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The Cumberland Islander Jan 14, 1922

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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which ll consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR—No. 2.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA. SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1922.
SUBSCRIPTION TRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Council Handled $53,000
During the Past Year
Has Been Best Year in City's History—Much Good Work Accomplished—Provincial Government Owes City About $2000 for
Work on Dunsmuir Avenue—Council Concluded Business of
Year With Good Balance.
A special meeting of the Ciay Council was held on Wednesday
evening for the purpose of receiving the auditor's report and
statement of receipts and expenditures for the past year. Mayor
MacDonald occupied the chair, and there were also present Aid.
C. J. Parnham, F. D. Pickard, D. Thomson, T. Bannerman and
City Clerk Mordy. Mr. A. MacKinnon, school trustees, also
attended in connection with the annual report and balance-sheet
of the Board of School Trustees.
The report of the auditor, Mr. C. B. Wood, showed that the
council had put through a large amount of business during the
past year. The total receipts from all sources amounted to over
$53,000, which was a large increase over the previous year. The
increased government grant for the schools, the poll tax and the
$6000 for the soldiers' houses were items mainly responsible for
the increase. The report and financial statement in full is printed
on another page of this issue.
Alderman Parnham thought It was
a very good report. A lot of money
had gone through the council and it
had been well handled and good value
received. He moved that the report
be received and published. This was
seconded by Alderman Pickard and
carried.
The report of the School Trustees
was also read and adopted.
Speaking on the work done during
the past year, Mayor MacDonald said
there never was so much accomplished
in Cumberland as during the past
year, nor such good value received for
the money expended. Some of the
work had not been anticipated early
In the year, such as the building of the
soldiers' houses and the renewing of
the 12-Inch main. The latter, said the
Mayor, was a credit to Cumberland.
An additional two blocks of Dunsmuir Avenue had been graded and
coated with tarvla, and there was
enough material on hand to give it
another coat In the spring. The provincial government had promised to
pay half the coBt of grading these two
blocks, their share of which would be
about $2000. This money should be
received by the council before long.
Dunsmuir Avenue had been classified
as a secondary highway, and the government hears one-half the cost of
upkeep of such roads.
His Worship said the citizens ought
to appreciate the amount of work done
by the Board of School Trustees and
the City Council. Much good work
had been accomplished during the past
year.
On motion of Aid. Thomson, seconded by Aid. Parnham, a vote ot thanks
was passed to the press for the publicity given proceedings of the council during the past year.
Before adjourning the meeting, the
Mayor thanked the Aldermen for
help during the past year. The busi-
ness of the council, he said, had been
conducted without friction and squabbles of any kind. He also thanked all
the committees for their work.
The only regret of the year, said
Mayor MacDonald, was the loss of
Aid. Francescini, who was a very good
worker and helper, and was always
anxious to do anything he could for
the Interests of the city.
Aid. Parnham said he had enjoyed
the year's work on the council. It was
one of the best they ever had.
Aid. Pickard said he was always
pleased to attend the meetings and do
what he could for the city. He hoped
If he was elected that all the others
would also be returned.
Aid. Bannerman said the members
of the council always got along very
well, and worked to the best interests
of the city as a whole. Much good
work had been done during the past
year, and he gave Mayor MacDonald
credit for the amount accomplished.
Aid. Thomson spoke In a similar
vein.
Mr. MacKinnon said the schools had
had a very good year. Great Improvements had been made to the schools,
and they were a credit to the town.
The buildings and equipment were
all In good condition except tlietheating plant in the old school. This would
have to be taken care of during the
coming year, as it was Inadequate and
unsatisfactory.
The council passed a hearty vote of
thanks to the management of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.
for assistance given the city In every
possible way.
PARENT-TEACHER ASSN.
MEETS MONDAY NIGHT
The monthly meeting of the Parent-
Teacher Association will be held on
Monday night next, in the High School.
A paper will he rend by one of the
teachers, and It is hoped there will be
a good attendance.
A considerable sum has been contributed by the Japanese ot the district towards the prize fund of the
school, and the Chinese have also
given liberally. An appeal will shortly
be made in the city to those interested
for assistance.
MEETING OF PUBLIC
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
The first annual meeting of the
Cumberland Public Library Association will be held on Monday night
next, In the Lecture Hall of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association. The meeting is called for 8
o'clock, when officers for the ensuing
term will be elected.
GOOD BALANCE FROM
RECENT SCHOOL CONCERT
The proceeds of the Public School
concert held in December amounted to
$140. This money will be spent on
the purchase of pictures for the class
rooms, and bookB for the teachers' and
children's libraries.
CLUB NOTES
The price of pool In the club billiard
room has been reduced from five cents
to two and a half cents per cue.
The gymnasium department of the
club Is going to make an earnest endeavor to start classes of physical
training Immediately. All that Is
needed to make it a success is enough
men and boys.
It Is the desire to have a number
sufficient to hold three classes three
times a week until such time as the
attendance grows to such an extent
as to require more class periods.
The classes will be arranged so that
both the day and afternoon shifts will
be accommodated at convenient hours.
Tho shipment of gymnasium apparatus is expected to arrive any day, and
the Installation of it will take place
at once.
All members who desire to take up
this work are requested to hand In
their names to the secretary at once
so that the classes can be arranged
for, and to make proper preparations
before the apparatus arrives.
DONATIONS TO HOSPITAL
Miss M. Browne, matron of the General Hospital, thanks the following
for gifts for use in the hospital over
the Christmas holidays: Mumford &
Walton, turkey; Burns & Brown, turkey; Campbell Bros., turkey; Mr. C. J.
Parnham, turkey; W. Gordon, fruit
and sweets; Mrs. Shepperton and Mr.
R. E. Frost, reading matter; Mr. Thos.
Pearse, bag of grain; Dr. G. K. MacNaughton, smokes.
BIG 12-REEL SHOW
AT ILO-ILO THEATRE
Showing Special Feature, "Jim
the Penman," and Extra
Comedies—2 Vi Hours
A special show of twelve reels Is
being screened at the llo-Ilo Theatre
Friday and Saturday of this week.
The special feature is Lionel Barry-
more In "Jim the Penman." This Is
probably the strongest crook play ever
produced. As a stage play It had a
long and successful run, and as a
motion picture It has been drawing
erowded houses all over the country.
In addition to this feature the following comedy reels will be screened:
"Made in the Kitchen," a two-reel
Sennet; also a two-reel Fox Sunshine
and "Mutt and Jeff."
This programme takes nearly two
and a half hours to screen.
On Monday only, Pauline Frederick
is presented in her latest feature play
"The Sting of the Lash." BuBter
Keaton appears on the same bill In
"Neighbors."
Tuesday and Wednesday Elsie Ferguson is presented in her first super-
special, "Footlights," a seven-part
drama. There will also be shown on
these nights, Clyde Cooke In "All
Wrong."
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
The Ladles' Aid of Grace Methodist
Church will hold a "Hard Times"
social on Wednesday next, January 18,
commencing at 7.30 p.m. Admission
25 cents.
Prof.Schofieldto
Lecture Saturday
"The Origin of Mountains" Will
Be First of Series Given By
University Professors
The Board of Management of the
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association has been successful In
their negotiations with the University
of B. C. Extension Course Committee
for a series of lectures to be delivered
in the club's lecture hall this winter
by various professors of the faculty.
The first of this series will be given
on Saturday, when Dr. S. J. Scholteld.
Ph. D., will deliver his Illustrated lecture on "The Origin of Mountains."
This lecture should appeal to most
of the members as it has a direct bearing on geology and all formations,
which is of vast interest to all miners.
The members of the club, and others
interested, should avail themselves ot
these lectures, as they are highly educational as well as very Interesting.
Professor Schofleld, It will be remembered, made a very favorable impression at the smoker recently given
to members of the University faculty
and others on their visit to Cumber-
laud, and there should be a crowded
hall Saturday night.
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
The Women's Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Church Intend to hold a Bazaar
in the Parish Hall on Wednesday,
April 26.
The annual meeting of the W. A. will
be held on February 6, at 3.30 In the
Parish Hall.
The annual meeting of the parishioners of Holy Trinity Church was
adjourned on account of a municipal
election meeting, to Tuesday next, 17th
Inst., at 8 p.m., In the Parish Hall. All
members of the congregation are
asked to be present.
The first practice of thOBe taking
part in the production of Stainer's
Crucifixion" will be held in Holy
Trinity Church on Sunday evening at
8.30 p.m. All interested singers are
asked to he present. There are a
number of copies of the words and
music on hand for Bale to those requiring Bame.
SPLENDID RESPONSE
FOR BENEFIT SHOWER
The promoters of the benefit shower
in aid of Mrs. Allara, are very pleased
with the results attending their efforts.
A large number attended at the Church
Hall on Wednesday afternoon and a
great quantity of articles of a miscellaneous character were donated. In
addition afternoon tea was Berved, and
this, together with donations, realized
$50 for the same cause.
The ladles responsible for the
shower were Mrs. T. Rickson, Mrs. E.
D. Gordon and Mrs. J. Fraser, and
they wish to heartily thank all who
contributed so generously. Thanks are
also extended to the church authorities
for the use of the hall, and to Mr. E.
W. Bickle for printing and advertising.
REV. WILLEMAR CELEBRATED 80TH BIRTHDAY
Rev. J. X. Wlllemar celebrated his
80th birthday anniversary on Tuesday
last by a social gathering at IiIb home
at Sandwick. The reverend gentleman,
who has been in the Comox district
over half a century, Is in good health
and spirits, considering his advanced
age and the hardships he underwent
as a pioneer missionary ot the West.
Mrs. E. D. Thwaites, daughter of
Rev. and Mrs. Willemar, came up from
Parkesvllle to attend the gathering,
accompanied by her children. Unfortunately, on I lie journey one ot her
little girls, Parmella, was taken 111 on
the train and had to be conveyed to
St. Joseph's Hospital, where she was
operated on for appendicitis. The
child is making splendid progress towards recovery.
Mrs. J.-W. Cooke ot Cumberland Is
also a daughter of Rev. and Mrs.
Wlllemar.
BOXING BOUTS ON
SATURDAY NEXT
Johnny Morgan of Ladysmith to
Fight Tommy Tapella for
Welterweight Title
An important boxing match will
take place In the Union Hall, Cumberland, on Saturday, January 21, when
Johnny Morgan, of Ladysmlth, welterweight champion of Vancouver, will
meet Tommy Tapella ot Cumberland,
who Is challenging Morgan for the
title. Four amateur contests between
well known local boys will occupy the
HrBt part of the programme.
It is the Intention of the promoters
to stage amateur contests at least once
a month. These will be conducted by
Tommy Tapella.
"Mushrooms always grow In damp
places,   don't   they   father?"   asked
Madge.
"Yes," Bald father.
"Is  that why  they look  like um
jbrellas, father?" asked Madge.
Benefit Dance
Tuesday Night
Proceeds in Aid of the Allara
Family, Victims of the
Recent Fire.
On Tuesday night next a benefit
dance will be given in tiie Ilo-llo
Dance Hall, under auspices of the
Lit'eat War Veterans' Association and
tho Women's Auxiliary. The proceeds
EVlll be devoted to the Allara family,
vho suffered such a heavy loss in the
recent Hre.
Good music will be provided and an
enjoyable time Is assured lo all attending. There will undobutedly be a big
attendance on this occasion.
Mr. Jas. Haworth, manager of the
lio-llo, has given the use of the hall
free for the occasion.
Admission will be one dollar tor
gents and 25 cents for ladles. Dancing
will be from 10 to 2.
THEM' K0A1) SEWINI) (LIB
On Friday the Girls' Club of Trent
Road met at the home of Mrs. Hannah,
and on Weduesday at the home of
Airs. S. Jones, for sewing and social
evenings. Goods have been donated to
the club by Mrs. Saunders, Mrs. Ec-
cleston and Mrs. Jones.
HIGH SCHOOL CLUB
The High School Club Iiob got off to
a good start for the new term by reorganizing In the form of a parliament.
The Government Is in charge of Cyril
Michel!, who ban selected a cabinet of
capable assistants to manage departmental affairs. The Opposition Is
assuming an aggressive attitude under the leadership of Montgomery
Hood. The president of the club, Jack
Fouracre, acts as Speaker during the
sessions.
At Friday night's meeting the Speech
from the Throne was read and a lively
debate ensued. The Government has
promised a lot of Important legislation
for the coming meetings, which will
be closely contested by the Opposition.
Everyone Interested In the doing of
the club is Invited to attend any of
the Friday night meetings, which
commence at seven o'clock, and an
Interesting time Is assured. On account ot the basketball game there
will be no meeting this week.
BUILDING NEW STORE
FOR MEAT MARKET
Operations are well under way for
the erection of premises for the Campbell Meat Market, on the corner of
Dunsmuir Avenue and Third Street.
The building which has occupied the
corner for many years has been moved
to the rear, aud the work of construction of the new premises will be rushed
to completion. It will have a frontage
of 30 feet on Dunsmuir Avenue and 60
on Third Street. Mr. Campbell hopes
to have it ready for occupation in a
month's time.
In the meantime the Meat Market is
located in the basement of Campbell
Bros.' Store.
TOMMY NAKANISHI
IN TEMPORARY STORE
Another of the victims of the recent
fire has secured temporary premises
In which to carry on business. Tommy
Nakanlshl is now located in a store on
Third Street, opposite W. Willard's.
where the stock saved from the fire
has been placed. Tommy is now open
for business and intends to put on a
sale as soon as he gets straightened
out.
$200 FINE FOR HAVING
OPIUM IN POSSESSION
On Monday tile adjourned cases of
charges ot Infractions o[ the Drug Act
was heard before Mr. T. E. Bale and
Mr. Frank Partridge, JusticeB of the
Peace, owing lo Mr. John Balrd being
Indisposed.
