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The Islander Mar 25, 1916

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Array f^®*4
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
41
VOL. VI., No. 52     THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, MARCH 25. 1916.      Subscription price, $1.50 per year
CONCERT AT BEVAN
The Girl Guides under the leadership of Scoutmaster A. J. Taylor travelled to Bevan on Tuesday
evening to give a concert with
the aid of the Bevan local talent
in aid of the Patriotic Fund.
The Canadian Collieries generously gave a free trip to the
Guides and those who assisted in
the Concert, which was much appreciated.
The Concert was a-success in
every way and the Hall was
crowded for the event. The special songs and recitations given
by the artistes were well received and brought merited applause from* the large audience.
The special event of the evening was a Tableaux depicting
the death of Nurse Cavell as
conceived by Mr. Taylor and originated by him. There were four
scenes in tableaux, each a very
real conception of what actually
took place.in Belgium at the
death of this heroine. As tbis
may be given later on in Cumberland, it is sufficient to say it
is worth the price of admission.
Those who took part in this
act deserve great credit (or the
splendid way they did their part
and the solemnity which was depicted in their faces showed the
true feeling and emotion for
such a cast.
Nurse Cavil was represented by
Miss E. McFadyen, assisted by
Misses Eva Bickle and Hilda
Watson and Mrs. Franklin, while
the Misses White, and O'Neill as
mourners stood in sympathy with
the heroine. The shooting party
of four German soldiers were
represented by Messrs. Hood,
White and Waterfield, with Willie White as officer who finally
shot the nurse with his own
pistol. The whole effect was
good, and the characterization
splendid, and the audience was
spellbound during the whole time.
PROGRAMME.
Chairman's Remarks J. Sutherland
Recitation  Guide L. Peacey
Recitation Guide Bickle
Egyptian Dance Guide MacFarlane
Quartette   Guides   Lockard,  McFadyn,
  and Bickle
Song Mr. Williams
Recitation Corp. Runciman
Song Guide Shearer
Song Patrol Leader Boffey
•Song  Scoutmaster Taylor
Violirt Solo Master Walker
Dance Guide Rushford
Song Ida McFadyen
Tableaux, Death of Nurse Cavil, 4 Scenes
Song   Mr. Williams
Recitation,   Guide Watson
Song Guide Mordy
Recitation Mr. Fraser Watson
Song  Mr. Johnston
Recitation Guide Brown
Soldiers of the King Girl Guides
Vote of Thanks and Remarks by
    Mr. Spruston
GOD SAVE THE KING.
The receipts of the evening
were $60.00
RESOLUTION FOR PROHIBITION
Last evening in the Ilo Theatre
a fair sized audience listened to
Mr.H.J. Knott, offical organizer
forthe Peoples' Prohibition movement on Vancouver Island.
Mr. Knott took up the various
arguments advanced by those
opposing Prohibition and in a
forceful address, that carried conviction to its hearers, proved that
the Liquor Traffic had not a solitary claim to justify its existence,
except the enormous profits made
by those engaged in the business.
Facts and figures were quoted
showing the moral, social and
economic improvement in provinces and states which have adopted a prohibitory law. In passing,
he cited the case of the editor of
the Seattle Times who, during
the campaign had championed
the license system, but after seeing Prohibition in force for one
month became one of its most
enthusiastic supporters.
At the close of the address several questions were asked by
members of the audience and
answered by Mr. Knott. -
Ex-Mayor Campbell in a neat
speech, commended the recognition of the referendum principle
in the matter of Prohibition as a
decided advance in legislative
methods. He moved the following resolution:
RESOLVED: That this meeting notes with
great satisfaction the announcement
by the Premier of the decision of the
Executive Council of the Province
with reference to the prohibition of
the Liquor Traffic; and
THAT this meeting hereby expresses its
sincere appreciation of the attitude
assumed by the Executive Council and
hereby .requests Mr. Manson, the
member of the Legislative Assembly
for Comox Riding, to give all the
assistance in his power to the Executive Council in carrying out its policy
as announced by the Honourable the
Premier; and
THAT copies of this resolution be sent to
the Honourable the Premier and to
Mr. M. Manson, M.P.P.
The resolution was ably seconded by Mr. T. A. Mordy, who in a
concise speech, showed the baneful effect of alcohol on mental
and physical efficiency.
After singing the National Anthem the meeting adjourned,
The Ladies Aid of St. George's
Presbyterian Church will serve
Afternoon Tea in the basement
of the Church on Tuesday, March
28th, from 3 to 6.    Tickets 15c.
SAVING OF $400 TO CITY
The following communications
received for publication explains
the able assistance and prompt
action on the part of our Representative, Mr. M. Manson, M.
