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The Cumberland Islander Mar 20, 1925

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THt "CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
4
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 12.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA   '      FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
H. E. MURRAY'S
TALKTOP.T.A.
BRINGS FORTH
DISCUSSION
The meeting of the Parent-Teach-
erB' Association on Monday was by
far the most Interesting and practical
of any meeting held since the association was formed and It Is to be congratulated upon the interest which it
has created between the parents ami
teachers of our schools. Attending
the gathering there must, have beeu
about fifty including teachers of both
public and high schools and parents
from the city and from Royston and
Minto. The meeting opened in the
usual manner with President Mrs. G.
K. McNaughton presiding, and after
the minutes were rend and the usual
reports from the various committees
received and adopted, the chief topic
of tlie evening was commenced, that
of a discussion concerning "home
work" in many of its aspects.
Mr. H. E. Murray, Assistant Principal, led off the discussion, but before
touching on the actual home work
part of the program he went Into a
full resume of the dally duties as performed by his own class, their problems, and suggestions tor the solution of many of the hindrances which
the ordinary pupil meets with in his
studies. He gave an outline of the
result of work done within the last
few days, showing that out °f a class
of 39 there wcre 13, or one-third, who
had failed to come up to a satisfactory standard, but when these 13 were
segregated' and looked into It was
found that quite a good proportl n of
them had physical defects such as
short-sightedness, anemia, or some
similar complaint. The suggestion
was given to parents of children who
were pi eparlng for entrance to high
'school that if at any time they had
any doubts concerning Reports their
children were receiving the teach.ers
would be delighted to show them the
actual work done ln every exam since
last September so that they would
know exactly In what work the pupil
had fallen down.
Miss Gallivan and Mr. Apps, with
Miss Partridge and Mr. Shenstone
took part in the discussion that followed, giving outlines of the work
they considered essential for students
at home. One parent brought up an
interesting point by stating that It
seemed unfair .that the class should
be dissected as to who were going to
enter high school without sitting the
government test and as to who were
sent up for examination. If the
Principal had the privilege of selecting students he should be given full
power to deal with the class as a
whole, or the alternative. Let everyone take the government tests and the
parents would have a feeling that all
were on their respective merits.
After the business was over the social side of the evening was entered
Into with great pleasure, and parent
met teacher amid frank and open discussion of the knotty problems which
both have to contend with. Mr. Apps
reported to the meeting that he expected Mr. Patterson, government Inspector, would be present next time
and enter Into a full explanation ot
the "Efficiency Tests" which were being conducted at present throughout
the province.
Trustees Mrs. Banks aud Mr. J. C.
Brown were present to report the
work the Board was doing In lmpro ;-
Ing the school grounds as well as the
playing equipment. They also pointed out "'at Mr. A. Maxwell was voluntarily doing quite a bit of work in
connection wilh the making of a tennis court. One or two new members
were heard to remark that "here was
a real live organization which wits
striving, with every sign of success,
for a good object, the getting together
of parents and teachers."
COMOX SEES SPECIAL
AERIAL MAIL RUN
NANAIMO, March 13.—The Victoria and Seattle mail seaplane passed over Nanaimo yesterday afternoon
at 5:30 en route to Comox, where this
morning the plane was to meet a Seattle bound Alaska steamer on her
way down off Comox and there pick
up an Important sack of mall which
It is desired to land In Seattle as
soon as possible. The plane will
convey the mall there, thus saving
several hours over ordinary delivery.
The plane passed over Nanaimo on
the return Journey at 7:35 a.m. Friday morning, evidently having accomplished Its mission.
Ladysmith Easy
For Cumberland
Soccer fans were greatly surprised
last week end at the ease with which
Cumberland eliminated Ladysmith,
present holders of the B. & K. Cup,
from the seml-flnal round of that
competition by the score of 3 goals to
0. The game was very clean, being
well handled by Referee J. Adams and
was witnessed by a large crowd.
The Cumberland half-backs were
Invincible, their brilliant playing together with several splendid saves
made by Blair In goal being the feature of the game. Fowler scored once
ln the first half while "Toots" Plump
boosted the total to three In the second period. This is the way the
teams lined up:
Ladysmith—Currle, Anderson, Camp
bell, Douglas, McCormick, Anderson,
A. Strang, F. Strang, Davis, Heaps
and Rafter.
Cumberland—Blair, Mortimer, Stewart, Monohan, Contl, Brake, Banner-
man Heyland, Fowler, Plump and
Hitchens.
ifiGiher Accident Alona theVaysii
fi
JOLLY PARTY WAS
HELD MONDAY NIGHT
ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT
VISITS REBEKAH LODGE
Mrs. Maud Woodcock, of Nanaimo.
President of the Rebekah assembly,
paid an official visit to Harmony Rebekah Lodge No. 22 on Monday evening last. There was a large attendance of members who listened with a
great deal of Interest to an excellent
address by Mrs. Woodcock on the history of the Rebekah Order. She
maintained that by June of this year
there would be no fewer than fifty
lodges In British Columbia.
Mrs. J. J. Potter, N.O., was in the
chair and the evertfag wound up ln
tbe nature of a social, dainty refreshments being served.
NATIVE SONS
DONATE CUP
FOR SPORTS
The committee ln charge of the Up.-
Island Inter-School Sports Day, which
Is to be held ln Cumberland on June
3rd, have been advised that the Native Sons of Canada, Courtenay Assembly, will donate a cup   for   the
sports, the same to be awarded for
any event ln which the committee may
see lit to place It for competition. To
date three cups have now been promised, and nine silver medals, Mr. A.
T.   Heyland   recently   Informing  the
committee that he would donate one
| of the latter.     The other two cups
| are being given by R. C. Lang and R.
| Kaplansky and the following gentle-
i men have promised    the    remaining
eight medals:     Mesrs C. J. Parnham,
[A. J. Taylor,    T. H. Carey,    0. W.
| Stubbs, F. R. Shenstone, G. E. App-,
I H. E. Murray, and Inspector Patter-
! son.     Mr. Kaplansky's cup Is to be
i used ln the first aid competition.
ANNUAL MASQUERADE
WAS BRILLIANT EVENT;
MAGNIFICENT COSTUMES
The 17th of March is, and always
has been, an event long looked forward to in the history of Cumberland,
not because It ls St. Patrick's Day, for
the city has no large Irish population
to boast of, but because It Is the day
on which the Volunteer Fire Brigade
holds its annual Masquerade. On
Tuesday night the llo-Ilo Hall was
crowded to capacity with interested
spectators who were present, to see
the maskers and tbey were not disappointed, for the costumes this year
were far more numerous and varied
than on former occasions and were
greater In splendor and originality
than any ever before seen at a Masquerade Ball here. In only one Instance was there any disappointment
and that was when only one couple
entered for the prize waltz, making
it necessary to abandon tbat event.
Promptly at 11:45 the Grand March
was commenced with the task of judging in the capable hands of Mrs. H. B.
Bernstein, Mr. Percy Booth, Mr. and
Mrs. Fraser and Mr. E. A. Griffith.
Following nre their selections, all of
which were loudly applauded by the
spectators:
Best Dressed Lady, Mrs. Fraser of
Union Bay; Best Dressed Gentleman.
Mr. Fred Donnelly, as an Arab sheik;
Best Sustained Character, Lady, Mrs.
Roland II. Graham, as a Japanese
girl; Best Sustained Gentleman, Mr.
Tommy Malpass, as a Jew (and a very
good Jew he made);   Best National
Lady, Mrs. Duncan, as an Irish woman; Best National Gent, Mr. A.
Thompsett, as an Arab; Best Comic
Group, Messrs H. Thomas, J. Thomas
and H. Thomas; Best Comic Gent,
Dan. Stewart; Best Clown, Dan Bannerman; Best Hobo, Fraser Watson;
Best Flower Girl, Miss Creta Kay of
Union Bay; Best Advertising Character, Mrs, Fred Smith, representing
Royal Standard Flour; Special Prize,
W. Whltehouse as a Mexican; Special
Prize, MlBses M. Redford, F. Sen! and
G. Oliver. The latter three were the
hit of the evening In their respective
roles as Jock, Mack and Sandy, three
extremely funny gentlemen from the
land of the heather. They were accompanied by Piper Jock Stewart, of
Courtenay, who rendered several selections on the pipes to which Joel;
and Mack danced. Tombola prizes
for the spectators were won by Mrs.
E. Carter, Mrs. Wm. Henderson, Sr.,
Mr. Colvllle Graham, Mr. Eddy Thomson, Mrs. J. Patterson, Ticket No. 190
(unknown), Mr. George Robertson
and Miss Hoffelnz. The little tot who
pulled the winning numbers was presented with a large box of chocolates.
Everyone was then allowed on the
floor and a jolly dance continued uninterruptedly until 2 a.m. to most excellent music provided by Plump's
well-known Orchestra. Beyond a
doubt the Ball wns one of the most
successful that the Brigade has ever
held.
LAID AT REST
DRAWING FOR RADIOLA
HELD SATURDAY NIGHT
The funeral of the late Gordon E.
Mounce, second son of Mr. and Mrs.
,II. E. Mounce, Derwent Avenue, was
The drawing for the radiophone,, „ela Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock
raffled by John H. Cameron of the j tnm the famMv res|dence t0 the Cum.
Cumberland Motor, Works, was held j neriand Cemetery for Interment. Serin thc Pastime Club on Snturday night V|cea were conducted at the home by
when ticket No. 233, held by John H. | thc Rev j R Butler and at tne grav,.
Robertson, wns drawn. The machine j „,,,„ by ^g Eagles j^^ thc Aen„t.
Is a Radlola IIIA. complete in every; ed youth be)ng a member of the Na-
respect, and Is valued In the neigh-! naimo branch of that order and t„e
borhood of $160.00, Norma: Ilohln- j following acted as pallbearers: O.
son drew the winning number. ' Lewi„   D   Richards,  D.  McNlven, C.
  DeCouer, J. Bradley of   Union    Bay
Don't forget the Saturday Night and T. Thames of Nanaimo. A large
Dance at the G.W.V.A. Hall. Good cortege of relatives and friends from
time assured. Gents SOc. Ladles 10c. all over Ihe Island followed Ihe rc-
Danclng 9-12.     Everybody welcome.  ' mains to their last resting place.
DEATH ON S. S. CHARMER
REMAINS A MYSTERY
No progress has been announced by
provincial police ln the case of John
.Smith. 65, Campbell River business
man and miner, who disappeared
Sunday night or Monday morning
from the S.S. Charmer en route to
Vancouver. A blood-stained cabin
is tlle only evidence In the case.
An additional theory advanced was
that It was possible the missing man
might have suffered from a hemorrhage of the head and while in a
weakened condition from loss of blood
and seeking air he staggered from his
cabin to the rail of the vessel on tlle
port side nnd fell overboard.