Two Chinamen who were charged
with being Inmates of an opium den
were found not guilty. Another pleaded guilty to having opium In posses-
Jon and was lined $2110 and $6.50 costs.
The charges were laid by the It. C.
M. P., and Mr. P. P. Harrison appeared
for tiie accused.
COUNTY COURT
On Wednesday His Honor Judge
Barker held a silting of the County
Court In Cumberland.
H. W. Hammond claimed $135 from
Charlie Sing Chong on a log-hauling
contract. Defendant was unable to
bring proper proof of amount of logs
hauled, the logs having been taken
possession of by the Robert Dollar Co.,
which resulted in judgment belnr:
givcu fur the plaintiff, with some small
reduction. Mr. Thced Pearse of Cour-
tenap appeared for plaintiff and Mr. P.
P. Harrison for the defence.
liiirnMit'i' Application.
Booth vs. Mitchell Bros.. Courtenay.
M. and   M.   Lumber   Co.   garnishees.
Ordor made lor payment out of monies
attached.
Keen Fight for Mayoralty
Seat; MacDonald Elected
Splendid Work of City Council During Past Year Endorsed By
Electors—Four Out of Five of 1921 Aldermen Returned—
Alex. Maxwell Heads Poll and William Beveridge Also Elected
—Thos. E. Bate Gave Mayor Very Close Run.
By the very close vote of 134 to 123, Mayor D. R. MacDonald
has been returned for the fourth successive time as chief magistrate of tho city of Cumberland. Mr. Thos. E. Bate, an old-timer
of the town, was his opponent, and put up a strong fight for the
honor, but Mayor MacDonald's popularity, coupled with the splendid work accomplished by him and the aldermen during his term
of office, won the day.
More interest was taken in the municipal election this year than
in any contest for years past, though it is true that this did not
develop until a few days before polling.
Four of the retiring aldermen were returned, Aid. Brown coming seventh on the list and retires to private life. Mr. Alex. Maxwell headed the list for aldermen, and Mr. Win. Beveridge was
also elected.
FOR MAYOR
D. R. MacDonald  134
Thos. E. Bate  123
FOR ALDERMEN
A. Maxwell  211
F. D. Pickard  174
C. J. Parnham  173
Duncan Thomson   156
T. Bannerman   140
Wm. Beveridge   136
J. C, Brown  118
John Thomson  114
John Miller  112
George Shearer    94
Monday was nomination day, when,
besides the two candidates for the
mayoralty, ten candidates were nominated for the six seats as aldermen.
These were: Thomas Bannerman,
William Beveridge, John C. Brown,
Alex. Maxwell, John Miller, C. J.
Parnham, F. D. Pickard, Geo. Shearer.
Duncan Thomson and John Thomson.
School Trustees and Police Commissioners Elected by Acclamation.
The personnel of Hie School Board
remains the same as last year. MrB.
T. E. Banks and Mr. N. McFadyen, the
retiring members, were the only ones
nominated, and were declared elected
Mrs. Bunks had intended retiring from
the work, but on the request of many
friends she allowed her name to be
put in again.
Mr. F. D. Pickard was the only one
nominated for the position of Police
Commissioner, and was declared duty
elected. Mr. C. J. Parnham Is the
other member of the board. The
Mayor is also a member ex officio.
Meeting on Tuesday.
On Tuesday evening Mr. T. E. Bate
held a meeting in the Ilo-llo Theatre,
which was largely attended. Mr. John
Thomson, Mr. A. Maxwell and Mr. J.
Miller, aldermanlc candidates, as well
W. A. WHIST DRIVE AND
DANCE VERY ENJOYABLE
The whist drive and dance given by
the Women's Auxiliary of the G. W.
V. A. on Friday last was largely attended, the hall being crowded, and a
moat enjoyable time spoilt by those
present. The prize winners were:
Miss H. Harrison, first lady; Mrs.
Slaughter, consolation; Mr. Water-
field, first gent; Mr. Jas. McWhlrter
and Mr. F. Fielding tied tor the gent's
I consolation, Mr. Fielding winning the
coveted (?) prize on a cut of the cards.
speakers were well received.   Mr. Geo.
Apps was chairman.
Ito-iills of Hie Voting.
Very keen interest was taken in the
election on Thursday, and a large vote
was recorded, 239 votes being cast
for the mayoralty. The Interest was
sustained until Mr. T. Mordy, returning officer, made the official announcement of .Mayor MacDonald's re-election. Immediately the crowd waiting
fir the result gave three rousing cheers
for the popular Mayor.
The result of the voting for Mayor
was known shortly after 7 o'clock, the
closing hour, but the results for the
aldermen, owing to the large number
of candidates, was uot known until
nearly nine o'clock.
Later In the night the City Band
turned out and serenaded His Worship
mid other successful candidates.
Several ballots were marked for only
one candidate in the aldermanlc contest, but the man selected tor this
doubtful favor is among those who
"also ran."
Mr. .1. Walton and Mr. A. C
were polling clerks.
BASKETBALL
The Brownies and tho High School
basketball teams left today (Friday)
for Denman Island, going by launch
from Royston. They will play as follows: The Brownies will play the
Deninan seniors, and the High School
team will engage the Deninan Island
intermediates.
On Saturday night the Five T's will
meet the Keystones In the local hall,
and the Riff Raffs will play the Owls.
To welcome back Miss Gallium, who
has just returned to her posl at Royston School after a six mouths' holiday In the East, and to say farewell
to Mr. Wildlg, who Is leaving the district, Mrs. Job. Miens entertained
about 36 friends at her homo on Wednesday night. Whist came first, Miss
Dougan winning first prize for ladles
d Miss Hildebrand securing the
consolation; Mr. Rankin of Courtenay
won the first prize for gentlemen and
the consolation was awarded to Mr.
Lyinu IM. A. McDowell. Afterwards a very
enjoyable time was spent in music.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF AT UNION BAY
Week Ending January 18.
Charmer, coastwise; Spray and
COW, Victoria! Oregon and scows,
Seattle; Chieftain, coastwise; Hoysa
Main, Japan; Quallcum, Vancouver;
Mckiuopc, Vancouver; Mutoru Muni,
Japan; Storm King. Vancouver; Faultless, coastwise; Active, coastwise;
Dauntless, coastwise; Cheerful, coastwise.
FIREMEN'S  FUND
Additional subscriptions tn the Firemen's Fund Ibis week were; Mr. W.
P. Syninns, $15; Mrs. W. Harrison. $10.
This brings the total up to nearly
$600, and Is being divided among the
men to compensate Ibein for the
damage to their clothes, etc., when
fighting the big lire of last week.
WOMEN'S Al MUAIIY OF THE
(i.W.Y.A.  MEETS  THIIIMIAY
A meeting ot the Women's Auxiliary
oi the G, W. V. A. will be held in the
Memorial Hall on Thursday, January
ill, n( 7.3<1. A full attendance ot members is desired ns the election of olll-
s for the coming year will lake
place.
TWO SOCIALS TONIGHT
There will be two whist drives and
dances tonight (Friday), one taking
placo In the O. W. V. A. hull under
auspices of the Lady Foresters Lodge,
and the other hold In the Anglican
Church Hall, under auspices of the
Men's Club.
GEORGE HARWOOD MET
WITH PAINFUL ACCIDENT
Mr. George Harwood, who Is employed at Fraser & Home's Store,
Union Bay, met with a painful accident on Monday when three of his
lingers on the left hand were caught
in the gears of a sausage machine
unit severed to tiie second joint. Nor
was this the end of Mr. Harwood's
misadventures. The ear In which Mr.
Harwood was being rushed to the Co-
mox Hospital broko down opposite the
Royston School, two of the spokes or
the wheel and the rim coming com-
plelely nfT. Mr. Edwards came to the
rescue at once, but he broke down
opposite the Happy Valley turn, and
another cur coining along took the
injured man to Hie hospital.
REORGANIZATION OF
GRACE METHODIST CHOIR
The reorganization of Grace Methodist Church choir took place on
Thursday evening, with a membership
ot 37. During the business portion of
the gathering the following were elected olllcers for the ensuing year:
Edward W. Bickle. President.
Alex. Henderson, Sec.-Treas.
W. C. Edwards, Organist.
t'hnrles O'Brien, Choirmaster.
The lad Charlie Macdonald, who met
.villi Internal injuries while slelgh-rirt-
ing two Weeks ago, is making satisfactory progress, but it will be some
lime before lie will be quite well Hgain.
Mr, George Tarbell was able lo
leave the hospital and return home
early this week, aller his Illness, Two
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January 14, 1922.
Mlliiiiilllilillillllllllllii
lllllllllllllliiiilllllllllllllllll
llll!!1
9
BEAR THIS
IN MIND
No rough work on our installations.
Fire Underwriters' specifications are followed to
the letter.
Materials exactly as called for.
Results all that are expected.
Our installations take just long enough to do a
GOOD JOB—no longer—no shorter.
W> invite expert criticism and minute examination of any installation we make.
On a recent tour of inspection in this city, the
Provincial Inspector of Electrical Energy pronounced our work Al.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of tho mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to WBte, we therefore
wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tamper with Buch
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to tho very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAIL WAV STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland. B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERR] FIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. C
KEEP TO THE RIGHT
Now the New Year is begun, "Keep to the Right"
is a very good motto. Follow it to avoid all
accidents.
Keep to the right, too, when you telephone. That
is, be right in the way you telephone, be right in courtesy, in short, be right in all those practices which
make for good telephoning. Keeping to the right
means good service.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Literary and Athletic Assn.
Concludes Successful Year
The annual report and statement of receipts and expenditures
for the first year's operations of the Cumberland Literary and
Athletic Association, composed of employees of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, shows it to have had a very successful run, with a bright outlook for the future. The total
amount of revenue received from all sources amounted to $8428.43,
and the expenditures $7036.70, leaving a balance of $791.73. A
detailed financial statement is now being distributed to the members of the club.
The report of the President, Mr. Chas. O'Brien, is as follows:
To the Officers and Members of the Cumberland Literary and
Athletic Association.
Gentlemen:
I have the honor to submit the following report on the operations of the Association from the time of its inception until
December 31st, 1921. As you are aware the Association building
was opened on January 20, 1921. and formally turned over to the
white employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited
Cumberland, B. C. The building was handsomely furnished by the
management of the Coal Company, and partially equipped. It
was then up to the members, through the Board of Management,
to equip the rooms. Writing materials were to be furnished for
the Reading Room, equipment for the Gymnasium and the Library.
It has been no easy matter to do till these things. The Library, in
particular, was, and is, the cause of much thought. The Board of
Management has done, and is doing, all in its power to cater to
the literary tastes of the members. That in itself is a great undertaking. The following figures will show to what extent the efforts
of the Board and its Literary Committee are appreciated
There are 300 members of the Club who are taking oul books,
and 21 public members. Number of books consigned from Victoria
since April last, 1168. Number of books circulated since April,
4705. Of this number, about 13 per cent, are scientific works, the
other 87 per cent, being works of fiction. At the time of writing
there are about 250 books in circulation. Several members have
pre»ented the Library with books to the number of 54.
The Board has purchased an almost complete Library of
Technology, also a complete International Encyclopedia. The information which may be obtained from these two works alone is
of vast importance. The mining student has at his command all
he requires. In fact, all branches of Engineering are fully treated
in these works.
In the Reading Room there are 23 monthly magazines, 11 weekly
magazines, 5 weekly newspapers, 8 daily newspapers and 10
technical magazines. Up to the lime of writing this report, there
is m the Heading Room every newspaper and magazine that we
have been requested to have there, whether oy a number ot members or by an individual member.
in the Lecture Hall there are facilities for playing all table
games legally permitted.   The only thing lacking in that room is
a pianoforte, and perhaps a little more room.   The matter of
enlarging the Lecture Hall and Gymnasium was recommended at
the Annual Meeting, and will be taken up with Mr. Thomas
Graham at an early date.   In the Billiard Room we have two of
the finest billiard tables in the Pro\ inee, ami a pool table.   The
revenue derived from this room travels but a little way in main-
taming its upkeep. The receipts ior the year just ended are about
ipliUU, which is just $300-short of paying the marker's salary,
while the matter of supplies an , equipment has to be taken care
of from the general fund,   in the early part of the winter the
Board of Management reduced the Joes for billiards to 10 cents
per half hour.   Phis was done with a view to keeping our younger
[members under the influence ol tiie Association, and not having
I them expo, ed to the evils and te nptations ol some of the gambl-
1 ing dens.   The Board reserves tu itself the right of raising the
! price ol billiards to its old level when circumstances permit.
In the Gymnasium, which is only partially equipped, are
facilities for developing the physical bodies ol the members who
desire lo lake up this line of work, ,'llie Board of Management
'feels very keenly the disappointment received by the failure of a
|certain firm 10 supply the , - I equipment. The order for
equipment amounting b oul 1700 was placed last August.
Several letters were sent to th rm enquiring the cause of delay
inshipment. I regret to saj .... this particular firm did not have
the decency to acknowledge the receipt of'said letters, let alone
Why Pharmacists
Go to College
Pharmacists are legally entrusted
with the buying, preparing, keeping
an dcompounding of medicines; upon
these you and your physician depend
in preserving and restoring health.
Next to the skill of the physician
nothing is more important than the
quality of the medicine used in dispensing his prescription.
In order that the Pharmacist may
buy right, judge quality, keep drugs
under proper conditions,- and rightly
compound medicines, it is necessary
that he possess a technical knowledge
of their chemical and physical properties and the action and doses of
drugs.
This requires special and thorough
training in colleges.
R. E. Frost
Graduate in Pharmacy
Thomas Graham has furnished us with heat, light and water, as
well as. janitor service, absolutely free of charge. Could you have
a better sample of co-operation?
At the Annual Meeting a request was made for an itemized
account of our receipts and expenditure. Attached to this report
you will find this statement, which to the best of my knowledge
is correct. Mr. Tremlelt, your Secretary, who is a very efficient
servant, has assisted me very much in drawing up this statement,
and I take this opportunity to thank him for his valuable service.
