list. j free on  the  regular   afternoon
After dealing with the numei- , pa3genger train of Tuesday,   and
ia special  free   train will  leave
*********************
The Burglar:    "I've got the swag, but strafe lhat copper!   1 can't
get away with it, and there's no food in that beastly cupboard."
--From Westminster Gazette.
A Red Cross Tea under the
ous individuals who appeared today, Mr. Mahoney will take up , .
With the political agents of the Cumberland alter the dance
virions parties the consecutive Union Bay and intermediate
is of objections. Richmond is points Tickets can be purchased
to be dealt with lirst, both Mes- from *«■ conductor on the tram
s?s Gerald G. McGeer and W, J. and will be on sale at various
Bard  the  rival  candidates   for: points throughout the district on
that constituency being present
to look after their supporters' interests. Mr. -I. W. Weart was
present to look after the South
Vancouver Liberals antl a whole
host of workers representing the
political partiesin the city wards.
— Vancouver Province.
Monday.
If you can ride a bicycle and
talk 'intelligently about a Motor
to drive it. 1 can offeryou a means
of milking money. Write Fred A.
Caton.611 View St., Victoria,B.C.
otic Society of Cumberland w
be held at the home of Mrs. E. W.
Bickle on   Tuesday May   23rd..
followed by a dance in the Ilo Ilo
dance hall in the evening.   Par
ticulars later.
Found A locket, owner can
have same by proving property
and paying for this advertisement.
Four Passenger Hupmobile
Motor Car for sale. Cheap for
cash. For further particulars
apply Hardy and Biscoe Courtenay B. C.
That New Auto
you intend buying will have to
possess certain qualities you insist
on. The engine must be utterly
reliable, efficient in every detail and
instantly responsive. Other features
such as bearings, upholstery, and
design, must also measure up lo
your ideal. In short, you want a
thoroughly good car, moderately
priced, and easy to run:—that's the
Chevrolet. For further information
see or write
LOUIS L. GRANT
Agent for Chevrolet and Dodge Cars.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Queen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in  itself.     It
supplies energy.     Is a
tine tonic.
wm
-l -■ ir
v .-'■■
...
V
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.     It aids digestion.     It is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed hy thousands
of ardent advocates of real temperance.    Drink beer
and be temperate.     Always ask for Queen Beer.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A  COMPLETE   SUPPLY  OF  RAILROAD V/ATCHES
OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Books, Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsmuir Ave.,
Cumberland, B.C.
FUR,
GcfMoreMoiiey" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected In yoanectlon
snip Yot'it fuiis irniECT to"snuBEnT"the iimest
hOUie In llir Wnrlil drilling tXtlllSlVclj III Null III AMERICAN RAH MlkS
ble-
.id.
el'
million existing lor mure t
cessfol record of sending l>n
ANU PROFITABLEretur
till* only reliable, n-inrate n
Wrilo f
rdofac
nut
iiu
11 rep.
jlllpperspromni.SA'fTSI'AC.TORY
;. Write for "Cli* SBillulirrl AllivVtr,"
rket report an.] price list pnblished.
•NOW-lt'n Fit EI!
AR   ^HIIRFRT  Inr   25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.
. is. snUDLM, inc. D„p,cC9Chicago,u.s.a.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters'for Choice Nursery Stock -all"home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees. Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
am! in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.] AH
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
Get Your
Spring Sewing
Done NOW!
And let the
Singer Sewing
Machine   Co.
Help You.
We will sell you a Singer Sewing
Machine on very easy payments,
and no interest. We will demonstrate thoroughly each machine sold,
and will give the Guarantee of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co.
NEEDLES,   OIL    AND   ALL   ACCESSORIES
See Our Windows at
Mrs. Alex. King's
Ice Cream Parlor and Candy Store
UNION   HOTEL
Opposite the Railway Station
WM. JONES.