With cabin 28. the one occupied by
Smith on the night of his disappearance, sealed by officials, the Charmer
ls continuing to cover her run and at
Victoria Monday the cabin was opened
and examined by provincial detectives
ihere. The examination revealed
nothing that was not discovered by
city detectives and the cabin was re-
sealed for further examination when
the vessel again docks at Victoria or
Vancouver.
Investigation is being made into
Smith's business affairs and in his
home town to see if any motive for
suicide can be established or any
enemies, who might wish his death,
' discovered.
A very Jolly time was had at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. J. Hill on Monday evening last when some twenty-
one boys and girls unexpectedly drop
ped In and held a surprise party on
Norman, eldest son of the family.
The evening was pleasantly spent in
singing and playing games and It was
apparent that these were greatly enjoyed by the young people. Delightful refreshments were served by Mrs
Hill, assisted by several of the girls,
bringing to a close, at 11:30 a most
pleasant evening.
C. B. Wood Will
Address Teachers
Mr, C. B. Wood, B.A., formerly
principal of the Cumberland High
School and now of the Victoria Normal School, will address a meeting of
the Comox District Teachers' Association in the school on Saturday, March
28, at 7:30 p.m. Mr. Wood's subject
will be "Modern Tendencies In Education." The C.D.T.A. extend an Invitation to attend to all those who
wish to hear Mr. Wood.
NOTED MINISTER TO
PREACH AT METHODIST
CHURCH ON SUNDAY
* The Rev. J. B. Smith, Ph.D., of the
Episcopal Church of New York, will
speak in the Grace Methodist Church
on Sunday evening, March 22, at 7
o'clock. Everybody should make a
special effort to hear this noted speak
er.
Mr. Smith Is in Cumberland on a
visit to his niece and nephew, the
Rev. J, R. and Mrs. Butler.
GIVES ST. PATRICK'S TEA
Mrs. D. R. MacDonald, Maryport
Avenue, threw open her home on
Tuesday afternoon for a tea on behalf of the Ladles' Aid of the St.
George's Presbyterian Church. The
reception room was tastefully decorated and the dining room, where ten
was served by Mrs. J. T. Bell and Mrs.
C. Whyte, was suggestive of St. Patrick's Day with Its decorations of
green and white In which the shamrock played an Important part. Many
ladles patronized the affair and a
very gratifying amount was realized.
REDUCTION
PROPOSED IN
TAX RATE
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held on Monday evening
last with Mayor C. J. Parnhapi In the
chair and all aldermen present. The
first item on the business program
was the appointment of a new matron
for the Isolation Hospital In place of
Mrs. Bullcn, who has resigned, and as
her successor thc council was unanimous in appointing Mrs. Gear. Included ln the reports received from
the various committees was a request
from Alderman John J. Potter, chairman of the Board of Works, that another man be secured tn assist the
present city workmen but to tbls request the council could not see Its
way clear to comply.
Much Interest wns aroused over
Ihe proposed reduction In the tuva-
tion rate which was put before the
meeting when the finance committee
presented Its estimates for Iho year
1925. For the school hoard the estimated expenditure wns $20,000, cs-
limated receipts were $31,398, and
the proposed new tax rate set ot 9
mills. City expenditures were estimated at $11,509, estimated receipts,
$14,000, and the proposals are ec-
cepted. and a by-law passed to that
effect, It will mean a reduction of 3
mills on the present school rale and
a reduction of 5 mills on. the present
general rate.
HUGETHRONG
AT FUNERAL
OF RESPECTED
GOVT^AGENT
The ranks of the real old-timers ot
('umberlaiid and district are becoming
thinner with the passing of each year,
being depleted by yet another one on
Tuesday morning when residents of
the city learned with great sorrow of
the death of Mr. John Baird in the
Vancouver General Hospital. Sixty
years of age. he has spent over forty
in the Comox District and of these
forty years, twenty-five have been
spent lu serving the publlc as Oov-
1 ernment Agent.      No man could have
served more faithfully than he.
The  late  Mr.  Baird   was  born  at
i Helensburgh, near Glasgow, Scotland,
on February 8, 1805 but left the Old
' Country when quite a young man to
farm in Canada. His first stop was
at Spencer's Bridge, on the Fraser
River, but a few months ot the dull
lite there were sufficient and consequently he landed at Victoria, on the
southern end of Vancouver Island.
Here he met Mr. Joseph McPhee (now
! residing In Courtenay) and was advised by lllm to take up a farm in tbe
Comox Valley and did so. homestead-
lng on a piece of land near Black
Creek for several years, the winters
of which he filled In by working on
tlle roads which were then being
built, and by serving as a clerk ln
McPliee's general Btore at Comox.
Ahout this time the first mines were
I started In Cumberland and as the
sawmill of Grant and Mounce woe al-
1 so In operation then It was In Cumberland that deceased next found himself, working for some time as bookkeeper for this latter concern.     In
j 1899 he and Mr. John Thompson (a
present resident of Cumberland) entered government service as  provln-
i clal police under W. B. Anderson, the
then   government  agent,   but   in   ad-
! ditlon tr his policing duties Mr. Baird
also served as clerk to his superior.
, Shortly afterwards thc party then ln
power in the province was ousted out
and Mr. Anderson wns obliged to dls-
continue olllce In favor of Mr.  Wll-
' 11am Mitchell, but a few months of the
routine work Involved wcre sufficient
'or this latter gentleman and he resigned In 1902. Thc late Mr. Baird
was appointed his successor as
agent, a post which he retained by
faithful service to the day of his
deatli. In all his years of residence
here he has only been once out of the
district, and that for a hurried trip
back to Scotland. He was a well-
known piano player In his day and
for the past few years was a leading
member of the orchestra which supplied the music Tor the various Old-
Timers' Re-Unions held in Courtenay
and In Cumberland.
The body was brought from Vancouver on Tuesday evening and was
interred  yesterday  afternoon   In   the
I Presbyterian  Cemetery  at  Sandwick,
| ihe cortege following the remains being perhaps the largest evcr 8een 'n
the Comox district. Rev. James
Hood  conducted   the  services  at the
| home and Worshipful Master William
E. Searle. of Cumberland Lodge No.
2« A.F.&.A.M.. of which the deceased
wus a member, conducted the burial
' service wblch was very Impressive.
The pallbearers were Brothers D. R.
I MacDonald, Nell McFadyen. J. Fraser.
! David Roy, J. N. McLeod, and William
: Merrifield, with T. II. Corey acting as
: Master of Ceremonies. [Deluded
among those attending the funeral
wore Mosl Worshipful Master Stephen
| Jones of British Columbia    nnd    hla
' retinue, Mr. P. P, Harrison, M.L.A..
Mayor William Duncan of Courtenay,
| Major Charles J.  Parnham of Cum-
1 berland and all thG aldermen.
!    To  mourn   his  loss,  he lenves  his
! widow, six daughters and one son. to
\ whom  much   sympathy  ls  being  ex-
; tended.     All are living In this city.
SPRING SALE POSTPONED
TIDE TABLE, MARCH
20—
27 INCLUSIVE
Time   H't.      Time
Date Time   H't.     Time
H't
H't.
The  time  used
?o
2:58    12-5
8:46
8-7
13:26   10-9 | 20:35
2-1
Is  Pacific  Stand-
21....
3:44    12-8
9:45
7-8
14:40   11-0 ! 21:31
2-3
ard, for the  12'i
22...
4:21    13-0
ln:34
6-8
15:40   11-2 ! 22:21
2-0
•Meridian West.  It
23....
4:54    13-1
11:10
6-7
16:44    11-4 : 23:06
3-2
Is counted from 0
24..
5:20    13-1
11:55
4-8
17:39    11-0    23:50
•1-0
to 24 hours, from
25.
5:50   12-9
111:38
4-0
18:33    11-7 I
midnight to mid
20.
0:33     4-9
0:33
12-6
13:12     3-3 , 19:27
11-7
night
27....
1:17     5-8
7:06
12-3
13:52     3-H    20:22
11-6
APPENDICITIS CASES
KEEP DOCTORS BUSY
Drs. George K. MacNaughton nnd
E. R. Hicks have been busy men during the past two weeks for they hove
removed the nppendlcls of no less
than six patients, which Is a record for
the local hospital ln such a short
space of time. Those operated on
were Gordon E. Mounce. .Miss Audrey
Gear, Miss Marjorie Grant, Archie
Dirk. Campbell Morgan and Wilbur
Hudson.
Thc Ladles' Aid of the Grace Methodist Church has postponed its Spring
Sole from March 25 to Wednesday.
April 8,     Please keep this date open.
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
TO MEET ON FRIDAY
A meeting of the Women's Auxiliary In tin, Cumberland General Hospital, will he held In the Anglican
Church Hall at 3:00 p.m. on Friday.
March 27.
Full attendance is desired
E. N. Jeffrey, Secy. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 11125
DID VOU EVER STOP TO THINK
That hard times mean nothing to a hen? She
just keeps on digging worms and laying eggs, regardless of what the new, papers say about conditions. If the ground is hard she scratches harder. If it's dry she digs deeper. If she strikes
a rock she works around it. I Jut always she digs
up worms and turns them into hard shelled profits
as well as tender broiler:;. Did you ever see a
pessimistic hen'.' Did you ever know of one
starving to death wailing I'or worms to tlig themselves to the surface? Did yon ever hear one
cackle because limes were hard? Not on your
life. She saves her breath i'or digging and her
cackles lor eggs.
THE NEW WONDER
One of the most striking things in connection
with the recent inaugural ceremonies at Washington was the broadcasting ot that interesting event
by radio. One must bow before the majesty of
an agency which makes it possible for a whole
people lo listen, undisturbed, to the voice of their
President while he unfolds for them his vision of
what is needful and best for the nation.
WHY NOT A SMELTER AT THE COAST?
Time after time the assertion has been made
that British Columbia is the richest Province in
the Dominion. This, doubtless, is quite true,
but the proof cat: only be demonstrated, by development ef her natural resources. Mining, agriculture, fishing and lumbering have long been
looked upon as the basic industries of the Pacilic
Province.
At the present time the greatest of these is
mining—so say members of the llritish Columbia
Chamber of Alines and they have set themselves
the task of letting Ihe world know thai their faith
is unbounded. The action of the Chamber of
Mines in instituting a campaign of publicity is
commendable and the influence of this body
should guarantee that wildcatting will be at a
minimum. We wonder if the public will continue I y
to    '      *' '* '     '"   ' *:l   ' ""'	
APPRECIATION
How seldom do we see a genuine example of
appreciation in this busy era of the world's history. The good, old-fashioned, "i thank you,"
has been abbreviated to a curt "Thanx," as the
recipient of a favor hurries on.