P. P., and the energetic efforts
of Mr. Thomas H. Carey, the
Secretary of the Board of School
Trustees, The result of their
activity will mean 'a saving to
the City of Cumberland of about
$400 per annum, and it is understood that High School education
will be*free from the first day of
January 1916. In the past High
School pupils* have been called
upon to pay $2.00 per month for
their education, and in cases
where there were two pupils out
of one family the price was $3.00
per month. This undesirable
charge will now be abolished.
The communication mentioned
above reads as follows:
Victoria, March 17,1916—Thos.
H. Carey, Esq , Cumberland, B.
C. Dear Sir: Replying further
to your letter of the 9th., inst,
with reference to the matter of
the payment by the Government
of the expenses of High School
pupils, attending your city
schools who live outside the city,
I beg to say that I am this morning in receipt of a letter from
the Superintendent of Education,
stating that your wishes will be
complied with in this respect.
He states that he is writing
you, giving you instructions as
to how and when to present your
account. I trust this will be satisfactory to your Board. Yours
very truly, M. MANSON.
^Victoria, Mar 16., 1916. Thos.
E. Carey, Esq., Sec. School
Board, Cumberland, B. C. Sir:
—Mr. M. Manson, M. P. P., has
brought to my attention your
letter of the 9th., inst, and in
reply I beg to acquaint you that
this department will be pleased
to pay, from the 1st January,
1916, for high school pupils attending yonr school from districts
outside of the limits of the City
of Cumberland just as we have
for some years been paying for
public school pupils under similar circumstances. In making
up your semi-annual statement
at the end of June, therefore,
will you please include the high
school pupils from outside districts attending the high school
in the. City of Cumberland. I
have the honour to be, Sir, Your
obedient servant,
ALEX. ROBINSON.
Supt of Education.
FIREMEN'S MASQUERADE BALL
The annual masquerade ball
held in the Ilo Ilo Dance Hall on
the evening of St. Patrick's Day
under the auspices of the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Brigade
was a grand success. Visitors
from various parts of the district
attended the ball. The following
secured prizes:—
Best dressed lady. Pricilla
Potter, $10, Best Dressed Gent,
William Clark $10, Best Sustained Character, lady, Nettie Stewart $5, Best Sustained Character'
gent, C. Decoeur, $5, Best Patriotic Lady, Deanie Lilley $8, Best
Patriotic Gent, Robert Rushford,
$5, Best John Bull, J. O'Conner
$3.50; Best Advertising Character
Mrs. R. McNeil, $5; 1st Clown,
L. Grant, watch; 2nd Clown R„
Gray, $1.50; Best Irish Character-
Mrs. P. Myers, watch; Comic
Group, W. McFadyen, H, Woods,
R. Robertson, $10; Prize Waltz,
Miss M, Campbell and H. Tappin
$5; Prize Two-Step, Miss H. Cun-
liffe and C. Decoeur, $5.
Messrs. Mumford, Maxwell and
Whyte acted as judges for the
evening and are to be congratulated upon their decisions which
were very satisfactory. There
being numerous and gorgeous
costumes it was no easy task.
The receipts were as follows:—
Sale of Tickets $139.60
Adv. space on program from City
business houses     75.50
Collection from Chinese merchants   36.50
Total Receipts $251.50
Expenditure  143.75
Balance  $107.75
Entrance fees collected from
the prize dancers and donated to
the Patriotic Fund totalled $3.50.
The Firemen wish to extend
their thanks to the judges for the
able and efficient manner in
which they awarded the prizes.
They also wish to thank the business men and all others who assisted in making the Ball such a
grand success.
J. S. Bannerman, Secretary.
Cumberland Volunter Fire Dept
The Canadian Collieries office-
staff defeated the All Stars at a
game of Basketball on Friday
evening by a score of 22 to 10.
The ladies played a very interesting Exhibition game between
themselves. D.C. Macfarlane refereed. Dubs Grant, our local
comedian, entertained the spectators during intermission.
The Auditors of the Canadian
Collieries left for Vancouver on
Monday. wo
THE ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, ti. U.
BE OF GOOD CHEER!
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
2Hj? Jalatttor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
-Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, MARCH 25th, 1916.
The Call.
"Hear the call, men, hear the call!
Give yourselves, your best, your all!
All is asked and must be given-
Yea, though home or heart be riven!
Follow the drums, the drums, the drums!
Save your souls, and follow the drums!
"Britain's honor is the stake!
Give your heart-blood for her sake!
Count the cost of life as nauf ht!
Ne'er was freedom lightly t ought;
Follow the drums, the drums, the drums!
Save your souls, and follow the drums!"
Sterner, sterner grows the call:
Make your choice, tis now or all!
Linger not in sheltered shame!
Challenge death for Britain's fame!
Follow the drum.--, the drums, the drumsj
Save your souls, and follow the drums!'
Young man! Young woman!
Don't let your lives be failures.