This Hotel has been renovated throughout and is now a strictly first-class Hotel
in every respect.    The best and finest
supply of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Silver Spring Beer
Contains backbone and
stamina, and gives you
back the appetite that
you have lost. Drink the
Beer that's pure at the
UNION HOTEL
Cumberland,   B. C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my   business   is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price.   We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A line selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No^games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m, and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R, Lockard,
General Superintendent.
King George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop.
First Class in Every
Respect    :    :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland.B.C.
Synopsis ot Coal Mining Regulations
(.'(>ALiiiitiHin ughta of tlie I) 'mm.**,
in M-iiiitnlm, SukatchoffHQ hi»'I Albert**
iliu VuktinTenitory. the*N rihweal Purr-
tories and in a portion * f >lie I'ruvmco ■>>
British Columbia, nrny ■ ■« eased for a term
nf twenty-mie years at „n iiuiu.tl lelital *••
Sliiiiacre.      Not  re than 2,600Hores
will lie leased tuone applioant,
Application for a lease must be uiado h-
lie applicant in |*c? h.-ii to tho Agei t --r suh
tgaiit of the district in which the right*
tpiiHed for are situated.
In surveyed territory ihe land uiual lie
l.-iiil-etl hy seutioU8*itr lc*t(»Uub(ll< isimiB
•I moiioua, mul in un u Veyed erntory
he < Met applied for shall ..wmak.il nit by
theapp toailt hunsulf.
(£ ten application muat he aceompanied
hy h fee i f IR which will be refunded if 'hi
iu li'h Hfiplie-l fnr are nol avnilab e, hut mil
i alter wise. A royalty shnll he jutid on tht
merchantabletmtput of lhe mine hi (In
trite of live cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shal>
furnish the Agent with sworn returns ac
'otii'timj for the full quantity of merch
antablecoal mined mul p-ty ihe my»lt)
'hereon. If the c ;.l miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least i 'lice a vear.
The lease will luo-ude I'-e coal minin
rights only, but the I saee may be permit-
led to purchase whatever available stir
face right" may he considered necessary
fur tbe working >>f the mine at the rate of
$L0.00anaore,
For full info'iimtion application should
he made to the Secretary of the Depart-
ment of the Inteiior, Oiiawa,  ur to   any
Agent -<r Sub-Atftut ■ fDnmiiitim Lands
W. W. CORY,
Depuiy M hum en*t ilie Interior,
N.B- I'nau horized publication of this
idvt m-i'iiieiit »ill not he i aid fur.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND.B.C
Agent fnr tlie
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex HedetS0n, Proprietor
Estimates ami Designs famished
un A|)[ilinitioii
MAROCCHI BROS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pii.sk.vei. Beee
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Speoialty
West Cumberland
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
1
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.    Fri,
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,    Sat.
P.M.     P.M.
4.35    7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4.35
A.M.     P.M.
9.35     3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:0(1
A.M.     A.M.
10;30    7:00
4.10     7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4.10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55     7:25
4.05     7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05     3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00     7:30
4.00     7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55 j 6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50     6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45     6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20 !   7:50
3.30     6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30     3,30
8.30    2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35 !  8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
EMPIRE   DAY   CELEBRATION
1916
OF SPORTS : :
TO BE HELD ON THE  RECREATION  GROUNDS.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.. MAY 24.
$500.00 IN   PRIZES
West   Cumberland conservative
Band will be in attendance all day
WALTER H. WHITE.  CONDUCTOR
PROflRAM
1. 9.30a.m. Football Match; Boy Scouts vs. Cumberland Public
Schoois. for Challenge Cup, value $15.00. Time. 20 minutes each
.way. To be played for annually, winning team to hold the Cup
for one year.
2. 10.15 a.m. 50 yard Race for boys 6 years and under; 1st prize 75c,
2nd prize 50c., 3rd prize 25c.   Cash.
3. 10.20 a.m. 50 yards Race for girls 6 years and under, 1st prize
75c, 2nd prize 50c., 3rd prize 25c.   Cash.