It is a line thing to be grateful, to show appreciation ; but how seldom is it done today. We
grab all we get, we take advantage of the other
fellow, we push each other aside, we permit ladies
lo hang on to the strap in street cars, we accept
favors and glide along without one thought of appreciation, one sign of gratitude.
Once upon a time there was a boy ten years
of age who took off his hat when he entered the
house; if he was sitting in the easy chair when
his grandfather came into the room, he immediately arose and gave him the seat. When he
went to church with his mother, he stood aside
at lhe family pew and permitted her to enter lirst
At tiie table he said, "Please, may I have another
slice of bread?" and when grandma gave him a
cookie he said, "Thank you." What has become
of that little boy who showed appreciation for his
elders ? He has grown to be a man past fifty ana
is frequently crowded off the sidewalk by the rush
ing youngsters of today, but he still stands when
a lady enters the room, and he takes off his hat
when talking to one of the fair sex, though the
March wind chills his old bald head. There aro
a few such men left because in their boyhood
they were taught to respect others and to show
appreciation i'or kindness.
Of course we live in a much more rapid age
today. The man, who, like Sir Walter Raleigh,
would spread his coat for a lady to Walk upon
would be smashed to smithereens beneath the
feet of the hurrying crowd. But there is still
me to say "I thank you," t!b show respect to
play the sucker for American  Oil  bunk or Ljder     ople     d t     .     ev'idence rf appr^iatio
choose to invest in legitimate mining enterprises, for favor8 recejved,
backed by the Chamber of Mines. j       ^0 not let this hustling, huirving age take all
One of the greatest stimulants that could be the consideration for others away from us. There
administered to the mining industry in British }a BtiU a hearty respect for the person who shows
Columbia would be the building of a smelter at appreciation to others. The boy who is court-
the coast. Vancouver Island has had two smel- e0us to older people, a gallant to his mothers and
ters—one at Ladysmith; the other at Crofton, an attentive escort to his sisters, attracts atten-
one of the bustling American cities has a smelter tion and receives favorable comment. The boy
to which a great proportion of the ore of this pro-uvho shows application for the things done for
vince is sent for treatment, thus helping to ere- him by others is today so rare that he is marked
ate a payroll with consequent prosperity in a for-|bv older men as a boy who can be given errands
eign land. Paying somebody else to do what we |0f trust and advanced to higher places. Mark
can do for ourselves is surely not good business, yoU( young man, and young ladies, too, one of the
and there seems to be no good reason why the finest things you can weld into your character is
mine owners of this province should continue to the habit of expressing and showing appreciation
do so. ' for the things the older people are doing i'or you
Without a doubt there are opportunities for'today. You don't realize it now, but you will
the prospector right in our own district and the some day.
erection of a smelter at the coast would mean < A genuine "I thank you," a solicitous
everlasting encouragement to him. There are j "Won't you please take this seat," a cordial "Let
hills not far from Cumberland that have never:me do something for you," may bring its return
been scratched, that might hold untold wealth, in a hundred per cent dividend. But aside from
Every prospect means a step nearer the erection hope of reward, it should be a privilege and joy
of a smelter and the erection of a smelter and its to show appreciation to others, to evidence grat-
operation means nothing less than added prosper- itude, because it is so seldom done today, that it
ity to British Columbia, and the stopping of the will linger long in the heart of him or her to
outflow of good Canadian money. jwhom you say, "I thank you."
CREAMERY PRODUCTS!
THERE ARE MANY BRANDS AND PRICES ON THE MARKET, BUT
Comox Creamery Products Are Best
ASK YOUR GROCER FOR
Comox Creamery Butter
StrawJrry Jam
P/\f afnac    "L00K F0R TIIE TA0
i UlcHUGS*      m T1IE BAG"
Creamery Eggs
THEY  ABE  ('IMDED
Whole Wheat Flour
COMOX ICE CREAM WILL BE AT YOUR FAVORITE PARLOR EARLY
NEXT MONTH. "IT'S BETTER
ii
ii
ii
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B.C.
FAMILIES FOR ALBERTA
At least two hundred of the three
thousand families to be brought out i
under the British Empire settlement
scheme this year will be placed on
central and northern Alberta farms,
according to information received
here. Already farms have been secured for every family in the quota
mentioned.
LARGE FARMS SOLD
Canadian Power Defends Chinese Villagers
The farm of George Lane, well
known Alberta rancher, at Namako,
has been sold to colonization interests, it was announced recently. The
farm is 13,320 acres and is stated
to be worth about J650.000. The sale
in also announced of the Rosedale
ranch,' in the Camrose district, and it
is understood will be divided Into
small farms for settlement purposes
by the buyers.
DEVICE INCREASES
LOCOMOTIVE POWER
N°
what on earth has power development at Shawtnigan Palls
pot to do with Chinese- village life?
you ask. The answer is that it
helps to protect Mr. Chinaman, Mrs.
Chinaman antl all the little Chinamen frmn bumlils. Yes! it's a long
cry from the writers of the St. Maurice Valley to the interior Chinese
village, but there you nre. And it
came about *>ius. A harassed Chinese head-man driven to desperation
and from his native village by bad-
men from the hills, came down to
Hong Kong, or perhaps it was
Shanghai,  and down  by  the  dock-
side saw men of his race working by
night as if by day on the unloading
of one of the giant Canadian Pacific Empress steamships.
What wonderful things were these
that could so defy the darkness?
Cluing Li drew closer, and saw that
at intervals along the shed in which
the stevedores wcre working much
light came from little cans that
growled softly in the breeze.
Now everyone knows that electric lights are the invention of the
devil and wcre introduced by the
white rnccs to burn the eyes of
Chinese babies and shorten the life
of    Chinese    men.     Therefore,   as
the power devclapmral
plant tl Shawinigin Pal!', Quebec. Th*
power generated here i, inn!. Indirectly. In
the defence of the Chlnexe village!, typical
»ccnca of which are ihown helow. On tha
left, off lo Ihe market town. Intel, n
partial explanation of tht enormaue rica
consumption   af   this   country.
Chinese men were working in the
light, it could not be electric. Chung
Li d>ew closer. If he could learn
the secret of these bright, white
lights what an honor would be his.
He would place them round his village at night and no one could draw
near without the knowledge of his
men. He would confer with the
other head-men of the district.
And so it came about that the
Canada Carbide Company, which
uses the power developed at Shaw-
inigan Falls to fuse coke and lime
into carbide, received an order for
many flare lights. A deputation of
the villagers made a long journey
tn Hong Kong to receive the shipment as it was discharged from tlie
Empress of Russia, and returned,
knowing thnt as long as the carbide
hung out they were comparatively
safe from the marauding bandits.
There you have the connection.
Shawinigan Falls lighting a Chinese
village and protecting it from bandits.
Demonstrating to the supervisory
forces of the Canadian National Railways at Winnipeg the value of the
"Booster" on locomotives, W. J. Cov-
ontry, service engineer of the Franklin Railway Supply company, of Mon
treal, recently showed motion pictures
depleting this piece of mechanism and
showing the functions of each part.
At the present time there are only 45
In use on railways In the dominion,
all of which are attached to Canadian
National locomotives. Thirty ot
these are ou western lines, ten each
at    Winnipeg,    Melville    and
Ladies' Hosiery
Art Silk Hose, in colors, per pair 60£
Art Silk Hose, in colors, per pair 80*0
Silk Hosiery, in colors, per pair $1.25
COTTON CREPES
Cotton Crepes, all the best colors, per yd 30-f)
TOWELS AND ROLLER TOWELING
Towles, a good large size, each 50**** & 60«*J
Roller Toweling, per yard 40**
MEN'S SOCKS AND HOSE
Men's Work Socks, per pair 25**
Men's Work Socks, per pair 50*?
Men's Fine Cashmere Hose, per pair 80£
A. MacKinnon
holding special market days, those
trading fixtures are becoming very
popular, quite a number of the so-
cietles having decided to have a general weekly market day this year. At
some of the principal market towns,
stores will remain open until 9 p.m.
Rainy I on  such  days.     All kinds of farm
River, the other 15 being ln the east.
The "Booster" Is a device which is
geared to the trailer axle and acts
as an auxiliary power plant, Increasing lhe pull of the engine at least
jleven per cent, or ten cars to a 65
per cent., locomotive. Five "Boosters" are equal to one modern locomotive, each circuit having a drawing
capacity of at least 11,000 pounds. Its
(unctions is to put the idle trailing
wheels to work, thus increasing the
power of the locomotive.
TRANSCONTINENTAL
WIRE CONNECTION
It will not be long before Alberta
people will be able to hold telephone
communication with New York, San
Francisco and other points in the
United States. Within the next
three months, connection will be established between the Alberta Government telephone system and the
Transcontinental telephone system In
the States, by means of three long
distance lines which are to be brought
to the southern border of the province
by way of the Mountain States telephone sytsem In Montana. This will
provide almost continent-wide telephone connection for Alberta.
MARKET DAYS POPULAR
As a result of tho experiences, during tlie past two years, of a few agricultural societies   In    Saskatchewan
stock will bo on offer, and true to tho
tenants of the agricultural societies,
pure bred stock wlll be on view for !
sale and exchange.
CNR TO BROADCAST
FROM VANCOUVER
Arrangements are new being completed to establish the last link ln the
continent-wide chain of radio stations operated by the Canadian National Railways. W. D. Robb, vice-
president in charge of this branch of
the work, and W. H. Swift Jr., director of radio, are at present at the
coast concluding negotiations for a
powerful station, of which the call
letters will be CNRV.
WOULD EXPORT
CAVIAR FROM B.C.
A number ot Russians who recently
arrived ln British Columbia by way
of Manchuria, are negotiating for the
establishment of a caviar Industry ou
the Pacilic coast. They were much
surprised that the by-products possibilities of the fisheries ln the coast
province had not been developed,
stating that, if they were, competition
with other countries could be shut out
and foreign trade extended.
Cunard or some White Star
And a first-class passage for me
And may there be no closing of the bar
When I put out to sea.—Judge.
/ Will Call
at your house In time to take you to
the train or boat.
Car  For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE 25 OR 93—ABK FOB
Geo.  Mason
DR. HUGHES
CHIROPRACTOR
Violet Ray & Electric Massage
That body of yours is just a
delicate piece of machinery and
needs to be overhauled by an
expert yearly and every part
made to function as nature
meant it to.
Your Chiropractor is an expert
and his treatment is what you
need.
Room 1
CUMBERLAND HOTEL FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1926
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
<i
FRIDAY - SATURDAY of this week
Adults, 50c.   Children, 25c.
Come, Laugh Your Troubles Away
f" DENNY
IN TWO DAYS HE TRIED TO GET THE
THRILLS HE HAD MISSED IN 20 YEARS!