Make the best of what God has
given you. Let your gratitude
to Him for life and its noble endowments, be exerted in a full
devotion of will, and thought and
strength, to whatever work He
brings in His wise providence to
your hand. And remember, that
it is only good and useful work
that He provides. Shun evil
work—work that harms your
neighbor in any way, as you
would shun the deadliest thing.
It may bring a harvest of golden
apples and purple grapes; but the
apples will he like those of Sodom,
full of bitter ashes and grapes
sour.
Our young lady reader, if you
are looking for your prince, just
test his home conduct before you
accept him. Don't be guided in
your choice by what a young man
is in your parlor; find out what he
is in his mother's sitting room.
Don't judge him by how he can
dance, or turn a compliment, or
tip his hat or carry your small
bundle;   find out how agile he is
I
The New
Spring and Summer
Styles and Fabrics
of
Individual Ladies' Tailoring Co.
Are now on Exhibit.
Tailor-Made
Suits, Coats, Skirts
To Your Measure.
All iGarments are Guaranteed For
Fit      Quality
to do a service for his old maid
aunt, or how he speaks to the
women-folks when his collars are
not laundered to suit him.
A schoolmaster once said to his
pupils, to the boy who would
make the best piece of composition in five minuses on "How to
Overcome Habit" he would give a
prize. When the five minutes had
expired a lad of nine years stood
up and said: "Well, sir, habit is
hard to overcome. If you take off
the first letter it does not change
'abit' If you take off another
letter, you still have a 'bit' left
If you take off still another, the
whole of 'it' remains. If you take
off another it is not totally used
up, all of which goes to show
that if you want to get rid of
habit you must throw it off altogether." Result—he won it.
Of all the cranks, the chronic
pessimist is the crankiest.   He is
always whining like a half-starved dog with a tin can tied to its
tail.   When the sky is begutifully
clear he is positively certain that
everything will dry up and there
will be a scarcity.     When the
gentle rain begins to fall he laments and is afraid the crops will
be spoiled.   He is always expecting some great calamity, misfortune of some kind, or of being
laid up with rheumatism.     No
matter how rosy the apples look,
or  how juicy the pears, he is
afraid that they are wormy at
the core and can't be kept until
Christmas.   The country is going
to the bow-wows, and everybody
is a dirty and dishonest rascal.
His own peaceful and progressive
town is all right but he is con
vinced that it will never improve
so very much. The high church
spire is a notable landmark, but
it might fall down some day and
do great damage. He himself
enjoys excellent health at present
but is sure that he will not live
long—and he shouldn't. The
world would be happier without
such cranky pessimists.
How sweet are the slumbers of
him who can lie down on his pillow and review the transactions
of every day without condemning
himseif!
Ridicule is but at best a gross
pleasure, too rough an entertainment for those who are highly
polished and refined.
Where's there a will there's a
way; but where th*erearea great
many wills, there's no way. THREE
4>
GIRL ANDJ BEAR
Brave "Little Sister" Gets Reward for Capturing "A Great
Ferocious Monster."
By GERTRUDE MARY SHERIDAN.
"I should die of fright," declared
Netta Faroes. "I am sure I should."
Why, Just think of it, Beauty—way off
on the very edge of civilization, wild
animals, savages and mountain outlaws!   No, thank you, not for me!"
"But David will be there," explained
Beatrice Merrill, the bride of a week,
and she spoke in a simple confident
way that indicated her brave bright
husband to be a power of valor and
strength in her estimation.
"Well, that is a good deal, I will
confess," admitted Netta. "But David
can't be with you all of the time, can
he? If he's going to be the great cattle king he thinks he is, he must have
a lot of work to do. I'm sure you will
faint at the first sight of a/erce cowboy, and as to those Indians—think of
seeing them creeping—creeping-
creeping through the grass, with tbelr
hideous tomahawks and scalping
knives—ugh!" and the imaginative
miss shivered in incipient hysterics.
Beatrice only smiled sweetly,'optimistically. It was true she had been
brought up tenderly, the only child of
fond doting parents, shielded from every rude alarm, her girlhood experience a path of ever-blooming roses.
But It was true alio that the rugged
earnest figure of David Merrill had
tome Into her life as a hero. His4ove
had filled her existence magically. One
of nature's real noblemen, he had
come from directly next to nature to
woo and win and carry **t*Y to his
rude far western home a timid, inexperienced prairie flower.
And when the eventful departure
came, every stage of the Journey accomplished seemed to carry Beatrice
into a new realm of delight. Even
that last stage drive over the lonely
hills and into a settlement crude as a
frontier mining town, waB full of novelty and excitement. Beatrice clapped
her hands ingenuously as some delighted child at the queer antics of
,     -C
UaMBP
' ******     ***T *f
******• ****
I There Burst From * Copse a Great
8hagged Bear.
| the playful prairie dogs.   She went
[wild orer the splendid   full   colored
(flowers.   Then when a cavalcade of
genuine cowboys came to Last Limit
accompany them   to the   ranche,
(their honest loyal admiration charmed
pretty bride and she felt that she
raa going among true friends.