I have the honor to -be, gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
CHAS. O'BRIEN,
President.
Cumberland, B. C, January 3rd. 1922.
any explanation. 1 instructed
but courteous letter, demanding
time cancelling the order. I w
for the full amount was in ii,.
cheque had been cashed by it, i
Secretary to write a final firm
an explanation, and at the same
ild remind you that our cheque
I .m's possession,   in fact, the'
d the cheque returned here by
the bank.   In the early part i irrber last we received a cheque
from the firm un: .?.i>: i and : ■... n the amount of the difference.
The order has since been plai 1 by telegraph with a firm in
Toronto, which has advised us that within two weeks from receipt
of order they would make shipi i nt. That m ians the equipment
is new on the way, and we hop o have it all installed before ilie
end of the month.
In connection with th i G; i a ium is a Bath Room equipped
with shower baths ai d thi nei ary wash basins and toilets. A
new addition to tht buildin; hi been made, in the form of a
Dressing Room. This room is equipped with lockers, etc. A
deposit of 25 ci nts to covi r th . . oi Key is required from each
member using lock rs. Phis i isit is, of coi rse, r turned when
the member ceases to use. the Ii  kit.
In respect to th social aim ol the Association, the Board of
Management, after consultation . ith Mr. Thomas Graham and Mr.
Charles Graham, decided to hold a smoking concert, This was
dune, arid the result was, to a i tain extent, satii factory, Later
on a second "smoker" wa heh u i owing to a better system of
distribution of the refreshmen and smokes, this concert was a
bigger succei s. The question of a continuance of these "smokers"
will be discussed by your new I oard of Management,
In connection with the la ■ part of our name, i.e., Athletic
Association, it is the desire o some of the members that all
athletic sports should be run ler-fehe auspices of the Association. The participants in all a I letic locally, without exception,
are members of the Associatio] . and there is no earthly reason
why they should not run under our colors, and make the Association's building their headquart rs.
Arrangements are being m cle for the visit of Dr. Schofield,
of the University ol Briti h I ilumbia, who will lecture on the
"Oiigin of Mountains."   Everj  member who can make it con
venient should hi ar Profei soi
and at an early date.
In closing this report, 1 Wi
n making this institution the i
naj not be able to see eye to i
taken and the same considi re
i ajority of the mi mbers, let  . :
long.   If any m ruber lias any co
o i..,i r  please trot them out   ,.
j,,e vou may make, it will receiv
hoiield.   He will lie in Cumber
Id ask the members' co-operation
st known in the country. We
:ii all tunes, but if any action is
to be to the interests of the
buckle to and help ihe thing
lplaintsito make,, or suggestions
d rest assured that whichever
! every consideration.
A few words more and I am done. Through the kindness of
the management of the Canadian Collieries, the Association is
saved the expenditure of several hundred dollars yearly.   Mr.
For Boots and
Shoes of Quality
Cavin's ShoeStore
Agent for Slater's "Strider," The Best Good Shoe for
Men and Women
MIT VMlF.lt PROTEST
Wllie: "And knowing my sentiment
on the subject, (llil that odious Mr.
BlnltB Insult you by offering you a
drink?"
Hubby: "That's what he did."
"And l'.6w did you resent it?"
"1 swallowed the insult."
Professional Candor.
"Hake friends with the doctors, and
work with them; they have got kind
hearts beating beneath shabby faces."
— Scotch paper.
HEREDITY AGAIN
"Late for reveille again. I see,
O'Malley," shouted the irate captain.
"How do you account for this persistent tardiness?"
" 'Tis inherited, sir," answered Pte.
O'Malley. "Me father was the late
Michael O'Malley."—American Legion
Weekly.
"With View to Matrimony?"—
Would like party to linancc young
woman in new venture; every man a
prospect; glad to talk to you about It.
—Advt. in Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 14, 1922.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Tnrea
TO   ENSURE   A
Happy New Yer
Old Drury Tea
75c. per pound
• „	
OBTAINABLE ONLY AT
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
3E=
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
THE EDUCATION OF YOUR CHILDREN
Have you the money with which to do it ?
Start to save while they are young—let them
commence life knowing you are at the back
of them.
Savings Accounts are a specialty with
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
Hardware
Tinsmithing and
Plumbing
Auto Radiator and Fender
Repairs
WE ALSO STOCK
Furniture, Linoleum, Carpets
Wallpaper, Beaver Board and
Strips, Sash and Doors and
Window Glass, Paints
and Varnishes
Come in and see our Cash
Bargain Counter
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. Bate Hardware Co.
PHONE 31
CUMBERLAND
SOCIAL AMBITION
CAUSES  DOWNFALL
Dollar Watch Attempts Finan
cial Flight and Comes to Grief
—Once Cost 28 Cents
NEW YORK—It was once said that
the dollar owed its fame to the' fact
that an entire watch could be bought
with it. Another jokesniith said the
dollar was invented for the purpose of
buying the lugersoll watch.
Now the dollar us a token has fallen
from its pedestal, lor the lugersoll
Watch Company has gone into the
hands of a receiver. Edward H.
Childs, of New York, has been appointed receiver for Robert II. lugersoll & Brother and an effort will be
made to put the company on Its feet.
Pessimists predict the day of the dlo-
lar is done and that even if the lugersoll watch does come back, never
more will it be sold for a dollar.
Harry Zalltln, attorney for the creditors, Informed the public in a brief
statement that a committee of creditors has been lukeriug will the machinery since last May. But still they
though It best to ask for a receiver.
Although financiers were awuie for
Bouie time Hint the lugersoll Arm was
having difficulties, few -disinterested
persons knew about the appointment
o£   creditors' committee.
The $2,000,000 of assets include cash,
accounts receivable, notes, merchandise and raw material, real estate anil
interest In the stock of other companies.
Vaulting Ambition Blamed.
Vaulting ambition is blamed in part
for the troubles of the dollar watch.
It began as hardware. Comparatively
few jewelers would keep the dollar
watch In stock because It crimped the
sales of various other brands of cheap
watches, which were not, however, as
cheap as a dollar. Therefore display
cards and small glass cases of dollar
watches began to take place with tack
hammers and trowels and ten-penny
nails on the counters of hardware
stores throughout America and Canada. There was a time, it is said,
when the dollar watch cost just
twenty-eight cents to manufacture, and
the dealer was allowed a roomy margin of profit for keeping the flivver's
father in stock.
The war forced the Ingersolls to Increase the price, however, and the
dollar watch, at $2.50, tried to renounce Its Ironmongery associations;
tried to be jewellery. The public had
been taught to think ot the Ingersoll
and the dollar as almost synonymous.
An lugersoll was a dollar; a dollar
bought an Ingersoll. The Ingersoll
was the dollar watch. Therefore sales
fell off.
The Ingersolls originated real quan
tity production. They originated "ser
vice" by repairing free any Yankee
dollar watch that didn't keep good time.
They even renewed your watch for
twenty-five cents, sending you a new
one for that price when you sent back
Ihe old one. Thus the upkeep was in
proportion to the purchase price and
the whole Investment so small that the
sprouting mechanical genius of a nation could afford to use the Ingersoll
for experiments in primary problems
of engineering.
WHEN I WAS A BOY
The following Is the prize jingle in
a competition conducted by "The
Packer":
When I was young and full of pep
My old employer always kept
A bucket sitting by his side,
And every now and then he cried,
"My son, begone," and off I ran
For 15 cents' worth In the can.
But now the poor old dented pall
Hangs rusting on a rusty nail.
No more I'll fill it full of joy.
'Twas different when I was a boy.
When I was young and full of hope
.My grandma made our laundry soap;
She knew just how to knit and darn
And make our socks from home-spun
yarn.
But now what notlonB Grandma has.
She bobbed her hair and whittles jazz,
She talks of feling hale and hearty
And "going out upon a party' '
With Bill and Tom and Ed and Roy—
'Twas different when I was a boy.
When I was young down on the farm
They didn't think it any harm
To drink hard cider from a cup
And then go shoot the village up;
But now the home-brew we must keep
In caves and mines and dungeons deep.
When thirsty to these holes we crawl
For fear the cops will make a haul;
No neighbors do we now annoy—
'Twas different when I was a boy.
Now that I'm old and growing fat
I wonder where that dealer's at
Who'd pay the draft then wire and say
"This car is fine that came today."
But now 1 get a wire which reads
"Your fruit is punk and has no seeds,
The pack Is wrong, so is the grade,
And all the fancies are decayed—
Take off four bits!"   I'm getting mad.
'Twas different when I was a lad.
JAPANESE BUSY WITH BEES
NEW WESTMINSTER—The latest
industry Invaded by the guileless
Japanese is the bec-hlve of British
Columbia. Reports suy Nipponese are
now engaging, extensively, In the bee-
raising business in the FraBer Valloy
and other points where their colonies
are thickest. Hundreds of new, homemade hives are springing up on Japanese farms. Orders for honey aro being placed with Japanese produce men
In the cities.
The Railways of Canada Draw to Your Attention the
NEW RAILWAY RATES!
FOR  PASSENGERS
The odvance on sleeping and parlor car tickets authorized in
1920 has been cut in half—the advance made on ordinary fares at
that time having been completely taken off many months ago.
FOR  SHIPPERS
The percentage of advance granted to the Railways in 1920 has
beep reduced ten points. In addition to a five point drop at the
first of the year.
These changes became effective December 1st.
Your cost of Living
VTOUR cost of living should be directly affected. If it is not it Is
' because (1) as the railways have pointed out before, the
actual money paid for rheir services is an almost negligible factor
In making prices, and because (2) even the huge sum now cut out
of the railways' revenues and amounting to approximately—
$25,000,000.00 *
annually—becomes a very small fraction of a cent when split up
among the billions upon billions of small and large articles which
constitute the freight traffic of Canada during a year.  And because
'(3) the Court which has the power to control railway rates is not
able to direct who is or Is not to get the benefit of reductions. In
other words, whether these savings in railway charges are passed
on to you—or whether they are absorbed in marketing, cannot be
controlled either by the railways or the public.
BUT this fact remains: a very great sum of money-
enough to build every year a small city, or a Quebec Bridge, or four hundred and fifty of the newest and
most powerful locomotives—is now removed from the
revenues of the Canadian Railways and should be
reflected, at least to some extent, in the family budgets
of all Canadians 1
VJJ7 HETHER your railways can continue to function without the)
" revenue thus lost to them, is an experimental problem facing
the various managements. It depends largely on whether traffic
keeps up or falls off—and whether costs rise or decline. ' But the
managements are attempting the problem cheerfully and with
determination to keep Canada's railway service the cheapest, mile
for mile, and among the most efficient in the world!
The RAILWAY ASSOCIATION of Canada
*
f
263 St. James Street,
Montreal, P.Q.
306 Union Station,
Winnipeg, Man.
LONDON
ESCAPES
GREAT TRAGEDY
Caving in of Oxford Circus, in
Shopping Centre, Narrowly
Averted.
LONDON.—This city has just narrowly escaped a great peril, the possible caving In of Oxford Circus, the
shopping centre of the West End, says
a story circulated by a news agency.
The danger of the disaster was known
only to contractors and workers underground. They were altering an exit from the Oxford Circus tube station
so as to make an entrance Into a business building when the contractors
discovered a bed of a little unknown
tributary of the Thames River which
waB covered over when Regent Street
was made.
riiey also found, lo ihelr amazement
and consternation, that they were
meeting the direct "lines of vibration"
of tho two underground lubes, the
Central London and the Bakerloo.
The news agency says that they
realized that If the excavations continued the whole of Oxford Circus
might be literally precipitated underground. There were perilous days
and laborious nights ocuplcd In underpinning the buildings above ground
and   overcoming   the   side   pressure
which was being felt.
In place of the shining sands of the
old river lied there was constructed a
retaining wall of cement which, it is
declared, has made the great shopping centre more secure than at any
lime since the river flowed down the
slopes of the present Regent Slrel.
"TEENS LESS TWENTY"
HARDING HEARS ABOUT
LIQUOR PROBLEM BE-
IN SOLVED IN B. C.
Lovers of the out-door life will welcome the January edition ol Rod and
(Inn In Canada, which contains many
Interesting and Instructive articles
and stories dealing with Nature and
her children. In the winter. "Teens
Less Twenty." Ir. Ihe title of a rnman-
llc story by Charles Dorian, the well
known short slory writer, which appears in this issue along with several
other stories by such well known
writers us F. V. Williams, Harry M.
Moore, E. T. Martin and others equally
famous.
For the firearms crank there Is the
UBual valuable tiuns and Ammunition
department and special articles on
ride and revolvef shooting. The fisherman takes a trip along a Nova
Scotlan trout stream, by Ronnycaslle
Dale, while Robert Page Lincoln's
articles open Ihe road to the thrills of
Ice fishing. The January Issue of the
national sportsman's magazine of
Canada Is published monthly by J. W.
Taylor, Ltd., Woodstock, Ont.
Petition  Asks for Government
Control in States Similar to
British Columbia's
From Washington comes Uie report that a petition lias reached President Harding, asking for his intervention in securing government control In the I'nlted States "like they
have it In British Columbia." The
President Is told that the plan works
"like magic" from Vancouver to the
Alaska border, and he Is urged to save
"America from further tyranny Imposed upon die many by a pestiferous
pack of Interfering husybodles who
cheated the majority out ol their
lights when good men were at war
lighting n national foe. while weaklings and cowards stayed behind to
steajvtbe liberties of a free people."
The petition comes from an organization called the "Freedom League or
America," and carries thousands of
rlgnalures from twenty-odd States.
NOTHING IX IT
Father: "What's this wild story I
hear about your bank account being
flat?
Son; "Tut, tut, dad, It's overdrawn." Four
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January i4, 1922.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN a GOWEN -. Editor.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1922.
THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS
The municipal elections are over, with results that must
be satisfactory to the big majority of the citizens. His
WTorshlp Mayor MacDonald and five of the "solid six" were
returned to office for 1922. This means an endorsation of
the Council's actions during the past year and the continuance of the good work accomplished by them.
When the voters first elected Mayor MacDonald to office
In 1919 the city treasury had a deficit of some $3000 by way
of unpaid cheques and unpaid accounts. The teachers of
the Cumberland Public School invariably were compelled
to wait two or three months for their salaries, which to say
the least was very disagreeable. By the wise and sane
administration of Mayor MacDonald and the Aldermen who
have been associated with hfru during the past three years,
this state of affairs hns been entirely eliminated, and the
school teachers receive their salaries when due. Today
through financial ability, energy and ambition for the
welfare of the city and those who reside within its limits,
the finances of Cumberland are In better condition than
they ever were. Cumberland occupies a financial position
to be envied by many cities on the Pacific Coast, taking in
to consideration the enormous amount of Improvements
completed during ihe past year.
Remembering this happy state of affairs it Is not to be
wondered at that the citizens saw the wisdom of return
ing Mayor MacDonald and four of the retiring Aldermen
to serve the city during 1922. Of course the opposing
forces who placed Mr. Thos. E. Bate In the field for the
office of Mayor feel disappointed. Mr. Bate himself felt
sure of election, hut as In days gone by some of his would
be friends must have decided to let him remain out of
office, thinking undobutedly that Mayor MacDonald Is the
right man in the right place, aud that a change when civic
affairs were highly satisfactory was absolutely unnecessary.
In the four Aldermen returned to office, Aldermen
Pickard, Parnham, Duncan Thomson and Bannerman, we
have seen the results of their work during the past year
and can expect even better results during 1922, Aldermen-
elect Maxwell and Beveridge have served on the Council
ou previous occasions, and have always given a good
account of their stewardship and studied the welfare and
Interests of the city as a whole.
With the Mayor and six Aldermen who were elected with
good majorities on Thursday, wc may expect Cumberland
to move forward during 1922.
With the money to be derived from the revenue tax,
auto licences, profits from liquor sales, and other sources,
we may expect a substantial reduction in taxation this
year and the city continue Its programme of Improvements.
"FIRST OFFENDERS"
Would gentle treatment by judges and magistrates save
men and women from becoming confirmed criminals? This
question was raised at Glamorgan assizes, when Inspector
Rees Davies stated that, in all his experience, he had not
known one first offender bound over at an assize court go
back to a life of crime. Mr. Justice McCardle stated that
he had come to the conclusion that in many cases the first
offender had been saved from a future criminal life by the
exercise of wide mercy on the part of the judge.
The opinion of probation officers In London coincides
with these views, and Cecil Leeson, secretary of the Howard
Association and formerly chief probationer officer for Birmingham, says that in his experience he had found that at
least 75 per cent, of the adults who were placed on probation were never charged again. In the case of children
the percentage was 94.
INCINERATOR NEEDED
In his report to the Board ot Health, Medical Health
Officer Dr. Hicks strongly recommended the establishment
oC a permanent city dumping ground and the installation
of an incinerator where the garbage of the city could be
destroyed. This refuse has been dumped on the outskirts
of the City Park since the old dump was closed. The
naming of the City Park as a dumping ground by the City
Fathers was a very short-sighted policy, and the practice
should be stopped at once. In spring, summer and fall.
thii ground Is used by many children and grown-ups for
games and athletics, and the presence of decaying vegetable
matter and other refuse in the locality should not be
tolf rated. During the warm weather the smell of the dump
w;.s very disagreeable to those living in the vicinity. With
the thousands ot acres of vacant land adjoining the city,
the establishment of a satisfactory dump should be no
difficult matter.
$Qm&QmMMQ&WWQG&&&QQ&9GQ&QGmG&&&&
NAVIES AND  POCKETBOOKS
Every man, woman and child in America lias about $25
invested In the United States navy. Each of them pays
around $3.50 a year for its maintenance. During tho government fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, the navy cost end
individual around $10, hut this was for a navy just recovering from a war and paying off its hills.
Operating costs alone of the battle fleet, were the 192
programme carried out, would exceed $100,000,000 a year,
with another $60,000,000 yearly for depreciation, interest on
investment, etc.—a low estimate. With this vast expense
afloat there would be the additional heavy charges of
keeping up essential navy bases to make tho fleet effective.
In 1920, with a far smaller fleet In commission than there
would be In 1925, that charge alone exceeded $170,000,000.
These figures show plainly what the world naval race
was leading us to, and even when the total Is divided among
100,000,000 people, the burden Is staggering to contemplate, for only a beginning was planned.
In 1925, had the naval building programme been carried
out, the navy would have cost each individual between $4.50
and $5. The curtailment programme now being worked out
between the nations of the world at the council table in
Washington means, therefore, a saving of between $1 and
$1.50 for everybody.—New York Herald.
DAD
He may wear a last year's straw hat, his finger nails
may need mnulcurlng; his vest may hang a little loose, and
his pants may bag at the knees; his face may show signs
of a second day's growth, and the tin dinner bucket he
carries may be full of dents and doughnuts; but don't you
call him "the old man."   He's your father.
For years and years he has been rustling around to get
things together. Never once has he failed to do the right
thing by you. He thinks you are the greatest boy on earth,
bar none, even though you plaster your hair back, wear
smart clothes, smoke cigarettes, and fail to bring home a
cent. He Is the man who won the love and life partnership of the greatest woman on earth, your mother.
He is "some" man, and not "the old man." If you win
as good a wife as he did, you will have to go some, boy.
—The Silent Partner.
A soft answer turneth away wrath, but the same cannot
be said about a soft drink.
KEEP THE MONEY AT HOME
The province is flooded with products that are made else-
where, mostly in the United States, and Santa Claus gladdened many kiddies with toys made in Germany, shipped
via the United States. Christmas cards from Winnipeg
were mailed by thousands in this province, while thousands
of Christmas cards made in B. C remain unsold. Thousands of dollars continues to leave this province for mall
order houses In Chicago, and mall order literature is being
sent all over the province. There is even an Increase of
mall order marriages, for matrimonial bureaus are working this province more than ever. These agencies are in
Eastern States and California.
This Is all wrong. Loyalty to the home town and the
home province demands trading at home. The "Made 111
B. C.55 campaign merits the strongest support. Secretary
McKelvIe has accomplished a great amount of good and
has been Instrumental lit keeping probably millions of
dollars from getting away, but there Is still too much
money going out of this province In payment of commodities thai may be obtained here. One mall order catalogue
on our desk has the effrontery to observe: "Buy from us;
we can give you better values than your own little town
merchant." This Is untrue. The average "little town
merchant" utters better value than any cheap-jack mall
order house can give. The home merchant Is your neigh
bor. If yon are not satisfied he will exchange the article,
or refund your money. You should Ignore nil luall order
blandishments mid buy nt homo.
Tho United Stntcs needs more citizens like Geo. Ellspcr
man, United States customs ofilccr at Blaine, Wash. He
Bays: "Let everybody work to get rid of this cursed ex
change. We .."ho live near the boundary care little for
this adverse exchange against Canada. I have lived on
the boundary for the past 2S years and never did believe
that the Canadian dollar was not wortli 100 cents. There
is I o reason why Canada, with all her natural resources,
should not have a dollar just ns valuable as that of the
American coin." He urged Canadians to build their own
factories, buy their own products, and tell the people of
the United Rtntes they would not trade with them so long
as the Canadian dollar is not taken at par.
Failing to catch any more suckers on the Mainland, the
Vancouver Magnetite Iron and Steel Company has shifted
the scene of its activities to Nanaimo, where it seeks the
financial support of the municipal authorities. We notice
the principal promoter now poses ns an authority on Iron
and steel, but we would suggest that the mayor and
aldermen of Nanaimo ascertain the basis for the claim.
The Information can be obtained from former directors of
ti.e Omlneca Gold Dredging Company; the Copper Queen
Mining Company, flic retired directors of the Vancouver
Magnetite Company and the late president, Dr. Hall, of
New Westminster. Nanaimo no doubt wants to get right
In any uulertaklng of the kind.—Mining and Engineering,
THE ONE WAY OF LOVE
By MARY AGNES GLIEM.
Over and over again throughout the ages we are given
the same message. Interpret it as we will, always, if wc
have the factulty of seeing in even a small measure, do we
find that the only way to reach happiness Is by the way of
the heart.
Love Is the only thing that abides. All other things of
this world change. Already In our day the horizon has
widened, science has opened new vlstns and leads the future
Into new paths. Former things are passing away. Like
an old cast-off garment seems the earthly tabernacle ol"
yesterday.   But love remains.   It is immortal.
Love Is light; hate is darkness. Love means sympathy,
harmony, fellowship. Hate means destruction. In our
time It has broken empires into pieces and scattered
peoples far and wide. Old systems built upon the toil of
generations are breaking into pieces, because they were
not founded upon that which abides. And the end is not
yet.
What is left that we can claim as our real inheritance
from the days of our forefathers? That only the way ol'
love leads to life. The new commandment that Christ
gave us, "That ye love one another," holds good yesterday,
today, tomorrow, forever. Happy Is he who has seen the
light and has turned his back upon the darkness, who has
found the one way and begun to walk In It.
How can we find this way in the maze of the practical
affairs of our dally life? We can dwell In thought upon
our duties and obligations, and forget our rights and
privileges. We can keep In mind that love, and sympathy.
and fellowship are closely akin. We can put ourselves into
the other's place and try and see his side when disputes
and differences arise. We can form the habit of saying
'we," not "1," In the family circle, among friends, in business, and social life. We can spend ourselves hi giving.
not In getting. Then experience will show us that the
one way of love Is the only way which leads to happiness.
And the end thereof Is peace.
SPECIAL CORSET
SALE
Odd Lines of C C a la Grace Corsets
In the newest prevailing models, in sizes 18 to 36.   These lines
all reduced to half the regular value.
STRIPED   TURKISH   TOWELS
Just received a large shipment of Striped Turkish Towels, ry C *
large size.   Special values in pre-war qualities, each  • **1»
763
SPECIAL VALUE IN CURTAIN MUSLINS
50c
HEMSTITCHED  MARQUISETTE  CURTAIN MUSLINS—In White, Ecru and
ivory.   Extra special values, per yard	
SPECIAL VALUE IN ROMAN STRIPED TAPESTRY CURTAINING—
54 inches wide.   Per yard 	
75c
MEN'S  DEPARTMENT
SPECIAL REDUCTION OF 20 PER CENT. ON MEN'S SUITS, OVERCOATS,
GABARDINE  TRENCH  COATS,  SWEATER COATS, AND BOYS' CLOTHING.
&99QG9&&99&SGGSGGGQ9GGl9SSe9&.
MEETING OF BOARD OF
POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Chief of Police Presented Detailed Report—Revision of
Bylaws Recommended
ONLY A NEWSPAPER GUY
I see a man strut through a jam in a hall,
Take a seat 'mid the speakers and chat with them all,
"Is thlB Murphy?" 1 ask. "that the crowd lie defies?"
"No," says some one, 'he's one of the newspaper guys."
I sec a man pushing his way through the lines
Of the cops where n lire brightly glitters and shines.
"Chief Parnham?" I ask, but a fireman replies,
"Oh, no, why, that's one of those newspaper guys."
I see a man start on the trail of a crook,
And he scorns all assistance, but brings him to book.
"Mr, Burns?" I enquire.   Some one scornfully cries—
"Burns? Naw. He's just one of them newspaper guys."
I see a man walk through the door of a show
Where great throngs are blocked by the sign S. R. O.
"Is this Goodwin himself that no ticket he buys?"
"Well, hardly.  He's one of those newspaper guys."
I see a man knock on a President's door
And the sign "No Admittance' 'completely Ignore.
"Is this Morgan thnt private's rights he denies?"
"Morgan? Shucks!   It's one of those newspaper guys."
And some day I'll walk by the great streets of gold,
And see a man enter unquestioned and bold,
"A Saint?" I'll enquire, and old Peter'll reply,
"Well, I should say not; he's a newspaper guy."
—New York Globe,
The final meeting of the 1921 Board
of Police Commissioners was held on
Thursday, when Mayor MacDonald
and Commissioners C. J. Parnham
and A. Maxwell were present.
Chief of Police Bunhury presented a
detailed report of the work of his department during the past year. The
report shows the conduct of the residents to have been very satisfactory.
The total fines collected amounted to
$1549, a big increase of the previous
year's total. This is accounted for
by the heavy fines provided for infractions of the Liquor Act.
The board passed a recommendation to the incoming council that a
revision of the Trades Licence Bylaw
:ind Traffic Bylaw be  undertaken.
The report of the chief of police is
as  follows;
To the Mayor aud Police Commissioners, Cumberland.
Gentlemen,—I have the honor to
herewith present my third annual
police report «fa>r the city of Cumberland for the year ending December 31,
1021.
During the past twelve months there
have been twenty-nine arrests made
and convictions sustained, classified
as follows:
Creating a disturbance  7
Liquor In possession  2
Drunk and disorderly  2
Keeping a gaming house  3
Frequenting a. Gaming House  2
' !onsumlng liquor in a public place 4
Prostitution 2
I'liel't of electricity  2
Falling to report an accident  1
.Speeding  1
indecent assault   1
Attempted  suicide    1
Theft    1
Total fines, exclusive of costs, $1549.
Collections-
Trades licences $1070.00
Dog tax      34.00
Weigh scales       2.00
Watchman's salary    720.00
The fines collected for the year 1921
xceed those of the previous year by
$654.
There is still some trouble In regards to the street lighting, due, I understand, to the fact that the present
system is carrying four amperes above
Hie peak switch load, with the result
that fuses are continually blowing
out.