MIX A PRETTY NURSE—AN AUTO
SMASH—TRAPPED ON A FLAG POLE—
A HUNT FOR FORTUNE—A MOTORCYCLE RACE AND
Denny  and
Oh,  Doctor
Also a 2 Reel Comedy and
The News Reel
I
Cat\larmmlr
Saturday Matinee at 2.30 p.m.
Adults, 35c. Children 15c.
MON., TUES.
-MARCH 24
607 LAUGHS 15 TEARS 29 THRILLS
COME ON FOLKS HERE'S YOUR BIG TREAT
THE JOY GANG IS HERE
m
ADULTS 35<f)
Saturday Night
DANCE
9.30 to 12
CHILDREN 15*r>
WED. and THURS.
25 MARCH 26
She was a stranger and hated the Kid. But he saved
her by a desperate ride into the jaws of death. Here's a
romance that makes it the truest picture you ever saw
HOOT GIBSON
IN
TheRidin'Kid
"FROM POWDER RIVER"
Edward Sedgwick Director Novel by H. H. Knibbs
Presented by Carl Laemmle
ALSO
CHAPTER 11 OF THE GHOST CITY
AND 2-REEL BUDDY MESSENGER COMEDY
ADULTS 35«*
CHILDREN 150
Friday - Saturday
37 MAItCH—28
Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
IN
Dorothy
Vernon of
Haddon
Hall
IN THE GREATEST COSTUME PLAY OF THE AGE
BATTLES AND FUEDS
BEAUTIFUL ANI) SPECTACULAR SCENES AND
SETTINGS.    THOUSANDS OF PLAYERS INCLUDING AN ALL STAR CAST
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C
Two Shows
NIGHTLY
7  and  8.45
L PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
MERCHANTS ASK FOR
REDUCTION IN WINDOW
AND OUTSIDE LIGHTING
COURTENAY, March 17.—A good
many matters wert handled by the
olty fathers Monday night, before the
council went Into committee as a
whole for the purpose of further discussing tho 1D2S estimates. These
matters included attention to a deputation of merchants asking for a rs-
duction In window and outside lighting rates. The business men In attendance were Messrs Wm. Booth,
Walter Heard, 11. llowle, J. N'. McLeod anil N. Smith. They were informed through Alderman .McDonald,
chairman or the electric light committee, that a revision of the lighting
rates, which would be of benelit to
lhe business men, was being considered by bis committee, and it was
hoped that a substantial reduction In
window lighting would be found possible.
Alderman McKenzie wanted it made
el-Jar that the Native Sons were not
asking exemption of taxation on the
proposed building and lots as reported to use for a public park.
Some discussion concerning deduction of Courtenay's share of liquor
prolits resulted In the city clerk being
Instructed to write formally protesting tlie deductions. Applications for
further relief by citizens were referred to the special committee.
Mr. Farmier attended to say that
the city dumping ground was getting
he.ond bis control owing to the deposit of such Junk ns old automobile
pirts Including fenders and other rub
bish that would not burn. Alderman Fielder thought that the refuse
of this nature might be dumped in
the sea as was done at other cities.
Alderman McDonald was of the opinion that the noninflamable rubbish
would make a good road bed. Alder
man McKenzie wanted to know if the
city was under any obligation to provide any dumping ground. City solicitor J. M. .Mitchell, who was present, didn't know of any clause in the
Municipal Act calling for such provision. The garage proprietors are
to be notified that no metal Is to be
dumped within the city. Notices will
also lie posted at the city dump.
After this, on motion of Alderman
McKenzie. seconded by Alderman
Pearse, the Council went into committee as a whole for the purpose of
considering tie 1926 estimates. M-
derman McKenzie was elected chairman and the estimates received a good
deal of attention. After considerable
discussion tne School and Fire estimates were passed with some slight
amendments. Other estimates were
referred back to the various committees for revision.     The figures for the
TENNIS CLUB GET
SILVER COINS FOUND
BUSY FOR SEASON I    AT ROOT OF TREE NEAR
COURTENAY, March 19.—The annual meeting of the Courtenay Tennis
Club was held in the City Hull on
Wednesday night. There was a fairly good attendance, particularly of
lady members. Dr. E. L. Pottinger
was elected president for the year and
Mr. Robert Thompson secretary-treas
urer. A committee was appointed for
tlie purpose of canvassing new members. The committee is composed
of Miss Mary Sutton, Mrs. Heber
Cooke, and Messrs Heber Cooke and
II. 0. Sutherland.
It was decided to accept an offer ot
the Lake Trail tennis courts for the
season for the sum of (200, provided
lliis amount can be raised by April
1st next. The following subscription
rates were set for the season: Single
ladies $r>.00 single men $7.50, family
tickets ?10.
It is the Intention of the club to
hold a social once each week during
the 192n season. Mr. H. E. Wallls
acted as chairman and filled the position admirably. Before the close of
the meeting a hearty vote of thanks
was extended to Mr. C. S. Wood, the
retiring secretary, for his valuable
work nf the past.
LAKE TRAIL ROAD
COURTENAY March 18.—Mr. R. B,
Haas made a lucky find early this
week. While taking out a root at his
property on the Lake Trail Road, ho
unearthed four silver coins. These
consisted of an American dollar piece
and a Strait Settlement half dollar. It
is thought that the money has been
laying there since the timber was
logged oil about twenty years ago and
that it was lost by a logger at tliat
time. The coins are dated 1S92 to
1900 and although tarnished they
show very little sign of having been
worn. It Is quite likely that there
may have been some paper money deposited with the silver at the time
The coins were under the sod, however, so that any billB would, in all
probability, have completely decomposed during a period of twenty years.
LEAVE FOR NANAIMO
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Atkinson left for
Nanaimo Wednesday. Mr. Atkinson
will have charge of the Mottlshaw
Mill in its new location. The furniture was taken over the road by W.
R. Creech. .Miss M. E. Johnson and
her mother are accupylng the house
on Lake Trail just vacated by Mr.
Atkinson.
Public Works Department did not
make provision for Improvements to
Union Bay Koad, Mill Street and Cum
berland Road and a recommendation
was made to the committee to include
these items. When discussing the
electric light estimates, Mayor Duncan asked if any request had been received from residents of the lower
road at Sandwick for service. Mr.
C. 3. Wood replied that so far the
residents of that district hadn't got
together on the matter. Alderman
MacDonald thought that the time for
extensions to tho light system from
revenue was a thing of the past and
that any future work should be done
as capital expenditure. Alderman
Cooke was also In favor of getting
away from capital expenditure out of
revenue and would be in favor of debenture issues Instead. The estimates will receive further consideration at the next meeting of the city
fathers.
COMOX   VALLEY   COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following is a list of cows lu the above association that gave 50 lbs, or
more of butter-fat for February, 1025.
Days Lb.     Lb.
Fresh      Name of Cow Dreed Milk   Fat
9.1   Josephine   Gdr. Jersey 1569
100   Lilly       Gdr. Jersey 13S0
35   Maxim*      Gdr. Jersey 1242
100    Hell      Gdr. Jersey I24S
40   Landseers Bonny Fern   P.B. Jersey 1341
12»   Spots   Gdr. Jersey 1248
8u   Buddv   Gdr. Jersey 1352
t!0   Mazzie   Gdr. Jersey 1290
73   Norther,, Star   P.B. Jersey 1389
35   Queenic   Gilr. Jersey 1057
84   Spotty  -  Gdr. Jersey 1056
92   Aggie   Gdr. Jersey 750   54.0
105   Pollv    Gdr. Jersey 963
78   Biddy   Cdr. Jersey 999
84 Happy Hollow Sultana 3rd P.B. Jersey 933
50 Warriors Rose Maid 4th .... P.B. Jersey 1041
120   Cherry   Gdr. Jersey 975
90   Jessie   Gdr. Jersey 1119
87   Barney 3rd   Gdr. Jersey 909   50.9
104   Yellow  _  Gdr. Jersey 1011
34   Ziller   Gdr. Jersey 954
7S.4
77.2
74.5
09.8
07.0
62.4
59.9
59.3
68.3
54.7
54.6
53.9
53.9
52.2
52.0
51.6
51.4
50.5
50.5
WM.
Owner
W. A. Urquhart
W. A.. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
Miss M. J. Hardy
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
Pritchard Bros.
R. U. Hurford
J. Iabester.
G. Bigelow
11. Scales
W. A. Urquhart
R. U. Hurford
J.  McKenzie
R. Williamson
Pritchard Bros.
J. McKenzie
W. A. Urquhart
G. Bigelow.
H. Cox.
ROSE, Supervisor.
DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR
MORE VA1 UE FOR THE DOLLAR
NEW FORD TOURING CAR
Gypsy curtains, non-glare headlights, lower seating,
■-li/jWrt lower top, more power        ^LR!70
Balloon Tires only $40.00 Extra
4 Speed Ahead Silent Change $75.00 Extra
Corfleld Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
SEE A QUEEN
^EATING BOX LUNCH
Imagine Quee„ Elizabeth, arrogant
ruler ot England ln the sixteenth century, eating box lunches and drinking certified milk! Such was the
strange sight which greeted onlookers
who witnessed the Aiming of some of
the scenes of Mary Pickford's newest
picture, "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon
Hall," which will be shown Friday
and Saturday of next week at the llo-
Ilo Theatre, while the company was
on location. In this production more
extensive trips have been taken than
ever before ln the pictures of Miss
Pickford, and It has been necessary
to feed hundreds of extras.
In San Franscisco's famous Golden
Gate Park, tn the Eusch Gardens of
Pasadena, and at the lakes of Los
Turas, passersby were astonished to
see Queens, Lords, Earls and ladies-
in-waiting strolling about in thc ar-
tractlve costumes ot the period of
English history with which "Dorothy
Vernon ot Haddon Hall" deals.
BORN—At the Comox Hospital, on
March 19. to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Marshall of Courtenay, a daughter.
GEORGE WEAVER IS
SENT TO OKALLA
COURTENAY, March 16.—On Saturday night at the City Hall, before
Magistrate Hames, Giorge Weaver of
Sandwick was charged with the theft
of a block and tackle the property of
Mr. W. Joyce of the Union Bay Road.
Weaver was found guilty of the offence and was sent to Okalla for two
months.
DENNY ADDS ANOTHER
TO HIS TRIUMPH LIST
Reginald Denny has added another
triumph to the list of his Bcreen achievements by his work as star In "Oh,
Doctor!" Universal-Jewel, which will
be given its first showing this Friday
and Saturday ln Ihe Ilo-llo Theatre.