"There' are no bears," she wrote ex-
ultingly to Netta two weeks later.
"The Indians are poor harmless creatures who come to the door begging
only once in awhile, and make you
glad to be able to be charitable. But
there is the clear, clear sky—oh, so
Infinitely blue all of the time! And
such sunsets! And the boys—dear,
rough, honest fellows, who come
around bashful and proud of their 'little sister,' as they call me, and who
would die for me, if I asked them.
And David—Oh, so grand and splendid
when he goes off on a horse that
would scare you! And me, poor little
me—gained ten pounds already, brown
as a berry, and oh, so happy in this
lovely peaceful spot, so sweet and solemn in the clear morning sunlight,
that I reverently call it God's land!
"As to the mountain outlaws—booh!
Once there was a few of them, but
they have been driven off the trail
There's a band, they ear, with a leader
named Buckskin Joe. They say he ls
a bad, desperate fellow. There's a
thousand dollars offered for his cap
ture, so it isn't likely he'll ever dare
to venture near a ranche where
half a dozen brave, powerful herderu
would be glad to make a target of
him. Bugaboo, all the horrid thing*
you predicted! Come out and see mu,
and see what real men look like!"
In fact Beatrice had become bo In
love with her new life, that one morning when she found the vicinity of tbs
house deserted she was not one bit
worried. David the day before had
made a famous Bale and had gone off
to a distance to negotiate for a ne.
herd. Most of the men had accompanied him. The others had been given a holiday and had gone to Last
Limit, where a circus had come along.
Beatrice went about her pleasant
home tasks happy as a sprite, singing
merrily, planning wit': delight a fam
ons strawberry pie of gigantic proportions for her formidable horde when
they should return, ravenous and de
************ ***,%•*    rn****.      *» ****.*** ****-.**
lighted, at supper time. She had gath
ered a great apron full of the rich.
luscious fruit in tbe ravine about n
quarter of a mile from the house, wher;
she heard shots and shouts in the dis
tance. These died away, and sh;;
started for the house leisurely, atttib
uting the commotion to some hurrah
exploits of the cowboys on a neighboring ranch.
Then suddenly Beatrice uttered a
sharp cry. There bum from a copse
a great shagged bear. Its irouth was
foaming, the blood was trickling down
from its face, and it swung along a:
a fearful rate in the direction of tht
house.
"I won't faint!" determined Beatriw
■—"Although I hardly know what to
do.   Oh, dear!"
She fluttered like a frightened butterfly. Seeking refuge or eatables, the
bear tore through the little house gar
den, aimed for the open cellar doors,
darted down the steps, and then-
Beatrice ran fast as she could, reached
the house, slammed down the cellar
doors and set the heavy oaken bars
across the heavy planks. Then she
ran into the house, locked and bolted
the door leading Into the cellar and—
sat down to cry.
It was only as a relief to her overwrought excitement that tbe tears
came, for Beatrice felt fairly triumphant She had controlled her fright,
she had caged the enemy. What an
exploit to write to Netta about!
What a grand thing to narrate to her
husband! How the gallant cowboys
would praise and make a veritable
heroine of her! Beatrice was very
proud of her flrst exploit ln capturing
"a wild savage denizen of the primeval
forest."
Beatrice valiantly took down the
house rifle from the antlers over the
dining room clock and placed it on
the table.   Then she got the axe from
the yard.   Next she added the poker'
to this warlike equipment.
She listened for some demonstrations from below. The "frenzied
growlB," the "frightful leaps." she had
read about as pertaining to bears, did
not ensue as she had expected. She
wondered if the infuriated animal had
gone to sleep. She hoped he had not
discovered the old cupboard ln which
she kept the butter and milk.
About an hour later Beatrice heard
the tramp of horses and the sound of
human voices along the trail. Six
mounted men came into view. Their
leader doffed his hat as he drove up
to the doorway where Beatrice stood.
"We are looking for a stray bear,"
he began.
"Oh, yes!" announced Beatrice eagerly, "a great ferocious monster—'
"Not at all—a harmless toothless old
animal escaped from the circus in
Last Limit, but valuable as a trick
bear, and $100 offered for its capture."
"Why, what is this?" inquired David
Merrill, as he and his hearty crowd
Bat down to the smoking supper that
evening, and he found a little heap of
bank notes under his plate.
Then Beatrice told her story, with
dancing eyes. And David swung her
up in the air and kissed her at its
termination, while the enthusiastic
cowboys gave "Huzza!" with an admiring echo for their brave "little
sister."
(Copyright, 1913, by W. G. Chapman.)
BROUGHT WEALTH   TO PERU
Guano Beds, Consisting of Most Wonderful of Known Fertilizers, Sold
for Immense 8um.
It is said that Humboldt added the
greatest wealth to the reports of his
discoveries when he called the serious
attention of Europe to the guano beds
of Peru.