4. 10.25 a.m. 50 yards Race for Boys 8 years and under, 1st prize
75c., 2nd prize 50c., 3rd prize 25c.   Goods,
5. 10.30 a.m. 50 yards Race for girls 8 years and under, 1st prize
75c., 2nd prize 50c., 3rd prize 25c.   Goods.
6. 10.35 a.m. 75 yards Race for boys 10 years and under, 1st prize
$1.00, 2nd prize 75c., 3rd prize 50c.   Cash.
7. 10.40 a.m. 75 yards Race for girls 10 years and under, 1st prize
$1.00, 2nd prize 75c, 3rd prize 50c.   Goods.
8. 10.45 a.m. 75 yards Race for boys 12 years and under, 1st prize
$1.00, 2nd prize 75c, 3rd prize SOc.   Goods.
9. 10.50 a.m. 75 yards Race for girls 12 years and under, 1st prize
$1.00, 2nd prize 75c, 3rd prize SOc.   Goods.
10. 10.55 a.m. 100 yards Race for boys 14 years and under. 1st prize
Watch value $1.50, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 75c   Goods.
11. 11.00 aJm. 100 yards Race for girls 14 years and under, 1st prize
$1-50, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 75c.   Cash.
12. 11.05 a.m. 100 yards Race for boys 16 years and under, 1st prize
Watch value $1.50, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 75c.   Goods.
13. 11.10 a.m. 100 yards Race for girls 16 years and under, 1st prize
$1.50, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 75c.   Goods.
14. 11.15 a.m. Shoe Scramble Race for boys 16 years and under, 1st
prize $2.00, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 50c.   Goods.
15. 11.20 a.m. Shoe Scramble Race for girls 16 years and under, 1st
prize $2.00, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 50c   Goods.
16. 11.25 a.m. Obstacle Race for boys 16 years and under, 1st prize
$2.00, 2nd prize $1.00, 3rd prize 50c   Goods.
17. Firemen's Hub-to-hub Race, for Cup value $10.00. Winning team
to hold Cup for one year.
18. 12.45 a.m. Grand Patriotic Parade of Boy Scouts, Girl Guides,
Allied Nations, Motors, Schools, etc., headed by the West Cumberland Conservative Band. Open competition for teams-on-foot
representing the Allied Nations, one member for each Nation, 1st
prize $30.00, 2nd prize $20.00. All entries free. The Nations to
be represented are:- British Empire, France, Belgium, Russia, Italy,
Japan, Serbia, Portugal, Montenegro.
19. 1.00 p.m. Baseball Match, limited to 7 innings, entrance fee $3.00
per team.   Priz.: $55.00.
20. 2.30 p.m. 100 yards Dash, open to all, 1st prize fishing rod value
$5.00. 2nd prize $3.00,   Goods.
21. 2.35 p.m.   Single Ladies 100 yards Race. 1st prize $4.00, 2nd $2.00.
22. 2.45 p.m. Old Men's 75 yards Race, 50 years or over, 1st prize
$4.00, 2nd prize $2.00    Goods.
23. 2.50 p.m.   Married Ladies' 75 yards Race, 1st prize $4.00, 2nd $2.
24. 3.00 p.m. Boy Scouts Ambulance Competition, (annual event),
1st prize Shield value $15.00. To be competed for annualy and
held by the winning patrol for one year.
25. 3.15 p.m. Girl Guides Exhibition Drill Contest, (annual event),
1st prize, Shield value $15.00, To be competed for annually and
held by the winning patrol for one year.
26. 3.30 p.m. Boy Scouts Exhibition Drill. Inspection by Colonel J. S.
Warden, Officer Commanding 102nd Battalion.
27. 3.45 p.m. Combined Exhibition Drill of Boy Scouts and Girl
Guides.   Inspection by Col. J. S. Warden, O.C. 102nd Battalion.
28. 4.00 p.m. Exhibition Football Game, Ladysmith vs. Cumberland.
Time, half-hour each way, with five minute interval. Prize $56.00;
money to be handed over to Lacysmith team.