But the public who has acclaimed
not only his humorous personations.
hut his rapid-action recklessness, is
due for a shock when he is Introduced
as an Invalid whose principal activities consists In taking his own temperature with a clinical thermometer
and drawing the stoppers from various bottles containing nostrums
guaranteed to cure, no matter what
the ailment. "Oh, Doctor!" is the
screen version of the famous Btory of
the same name written by Harry
Leon Wilson and Denny has the part
of Rufus Billups, Jr.
Denny's characterization of this
young hypochondriac Is one of the
best things he has ever done. It
Is a part that might easily have been
overdone, and that would have ruined
tho picture; one Is forced to the conviction that the big star must have
devoled considerable time to studying the peculiarities ot the hypochondriac.
The best opportunity for Denny to
emphasize his subtilty of character
portrayal conies when, having fallen
in love with his beautiful nurse, portrayed by Mary Astor, he battles with
himself to overcome his obsession regarding his own health and to act
like a normal human being.
He succeeds and then, spurred to
great endeavor by his desire to become like the heroes of the novels,
she reads, he enters Into a series of
Buick
WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT WE
HAVE BEEN APPOINTED DISTRICT AGENTS FOR
THE ABOVE AUTOMOBILES, AND HAVE THE
NEW McLAUGHLlN-BUICK MODELS ON DISPLAY
IN COURTENAY
In order to give the public satisfactory service on Mc-
Laughlin-Buick cars, we are stocking a full supply of
parts for the different models, and we have mechanics
who are thoroughly familiar with the repairing of
these machines. If you are in the market for a car,
don't miss seeing the latest, improved, McLaughlin-
Buick models, and compare them with any car in the
same price class.
Blunt & Ewart
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
PHONE 61 PHONE 61
E43
adventure  that  almost  cause heart-j
failures to his aunt, his nurse and
the three Shylocks who have loaned
him money.
In this latter part ot the story It
is the Denny ot "Sporting Youth' and
other vigorous action pictures that !.,
on the screen.
"Oh,   Doctor!"   was   directed   by j
Harry Pollard, and he achieved something worth while, as he has in the '
other Dennys' which he has directed. I
The supporting cast is a One one and .
Includes  such  widely  know,,  screen
players   as   Otis   Harlan,    William
Mong, Tom Rlcketts,   Lucille   Wanl,
Mike     Donlin,     Clarence     Geldert,
Blanche Payson, George Kuwa, Mar- j
tha Mattox and Helen Lynch.
SOME PEOPLE]
GET GREAT
SATISFACTIi
thinking of
The things
they would
do ip they
ONLY HAD
MCOURAGE
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
CtoiNftWW) GrainiI;?iystc,II
CHEER UP!
buy soMEBrandram & Henderson's
PAINTS, VARNISHES, ETC.
AND MAKE A BRIGHTER CITY
-SOLD BY—
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
P.O. Box 62 COURTENAY 'Phoiw 17
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
Tht White Store
The White Bakery
Bat McBryde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that drives
the poison from the system.     He that Is hailed as the greatest
writer on health says, "Patent foods should be shinned like the
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First CImi Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantee* the auality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
USEDCARS
Of Good Value
ON EASY TERMS
STAR—In really good shape, just 12 months old.
Good rubber  $525
FORD LIGHT DELIVERY—In really good running
order; has just been thoroughly overhauled;
4 good tires (two new ones)   $150
CHEVROLET FOUR-NINETY—Has just had engine
and rear end overhauled; in good running order
good tires   $200
FORD TUDOR SEDAN, 1924—Ruckstall axle, Gabriel
Snubbers; engine and battery, etc., have just
been overhauled; in really good shape $750
THAT SPRING OVERHAUL OF YOUR CAR
Bring your repair work to the shop where the work is
guaranteed.    If it is not right we will make it right.
Bell-Irving Motors, Limited
Hudson, Essex, Star and Durant Agents. ,
'DJAKfliSlMIQ* ©ISIS
BATTERIES FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGE FIVE
4
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
THE JUDGE* He Wants to Work With Spirit.- ^M3
I WELL WOULD YOU
1  WORK IF IQOT YOU A JOB
■^ AT THE DRY DOCK
It'stiesl
rorlou x
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING AND PRESSING
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Ladies' & Gent's Tailoring
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunamuir Avenue
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders tt
Tommy'a Hardware Store
crniuANs, b.c.
NEW MARY PICKFORD
PHOTOPLAY BOOKED HERE
Announcement has been made by
the management ot the Ilo-llo Theatre
that Mary Pickford ln "Dorothy Vernon ot Haddon Hall," her latent
United attraction, will be shown In
Cumberland for the first time next
Friday and Saturday, March 27-08,
with a special orchestra.
Plcturlzlng "Dorothy Vernon of Had
don Hall," the most famous of the
Charles Major novels, stands out as
one of the cinema events of the year,
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKBRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
presenting Mary Pickford in her
greatest role. Her thoughts having
dwelt so much upon the (liming of
this story, Mary has given her whole
heart and soul to the creation of her
newest screen personality.
A most capable cast of players will
be seen in her support. Allan Forrest is the lover, Sir John Manners,
and Marc MacDermott Is the villainous cousin, Malcolm Vernon, Anders Randolf makes an Ideal father for
Dorothy Vernon, and Wilfred. Lucas
Is the Earl of Rutland. Clare Barnes,
famous for her portrayal of queenly
roles on the speaking stage, brings to
the screen a characterization of Queen
Elizabeth that is a revelation of historic art.
Among the other players of note
are, Lottie Pickford Forrest, Malcolm
Waite, Courtenay Foots, Howard Caye
Estelle Taylor, Mme Carrie, Daumery,
Eric Mayne, Colin Kenny and Lewis
Sargent.
The production is lavish, no expense having been spared in erecting
stately mansions and mediaeval cas
tles. Scenes of pageantry and revelry are presented with picturesque
magnificence.
Under the capable direction of
Marshall Neilan. "Dorothy Vernon of
Haddon Hall" has renewed interest
ln the romatic costume drama of the
screen. The photography by Chas.
Kosher is the most beautiful ever
done by this well-known cameraman.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - . B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
Facts and fiction for th? sportsman,
Interesting and of a wide variety, aro
offered In the April issue of Rod and
Gun in Canada. The initial story,
The Shanty Up By the Gens-de-Terre,
by Alden Griffin Meredith, ls a tale of
silver prospecting warranted to hold
the attention of all who read It. Iu,
The Motoring Legions Are Coming,
Wm. G. Irwin berals the influx of
summer tourists into Canada. Bonny-
castle Dale and J. W. Winson again
discourse Interestingly on wild bird
life and F. V. Williams and Martin
Hunter add their quota of good reading. The Guns and Ammunition is
up to its usual standard of excellency
and Includes articles on the Varmint
and the Early Remington rifles. In
Fishing Notes, Robert Page Lincoln
takes up the question of different
lures to be used for fishing, and the
other departments, stories and
sketches, all deal with some seasonable subject Interesting to the sportsman. Published monthly by W. J.
Taylor, Limited, Woodstock, Ont.
When you are In need ot a
Plombhtf A Heating Engineer, Be*
R. RUSHTON
DENMAN ISLAND NEWS
Visits IsIiiimI
The Hev.  W.  Leversedge, of Cumberland, was a visitor to the  Island
last week end.
(tone U* Hornby
The McGee and Robertson tamllles
have moved to the site of the camp ou
Hornby Island.
(■one to ('umber-land
Mr, Wester, of I'iercy's Camp, Denman Island, went to the Cumberland
General Hospital last week to receive
treatment on a cut knee.
It Hums Home
Mr, A. H. Swan has returned from
a harried business trip to Vancouver.
He was accompanied in his boat by
Messrs J. Scott, Green and Harper
Balkle,
Women's Institute Moots
The Women's Institute rfheld its
monthly meeting at the home of Mm
John Corrigal last Thursday when
a large attendance was On hand. The
main business of the day was the arranging of the program for the year
and, after correspondence had been
gone through, this was done. The
meeting then adjourned for tea which
was served by Mrs. Chalmers and
Mrs. Corrigal.
1IORNE LAKE RECEIVES
SHIPMENT OF SPAWN
Newcomers to the number of 75,000
arrived at Home Lake last Sunday
morning. They came by motor truck
from Xaiiaimo and were ln small
wooden boxes packed in lee and In
the form of cut throat trout spawn,
under the protection of the Dominion
Government Fish Warden from Victoria* The spawn were immediately
liberated in the upper end of the Lake
But listen, Mr. Angler, it will be another eighteen months before these
fish are of the fisbable size. Never-
the less we are mighty glad to see the
new arrivals and hope they soon become climatlzed and like their new
surroundings.
BORN RICH
CHEAPER BEER FOR
USERS IN ALBERTA
EDMONTON, March 14.—The beer
drinking public of Alberta will have
cheaper beer in future, if the suggestion by Dr. J. S. Stewart. Conservative, Lethbrldgc, in tlie Legislature
ls productive of results, it was contemplated that the price charged at
the present time was entirely too high
considering the small profits made
by the Liquor Board on this product
and an investigation by tlie Public
Accounts Committee might show that
the profits of the breweries were sufficient to warrant a reduction.
1.
8.
Marcel Waver
Nine Reasons Why You Should Buy This Waver
Assures a beautiful  Marcel  Wave  in Ave
minutes.
It will not burn or singe your hair.
It will save its cost many times in the first month.
A wave when you want it—No waiting for the hair
dresser.
After the swim, put a quick wave in.
Costs practically nothing to operate—Fits in any
socket.
A quicker and better wave than is possible with
any other appliance.
Your appearance depends  on  your  hair  dress.
Here is quick beauty.
Absolutely guaranteed.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, EC.
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Phone 1(7
Cumberland
Phone 124
Courtenay or
Tour  need*  will  receive  immediate
attention.
UNION   HOTEL
CCaTBIKLANB, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
U  rooms,  eloetrleaikr  heated.
Bic.ll.at eulslno—
Per reiervattone Phone 11.
t. TiTU, lianaser.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND.  B.C.
New Car Service
CAK FOB HIKE DAI OK NIGHT
M TELEPHONE—100
Cumberland Hotel
jTJar leaves Cumberland Hotel at
i 8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Stories of the lives of thoBe fortu-
nates who are "born rich" always are
fascinating to tiie vast army of motion picture fans and "Born Rich"
possesses that alluring appeal. But
"Born Rich" ranks far above the average "society drama," because it has
been accorded an unusual treatment
by Director Will Nigh that makes It
ixtraordinary delightful. While the
story, based on the novel by Hughes
Cornell, relates the domestic troubles
of a young couple thc director has Interlarded the drama with delicious
humor.
"Born Rich" was produced by the
Oniriik Pictures Corporation and will
be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre on
Monday and Tuesday, March 30 and
.11.