Near midway of the equator and the
tropic of Capricorn on the Peruvian
coast are the Chlncha islands, whose
guano deposits have been worth more
in money than the copper, gold and silver of the world's best mines. For this
great fertilizer $1,000,000,000 had been
paid up to the time that exports were
prohibited by Peru Itself.
The islands are small, high and
rocky, barren and uninviting. to the
last degree; yet it is said there is no
other spot of equal size on the earth's
surface from which so much wealth
has been taken.
In some cases the deposits reached
a depth of 160 to 180 feet and are
calculated to be thousands of years
old.
Nowhere else in the world are marine birds found in so great quantities
as along this coast. Their presence in
such immense numbers ie due to the
quantities of fish found there, upon
which the birds feed. Cormorant's,
pelicans, seagulls and marine crows,
in clouds, numbering hundreds of
thousands, may be seen flying low to
or from the islands.
But the birds alone could not have
produced the Peruvian guano. It was
necessary to have the rainless climate
of these islands in order to accomplish
the result.
"Rain so seldom falls tbat aged men
can count on the Angers of one hand,"
says one commentator, "the times in
their lives when they have seen this
marvelous thing—water falling from
the skies."
It is on this account tbat Peruvian
guano in its natural state, never having been exposed io rain or dampness,
has retained its nitrogen and ls of
such great value. Some guano contains all three elements of plant life—
nitrates, phosphates and potash—and
all of lt contains two elements—phosphates and fixed nitrogen. It sells as
high as $100 a ton.
The most striking feature of tha
present war is not the influence of one
personality, but rather the splendid
courage and heroism, both in lighting
and bearing suffering, which has been
manifested among the rank and file
of our soldiers, so that theso qualities
are become not singular but commonplace. The fear that our race had
grown degenerate and unresponsive
is now gloriously nogatlved, and by, in
many cases, what was deemed the
most unlikely material. Professor Patrick Geddes, Brita.'i.'s greatest sociologist, speaking in London, said:
"Most dramatic of all to me ln my
own everyday life and experience in
Edinburgh has been the rapid change
of the deteriorating loafer into a
strong upright man. This refers to
the large numbers of Edinburgh men
of the poor class who have enlisted.
Few have suffered more heavily than
Scottish regiments; few have done
more to cover themselves with imperishable glory.
A BRITISH DOG OF WAR
The mascot of H.M. Hospital Ship-
Paulina, a splendid specimen of a
bull dog wearing one of the regulation caps of the navy. This picture was take:- at the Dardanelles..
A School Story
At the examination of the pupils.
In a primary school a short time ago,
the Inspector put questions at random to the scholars. Among the latter was a red-headed lad, who. on:
being asked how many days there are-
ln a year, answered ''seven." Whea
the tittering of the rest of the class
subsided, the  Inspector remarked: —
"I said a year, not a week. Now try
again. How many days are there in
a year?"
The lad appeared nonplussed and1
vexed for a moment, and then ejaculated:—
"Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
—Just seven. If there's others I never heard of 'em."
Made   In  Germany
Purchaser:  "I dont want it if it's--
made in Germany.   It would be sure
to play some dirty trick.    Go off in.
the middle oi the night, or something.
of that sort!" F01.F
TH    ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND. B.C.
On the department boards recently, of what is said to be the
greatest hardware company in
the world the following notice
was posted by direction of the
board of directors and headed
"House Notice."
IF YOU MUST DRINK.
To he married man who cannot get along without his drinks,
the following is suggested, as a
solution to the bondage of his
habit.
First: Start a saloon in your
own house.
Second: Be the only customer,
and you will have no license to
pay. Give your wife $2.00 to
buy a gallon of whiskey, and remember there are 69 drinks in
one gallon.
Third: Buy your drinks from
no one but your wife, and by the
time the first gallon is gone she
will have $8.00 to put .in the bank
and $2 to start business again.
Fourth: Should you live ten
years and continue to buy your
booze from her, and then die
with snakes in your boots, she
will have money to bury you decently, educate your children,
buy a house and lot, marry a decent man and quit thinking about
you. I
pa iin ITCM3
tit,)   I tiki    I • *-■»•   - <
THE BROKEN COIN
Episode No. Ninctoen-'The Sacred Fire."
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas."
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Rescue."
Episode No. T\venty-t\vo--"An American
Queen,"
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be held in the
West Cumberland Band Hall on
Wednesday, April 26th. /
David Stephenson, Chief Provincial Constable of this district
with headquarters at Nanaimo,
and J. S. Fleming, Provincial
Relief Officer, arrived on Thursday's train.
1   PRO. CHANGED MON., TUES, THURS. & SAT.  I
The local Liberals held a smoker
in the 3ity Hall on Thursday
evening. They are evidently no
prohibitionists as the growler was
passed around very freely, so
much so that some of them had
that "0 be joyful" look when
they came out of the smoker.