There has been practically no serious crime during the past year, one
possible exception being the case of
breaking and entering, for which one
J. Short was arrested and sentenced.
The conduct of the town, on the
whole, has been very good, with very
lew street disturbances, the Christmas
season being especially marked by the
absence of any disorderly conduct.
As the probable result of arrests
made in the matter, recognized gambling games have apparently ceased,
though, as I pointed out to your honorable board in my previous report,
the game known as "poker" Is still
played to a great extent, and I am still
unaware of any means by which I
could obtain convictions.
The illegal sale of liquor under, In
my opinion, a beneficent but still imperfect act, to which amendments are
constantly being made, known as the
Government Liquor Act, 1921, has obtained to a considerable extent, but as
ihe act allows the consumption of
liquor in private dwellings and as
most of the places where Illegal Bales
are reputed to take place, come under
that heading, it is impossible to oh-
;ain convictions unless actual sales
can be proved, and this can not be
done without the use of "stool
pigeons." The government, with the
machinery of the law at their command, made but a doubtful success in
their efforts to obtain results in Cumberland. Liquor Is almost openly sold
In all the larger cities of the province,
und will continue to be until the
present net Is amended to make convictions more cosily obtainable. The
difficulties encountered by the police,
detectives and "stool pigeons" employed In larger cities are multiplied
considerably in the case of an officer
working alone and unassisted. I can
only point to the fact that the amount
of fines collected during the paBt year
will at least Bhow that I have made an
attempt to enforce law and order as
Ear ns It has been in my power.
It is customary in all cities for the
authorities to retain the services of a
qualified prosecutor, as owing to the
many technicalities of police court
law It Is difficult for nn officer, unassisted, to obtain conviction, more
especially when the defendant has
secured counsel. 1 would suggest that
this be done.
Our Traffic Regulation and Trades
Licence Bylaws are urgently In need
jf revision. The former, especially,
being ultra vires.
It is my custom at all times to meet
the night watchman at midnight, issue
any necessary instructions, receive his
report and make the rounds of the
business section with him, and I beg
to state that I have found Mr. R. Coe,
Sr„ a most efficient and conscientious
watchman, and this fact many busi
ness men will substantiate.
And now, in this my third annual
report, I beg once more to tender my
thanks to your honorable Board for
your support of my efforts during the
past year aud to the citizens of Cumberland for their forbearance and fair
dealing.
1 am., etc.,
C. J. BUNBURY, Chief of Police.
Moose Lodge
The Cumberland Lodge of the Loyal
Order of Moose held its regular meeting on Saturday lost, when there was
a large attendance. Twelve candidates
were Initiated into membership, among
whom was Mayor MacDonald. Members are elated over the fact that their
new member was returned as Mayor
of the city.
The next meeting will be held on
January 30, when several more candidates will be Initiated. The lodge Is
gaining a large membership and should
have a very successful career In Cumberland.
Youngly; "Did you ever notice that
the matrimonial process Is like that of
making a call? You go to adore, you
ring a belle, and you give your name
to a miss?"
Cynlcus:    "Yes,   and   then
taken In."
you're
Japanese
Oranges
90C.
W. Gordon
THE CORNER STORE January ±4,1922.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
1
Pitt
Corporation of the City of Cumberland
Auditor's Report and Financial Statement, for the Year
Ending December 31st, 1922
Cumberland, B.C.,
January 10th, 1922.
To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Cumberland, B. C.
Gentlemen:
I beg to submit herewith my report as Auditor
for tho Corporation of the City of Cumberland for the
year ending December 31,1921. The amount of business to be examined and the many demands on the
time of the City Clerk have rendered unavoidable the
delay in the presentation of this report. I would
recommend that every facility be given the City Clerk
in future to complete the year's business early.
The total amount of business transacted by the City
Council during the year was $53,653.29, as compared
with $36,711.72 111 1920. The Increased amount was
derived, however, from the Poll Tax, Profits from
Liquor Sales, Increased grant for schools, and Government Loan for Soldiers' Houses; revenue from
ordinary taxation declined slightly from the previous
year, as the following summary will show:
1920 1921
City Taxes  $ 5,263.09   $ 6.14t!4S
School Taxes     9,163.45      8,990.37
Trades Licences     2,112.50      1,986.00
Road Tax        230.00 364.00
Poll Tax          — 6,123.00
Liquor Profits          — 706.89
School Grant (Government)  12,607.81    16,003.78
While a comparison of receipts and expenditures
shows a debit balance for the year of $916.29, this Is
offset by bills receivable in connection with the soldiers' houses, etc., to the amount of $2,219.61, this
being money advanced by the city as a loan in connection with the scheme.
Schools cost $25,364.40 In 1921, as compared with
$19,047.70 in 1920. ThlB Increase is partly accounted
for by extensive repairs, painting, clearing ol
grounds, etc.
With the Poll Tax and Liquor Profits to rely on
for the coming year it should be possible to carry on
the business of the city with a considerably reduced
tax rate.
A good deal of confusion arose In connection with
the Poll Tax during the past year owing to the fact
that a great part had already been collected by the
Provincial Government before the bylaw was introduced. In order to ensure complete enforcement ol
this tax as complete a roll as possible Bhould be
drawn up of the names of persons liable
Greater care should be taken In making returns of
Trades Licences and other local collections so that
Jt will be less difficult to Identify the vouchers. The
ho„nHa^/J?e?1lture .8heets 8hould b0 Immediately
bound and filed In such a manner as to ensure their
permanence as a record.
In conclusion I wish to thank the City Clerk for his
courtesy and assistance in making this audit
i have the honor to be, gentlemen.
Your obedient servant,
C. B. WOOD, Auditor.
Statement of Receipts and  Expenditures of Cumberland
Public and High Schools, for the Year Ending
December 31st, 1921
RECEIPTS.
Government Grants  $15,973.78
Transportation   30.00
Sundries  :  35.00
City of Cumberland    9,325.59
TOTAL   $25,364.37
RECEIPTS
$ 1,985.00
354.00
62.42
1,197.30
1,604.50
905.00
5,123.00
4.55
720.00
940.91
784.40
200.00
50.00
315.40
34.00
449.27
6,036.50
705.89
8.00
2.75
Road Tax 	
Relief Work 	
Poll Tax 	
Memorial Arch 	
Street Account (Tnrvia) 	
Street Account (New Street)
Live Stock Sales 	
Material Sales 	
Dog Taxes 	
Hauling   	
Government Liquor Profits
Office 	
Scale Pees 	
(21,473.44
13,264.66
611.64
234.44
TAXES—
City. 1921 	
School, 1921 (inside) 	
School, 1921 (outside) 	
4,740.97
4,498.62
4,024,97
Cltv, 1920 	
School, 1920 (Inside) 	
School, 1920 (outside) 	
284.38
271.81
65.45
City, 1919 	
School, 1919 (inside) 	
School, 1919 (outside) 	
109.10
97.16
28.19
City Interest 	
13.00
14.18
School Interest 	
27.18
16,003.78
35.00
Government Grants 	
Government Transportation
15,973.78
30.00
School Sales 	
35.00
51,649.04
6,147.45
5,123.00
705.89
15,643.55
51,649.04
Poll Tax 	
Liquor Profits	
Other City Receipts 	
26,619.89
School Taxes 	
8,990.37
35.00
16,033.78
$51,649.04
EXPEMD1TUHES
Advertising   .  ,.»,.
"*»«», ::::::::: ' ITd
Donations
62.00
Fire Department   343
Lighting Account-
Current   664.60
Repairs     34S.34
Water 	
Office Account-
Salary 	
Supplies 	
Sundries   	
Election
Legal 	
79.33
720.00
140.48
382.17
54.00
247.40
Police Department-
Salary   1,320.00
Light and Fuel  109.93
Sundries   269.95
Watchman   940.00
Street Account-
Labor         3,961.27
Material      1,186.25
Sidewalks     194.88
Sewers-
Labor    617.02
Material   1,615.64
Health Department-
Health Officer 	
Scavenging 	
Telephone  	
Stable Account .
Stock 	
City Buildings ...
Dog Tags 	
200.00
901.65
92.70
393.06
225.00
303.61
3.26
Memorial Arch   1,777.41
Workmen's Compensation Board 19.95
Hospital  230.39
Loan Account   6,164.28
Poll Tax HefundB   637.40
Road Tax Refunds   72.00
Interest, Exchange and Discount 11.55
Civic Salaries   398.00
New Houses Loan Account  3,383.51
School Account-
Salaries     18,382.60
Sundries   6,982.00
349.17
62.00
343.20
912.94
79.33
1,222.65
301.40
2,639.88
5,137.52
194.38
2,232.56
1,101.65
1,017.62
1,777.41
7,533.57
3,383.51
25,364.50
$53,653.29 $53,653.20
ASSET AND LIABILITY ACCOUNT
TAXES OUTSTANDING—
City-
Arrears  (1921 rates plus ln-
intercst)     $  361.94
Delinquent   (1920   rates   plus
interest)          151.26
School (Inside)—
Arrears (1921 rates plus Interest)   	
Dellnqurnt (1920 rates plus
Interest) 	
School (Outside)—
Arrears (1921 rates plus Interest)   	
Delinquent (1920 rates plus
Interest) 	
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE—
Soldiers' Houses 	
Sundry Accounts 	
REAL ESTATE—
Land Owned by the City..
City Buildings 	
STOCK AND EQUIPMENT—
Wagons and Sleighs 	
Horses  	
FIRE DEPARTMENT-
Motor Truck 	
Apparatus 	
MATERIAL ON HAND-
Sewer Pipes 	
Tarvla 	
OTHER EQIPMENT-
Plough  	
Tools 	
333.38
143.13
48.91
42.05
2,185.66
33.95
300.00
3,438.50
300.00
300.00
2,200.00
1,500.00
43.60
220.00
30.00
10.00
503.20
476.51
90.96
2,219.61
3,738.60
600.00
3,700.00
263.60
LIABILITIES ACCOUNT AND BALANCE-SHEET
Cheques Outstanding   $3,684.41
TOTAL   $3,684.41
Bank Balance   $2,234.30
Cash on hand      643.82
Dr. Balance      916.29
TOTAL $3,684.41
TOTAL EXPENDITURES   $63,653.20
TOTAL RECEIPTS   $51,649.04
Plus Bank Balance on January
1st, 1921       1,087.76
    62,736.011
Dr. Balance (as above)         916.20
CASH ON HAND .
TOTAL 	
40.00
10,561.71
543.82
$12,176.20
STATEMENT OK COST OK SOLDIERS' HOUSES
September-December, 1921
BUILDING ACCOUNT—
Lumber    $3,716.90
Hardware    303.00
Lime and Bricks   153.10
Freight aud Hauling   129.0!
Labor     2,325.00
Lighting   176.00
Plumbing   1,715.25
SEWERAGE ACCOUNT—
Pipes   105.72
Cement     87.00
Labor  85.40
ARCHITECT'S COMMISSION at 4 per cent. 363.00
WATER INSTALLATION   105.30
OFFICE CHARGES   20.25
TOTAL   $9,286.86
Labor on ExtraB $276.00
Total cost to be charged against
the purchasers       9,286.86
Less Extras to be paid privately       143.50
9.143.36
Certified correct this 10th day of January, 1922.
C. B. WOOD, Auditor.
EXPENDITURES
Teachers' Salaries  $16,
Janitors         2,
Books and Supplies 	
Office   	
Furniture 	
Repairs and Painting      1
Light 	
Water  	
lanltur's  Supplies  	
Fuel 	
Sundries 	
Library 	
Insurance   	
Furnace  	
Payment 011 Grounds ....'	
.abor Levelling Grounds 	
Transportation. Royston Children	
TOTAL   $26,364.37
Certified correct.
C. B. WOOD, Auditor.
A. .MACKINNON, Secretary School Board.
Cumberland, B. C, January loth, 1022.
During tiie year 1921 many Improvements have
been added to the school property.
The new four-room addition to the new school
building was occupied at the beginning of the Spring
term and provided necessary accommodation for the
High School classes. The exterior has been painted
and provided witli suitable fire escapes. The interior
hns been kalsomlned and varnished. This building is
heated by a steam plant which is giving every satisfaction.
During the Summer holidays the old school building was repaired and painted and several of the class
rooms kalsomlned ami painted; a portion of the basement was excavated and complete sanitary arrangements installed. During the coining year serious consideration will have to lie given the heating arrangement of this building, as the present system Is expensive in upkeep and Inadequate.
Necessary equipment lias been procured for use In
the High School, and is proving of great assistance.
Several sets of Supplementary Readers, for use of
Junior Grades, have I een supplied.
A Library has been provided and Is being largely
used by the pupils. The thanks of the Board are
due the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited for
their generous contribution of buoks.
The school population Is constantly increasing and
It was necessary lo open a new division hist February, there being now twelve teachers on the staff of
the Public School. Another division is now required
and will be ready for the jpring term.
Additional grounds were procured and good progress made toward grading and levelling same.
Bevan Notes
Mr. Chas. Waugh relumed home on
Wednesday from Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. William Cornwell have
jone to Vancouver, where they will
reside in the future.
Great preparations are going on for
the coming event of Robbie Burns'
time. It will be held under the
auspices of the Bevan Burns' Club.
Mrs. Dan Bannerman, of Bevau, was
liken to the hospital last week, seri-
jusly ill. Her muny friends hope for
a speedy recovery.
Mr. Robert McAllister is still unable
to return to work owing to having
hurt his knee in an accident some time
ago.
A Sunday School class is being organized by Mr. John Green of Bevan.
.Many have volunteered to assist Mr.
Green, and Sunday School starts on
Sunday next In the Bevan School.
Mr. William Weir, who for some
time has been 111 at home, Is making
a very good recovery.
JAPANESE COLLECTIONS
FOR ALLARA FAMILY
Mr. Hiro and Mr. T. Nakanlshl collected the sum of $37.75 among the
residents of No. 5 Japanese towu on
behalf of the Allara family, who lost
all their belongings in the recent fire:
No. 5 Japanese.