NOTRE TO CONTRACTORS
COMOX ELECTORAL DISTRICT
CONCRETE SIDEWALKS
I iinilii'i'hiuil, B.C.
SEALED TENDERS, cndorsed"Ten-
der for Concrete Sidewalks, Cumberland," will be received at the office
of tiie Honorable tlie Minister of Public Works, Victoria. B.C.. up to noon
Monday, March 80th, 1925.
PlanB, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender can be seen at the
office ut' the undersigned, Victoria,
B.C., and at th,. Publlc Works Olllce
al  Courtenay, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque on a
chartered bank nf Canada for the sum
nl' Seventy-live ($75.00) Dollars, made
payable in tlic Honorable the Minister
of Public Works. Tlie cheque of the
successful tenderer will be retained
as security for the due nnd faithful
performance of the work until the
satisfactory completion of the same.
Tlic lowest or any leader not necessarily acoeptod,
p. piiiijp.
Deputy Minister and
Public Works Engineer.
Department  of Public Works.
Parliament Buildings,
Viiioriii. B. C.
March 12. 1025. IS,
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
"The Old Folks At Home"
One of the finest uses to which the long-distance
telephone can be put is the bringing of good cheer to
"the old folks at home." Sons and daughters living
miles away can delight their parents with a longdistance chat every now and then—perhaps every
week-end.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
ftene fWOH DOeTOR"'*3t,irrin<] REGINALD DENt-T
A-  *JNlVtKS/».L'.H_wiL.
AT TIIE LLO-ILO THEATRE
Friday and Saturday of This Week. PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1826
m
SUCH  A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your laundry to us.  Our long experience safeguards  your interests and guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove it.
Free  Patches   —   Clean Work   —   Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry '
PHONE 34 Quick Delivery P.O. Box 394
\% ^*-a~^ * —- 4. — E
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
8HINQLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
[Night calls: 184X Courtenay
I Office: 159 Cumberland
ft
The Short Route Between Pacific Coast
and the
OLD COUNTRY
is
Continental Limited
9.30 P.M., Daily, From Vancouver
All Steel Equipment        Radio        Unexcelled Service
Bookings on Any Transatlantic Steamers
Reservations  and  Full   Information  From
E. W. BICKLE
Dunsmuir Ave. — CUMBERLAND —    Telephone 35
K
LATE DANIEL DRUM-
HELLER WAS AT WILD
HORSE IN EARLY DAYS
INVERMERE, B.C., March 14—With
the death of Daniel L. Drumheller, of
Spokane, Wash., who passed away
lately at Los Angeles, the last known
survivor of the early days of the placer gold mining rush to Wild Horse
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
NOTICE IS HEHEBY GIVEN that,
on the 14th day of March nexl, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part of the
building known as Willis Hotel,
situate at Union Bay, adjoining Island
Highway, Nelson District, County of
Nanaimo, Province of British Columbia, upon the lands described as Section 32, Victoria Land Registration
District, In the Province of British
Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated this 20th day of February,
1925. I, C. WILLIS,
8-11.
Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 14th day of March next, the undersigned IntendB to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part of the
building known as the Bevan Hotel,
situate at Bevan, Comox District,
County of Nanaimo and Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Part of Sec. 4, Township 9,
Victoria Land Registry District, In the
Province ot British Columbia, for the
sale of Beer by the glass or by the
open bottle for consumption on the
premises.
Dated this 20th day of February,
1925.
ALEXANDER J. McMILLAN,
8-11. Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 14th day of March next the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license In
respect of premises being part of the
building known as Campbelltown
Hotel, situate at Townsite of Campbelltown, near Campbell River, on the
Island Highway, in Sayward District,
County of Nanaimo and Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Lot No. 26, of Lot 66 Block
No. C, Map No. 1058, Victoria Land
Registry District, In the Province of
British Columbia, for the sale of Beer
by the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated this 20th day of February,
1925.
JAMES ENGLISH,
8-11. Applicant.
Creek, in the East Kootenay, which
took place in 1864, has gone. It
cannot be ascertained locally just at
the moment, but it is thought that
Mrs. Harry Mather, who was also
amongst the pioneers, still Burvives.
Unitl a late date she was residing in
the Okanagan country.
While not actively engaged in taking out gold ln the Wild Horse rush,
yet, the late Mr. Drumheller was
both directly and Indirectly Interested in the luck of that roaring camp.
He supplied on the hoof, most of the
beef that was consumed by the several thousand husky beef-eating miners who then called Wild Horse Gulch
their home. These cattle were driven up from tho south by way ot
Bonner's Ferry, Idaho, crossing Into
Canada by way of Tobacco Plains,
on the old pack trail which follows
the Kootenay River. The entry port
of thai part is now Newgate. The
old pack trail was deepened mid
grently widened of late years by tlic
caravans and fleets of fast cars carrying liquor from Fernie and other
Crows Nest Points for export into
the United States. For many years
before the construction of the main
line of the C.P.R. this trail was the
only means ot comfortable ingress
and egress Into the fertile valley of
the Columbia and Kootenay rivers.
Incidentally, the name of Mr.
Drumheller stands connected with
the famous coal mines of Alberta and
the thriving town which bears that
name, it being carried there by a sou
and a nephew of that early pioneer.
ARE ACTORS DUMB?
CAMEO, DOG STAR,
GLAD TO ADMIT IT
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt atten!' n.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at-^ pAMILY SH0E REPAIREHS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application fer Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 27th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of preailses being part of the
huilding situate on the West side of
the Island Highway, at Merville,
Comox District, County of Nanaimo,
Province of British Columbia, upon
the lands described as subdivision of
Lots 27 and 42, being part of Block 29.
Map No. 2270, Victoria Land Registration District, In the Province of
British Columbia, for the sale of Beer
by the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated this 26th day of February,
1925.
R. H. SHAW,
9-12. Applies it
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR  ACT
Notice of Application for ltwr
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihat,
in the 10th day of April next, the undersigned intends to apply to tlu
Liquor Control Board for a license 11:
respect of premises being part o:
building known as Alert Hay lintel
sltunted at Alert liny, British Columbia, In Comox District, Lot 68,
Rupert District. In the Province of
British Columbia, for thc sule of Ileal*
hy the glass nr by the open bottle tor
consumption on the jiremlses.
Dated this 9th day of March. 1925.
A. A. GIBBENS,
11-14 Applicant.
NAVIGABLE WATERS PROTECTION
ACT R. S. C. CHAPTER 115
Wood and English, Limited, hereby
give notice that they have, under section 7 of the said Act, deposited with
the Minister of Publlc Works at Ottawa, and In the olllce of the District
Registrar of thc Land Registry District of Victoria at Victoria, B.C., n
description of the site nnd the plans
of thc Mill, Log Booming Grounds nnd
Docks proposed to lie built in Iho
West Arm of Beaver Cove in front
of Lots 115, 1092 and 109*1.
And take notice that after the expiration of one month from the date
of the first publication of this notice.
Wood and English Limited wlll under
section 7 of the said Act. apply to the
Minister of Public Works at his olllce
In the City of Ottawa, for npprovnl of
the snid site and plans, and for leave
to construct the said Mill, Log Booming Grounds nnd Docks.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this third
dav of March 1925.
WOOD  &  ENGLISH.  Limited,
11-14 F, C. Green, Agent.
Quick attention to bronchitis will
usually ward off its serious complications. Shiloh reduces inflama-
tion in the tubes, eases the dry,
painful cough and heals the raw
throat tii-ran At vour drusstit. SOc,
mc. anil «1.20.
SHIL0K
r FOR
COUGHS
Use Celery King
a gentle laxative"Tea"
relieves sick headaches
At your druggiet 30c and 60c.
Some actors and actresses are dumb
"Cameo." as perfect a lady as any
dog 0|, the screen today, admits It lu
her most Intelligent way.
Her ability to act, intelligently,
though rated a "dumb animal," has
again won her a role in a J. K. McDonald production for First National
ThlB time tt Is in "A Self-Made Failure," directed by William Beaudine at
the Hollywood studios,
"Cameo's" work in "Penrod and
Sam' endeared her to the picture-
goers of the world, and by popular
demand she Is now a member of "A
Self-Made Failure" cast.
Three years ago when she was u
puppy only a few weeks old, her
master, Hap Ward, started to teach
her the simple trick of running after
a ball.
Today "Cameo" has developed a
brain which would do credit to a human being.
And for her intelligence she draws
a salary that would make a member
of the President's Cabinet or the Supreme Court turn green with envy.
"Cameo" is not hired by the da/.
Her services are obtained by means
of a legal contract which secure tor
her: screen credit, a dressing room, a
closed car to transport her from home
to the studio, Insurance against accident, observation by a veterinary,
special foods and a working day limited to three hours.
"Cameo" doesn't carry a watch but
she quits work at four thirty without
anybody telling her the time.
"A Self-Made Failure" will be
shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre ou Monday and Tuesday, March 23-24.
NOTICE
"The  Navigable  Water's   Protection
Act" R.8.C. Chapter IU
Nourishes baW
io robust health
FREE BABY BOOKS
Write to the Borden Co., Ltd., Vancouver for two Baby Welfare Books.
The Royston Lumber Company Limited hereby gives Notice that It has
under Section 7 ot the said Act deposited with the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa and ln the Office of
the Registrar of Titles at the City ot
Victoria, In the Province of British
Columbia, a description of the site and
plans of its proposed wharf, boomlng-
grounds, piles and works appurtenant thereto to be constructed on the
site known as Lot 151, Nanaimo District and which site Is situate in front
of the Marine Drive which lies between high tide mark and Ihe North
Easterly boundary of Blocks "C", "D",
and "E" of Section 4 In Nelson District Province of British Columbia,
Plan 1478.
AND TAKE NOTICE that after the
expiration of one month from the date
of the first publication of this Notice
the Royston Lumber Company Limited will under Section 7 of the said
Act apply to the Minister of Public
Works at his offlce at the City of Ottawa tor approval of the said site
and plans and for leave to construct
the said Wharf and to drive, place
and erect the said piles and works appurtenant thereto.
DATED at Cumberland, B.C., this
26th day ot February, A.D., 1925.
THE ROYSTON LUMBER CO. LTD.
Per G. K. Uchlyama,
9-12 Managing Director.
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE IU
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Manns Hakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Psstrtes
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc.
Taste Teasing Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give us a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
DRUG STORE SOLD
TO RALPH FROST
OF VANCOUVER
Ralph E. Frost, formerly ot Vancouver, British Columbia, has purchased
the Clapp drug store, long operated
by the late Carl F. Clapp. This business has been established ln Covina
(or the past twenty-nine years.
Mr. Frost is a graduate of tbe Ontario College of Pharmacy and has
had twenty-six years experience In
the drug business.
In selecting Covina as a permanent
home in Southern California Mr.