CORPORATION  OF THE CITY OF
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of
the Court of Revision for tha purpose of
hearing and deciding complaints against
the assessment as made for the year 1916
will be held in the City Council Chambers-
on Monday, Aprit 24th, at 7.30 P.M.
Any person desiring to make complaint
against th? said assessment must give
notice to the assessor in writing at least
ten days prior to the sitting of said Court
of Revision.
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 22nd
day of March, 1916.
A. MACKINNON, '
City Clerk.
!
j TONIGHT    19TH. EPISODE      f
f "The Broken Coin" !
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MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
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EVERY TUESDAY, One Number f
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- of the -  ' f
"BLACK BOX" t
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Serial in Fourteen Episodes.       |
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FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.  Phone
95 L.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
A DIPLOMATIC TRIUMPH."
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BROADWAY FEATURES
Every Thursday.
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TRIUMPH*
M
*^W ■'     )
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mm
*\*\*\}i. ; (
¥ y- y  ft (,* ;• •
N.Y. Evening Sun.
The Long Distance Telephone Saves Trips.
It saves the many inconvenience!* and uncertainties
of travelling.
It enables you to get the same i esults with minimum
effort and without loss of time.
YOUR telephone is a long distance telephone.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd. j
I
(-OH
-HOUOHCHO
FURS
Get "More Money" lor your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yonr section
SHIP YOUR FURS DIRECT to "SHUBERT" Ihe largest
house In the World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW FURS
a reliable—responsible-safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for more than a third of a century," a long sue-
AND PROFITABLE returns.   Write for "«te fttubtrt Mitt**,"
the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
Write for It-NOW-lf. FREE
A. B. SHUBERT Inc. 25*27 west Austin ave.
sTL, O. *JA\\JDCiI\ 1, inc. DeptCM CHICAGO,U.SJt*. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
Ki*]*K:!*\*\***yiltXi***\il*ttlXX
fi      FIRE   INSURANCE
! C^lZarsace Coca^.
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford.
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO
EDWARD  W.  BICKLE
OFFICE;  THE   ISLANDER  BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND
fi
fi
fi
fi
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev, Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 3rd Sunday in Lent.
8.30 a.m., Holy Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service  of   Intercession    on
Wednesday at 7.45 p.m.
Litany on Friday at 11 a.m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
S. G. WHITE LE6H0RN8
White Heather Strain   (Finest
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pullets for sale at
.   $1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland,
Girl Guides.
The Girl Guides meet every
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Patrol Leaders and  Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
For Sale Now
SOLID OAK MISSION DINING
FURNITURE, PIANO, PICTURES, CARPETS, 2 BUREAUS,
DOUBLE BEDSTEAD, CHINA,
AND KITCHENWARE.
Mrs. E. Allen,
Happy Valley.
*****
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OI FICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Book*  Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsmuii Ave.,
Cumberland, B.C.
We have just received a consignment of
60 Watt Nitros
the lamps which consume % less
current and give a prettier, whiter
light than the ordinary Tungstens.
Try One in Your Parlour.
Every   One  Guaranteed.
PRICES:
60 Watt Clear Nitros, -   $1.10
100    "      "      " -   1.25
200    "      "      *        -     2.10
Add 10% for Frosting.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphopkones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
«\ SIX
ER,    * MBERLAND. B.C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my  business  is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria. B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
, small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R, Lockard,
General Superintendent.
L
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 87
Agent for tha
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex U'dM.xnn, Prnpr ietor
Estimates and Denij-n-. furnished
on Application
VI.AROCCHI P ICS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations]
COAL mining lights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the N-rthwest Terri
torie* and in a portion nf the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years ar nn annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections.or logal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaiit himself.
Each applioation must be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
riphts applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at tha
rate of live cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shaH
fnmish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, suoh returns shall be
furnished at least onoe a year.
The lease will inoiude the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may ba considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rata of
$10.00anacre.
For full information applicatiun should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
Sat.    Fri.
READ  UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri.
Sat.
P.M.      P.M.
4.3!".     r.3S
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4.35
A.M.     P.M.'
9.35     3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M,
1.00
A.M.
10:30
2.W
A.M.
1030
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
1030
A.M,
7:00
4.10    ;.!)