29. 4.30 p.m. Chinese 1*4 Mile Race, (in football interval), 1st prize
$2.50, 2nd prize $1.50.   Goods.
30. 5.10 p.m. Japanese 1*4 Mile Race, 1st prize $2.50 2nd prize $1.50.
Goods.
31. 5.15 p.m.   Open Mile Race, lsl prize $8.00, 2nd prize $4.00.
32 5 25 p.m. 1*4 Mile Race, Open to employees of Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., 1st prize $7.50, 2nd prize $5.00.
33. 5.30 p.m. Relay Race, 3-4 Mile, 2 men and 2 ladies in each team.
1st prize $10.00. If mure than twu teams compete a 2nd prize of
$6.00 will be given.
.'II 5.45. p.m. Chinese Football Race, time 20 minutes each way,
Prize $20.00.
GOD   SAVE   THE   KING.
SPECIAL PRIZES FOR THE BEST
REPRESENTATIVE GROUPS
OF THE ALLIES.
1st Prize $30        2nd Prize $20
BEST DECORATED PATRIOTIC FLOAT
1st Prize $10.00.
LIST OF OFFICERS:
MAYOR PARNHAM, President.    JOHN GILLESPIE, Vice-president.
T. MORDY, Secretary.   W. WILLARD, Treasurer.
Giounds Committee-   Messrs. N. Bevis, Jno. Brown. Wm. Whyte, T. J.
Brown, Jr.. R.Bryce,T.Watson.G.Ramsell, W.R.Dunn.
Sports and Programme- Messrs. Jno. I lillespie, T, Mordy,  Jas.   Walker,
N. Bevis, T. Murdock.
Starlets-   Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton,  Messrs.  W. E. Lawrence, John
Sutherland, R. Henderson.
Judges- Messrs. T. E. Montgomery, F. Jaynes. A. McKinnon, T. E. Bate,
H. Sloan. T. Spruston.
Jlmbalatice Jitdges- Dr, G. K. MacNaughton and Dr. Hicks.
Drill Cmlat Judges- Col. J. S. Warden, Rev, A. Blschlager, T. Rushford,
Jas. Ward.
Football Referee- Jas. Walker. Baseball Referee Jos. Horbury. FOI B
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Born- To Mr. and .Mrs. C. D.
Hobbs at the Cumberland General Hospital, on Tuesday May
l(5th, a son.
, Born To Mr. and Mis. Harry
Brj al ii!>' Cumberland General Hospital on Wedneseay May 17
1916, a daughter.
Born To Mr. and Mrs. Davis
Mi i al can at the Cumberland
11   ere] Hospital, a daughter.
.1. Irvine, of Vancouver, apro-
i isitjng member of the
Mi  oi ic Lodge, was lure during
week,
I   ii ' Sawford, chief electrical
■; i- Canadian   Collieries al   Union  Hay   and   A. S.
l'i rontovisited Cum-
I erla     and tl.e local   mines on
Daniel Kilpatrick and Mr. Ecc-
leston are conducting the trans-
! prtation  et'   the  diamond drill
nberland   to   a   point
. hi ivin ihe vicinity of Bev-
;   . It is stated that Ihe Canadian
i      -lies will start boring oper-
i; i near future,
■ .i. McDowell, stenographer  i      ihe   Canadian   Collieries
on  L'hursdaj   on  a ten day
vacation to Victoria antl sound
cities,
A meeting of   the   collecting
mmittees  in  connection   with
tl i    -Mill of  May  Sports will be
held on Monday at 7 p.m.  in the
council chambers.
The Blue Funnel liner Ix'on
arrived at Union Hay on Saturday evening for bunker coal and
left for Vancouver on Sunday.
A. S. Henderson of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Mrs.
ami Miss Rodwell were passengers hy Monday's train for Victoria.
Aurthur Wood and family has
returned from quartz mines of
Utah Mid is row residing at
West Cumbi rland.