T. Nlshlglma, J. Kasubuchl, S. Ka-
wata and T. Hlro, ech $1; N. Kaga, K.
Iladada, R. Nlslilmuda. M. Alani, S.
rsujlmuda, Y. Morlwakl, M. Yashl-
kara, A. Kogoe, N. Shlntani, Y. Isoya,
K. Mlhata, K. Aalshi, T. Tokuga, S.
Nlshlkawa, M. Ikegaml, U. Doi, M.
Suglmorl, J. Yono, J. Kumabe, Morl-
waka, Tokal, Y. Omoto, J. Sara, S.
Hayashi, K. Takekuma, S. Nlshlkawa.
Otsubo, Nagatu, S. Hardpujl, Y. Iinao-
kn, Narazakl, Nagatogawa, T. Kita-
iaka, H. Isonagu, K. Hlgano, Z. Tenu-
aka, Y. Hlrose, II. Watanabe,, K.
Asaka, N. Okazaki, T. Kllumura, T.
Ivawagulki, D. Hlgano, Y. Higano, II.
Deguchl, S. Nakauo, S. Ohashi, R. Hl-
kltta, M. Arakl. M. Naruse, H. Tsabe,
K, Matsumoto, II. Ilnmada, Mshlkara
K. Yogi, T. Izawa and H. Ere, 50c
each; Yamamoto Bros, and K. Tcra-
kura, each $1; Takeshlma. 75c; Yono,
irlznwa, Katagirl, C. Yagulchl, T.
Kato. K. Harada, T. Muraraka and K.
Komatsubara, each 25c.   Total $.17.75.
Buckley Giving Away
Over 100,000 Bottles
The chief oi cold killers to slay
every cold  in existence.
The hour has struck! Coughs, colds and
bronchitis must surrender ! Thousands
of tree bottles ol Hockley's Brouchltls
Mixture will prove to sulferers everywhere that it is the most successful
method ever discovered lor combating
disease germs. To convince yourself
that what over ,200)IHIOpi""plcare saving
about this remedy is absolutely line,
exchange the coupon below at any of
the drug stores listed fur your buttle.
You'll Be so agreeably surprised with
the test that you will proceed at once
with the regular size in order to complete
the miraculous work of totally destroying your cold. Right here and now fill
in tho coupon.
W.K BUCKLEY,Llmll.d,Mlit.lieliin»itta>i!li
1« Miilual lint!      —      Imm
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to extend our heartiest thanks to all who
so kindly helped ns at the fire on Monday morning,
especially those who assisted in removing stock from
the burning building. We deeply appreciate the valuable service rendered and take this means of thanking
everyone.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Nakanishi
Cumberland, B. C, January 5, 1922.
TEMPORARY
LOCATION
I wish to notify my patrons and others that, since
my store was burnt down by the recent fire, I have
secured temporary premises on Third Street, and am
now getting the stock in order. The goods are being
marked at lowest possible prices, as the stock must be
reduced.
As soon as possible I intend to put on a big Sale of
Fire-Damaged Goods.   Watch for the bargains.
Don't forget the new address, where all patrons and
others will be cordially welcomed.
LOW PRICES AND BEST SERVICE
T. NAKANISHI
Third Street
Opposite W. Willard's
Free trial Bucklcv'n Bronchitis Mixture.
This coupon Tnllnut be accepted ii
presented In- a child.
Sold in Cumberland by
R. E. FROST
"What views ol the hotel would you
advise me to have published?" asked
the proprietor.
"Not mine," murmured the dls-
dlsgruntled guest. "My views wouldn't
be fit for publication."
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
it , ■
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   •   -    Proprietor
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
IMMENSE COAL SEAM  IS
FOUND IN AUSTRALIA
Has Maximum Thickness of 93
Feet—Said to Be Thickest
Ever Discovered
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Ket. W. I.evcrsodgc.
.Iiiiiiiai) 15.
Sunday School, 2.3" p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m,
Roman Catholic Church
Iter, r'ullier Ilealnn.
•Inniiiir)  l.'i.
Mars 9 a.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
Iter. Jas. Hood.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
livening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.80 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
Grace Methodist Church
Iter. (J. II. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
"Are Ihe women we love ihe women
we marry?" says a film ad. No, indeed!  All of us are not bigamists!
SYDNEY, N. S. W.—Probably tho
hickeBt seam ol black coal discovered
II any part of the world Is now being
ixplolted at Itlalr Athol In Queens-
tint! Its maximum thickness, as far
is'can lie ascertained. Is 1*3 feet. The
vliole seam, from Inp to bottom, Is
ulle free from any clay bands.
Professor Sir Bdgeworlli David, who
lias Just paid a visit to Blair Atbiil.
lays Mint under the present method
if working It was only possible to exploit a third of the coal lu the field.
III amount estimated by him at about
16,000,000 tons. It was estimated that
under the present method of working.
178,000,000 tons of coal would be
wasted.
As regards ihe possibilities of establishing large markets for the coal
rom Ibis Held, the chief difficulty was
the distance from the nearest seaport
- Port Alma, near Kockhaniptou,
iome 278 miles by rail from Ulair
Athol. The Blair Athol coal was hard
and specially suiled for export by sea
and was very suitable for raising
■iteam both on land and sea. Professor
David was Immensely impressed with
Ihe great potentialities of this field.
A historian says that women ruled
'he world 2500 years before (he birth
of Christ. They have also ruled it
1921 years since. — Charleston Ga-
zefte.
If you want to trade what you have
for something the other fellow might
have -try a Islander Want Ad, Six
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January 14, 1922.
WHAT DOES YOUR BOOK
SHOW?
It you have ever been the victim ot
incompetence, you will doubly appreciate the work of our master median
ics who know every branch ot auto
mobile repairing thoroughly and have
the facilities and equipment to do
every Job as well as It can be doue.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2820 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Liddell's Orchestra
— Is -
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Function*
of all kinds. Any number of
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave.
Notice
Pending erection of new
premises opposite the Post
Office our business is being
carried on in the Basement
of
CAMPBELL BROS..
STORE
where we will give you the
same service and satisfaction as in the past.
Phone 19
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Basement, Campbell Bros.'
Store
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.00 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE an:> upb insurance
Cumberland, B. C
Officer (to men who have been
grumbling): "There is nothing whatever the matter with this soup; I've
tasted It."
Private: "That's just It, sir; but the
cook wants to call it coffee."
To believe that two could live aB
cheaply as one used to be optimism:
BOW it's insanity.
Multum In Parvo
Trial by jury Is said to have existed
in 2000 B.C.
Thirty-live secretaries are required
to deal with the Pope's correspondence.
Each female salmon yields approximately 3500 eggs each year.
Women farmers in the United
States number over a quarter of a
million.
Applications ot electrical currents
to growing crops has Increased the
yield by 21 per cent.
Bees have been trained to start and
stop work at the sound of a gong by a
breeder In Fleet, Hants.
A cherry tree at SIttlngbornc, Kent,
which still bears fruit, was planted In
the reign of Henry VIII.
One teaspoonful of good arable soil
ontains more living organisms than
there arc humnn bolngs in the whole
United Kingdom.
More than 1200 blind men have already been established In trades and
professions through the medium of
St. Dunsntan's.
In Japan the metric Bystem became
legal In 1913, and now, after eight
years to give the people time to adapt
themselves to the new units, the system haB been made compulsory. The
same plan has been followed in China
and Slam, where It Is still In the pro
paratory stages.
A reversible turbine, the Invention
of a Brazilian, Fausto Pedrelra Ma-
chado, Is now being perfected for
commercial manufacture by a company In the State of Delaware. It Ie
claimed that the new mechanism will
revolutionize marine propulsion, and
it will cost less to manufacture, will
reduce operating costs, and will be
positively reversible.
A considerable Industry haB been
developed at the foot ot the French
Alps In the manufacture ot ferro-
slllcon by the aid of the electric furnace. Ferro-sillcon is an Indispensable agent In the metallurgy of Iron
and steel, being as important in that
respect as manganese. For a long
time It was produced only with the
blast furnace.
All dewdrops are perfectly round
Dew is deposited only on a fine, clear
night. Evening dew Is unhealthy, being laden with noxious exhalations.
More dew is deposited on cultivated
than on uncultivated land. Dew will
not stay on rose leaves, because they
have an essential oil In them. Dew
rolls off cabbage and like leaves, because they are coated with a fine
waxen powder. Dew Is most abundant
In exposed situations, there being less
to arrest the raditalon ot the earth's
heat. There Is no dew after a windy
night; It Is evaporated as fast as produced. We get most dew after a hot
summer's day. Little or no dew is
ever deposited on smooth stones, polished metal or woollen material. If
there were no sunsets thtre would be
no dew, and vegetation would perish.
It is the sun's withdrawal, and the
cooling ot the earth, plants, etc., by
radiation ot their heat, that makes
them cold enough to condense the
air vapors into dew. Nature's wisdom
is shown by the fact that plants with
woolly leaves require most moisture,
and It Is those leaves which radiate
most heat, and therefore get most dew.
There are skies blue, red, yellow,
black and grey. What makes the colorings, and what do they portend?
First, it must be noted that there Is
really no "sky" In the sense that poets
write of It as the "arching dome."
What we call the sky Is just air, plus
the Illusory effect of distance. And a
blue, red or other colored "sky" is
only air which Is holding or reflecting
blue, red or other rays. A yellow sky
Is that color because the air Is moist,
Moist air Is more transparent than
dry, and It allows the yellow rays to
pass. A yellow sunset Is an Indication of wet, because the color shows
that the vapors in the air are already
condensed into clouds, which will soon
discharge as rain. A blue "sky" is
brought about In a somewhat peculiar
fashion. The weak blue rays of light,
which are reflected upwards from the
earth, cannot get through the air, and
are therefore sent down again. So wc
get a predominant blue vision or a
blue "sky." A grey sky at sunrise is
caused by the air being sufficiently
clear to allow the three main colored
raya—blue, red and yellow— to pass
With feeble Intensity. This combination Is a "grey." A red sky means
that the air Is so dense that It slops
all but the red rays. This air density
Is due to a great excess of vapor al
the point of condensation into rain
Thus "red In the morning" portends a
wet day.
Certain surnames are prominent In
the records of achievement. Take
Napier, for instance. As soldiers,
sailors, diplomats, and authors, men
hearing this name have made history
The families of WordBworth and Coleridge have contributed splendid talent
to church, bar and literature. Another
name which shines is Scott. Of
course, Sir Walter Is the great Scott,
but many of that name who bear no
relationship to the author of "Waver-
ley" have added lustre to the record
of this famous surname. But It is
doubtful If any British name can beat
the record of Russell. Lord John
Russell was a distinguished Prime
Minister; Lord Russell of Klllowen
was a great Chief Justice; Sir William
Howard Russell was the greatest of
war correspondents; G. W. E. Russell
was a famous man of letters and a
brilliant essayist; while there are
many other well known Russells to
keep up the honor of the name.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second
and fourth Wednesdays of each mouth,
in the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Ranger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F. Slaughter,
Treasurer.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
PROTEST MADE AGAINST
LIBELLING CANADA IN
STORY AND PICTURE
Writer in Dearborn Independent
Points Out Injustice Done to
Canada by U. S. Writers
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt    /JriSl
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
S. DAVIS, ■SS?
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballers
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
The reader of much contemporary
American fiction could scarcely trill to
get the idea that Canada is a country
peopled almost exclusively by bearded,
ignorant habitants, garbed the year
round In maoklnaw; prospectors,
bootleggers, dangerous adventurers
and others of that Ilk, who live in some
mysterious "northland," where they
do nothing but drink whiskey, play
poker and engage in gun *llghts.
Among these uncouth individuals is
generally a beautiful girl—where she
comes from Cod only knows! She Is
usually alone In this '"northland"—
excepting, perhaps, for a pet grizzly
or mayhap a faithful wolf! Then these
bowhlskorod, whiskey-sodden ruffians
light to the deatli for possession of
her. The general atmosphere is one
of snow,, snow everywhere—dog sleds,
northern lights, Intense cold, blizzards, frozen waters.
And then the Mounted Police "get"
their men. But with this force "getting" does not mean shooting him; it
means arresting him and bringing
him to trial.
British Columbia has been termed a
"sea of Mountains," and there Is no
doubt that future transcontinental airplane passengers will be quite willing
to confirm this description.
So Canada Is subject to all climatic
conditions excepting the tropical; It
contains all sorts of people but the
blacks. Between its coats may be
found cities which, if smaller, are hot
less advanced and progressive than
any on the continent. Within Its borders may be found all gradations ol
society, from those possessing the advantages of the latest advancements
of civilization and science, down to
the most primitive frontier conditions.
It would bo bard to indicate any
particular sphere ot activities as being typically "Canadian," but perhaps
the keynote might more truly be found
ill a picture of rural life, that great
culture-bed ill which He the seeds of
this young Dominion's coming greatness; those human elements which
will go toward shaping the destinies
of this virile new nation in the course
which fate hns marked out for her.
It is true that the wheat operator at
Winnipeg and the dry goods merchant
of .Montreal or Toronto arc little distinguishable from their countreparts
in Chicago and New York; that the
lumber barons of Ottawa are no dtf-
i lerent from the men who have made
their millions in the woods ot Michigan; that the wheat grower In Saskatchewan Is not essentially different
from the grain grower In Kansas or
the Dakotas; that the ranchers in Alberta resembles closely the ranchers
in Wyoming. On the other hand, the
habitant of Quebec, the Northwest
Mounted Policeman, the trapper, cruiB-
er and frontiersman of the north are
peculiar to Canada now, and because
of that fact they are probably more
interesting ns subjects for fiction than
Individuals In the more prosaic walks
of life. This is undoubtedly true. It
Is perhaps inevitable that the mention
of Canada should bring to the minds
of people unfamiliar with the Dominion pictures of habitants, trappers.