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10     3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.0f.  j 7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05     3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
230
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00     7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.36
11:05
735
11:05
7:35
3.55 i 8.55
3.55
6.55
|
3.55  : 3.55
8.55     2,55
(f) Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
1
3.50 ' 6.50
■
3.50
6.50
i
3.50     3.50
8.50     2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45  | 6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
****
3.30     6.30
3.30
 ■    —  ■
6.30
3.30
3,30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
SSSSB
1135
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY 4
V
TH*. ISLANDEK, CU
SEVEN
THE CANADIAN BANK   moral gain by war     atrocities affirmed
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL. $15,000,000    RESERVE FOOD, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
I Wa Una n,ofe!;P8auty may be only skin deeP'>
f   TY aupapci b ^fbut don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging inj price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
IJA^beerlyou'can't help liking—so
'sM ^ mild, sojpure, so very gocd.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling. Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIiES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy treea and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on applioation.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
Inspiring  Interpretation   oy   Most  Fa-    Report   cf   Austrian    Priests    Makes
mous  Philosopher of  France Huns Out Worse
As President of the Academie des
Sciences Morales et Politiques, Henri
Bergson, France's most dearly loved
philosopher, delivered an address on
the meaning of the war. He shows
how, when Germany was working out
her natural self-development, Prussia
I —an artificially-created State, not one
I of natural growth—introduced and
succeeded in imposing on Germany
her mechanical system of Govern*
, ment, her mechanical army, which
strangled the free, human, development of the people. By the defeat
of France in 1870-71, Bismarck induced the whole of Germany to accept
PrusgJsii materialism. In the great
industrial development that followed,
lust of conquest took a new form in
the thirst for wealth. So came the
desire to dominate the world, and the
trust ln material force to secure that
end. The alliance between militarism
and industrialism has made Germany
ruthless and regardless of all rules
In the conduct of the war. Wishing
to strike at the enemy's industry and
wealth, she was filled with the spirit
of destruction, and to make the war
short, in the interests of German commerce, she adopted all methods for
terrorizing the enemy population.
Such, says M. Bergson, is the explanation of the spectacle before the
world. "BarbaTism reinforced by the
capture of civilization." Humanity,
physically enlarged enormously by the
advance of the mechanical arts, was
busy trying to fill up "the soulless
void In the body politic by creating
more liberty, more fraternity, more
justice than the world has ever seen."
Then, ln the person of Germany, brute
force sought to usurp the place of
moral force. But, says Bergson in a
fine passage, great miracles then hap-.
pened; moral forces suddenly revealed themselves as creators of material
force—in Great Britain especially,
where "one million, two millions of
soldiers suddenly rose from the
earth," and "in a nation thought to
be mortally divided against itself all
became brothers in the space of a day.
From that n-oment the issue of tlie
conflict was not open to doubt." Great
spiritual gains, Bergson is confident,
will be the Issue of the war, and the
philosopher of the future will see
"how humanity was saved by material
suffering from the moral downfall
which would have been its end."
Clothing Kitchener's Army
The manufacture of clothing for Kitchener's armies proceeds in the West
Riding of Yorkshire on a colossal
scale. It is estimated that between
250 and 300 miles of khaki cloth are
being woven every, week. Over 12,000
looms are busy, working on an average nearly "time and a half." One
mill alone produces forty miles of
cloth weekly. Some 50,000 tailors and
tailoresses are making up the material into garments, the work as a
whole being supervised by a committee of experts appointed by the War
Office. In regard to army boots about
twenty factories ln Leeds alone pro-
iuce some 40.000 pairs a week.
flnthub.^o ic visitor: i think all you
nurses deserve to have medals."
Nurse: "Well, we certainly are offered
plenty of clasps."—Drawn by Geo.
Dixon, in The Passing Show, London.
Some time ago ■: committee of Austrian priests with the approval of
Archbishop Pifl of Vienna set out to
Investigate the alleged cruelties of
German troops in Belgium at the beginning of the war lt was hoped that
the report of these priests, who had
been admonished d'rect from the Pope
to consider the e.!dence from an absolutely impartial standpoint, would
clear the Germans in the eyes, of the
World. The report was handed to
the Pope as well as to the Archbishop
of Vienna, but the publication of it
has been forbidden in Austria and Germany. In clerica circles in Rome,
however, its contents are well known,
and the reason why it is being kept
secret in Germany and Austria is perfectly plain.
"The German War Department, the
report says, "has already admitted that
many of the accusations m-.de against
the Belgian franc Mreurs are false."
Concerning the case ci the parish
priest of Oyenbrugse, the committee
reports: "When the unfortunate priest
returned to his paiish he was arrested
without any reason whatever and
thrown into prison together with
twenty-eight civilians. Here he was
compelled to stand in the middle of
the floor with the hands raised about
his head for several hours. When he
finally collapsed from exhaustion he
was prodded with bayonets and struck
with the butts of rifles. Soldiers tore
his breviary to pieces and threw them
into his face. They forced two civilians to strike him and spit into his
face. Finally they threw a bucket
of water over him while he was lying
helpless on tho floor, and whenever
he moved they prodded him with
bayonets. When the priest tried to
push aside the point of a bayonet
which almost touched his face a soldier sent a bullet through his head."
This is a verbatim translation of a
report made by trustworthy priests,
each of whom is personally known to
the Archbishop oi Vienna.