D. ('. Macfarlane of the acc-
ounting department of the Canadian Collieries is due to arrive
here to-night.
Mrs. John Furbow returned on
Tuesday afternoon from Vancouver. For the last two months Mrs
Furbow has been under the treat-
menl of an eye specialist and
expects to return to Vancouver
for additional treatment during
September.
Robert Rushford, a returned
soldier and who saw active service in the battle of Ypres has
been appointed Provincial Game
Warden foi' this disti ict.
It is with regret that we announce the illness of Mrs. W. H.
Whyte who is confined to her
home on fifth street.
Miss Campbell of the Cumberland General Hospital was a
passenger by the outgoing train
on Thursday.
There are several   vacancies in
tl     i   mbi Hand  Pack of Wolf
(''■ 3 for boys between the ages
of U tn 11. Cubs are juniorscouts
n addition to being instruct-
i scoutcraft aro  taught box-
i.: . swiming and football. Smart
are invited to apply  to  the
■ easier. Rev. A.   Bischlager,
al    ie Cily Hall  on  Mondays at
6.11   p. in.
1 '        < 'an pbcll,  painter and
11- ir, :   da staff of men are
busy      no\ ating  the  interior of
ii   Hotel,    this  popular
\ is   now under the man-
ii  Mr.   and Mrs.   Wm.
" have merited a name
for I    ' stdvi.; un Vancouver Is-
land I oi the  kind and careful at-
ti ntioi In vi .king guests.   When
■ ii i        the   i Inion   Hotel   you
d en   excellent service.
'i he i:       .', ' ment are now replac-
i ; - and sitting rooms
1        j chair.-,   new furniture,
n  and carpets and making
the i .  01  Hotel  in every respect
ke resting place for the
traveller.      The   paper
anil   decorators   are ex-
i ei te   ,1. iie finished  by May 24.
..oval Notice
To   ihe   People o^ Cumberland
and District:
Leslie J. Aston, Pratical Shoe-
maki 1 as removed his business
to more suitable premises, oppos-j
iti e Kii p George Hotel, Dunsmuir Ave. Repairs in atly and
promptly executed. Prices consistent with the times.
r
THE   BIG   STORE
The Latest Summer Goods
Ladies' Skirts made in the very latest style, all new cloths, and the prices
are right. Every one is stamped "Northway," which is the " Hall-mark"
of fashion.
Ladies' Suits, "Northway" Garments, in some very smart designs, made
of beautiful cloth, and excellently finished.   Prices $17.50 to $30.00.
Ladies' Sport Coats, new checks, latest styles and moderate prices.
Ladies' Millinery. We have a very comprehensive stock of ladies' and
children's Hats on view. We specialize on Read-to-wear Hats from
$1.25 to $2.50.
Children's Smart Hats. A splendid variety to choose from. Prices 25c.
to $1.50.
Fancy Parasols for the Little Tots, at 25^ each.
" Oliver Twist" Suits for the Little Tots, guaranteed to give splendid
wear.    Price 85^f each.
Blue Stripe Overalls, from size 3 to 10, made from a good quality cloth,
Price 35^ a pair.
Khaki Boy Scout Overalls, with red band down each side, all sizes. Price
$1.00 each.
Infants' and Children's white Muslin Dresses, made of the daintiest sheer
lawn embroidery, beautifully worked.   Prices $1.50 to $3.50.
Middy Waists for girls and ladies, fast colors, 95^ and $1.50 each.
D. & A. Corsets. We are sole agents for this well known brand of
corsets. We can save you money. It will pay you to see our line of these
guaranteed Corsets.    Prices from 75^ to $6.50 a pair.
Groceries:
Our Grocery Department is crowded with the best lines obtainable of
choice quality goods. Price is not the only consideration; we put Quality
first and Service second, and on these you will find we excel.
In our Grocery Department we guarantee our goods; satisfaction or your
money back.   Ue-sh Our aim is to please our customers.