Northwest Mounted Policemen, snow,
ice, dog sleds, northern lights, al
though the great majority ot Canadians are, themselves, as unfamiliar
with most of these things as the people of the United States.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY  STORE
Good Selection of Pipes, Cigar anil
Cigarette Holders.
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
James Brown
Cumberland
A howling success—the first baby,
Beauty's only skin deep, and there's
a lot of thin-skinned folks In the
world.
THE OUT-OF-DOORS
The rhythmic spring and summer
I love my spacious mundane home,
The fleecy clouds and azure dome;
I love the flow'ry carpet floors,
The groves and gardens by tne scores—
The art-reflected out-of-odoors.
I love the desert tracks of land,
The cactus and the blenching sand;
I love the rush-embellished moors;
The arctic grey and Ice that gloars—
The life-neglected out-of-doors.
I love the mountains' lofty walls,
The wedge-shaped gorges and the falls;
I love the granite boulder stores,
The hanging crags and sparkling ores,
The rock-protected out-of-doors.
I love the rivers and the seas,
The cooling rains and wind-swept leas
I love the reminiscent roars,
The quiet coves unci sunny shores—
The joy-projected out-of-doors.-
I love the twinkling stnrry lights,
The   rhythmic   spring   and   summer
nights;
I love the nightingale that pours
Its soul into my heart and yours—
The love-perfected out-of-doors.
—Willis Hudspeth in Typo. Journal.
IT COULDN'T BE
He had fished all day and caught
nothing, yet ills heart was light and
gay as he walked homeward. The
bottle of "cold-defier" which he had
'aken out in the morning full now re-
insed, empty and dead, among the
Terns along the river's edge. As he
wavered along the street ho sang hap-
■illy. though quite out of tune, and the
grey wintry twilight was to him a rosy
Slow. Hut presently he stopped and
looked with owl-like gravity over tho
,'ence ot a scare-crow which stood in
i lie field. Its nrms outstretched. The
iingler shook his head. "You're a liar,"
he said sternly. "There never wash,
and never hash been, a fish cnught as
blg'sh that!"
TO   INVESTORS
We have recently opened a Piond Department at
Toronto, through which we shall be glad to arrange
the purchase or sale of Victory or any other bonds for
our customers.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
THE
PIKET - ELECTRIC
We handle everything in the Electrical line.
EXPERT  HOUSE  WIRING
Don't throw your broken irons away.   Have them
repaired.
WHITE CAP ELECTRIC WASHERS, $135
LEN D. PIKET
Phone 1,'UR
P. O. Box 21        Courtenay, B. C.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know how to make your car behave,
aud will give you a lot of free advice on tiie subject it you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
BREAKING UP ANCIENT
STONE WALLS OF SAMOA
Cannibals Kept  Victims  From
Neighboring Islands in These
Stone Wall Enclosures.
Many miles of ancient stone walls,
which bear witness to ancient Samoan
savagery, are now being broken up
and used as road metal.
These walls form great enclosures,
and must have been built with prodigious labor. They probably date
back COO or 700 years, and arc grim
reminders of the days when Samoa
was a cannibal Island.
Cannibalism came to an end in
.Samoa about 150 years ago, but before
that time these enclosures were used
by the Samoans for Imprisoning vic-
time eaptred from neighboring Islands.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Amy.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  M TELEPHONB
or Leave Orders at Tendome Hotel.
FAMOUS MEN
A Jew and a Scot had a bet as to
which of their nationalities had produced tiie greatest number of famous
men. For each name the opponent
was to table a penny.
"Moses," said the Jew, and down
went Sandy's penny. ;
"Burns," said Sandy, and the Jew'
equalized. |
"Joseph and his brethren," said the |
Jew, and it cost the Scot a shilling.
"Ouch, It s'bunches, is it?" said
Sandy. "Then, the Fifty-first Division,
and get oot yer cheque book."
"Say, Red," said Dead Shot Bill to
a bartender In one of the thirteen leading speali-easles of Burnt Powder,
Arizona, "didn't Shifty Pete tell you
that he thought I had a hasty temper?"
"Wliy, no," replied Red, "not that
I can remember."
"Too bad," said Bill, giving one ot
Ills holsters a hitch. "Then I killed
in Innocent man."
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
IS YOUR MONEY SAFE?
Hidden in your home it is a temptation
to thieves.
Deposit your money in the bank and rent
a SAFETY DEPOSIT BOX for your
valuable papers, Victory Bonds, etc.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA f
January 14,1922.
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
■■III
|FIRE
| Insurance
|   Best Rates and Service
|       for Insurance of all
| ' Description
1   EDWARD W. BICKLE   I
m ==
1 representing 1
Royal Exchange Assurance, London, England.
Great American Fire Company.
Canadian Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg.
.Newark Fire Insurance Company.
London Guarantee and Accident Company.
Boston Fire Insurance Company.
Queen Insurance Company.
National Fire of Hartford.
m
Edward W. Bickle
ISLANDER  BUILDING
1850
Ye Olde Firme
1921
PLACE IN YOUR HOME THIS CHRISTMAS
Heintzman & Co. Piano
or Player-Piano or Gramophone
Make your choice NOW.   Pay a small deposit, for
delivery later.
Can You Imagine a More Delightful Christmas Gift!
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
VANCOUVER.—Year-end reports of
the custom and inland revenue returns
show an increase of more than $1,000,-
000. The present figure Is if 12,137,000.
Big business in the latter months ot
the year have more than offset the
earlier days of depression in the year.
ll
WASHINGTON APPLE
GROWERS ANXIOUS
OVER B.C. PRODUCT
WENATCHEE, Wash—The Wenat-
chee Valley Traffic Association and
the Commercial Club, In connection
with other organizations throughout
Washington, are planning a wide
campaign to advertise the valley apples. It Is known that this product
faces a serious competitor In the British Columbia applo, which is finding
such a wide demand. Apple growers
of this region intend co-operating with
a view to conserving the Industry and
protect   their   Interests   with   jealous
C. MAN, AGED 101,
REFUSES FAME IN FILMS
VANCOUVER. — British Columbia
has missed another chance to achieve
fame In the dims. "Dad" Charles
Quick, aged 101, saddler, In best or
health, declines to enter the movies!
Resisting all blandishments to star
with Mary and Doug and Charlie and
the rest ot them, the hearty old gentleman says he prefers to stick to his
saddler's shop. "I'm getting a bit too
old for tiie stage or movies," he says.
It is known that he has received several serious offers from Hollywood,
California. The Keystone, Laskey,
Sennett and Goldwyn studios have all
been attracted to the remarkable old
man who looks forty years younger
than his real age.
PORT TRADE OF
VANCOUVER EXPANDS
POINT GREY BEATS CITY
IN AMOUNT OF BUILDING
VANCOUVER.—Point Grey, a suburb of this city, goes on record with
building Ilgures that beat those ot the
city proper, at present. Latest Ilgures
show $3,600,000 building permits for
the past year, as compared with Vancouver's $3,195,000. This is an increase of $1,500,000. About 700 new
homes were erected in the municipality during 1921. There arc now
about 4000 homes in the municipality.
LOWEST FIRE LOSS IN SIX
YEARS IN VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER.—The report for fire
losses here for the past year has been
the lowest since 1915. The total loss
has been $332,000. This, it Is believed,
shows the very lowest lire loss for a
city of the size on the continent during the period. Vancouver's highest
record fire year was In 1918, when
Coughlnn's shipyard fire swelled the
loss to $1,592,560.
GRAIN CAPACITY OF
COAST TO BE INCREASED
One or Two More Elevators to
Be Built at Vancouver.
VANCOUVER.—The grain capacity
of this port is to be quadrupled, when
elevator facilities are installed, according to estimates now completed.
Much wheat Is coming In. The congestion Is due to the fact that the C. N. R.
lias no elevators on the Prairies. The
local elevator can handle only 40 cars
per day. It would take a mouth to
unload the carloads new en route. Efforts are being made to rush the construction of at least one new elevator,
and possibly two ot them, making a
total cost of $2,000,000.
CHINESE BRANCHING
OUT IN CATTLE FARMS
I   IL0=IL0 THEATRE   I
| FRIDAY and SATURDAY.Jan. 13 & 14 |
I 12 - REEL  SHOW - 12 I
|       Lionel Barrymore in       |
I JIM THE PENMAN 1
1   5 Reels of Comedy. 2'/hours of Entertainment   ||
I    MATINEE   SATURDAY   AT   2.30    I
I    Usui Saturday Night Dance. 9.30 p.m.  1
MONDAY ONLY:
Pauline Frederick in "Sting of the Lash"
— ALSO —
| Buster Keaton in "Neighbors"
COMING   TUESDAY   AND   WEDNESDAY
Elsie Fergusson in "Footlights"
HER FIRST SUPER-SPECIAL—A SEVEN-PART PICTURE THAT IS DIFFERENT
Clyde Cook in " All Wrong"
■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
NAPOLEON'S  F.UHUS HOUSE
The correction of popular misapprehensions about Napoleon seems well-
nigh endless. A recent magazine article on the Barb horse says Napoleon's famous white charger, Marengo, though popularly depicted as an
imposing and welghy horse, was In
reality a Barb 14% hands high. The
enduranco of this celebrated war
horse Is well known; he carried Napoleon throughout his strenuous campaigns—a great little man on a wonderful little horse. Marengo's skeleton Is to be' seen at the Museum of
the United Services in Whitehall,
London.
For Reading or
Writing
good, clear, unstrained eyesight is
essential. You cannot be your best if
your eyes are not right, nnd It's so
easy to make them right. Our eye examination is thorough, expert, unbiased and reliable. You can depend
upon our eye advice, Consult us before your condition gets worse.
Louis R. Stevens
Eyesight Specialist
Cumberland, O. C.
Thos. E. Bate
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
COLLECTIONS
GENERAL AGENCY
Persons having property for sale are
asked to list same with us. Our clients'
Interests will have our best attention.
BIG SACRIFICE FOR
QUICK SALE
Several live-acre blocks on Royston
Rond, which we are instructed to sell
nt the very low price of $40 to $50 per
acre for quick disposal. Exceptionally good locations. One is a corner
near Cumberland.
Thos. E. Bate
NOTARY PUBLIC
Maxwell's Office     Dunsmuir Avenne
Johnny's mother looked at him reproachfully. "Johnny," she said, "you
have eaten enough for a miner. If you
don't stop, you'll burst."
Between mouthfuls tho undismayed
Johnny replied, "Mother, pleaBe pass
the cake aga'in; and stand back."
VANCOUVER—Chinese are branching out in the cattle and stock-raising
business throughout the province. A
late Illustration comes from Ashcroft.
B.C., where notice is tiled under the
Cuttle-Farming Act by Toy Tong, Sing
Toy Ylng, Toy l.ung and otherB. Chll-
ltwuck also has new Chinese stock
misers buying and leasing land. They
arc taking over a large area.
BIRD SANCTUARY IN
WORLD'S GREATEST CITY
Public Interest In bird sanctuaries
lias been considerably freshened as a
result of a recent dinner held In London by the Selbourne Society in celebration of the purchase of the Brent
Valley Bird Sanctuary—one of the
most remarkable refuges of wild life
from Its lying within bounds of the
world's greatest city. This refuge is
a small oak wood near Oreenford.
Middlesex, and there the nightingale,
cuckoo, blackcap and many other birds
which would otherwise surely have
been banished by the sprend of Greater
London, may live in peace and security and propagate their kind.
IT LOOKED BAD
All a man gets by arguing with his
wife Is—In bad.
"Why yon cull my poor a poor nut?"
queried an Indignant mother, who
confronted the dietitian of a New
Jersey charities association the other
morning at her office door. And the
latter has not yet found a way of con
vlncing Mrs. Caruso that "poor nut"
on the face of Angeio's card stands
for poor nutrition.—Survey.
IN A STEW
The missionary smiled benevolently
on the native tribe around him. "I
will cure them of ail cannibalism," he
said, hopefully, as ho retired to his
lull. There he was Bhortly afterwards
joined by a native.
"The king has sent me to dress you
for dinner," said the man.
"Ah!" smiled the missionary. "How
thoughtful of him! You are Ihe royal
valet, I suppose?"
"No," replied the native; "I'm the
royal cook!"
WHEN THEY FLUFFED
Smith visited his friend Jones, tho
playwright, and observed with regret
that Jones treated his wife shamefully.
So he said to Jones:
"Why do you talk so roughly to your
wife?"
"1 hale doing it, hut I'm obliged to,"
returned Jones.
"How are you obliged to?"
"Well, you see. I am writing a
tragedy, and I have to keep myself in
a proper frame of mind. You should
see how I fluff with her when I'm
writing a comedy."
BREAD!
Do you know that bread con
tains many times the nourish
ment of other foods?
Do you know that bread and
butter' or bread toasted with
(rood coffee in the morning is
the most substantial breakfast
on which to start the day ?
Don't stop with one slice. Eat
several.
Ilalliday's bread has a really
delicious flavor and lots of nourishment.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAY S BREAD
"The Bread That Builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Dunsmuir  Avenue     •     < umber hi ml
tt
SPECIALS
GREY   WOOL   BLANKETS— d»J   fTA
Each   »M-.e)U
LARGE WARM COMFORTERS— rt»J   r/\
RUGS—Assorted colors, size 30 by 60        d»n pn
inches.    Each   *^UtD"
WASH  RUGS—Assorted colors. d»0 PA
,,S,T,"v"xs35c,50c,65c,90c
TAPESTRY TABLE COVERS—A (rood range of colors
and prices.
ART SATEEN—A few-pieces to clear at,        Rfin
per yard OUC
BABY BLANKETS—Blue and Pink. rt»n f\f\
Each, up from   tj)^»UU
ASV,UGS- $5.00
KITCHEN CHAIRS— <J*1   Q|»
Each   «M.OO
A COMPLETE LINE OK FURNITURE, BEDS AND
BEDDING
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon Eifht
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January 14, i922.