GERMANY AND ALSACE
Outrageous Treatment of Indomitable
of Conquered People
If Germany ever had any illusions
regarding the loyalty of the people of
Alsace to her, they have completely
disappeared and there ls not tetter
proof of this than the way ln which
German officials treat the people of
the "Reichsland." Their fury against
them ls boundless and every prison
is full of men and women of all classes
who have incurred German wrath.
Soldiers of Alsatian birth are sert to
the most dangerous part ot the eastern
front. The fidelity of the Alsatians
to France is touching. Everybody
speaks the Alsatian dialect, which
most of the innumerable spies do not
understand.
Buckingham's Workshop
One of the finest carpenter's workshops in London is at Buckingham
Palace. A little while ago the King
had this workshop entirely refitted,
and it now contains a splendid electrically-driven turning plant. In many
of the rooms at the different Royal
residences may be seen substantial,
well made pieces of furniture that are
the handiwork of the King's carpenter.
All the packing cases in which the
Royal gifts of flowers, fruit, and game
are desptched to various friends of
their Majesties and charitable institutions are also made in tlie workshop
at Buckingham Palace, where about
3,000 packing cases are turned out
every year.
Soldiers Avoid ,Writs •
Asked in the Vacation Court, Ljn
don, Eng., to grant "an attachment
against a sergeant-major for non-
com, liunce with an order calling him
for a . irety bond for costs, Mr Justice Low refused the application. His
Lord, ni,i said that h<- was not going
to n te a wrii of attachment against
a p i ser ing iii His Majesty's
fori i tin.! of war, exuept for
~ erl    nal. EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOW N    TOPICS
Mayor Kilpatrick of Courtenay
visited this city on Tuesday.
J.G. Branch and E. Hunden left
for Nanaimo on Thursday.
Rev. S. J. Green, left for Nanaimo on Monday.
Alex Ronalds has left for Nanaimo and H. J. McKay for Ladysmith.
Robt. Freeburnand B. Sweeney
left for Nanaimo on Thursday.
Mrs. John Gillespie, returned
from a visit to Victoria on Tuesday.
Conrad Riefle, manager of the
Union Brewery Co. left for Nanaimo on Friday.
.Mrs. Samuel Jones and family,
of West Cumberland, left for
Nanaimo on Thursday.
Mrs. S. Horwood returned on
Tuesday from a three weeks visit
to Victoria improved in health.
Constable John Macdonald left
for Vancouver on Wednesday and
expects to return on Sunday.
A number of workmen are busy
moving ths planing plant from
the Grant and Mounce old mill
site in this City to Royston.
The Wellington Colliery Railway carried 600 passengers between Cumberland and Union
Bay during the last week.
Campbell Bros, have been ap-
pc inted exclusive agents for the
Individual Ladies Tailoring Co.
Suits, coats and skirts tailored to
individual order. Guaranteed for
style, fit, and qnality.
H.S. Fleming of New York,
chairman of the Executive Com-
mitte of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd, and his private
secretary, arrived on Saturday
last and has remained here inspecting the local mines during
the past week. Mr. Fleming expects to leave for points East on
Sunday.
A very enjoyable afternoon tea
was held at the home of Mrs. J.
H. Macmillan on Tuesday afternoon under the auspice? of the
Cumberland Red Cross Society.
The gents enjoyed their cigars
in one part of the residence while
the ladies discussed their future
plans with their cup of tea in the
dinining room. The receipts for
the afternoon were $35.65, and
this sum was forwarded, to the
Red Cross Hospital of the 102
Battalion at Comox.
The members of the-congregat-
ion of Grace Methodist Church on
Sunday evening received a pleasant surprise and a musical treat
when the choir of twenty adult
voices sang the anthem, "Praise
Ye the Father. The singing was
remarkably good and would have
done credit to a city ten times
the size of Cumberland. Mr. E.
J. Searle, the leader of the choir
is to be commended for his attention and service for he has made
the Methodist choir second1 to
none in this district. Rev. S. J.
GresMs of Nanaimo and chairman
of the district occupied the pulpit
and delivered a sermon on mission
work.
£W->"S%
'^WV^N^-^>
THE   BIG   STORE
NORTHWAY
GARMENTS
Customers that Come to Stay.
And where is the woman who isn't look
ing for the merchant who carries the
most stylish and best made apparel?
Northway Garments have been bringing
these folks together for twenty years.
Keen to be better dressed than most
women, Northway Styles capture her
interest on sight.
Alert to detect that real sincerity which
means shape-keeping and perfect tailoring qualities,—she finds them in North-
way Garments, which are made under
the personal supervision of members of
the firm in tne workrooms.
See our new smart up-to-date suits; they are very smart and
the styles are the latest. No two alike, we strive to give
you satisfaction.
New Sport Coats are arriving from time to time. Our
present assortment comprises the most desirable Coats and
you will find our prices are right.
New Northway Skirts, and every one with an individuality
of its own.   We think you will be pleased; ask to see them.
t*.************
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
.LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8
*****

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