EXTRA SPECIALS
Half cases of extra fancy navel oranges, large and
delicious, 61.70 per half case.
Boxes of small winesap apples, just the thing for the
children, regular $2.50 per box. Special price $1.95
per box, 5^ per lb.
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
Private Telephone Exchange
Telephone Talk for May says:
The Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir, Limited, are enlarging
their office premises and increasing their staff at Cumberland by
moving a number from the Victoria offices. Mr. Lockard, General Manager, when in Victoria a
few days ago contracted for the
installation of a private branch
exchange at Cumberland to sup-
lily service to the different departments and ultimately to handle all the telephone service to
the eight mines centering at that
point.
The offices of the Canadian
Collieries company were enlarged
six months ago and the head office transferred from Victoria in November, 1915. The
Telephone Exchange system has
evidently been held up but is
now finally settled. When installed the various departments
will have direct communication.
The "Immigrant," a five reel
Famous Players film, which will
be shown at the Ilo Ilo May 24th,
features Valeska Suratt as an unsophisticated girl seeking a better future in a new world, and
contains many novel scenes,
ranging from ship-board to dam
building and presents a number
of East side types, depleted by a
competent cast. This program
will be shown one day ojnly.
Energetic Members in Council.
There is great credit due the
Board of Works of the city of
Cumberland for the manner in
which they are carrying out the
4th street improvements connecting up with the main-highway to Comox and Campbell
River. When completed it will
be one of the best pieces of road
in this vicinity and a credit to the
city and the men who have the
work in hand.
Aid. D. R. McDonald of the
Board of Works has been on the
job during the past two weeks
and the improvements are due
to a great extent to his
untiring efforts, who seems to
take an interest in the work. The
citizens beyond a doubt appreciate Aid. McDonald's activity in
civic improvement.
Aid. Bate is another member
of the council who is coming to
the front and it is easily seen by
his actions at the council board
providing that he keeps up tlie
energy and ambition, that he
will ultimately secure forthe city
a lighting system which the citizens deserve, t
G. C. Baker of the accounting
department of the Canadian Coi-
lieies left for Victoria on Monday.
For Sale—1915 Big Twin Indian motorcycle, fully equipped,
fine condition.   Apply Box 314.
"~l
I
*******\t***r
*A\\\aa\\\*\*aka*m\%
\      FIRE   INSURANCE
*          	
| Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and        '•
National Fire of Hartford, j
a
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY  TO R
EDWARD  W.   BICKLE 8
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG.. ft
• DUNSMUIR AVE., Cumberland
8
*OHOH0HOHOHOHOHOHO<*J-.Ol0«O».OtO>.r*.CXa-X.C-eO.S.:
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
Class A, Number 6 COLUMBIA
1GNITORS for General Ignition
purposes. Absolutely fresh stock
Every battery tested before being
sold.
Price 45^ each.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. 0.314
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church,
(Anglican.)
Services    for  Fourth Sunday
after Easter.
11.00 a. m„ Litany and  Holy
Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession Thursday at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bisohlager, Vicar.
S. C. WHITE
White
LEGHORNS
(Finest
Heather  Strain
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pullets for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland,
Stoves & Ran
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelwhre
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
i VI
T.E.BATE J*
Magnet Cash Store
P.O. Box 279 Phone 31
mm
fi B      ~l'      \i
iaioiaiioioioio0iOHo>oo!aio<o'o ■ £ ■..-...■_-: a
l
When you do a thing by telephone, you do it now. »
§ Not tomorrow or a couple of days hence, but fi
' rigght at the moment. §
s
A telegram means another telegram, and at the 5
best a wait of part a day. A letter means further jjj
correspondence, and a delay of days. fj
I
The Telephone is Instantaneous!    It gives direct     §
S    action!   You get your answer in a moment! g
8 9
The telephone will take you far or near. Appoint- $
ments can be made to talk at any time. Special f
rstes between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. *
0
BritishColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd. I
8
.a

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068451/manifest

Comment

Related Items