Frost states that the municipal spirit
depicted by the beautiful children's
play grounds and park, the splendid
grammar and high schools were the
chief incentive for his coming here,
as a city with such community spirit
ls bound to progress Is the opinion
of Mr. Frost.
Mr. and Mrs. Frost have rented a
residence on Navilla Place and with
their children, a son and daughter,
moved Into their new home a tew days
ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Frost were formerly
of Cumberland where they have numerous friends, having operated for
three years, the Drug Store now owned by R. c. Lang.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACTAI1MENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, aurvsysd
Crown lande may be pre-empted at*
British subjects over IS years of aft,
and by aliens on declaring laUnslaa
to become British subjects, eentl-
tlonal upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for tgrlcnltartl
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions il
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," cosies ef
which can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing tbe Department ol
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Oev-
ernment Agent
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agrlctsltiral
purposes, and wblch is not timber-
land, le, carrying over MOO beard
feet per acre weet of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
ApplicaUons for pre-emptions are
to oo addressed to Ut Land Can-
missioner of the Land Recording Division, in wblcb the land applied for
ia situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of wblch can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of 110 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least Ire
acree. before a Crown Orant eaa be
received.
For more detailed Infoi nation see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
ApplicaUons are received ter purchase ot vacant and "reserved
Crown lande, not being tlabtrland,
(or agricultural purposes; mlnlmess
price of Bret-class (arable) land It II
per acre, and eecond-class (graalag)
land 12.60 per acre, rurther Information regarding purchase er lease
of Crown lands Is given la Bullslla
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase tad
Lease of Crown Lande."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites oi
Umber land, not exceeding 41 aartt,
may be purchaeed or leased, tht conditions including payment of
ttumpage.
HOMESTEAD LIASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 10
teres, may be leased at hometltee,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditlone are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed,
LEASES
For graiing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 140 unit
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Orating Act the Prov.
ince Is divided into grating districts
tnd the range admlnlstsred nnder a
Ortslng Commissioner. Annuel
grazing permits trt issued utsed on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-ownere
may form associations for range
management Free, or partially free,
permlte are available for cottiers,
campers tnd  travellers,   up   to   ten it
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
Yukon Won Balto Trophv
Struck with the fine qualities of determination, rnnrnee and endurance displayed by the veteran Balto, who battled his way In record
time at the head of twelve other dnjts driven by (limner Kesson nsrainst
most adverse conditions into Nome, Alaska, with dyptheria anti-toxin,
Mrs. Frank Clnrke of Sheepshead Bay, N.Y.. offered an antique silver
plate a* a trnnhv to be awarded to the beRt hn*"t'y in the winning team
in the Eastern International Doi? Sled Derhy. The trophy was awarded
to YnV-.ii, the lendlner inn In the Manitoba foam driven to victory at
Onohoc by St. Goddsrd under the Frannuelln PaOPr Comniny colors end
will be held in perpetuity by its owner. Mrs. Clarke intends to offer
• similar trophy each year.
4we
on your
groceries
One way to save on your
groceries without reducing
your menu is to order thorn
from Frelone's. We guarantee our qualltyas well a*
price.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. Stli and Dunsmuir.
WHO'S  WHO  AND  WHAT'S
WHAT   IN   FOOTBALL
CIRCLES
The final of the Brackman Ker Cup
will be held on Saturday at the Central Sports Grounds, Nanaimo, when
the Nanaimo Veterans and the Ciiiii-
! berland  United will   battle   for   the
right to meet the best of Victoria's
| Soccer players.     Cumberland's easy
j win over Ladysmith last   week   has
put them hot favorites tor the game
! tills week end, but the boys are tak-
i lug no chances In taking their oppon-
| cuts too easy, and all players are reported as being fit and anxious for
T. Malpass
GENERAL HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
.Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
OR PHONE IS UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
THE ILC. MINING GAZETTE
Through  our  connection   with
the publishers of this up-to-date
mining journal,  we can  offer,
to a limited  number only,
THREE MONTHS' FREE
SUBCHIPTION
without obligation on your part,
Call or write
ORANT MAHOOD & CO., Ltd.,
Members Vancouver Slock
Exchange.
kx Rogers Bldg.,
B^k Vancouver, B.C.
IS
Auction Sales
BY
Hardy & Pearce
MARCH 24— AT Mr. G. Bigelow's Ranch, Courtenay,
Pure Brad ar.fl Grade Jersey Cattle. Sale at 2 p.m.
APRIL 1—-At Bush Farm Arden, Cumberland Road,
for Mrs. Seaborne, Antique and Modern Furniture
the fray. A short history of the
players taking pnrt in Saturday's
game has been compiled by our cub
reporter:
Tom Blair, Scotchman, Goalkeeper
Par Excellence, Veteran of the Oreat
War. Plated for Kilmarnock and
.Manchester City, second season with
Cumberland United. Played with
Kdmouton C.N.R. before coming to
•"umborland. Six feet one inch. At
present playing better than ever.
Arthur Mortimer-Scotchman, Right
full back, played for Calgary Hilhurst
before coming to the coast, third season with Cumberland, one of the
mainstays of the team. Also a Veteran of the Great War.
Jock Stewart—Left full back, supposed to be an Irishman, played for
Prince Rupert before coming to Vancouver Island, played for Nanaimo
City portion of one season, now playing his third season for Cumberland.
;iic team's penalty kicker—never
known to fail. War Veteran.
Joint Monohan—Liverpool Irishman
Right half back, played for Leth-
brldge before coming to the Island.
One of the team's most consistent play
ars A favorite wilh the ladles owing to the color of his hair, which is
u fiery red. Playing great football
at present. War Veteran.
Thomas Conti—A Native Son—five
feet, seven, height, B.C's leading center half, without a doubt, Captain of
the team, fears none but feared by all.
ln the game from start to finish.
Walter Brake—Left half, claims
London as his birthplace, height five
feet, eleven, well known for his excellent work in breaking up opposing
forwards' combination. A Veteran
of the Great War, at present right at
die top of his form.
Danny Cannerman—Outside Right,
A native Son, height 5 feet, eight, one
if the fastest wing men playing foot-
mil today. Learned his football In
Cumberland and Is favorite with all
.spectators, Improves with age.
Tommy Heyland—Another Native
Son, a Veteran of the Great War,
height five feet, eight, an all-round
sport, being a first class tennis player, holding the Upper Island Championship In singles, playing inside
right to Bannerman, ls a great manipulator of the ball, In the game all
the time.
Alexander Fowler—Nanaimo fans
call him Foxy Fowler, A Scotchman
by birth, plays center forward and
keeps the opposing backs ln a state
of absolute terror. Second season with
Cumberland, played for Nanaimo City
in the Connaught Cup, scoring the
goal that brought the famous silverware to Vancouver Island. War Veteran.
Henry Plump (Toots)—Inside left,
height !> feet, 7, another Native Son.
Played for Victoria's leading soccer
teams, an all-round athlete, plays a
great game of baseball, being classed
as one of the best first basemen on
the Island. Fourth season with Cum
berland, the teams leading goal scorer
In the game all the time and the most
dangerous man In front of goal. Also
a Veteran of the Great War and leader of Plump's famous Jazz Orchestra.
Charles Hitchens — Outside lett,
born in India, but lived In Liverpool
before trying the land of the Maple
Leaf, has played for Mlllwall. He
is the brains of the team and has play
ed every position ln the team lnclud-
Job
Printing
—of the
Better Kind
Obtainable at the office
of the
Cumberland
Islander
Phone 35
Job Printing that won't stick is
not worth any more than that
kind of a friend.
Ing goal. A veteran of the Great
War. Made a great name for himself
lu army football, at present playing a
great game.
W. Marshall—The baby of tbe team,
height 5 feet, seven, raised from the
Junior Rangers team tills season, has
the makings of a great footballer,
as his name implies, he Is a native
of the land of the heather, has played
both as a forward and as a full back.
A great future Is in store for this most
versatile player.
Francis Ferguson—Another Scotchman, height jj feet, seven, played for
Bedlay Juniors, a noted Scotch junior
team, a good understudy to the fam
ous Contl.     First season with Cumberland, War Veteran.
Robert MacDonald—Better known as
Scotty. Height 5 feet, five, played for
Vale of Leven before coming to Cumberland, is small of stature but a
great dribbler with the ball. One of
tbe most gentlemanly players seen In
B.C. for a long time.     War Veteran.
W, Walker—The manager of the
team, Scotchman, an old time player
who, in his day was known as tho
Penalty King, saving more penalties
than any goalkeeper in Ihe history of
the game, so far as B.C. Is concerned.
Takes a great inetrest in all the play-
ers and at present acts more like a '
father to them than a manager.
A. J. Taylor—Trainer, commonly
called "Sawbones", as lie Is one of the
best first-aid men in the Dominion of
Canada. Holds an instructors certificate in the St. John's Ambulance
Association.
B.C. POLES FOR EXPORT
Tlie Xiiugle Pole company, an international concern, has given a large
contract for poles to contractors op-
peratihg along the Canadian National
Railways In Central British Columbia.
The poles taken out in that part of tho
country arc said to lie the best tbat
can lie procured anywhere.
RADIO Station CNRW, operated by the Canadian National Railways at Winnipeg,
Manitoba, has found an admirable
studio in the Concert Room, located on the seventh floor of tho
Fort Garry, the company's hotel in
the western Gateway City, according to opinions expressed by listeners in all parts of Canada and
the United States. The acoustic
properties of this room lend themselves splendidly to microphone
transmission; plenty of space is
available for properly placing
musical aggregations of any site,
even to brass and pipe bands, symphony orchestras and large choirs,
and the broadcasts, which are conducted by remote control through
station CKY, have "gone across"
splendidly since this location was
secured. Photograph shows .the
scene in the studio on the night of
Thursday, January 22, when the
photographer interrupted the broadcast for a few minutes with his
"Look pleasant, please."
From left to right the photograph shows The Winnipeggers
Male Sextette, who contributed
vocal   numbers:    R.H.R.   at   the
"mike"; Miss Helen Huggard, contralto; The Melody Three and Mr.
(Jus Hughes, assisting violinist;
Al Kilgour, popular soloist, and
Miss Orcan Hogan, soprano.
CNRW broadcasts each Thursday evening from 8 till 11 o'clock,
Central Standard time, beginning
with livestock market reports;
Kiddies' Travel Tales; studio vocal
end instrumental program, and
Frank Wright's Country Club
dance orchestra in dance program from thc main dining room.
EASTERN SALMON (object  a  campaign  designed   to dis-
iT'/'u vt\o nifivin   oourage the flow of population from
MA,S KIR 1 At.IMC   th(, c01|ntry am| ru,.al (.„n,munitles t0
the cities. It Is said by Father Ouel-
lette that the results so far obtained
in the pursuit of those objects have
been highly encouraging.