Special Sale of
LADIES' COATS
To be offered at Greatly
Reduced Prices
Ladies' All-Wool Velour Coats—Smartly tailored, in
several good shades, at the $"17 Pift
special price of  «PA I •til/
Ladies' All-Wool Velour Coats—Specially fine quality
velour, well lined to the waist, and made in the
newest styles. *£*?0  K(\
Special price «p£«S.O\J
Ladies' Very Fine Coats—Values to CJQK f\(\
$39.50.   Now on sale at .: «p£t>.UU
Ladies' Brown Velour Coats—With Bevc-rine collar.
Most desirable, and genuine bargains  flJOr*7 CA
Girls' Rainproof Capes — English make; every one
guaranteed to give satisfaction. Values (jJO QP
to $8.50.   Take your choice now for  «P J vU
Ladies' Hats—Every one to go at reduced d»"| QP
price—no reserve   tJJAet/U
DRY GOODS
& GENTS FURNISHINGS
WHIST DRIVE
AND    DANCE
under auspices of the lien's Cluh will
be held In the
ANGLICAN CHURCH HALL
TONIGHT
Friday, Jan. 13th
commencing at 8 p.m
Admission 50 cents.
Whist 8 to 9.30.        Dancing 10 to 12.
Dobaon: "Why is a hen like the
British Empire?"
Hobson: "Because her son never
sets, of course."
Referee: "Gentleman, on my right,
Battling Ned, son of the local undertaker."
Nod's Opponent: "That's enough—
I'm off."
The good  die young:  so do good
resolutions.
WHEN MAIDENS VOTE
She paused—the pencil In her hand:
The ballot there before her—
A look of Indecision crept
Her pretty features over.
It was her Brat—her maiden vote—
And she was tender-hearted;
She sighed and from her azure eyes
The tear-drops nearly started.
She looked the ballot o'er again,
Her loving heart it fluttered,
The pencil In her lingers shook,
Her cheery lips they muttered:
"That Grit is such a handsome man,
And I Just love that Tory—
If one had been a single man
'Twould be another story.
"For tariffs low or tariffs high
Who would care to fuss and stew-
But, (ah, to vote for only one,
Seems a cruel thing to do."
A smile o'ercrept her charming face,
Chasing shadows dense away,
She knew the proper thing to do
And went about it blithe and gay.
She   marked   the   ballot,   marked   it
plain—
Candidly, to tell I'm loth,
For this is what the maiden did:
Voted, yes, she did, for both.
—A. C. Wood in Ottawa Journal.
H
WE ARE
TAKING STOCK
From this date to the 31st of January, a refund of
TWENTY PER CENT.
will be given on all purchases of one dollar and over on
the following lines:
On all Heating Stoves
Enamel Ware, Tin and
Aluminum Ware
Crockery and Glass Ware
Second-hand Ranges
We have in stock four Second-hand Ranges, fitted
up in perfect condition. These are priced very low.
We guarantee them to give good service and to bake
perfectly.   We need the room for new stock.
C. H. TARBELL & SON
Hardware and Sporting
Phone 30 Goods Cumberland
The Pioneer Hardware Store
NEGRO BLOOD RUMORED
AS CAUSE OF DIVORCE
CASE IN VANCOUVER
Special to The Islander.
VANCOUVER.—A beautiful and accomplished debutante of last season
is filing suit for divorce, through her
parents, as she is a minor, and it is
now common talk that the cause lies
in the suspicion that her husband has
negro blood in his veins. The discovery, it is said, followed with the birth
of a baby that demonstrates marked
negroid appearance.
The suit, which is being presented
with the utmost possible secrecy, will
cite "Inadaptation of temperaments"
as the cause. The girl visited California nearly a year ago and met a
dark and gifted, but penniless, musician who was leader of a cabaret orchestra. He bore a Spanish nnine and
Claimed to be the scion of nn aid
Spanish-California family. The pah-
eloped. Parental forgiveness followed
and the couple came to British Columbia, where they made their home with
the bride's parents in a fashionable
home In Shaughnessy Heights.
Society folk had their doubts, and the
situation was embarrassing. It later
developed that the young husband
was really not a Californian, but came
from New Orleans. The pair have
been separated for several months and
the visit of tho stork verified doubts,
according to reports. The family Is
moving to Montreal.
Personal Mention
The many friends of Mrs. W. A.
Owen are pleased to know that she is
well on the road to recovery from a
bad attack of tonsilitls.
Ladies' Auxiliary of the
G. W. V. A.
Whist Drive and
DANCE
on Friday, January 20th
Memorial Hall
Cards at 8.     Dancing 10 to 12.
Refreshments Served.
Admission  50 cents
FOR SALE
GOLDEN OAK HEATER—GOOD AS
new; burns coal or wood; price $7.
Apply V. W. Fouracre, Third Street.
2-3
COOK STOVE IN GOOD CONDITION.
Apply 202 Derwent Avenue. 1-2
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE CONSIST-
lng of slttingroom and bedroom furniture. For further particulars apply Mrs. Thomas Hanuay, West
Cumberland. 1-2
LOST
AUTO SKID CHAIN OFF TRUCK AT
the fire Monday morning. Return
same to B. & B. Grocery.   Reward.
BROOCH IN 1LO-ILO THEATRE ON
Thursday night; name engraved on
back. Reward on returning to
Henderson's Candy Store. 1-2
FOUND
BOYS' MACKINAW COAT AND CAP
near office of Provincial Police; apparently fell off car. Owner can
have same on application to Provincial Police and paying for this
advertisement. 1-1
Automobiles
$595
1921 Ford, 6- passenger, in
extra good order. This car
has excellent tireB, a new
top with side curtains, a reliable self-starter and a set
ot very good shock-absorbers. Tho general appearance
of the car is very good, and
it runs equal to a new one.
$200 cash, and the balance
can be arranged to suit you.
Guaranteed for' 110 days.
Mr. T. H. Carey, officer of the Grand
Chapter of B. C, A. F. and A. M., accompanied by Mr. J. Walton, went to
Victoria on Sunday last to take part
in the installation ceremony of Ca-
mosun Chapter No. 14. They returned
home on Tuesday, and report the
roads between Nanaimo and Cumberland in very bad condition.
Mrs. D. Bruce, of Belvoir Villa, left
for Vancouver on Thursday to attend
the silver wedding of Mr. and Mrs. J.
A. Mateer. Mrs. Bruce will visit Seattle and other Sound cities before reluming to Cumberland, and expects
to be absent about two weeks.
His Honor Judge Barker was In
town on Wednesday holding a sitting
of Ihe County Court.
Mr. Octave Godfrey left tor Vancouver on Thursday.
Mr. J. Bird, accompanied by his sister, left for Vancouver Thursday to
meet his wife and family, who are expected to arrive from England tills
week-end.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd.. returned from Victoria and Vancouver on Wednesday
morning.
Mr. Colville C. Graham left for Victoria on Saturday last.
Mr. George O'Brien. Safety Engineer
ot the Canadian Collieries, left for
Ladysmlth on Wednesday.
Miss Phyllis Partridge, who has
been spending the holidays with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Partridge,
returned to Vancouver Tuesday morning, where she will resume her duties.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Taylor left for Nanaimo Tuesday morning.
Cadets Morton, Thomas and Pierce
Graham returned to University School,
Victoria, after spending a month's
holiday with their parents.
Miss Violet Graham returns to St.
Ann's Academy, Victoria, on Saturday.
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Nanaimo
Friday morning.
Cadets Hawthorne and Thomas
Graham returned to University School,
Victoria, on Tuesday.
Mr. A. Thomson motored to Nanaimo
on Friday.
Mr. Bert Kllpatrlck  left for Vancouver Tuesday morning.
Lady: "I want a pair of shoes for
my little boy."
Shoe Dealer; "Yes, certainly; er—
French kid?"
Lady; "No, indeed. He is my own
son, and born right here in Cumberland."
Street Orator: "It's knowledge we
want! Ask the av'ridge man when
Magna Charta was King of England
and 'e can't tell yer!"
BIRTHS
O'BRIEN—At the Cumberland General
Hospital, January 12, to Mr. and
Mrs. Chas. O'Brien, a son.
IN MEMORIAM
REYNOLDS—In memory of Kate Gertrude, wife of Charles Reynolds,
who died January 6th, 1020, at Vancouver, B. C.
Corfield Motors Ltd.
Ford Dealers
Courtenay
Phone 46
Card of Thanks
I take this opportunity of extending
my sincere thanks to tile electors of
the City of Cumberland for the great
confidence placed in me, by electing
me as their Mayor for a fourth term.
I will continue to devote my best
efforts to the welfare of the city, and
hope to merit the continued confidence
placed In me.
Yours very sincerely,
D. R. MacDonald
Cumberland, January 13, 1922.
Clearance Sale
20%
discount on
Grey English Enamelware
3-qt. Coffee Pots
2-qt. Tea Pots
5-o.t. Kettles
21/o-qt. Lipped Saucepans
4-qt. Lipped Saucepans
Medium  Wash  Bowls or
Basins
Large Preserving Kettles
Deep Pie Plates
2-qt. Deep Pudding Bowls
3-qt. Deep Pudding Bowls
1-qt. Mixing or Soup Bowls
12-qt. Rolled Edge Saucepans
Medium Size Chambers
Round Double Roasters
3-qt. Boilers
8-qt. Windsor Kettles
12-qt. Seamless Water
Pails
l'/j-qt. Dipper Mugs
See  Windows for Prices
CUPS AND SAUCERS
Plain White Cups and Saucers, dozen $2.75
Gilt Edge Cups and Saucers, dozen $2.95
FOR COMPLETE SATISFACTION USE
Cream of the West Flour
24-lb. sacks ." $1.25
49-lb. sacks $2.15
98-lb. sacks $4.15
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
m
>
The Chevrolet 490 Special
has, among other improvements, longer and header front springs,
heavier steering gear, spiral gears throughout rear end, gas tank on
rear, vacuum feed, grey whip-cord top, and Gipsy side curtains opening with doors; cord tires, bumper, etc.
Price $1085 f.o.b. Courtenay
Blunt &Ewart, Ltd.
Courtenay Garage
Phone 61
FLITS AND FLASHLIGHTS
Robert Qulllen in Prairie Farmer.
Card of Thanks
The undersigned desire to express
to the electors of the City of Cumberland their sincere thanks for the honor
bestowed in electing them to represent
the voters on the City Council during
the year 1922.
We also wish to take this opportunity of assuring the electors that
Ihe best Interests of Cumberland will
lie our first consideration.
Again thanking the electors for their
confidence, we are,
Your obedient servants,
ALEX. MAXWELL,
FRED. D. PICKARD,
C. J. PARNHAM,
DUNCAN THOMSON.
THOS. BANNERMAN.
WM. BEVERIDGE.
A foolish young thing is an old person who tries to act young.
Nations might bear one another's
burdens, but they much prefer to bare
one another's sins.
China: A densely populated area
inside a Great Wall entirely surrounded by spheres of Influence.
Love: The emotion that persuades a
girl she would enjoy sweeping up a
man's cigar ashes for life.
Of all glad words that are on deck,
the gladdest are these: "Enclosed lind
cheque."
Some Americans are Irish patriots
because they love the green, and some
because they love the long green.
Well, the munition-makers can turn
to the making of automobiles without
lowering their batting avernges.
We are for the naval holiday. It
will be fine to put over one holldny the
bankers can't celebrate by closing.
Still, they'll probably slip In a paragraph permitting addicts to buy a few
cruisers on a doctor's prescription.
Now that the ladies are taking up
boxing, mothers of the next genera-
lion may have a new method of rocking refractory sons to sleep.
Never trace a family tree too far.
You may discover that some ot your
ancestors roosted on It.
Now let's arrange a little agenda to
limit flic tilings the neighbors arc
privileged to talk about.
When the swords are beaten into
ploughshares, spiral puttees might
come in handy for golf stockings.
It is hard to tell whether the sleeping porch enthusiast likes it or is Just
loo stubborn to confess himself licked.
Our Idea of a courageous man is one
who tells a woman her baby isn't
pretty or tells a man his home brew
Isn't fit to drink.
The old-fashioned young man couldn't make love without turning down
the gas; the modern one can't make
love without stepping on it.
Benefit  Dance
under auspices of the G.W.V.A.
and Women's Auxiliary
in aid of the
ALLARA FAMILY
will be held on
Tuesday   Next
January 17th
In the
ILO-ILO DANCE HALL
Dancing 10 to 2.
Admission: Gents $1, Ladles 25c.
IT WAS ALL RIGHT
She burst into tears.
"Oh!" she sobbed pasiouately, "see
what I have discovered! A hair on
your coat!" And in a hand that trembled she held before him a long brown
hair.
But he, with n smile, returned:
"Darling, the hair is your own."
"Mine?" she cried. "How can you,
when It is a brown hair?"
"But you must remember," said he,
"that this is my last winter's suit.
Last winter's, do you understand? Before' you abandoned the brunette "
Murmuring confused apologies the
lovely creature threw herself upon his
breast.
FOR SALE
TO HUNTERS AND
SPORTSMEN
One-third   Interest   in    45-foot
CABIN CRUISER
Ilig  and  roomy  and  good  sea
boat.   Will sell cheap for cash.
Apply llux 2H\, Cumberland.
Lady Foresters
will hold a
Whist Drive
and Dance
in the
G.W.V.A. HALL
on
Friday, Jan. 13th
commencing at 8 o'clock.
Admission 50 cents.
"Rastus, what's an alibi?"
"Dat's provln' dat you wuz at prayer
mcetin' whar you wasn't, in order to
show dat you wasn't at the crap game
whar you wuz."
The height ot fashion Is knee high.

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