Coming all the way from Newcastle,
N.B., a carload of Atlantic salmon
eggs passed through western Canada
recently over Canadian National lines
en route to the dominion fish hatcheries on the Pacific coast. Some ),-
100.000 eggs, contained In seven large
cases, comprised the shipment, believed to be the largest ever mode.
The eggs were obtained at South Esk,
N.B., were delivered at Vancouver
by the Canadian National within six
days of the date of shipment.
MISSIONARIES
INTERESED IN
COLONIZATION
TO TOUR WEST
.MONTREAL, March 19—In order
to mark the practical character ol
the excursion to the west which has
been arranged under tlie title of "La
Liaison Francalse" and which wlll
leave Montreal on July 8 next by
means of a special train over the lines
cf the Canadian National Railways,
Rev. Father J. A, Ouellette, director
of colonization missionaries has announced a special competition for the
purpose of encouraging his compatriots In the writing of essays and of
offering suggestions on the subject of
colonization and reparation.
This contest is open to all French-
Canadian residents of eastern Canada
and Franco-Americans living In the
New England states. Three prizes
will be offered consisting of trips to
be made at the IIin,, of the specinl
excursion to the west. The principal
prize will be a trip to Vancouver and
return; the second i. trip to Edmonton
and return: nnd the third, a trip to
Winnipeg and return, ull of which
will be arranged by the organization
headed by Father Ouelettc. The actual conditions of the contest wlll be
announced later but In a general wuy
competitors will he asked to deal with
the important problems of emigration
and colonization. . The society of col
onlzation missionaries Is an organization which hns beeu in existence for i
period of thirty years and began In
a modest wfl>* through the efforts of
individual priests who were directly
interested in colonizing the undeveloped territories. Then In 1089 the
federal government became Interested
In the movement nnd permitted the
grouping of such Individual clergymen under the control of a director
witli headquarters In Montreal.
This establishment has representatives in Alherla, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Bruna
wick. These clerical representatives
are engaged in combatting emigration
of French-Canadians townrds thc
I'nlted States and have as a further
HOOT GIBSON COMING
WITH TWO-GUN PLAY
INDIANS INTERESTED
IN GOOD ROADS
Ah well as being good workers and
enterprising, the Indians of the Bab-
ine Mountain district, central llritish
Columbia, are of a decidedly independent nature. Recently they decided that graded road from their
mountain village to Tolkwa, on the
Canadian National Railways, a distance of approximately 15 miles,
would be more in keeping with present day requirements than the old
pack trail blazed by their ancestors
many generations ago. They approached ollicials at Smithers regarding the project, and when the question of the cost of the undertaking
presented itself and possible delays
before a decision could he reached
were suggested, they immediately put
up the proposition that if they wero
furnished with tools and construction
supplies, they would huild the road
themselves, providing all horse power
and manual labor free of charge.
SLOAN IS ASKING
DAMAGES NOW FROM
GEN. A. D. McRAE
VANCOUVER, March 17. -Reviving
his libel action, Hon. William Sloan
Provincial Secretary and Minister of
Mines, has caused a statement nf
claim to he filed In Xaiiaimo agalnsi
Major-General Alexander Duncan McRae, Vancouver capitalist.
Tho plaintiff, whose solicitors am
Messrs. Farris, Karris, StuttZ & Sloan
claims unstated damages from the
defendant, although the endorsement
of the writ named $50,000 as the desired monetary compensation.
The libel complained of, according
to  the statement ot claim, appeared
i In the "Searchlight" in January, 191! 1,
under the heading, "A Petition For a
I Royal   Commission."       Therein    fol-
. lowed     the     sufficiently     ventilated
■charges concerning the Pacific Great
j Eastern  Railway, wherein  Mr. Sloan
was  charged   with   having   accepted
approximately $50,000 to assure protection to the promoters of the railway.     According to the statement of
claim,  the  words    meant    that    thc
plaintiff has   accepted   a   bribe   and
after the election afforded protection
; and  favorable treatment to the promoters   of  the   P.G.E.   and   that   Mr.
Sloan  had  been   guilty  of an   Indict-
I able offence.
j Thc charges had been investigated
I by Mr. Justice Galllher, who exonerated Hon. William Sloan.
Long barreled revolvers belching
itame and deatli into the darkness of
a rendezvous of reckless men; hard
. riding, rollicking cowboys; vengeance
heroism and love!
All of these go to make a thrilling
romance of "The Ridfu' Kid From
Powder River," which is the name of
the Universal-Hoot Gibson attraction Wednesday and Thursday of next
week at the Ilo-llo Theatre. The
scene of the story is in Arizona and
the time in the days wheu the territory then was virtually nothing other
than a vast cattle ranch.
Those were tiie days of one of the
most, thrilling periods of the settlement of the West, a period of the beginning of tlie transition of the land
from a feeding ground for great herds
of long-horned cattle to a land of ag-
rlcultural pursuits. The cattleman,
long king in his rule, resented bitterly und forcibly the intrusion of the
nester and there was much bloodshed
before the persistency of the nester
brought in the law of the courts.
Hoot is cast as a young man whose
sole mission In life Is to accomplish
the death of tho murderer of his foster father, a nester, who was shot one
night by cattlemen whose demands to
vacate lie had refused to obey. Perilous adventure besets the young avenger as be rides the country over
[ seeking to keep his vow, and the spirit
of Henry Herbert Knihhs" novel.
Tin' supporting cast Includes Tully
' Marshall, Gladys Hulette, Gertrude
; Astor and Walter Long and a number
! of the famous Universal Ranch Riders, Edward Sedgwick directed, and
(he Miming was done in one of the
most picturesque locations in California.
. LOST   Small   key  attached    to    red
■    string, on   Friday morning.     Will
finder please return same to Island-
I    er office. 12.
i FOR SALE Fifty (60) acres, five Co)
I acres cleared, with 4 room house,
j good condition, outer buildings in-
| eluding garage, barn and chicken
j house. Situated near Royston
Station, Vancouver Island. Apply
j full particulars P.O. Rox 72, Cum-
I    berland.  U.C. 12-18.
FOR SALE -I parlor organ, in perfect condition, price $60.00; 1 kitchen cabinet $25,00, Apply 10S,
Maryporj Ave., Cumberland. 12.
FOR SALE. CHEAP-Tent In excellent condition, 1 pair of boat oars
and oar locks, and various tools.
Apply Mrs. Evans, House 14, the
Camp, Cumberland. u.
WANTED A HUSTLER-HELIARLE
for mail subscription agency In
this district Whole or part time,
Hig commission. Apply Country
Circulator. The Vancouver Sun,
Vancouver. B.C, 12. PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
My Story Of A
WONDERFUL
NEW GIRDLE
THAT I'VE JUST FOUND
"And to thlnk—l look more slender
instantly: But even more splendid,
I am quickly getting back the Blender
figure of my girlhood—day by. Uay my
Girdle is actually reducing my waist,
hips and thighs. Again I may choose
from the styles I admire so much. Du
you wonder i want others to know
"My Story of a Wonderful New Girdle
tliat I ve Just Found" the Madame X
Reducing Girdle costing only $11.60
made by Dominion Corset Company,
Quebec, Montreal, Toronto,
Must What I Wauled I'nu.i Every
Angle"
"My Girdle just came and opening
the laces I stepped into ii. What a
difference! One glance was enough to
show me tha| it was just what 1 had
been wanting for so long. Just high
enough plenty long enough—aud you
yourself will see. And tiie laces fixed so that I cnu adjust tlie Girdle as
1 become more slender. I think tho
design in front particularly practical
Because no matter which way 1 move
there is no 'shifting,; the Girdle tits
snugly to my figure like a glove.'"
"Perfect Support Yii So
Comforbiblo"
"How firmly the Girdle holds my
figure in place! Yet I never have
that sti If 'laced-in' feeling. At one
time, do you know, I thought I'd have
to go back to constant wearing of stiif
corsets? Hut then I found tliis
Girdle, ami my problem was answered—just the necessary support, yet
perfect comfort every minute, too.
And—even more important—an easy
and automatic way to reduce at the
same time'
"Such Freedom of Movement1,
Always"
"What ;i relief it is to be able to
stride briskly along like a Vassar
sophmore—with perfect freedom of
movement, yet knowing that every
movement is bringing your figure hack
to the slenderness you long for!
Even after the first day I knew why I
was feeling so much better—and why
my body was getting just the h'-m
support it needed. No wonder I felt
buoyant—feeling years younger a.*
well as looking it."
"Comfortuhlj In Place—Evon When I
Sit Down"
"And not a hit of shifting when I
sit down! You see, the pure para
rubber is soft and specially molded,
so that it is actually a part of my
figure—bendlnc and instantly adapting itself to any position of my waist,
hips and thighs, just as naturally as
my own skin."
»w
MM*
r^,
Hk      ^\$$mrs
v isfi
Km.  v .   \ \}Mf~&
■L°-+ig!]n
2 nL   ^Kn*l'wtf
||^a**Waj2il   ■
Social and Personal
.Mr. Hurry Stienson, of the Kelly
Douglas Company, was. in the city
over the week cml.
Mra. N, Huby left i
morning fur Ladysmith,
will reside in [uturo,
ii   Thursday
where    she
Mr. and Mrs. R. A.  Robertson left i ONLY ABOUT TWELVE
by motor tor Nanaimo on Wednesday j        FRUIT GROWERS IN
Sutherland
Mr. William Horwood left on Tliurs
day morning's train for Revelstoke.
He has been in Cumberland for the
past two months, the guest of his
aunt and uncle, Mr, ami Mrs. Sidney
Horwood.
Mr. II. E, MurrO) returned Sunday
night after a week-end trip by motor
to Victoria and Ladysmith,
* *   *
Mrs.   \V.   1'.   Symons   returned   to
Cumberland on Saturday after a short
visit with friends i„ Ladner, B.C.
...
Mr, anil Mrs. Eric King and family
.if Vancouver, have been visiting relatives iu Cumberland and the district.
* *   ♦
Mis. J. II. Bennett, who was in
Cumberland to attend the funeral of
her nephew, tlie late Gordon 13.
Mounce, returned to North Vancouver
on Thursday morning.
Mrs. J. U. Davis and son William
returned from Vancouver on Tuesday
night. While in tlte city Bill underwent ll successful operation on bis
iiiisc in tlic Vancouver General Hospital.
.   .   .
Mr. William .hide, who has been
spending a short vacation witb relatives in Vancouver, returned to Cumberland on Thursday evening to resume ills duties ai Lang's DVug Store.
morning.
...
Mr. ('. H. Cameron, Naturalization
Officer of the Dominion Government
with headquarters at Victoria, was
in the city during the week on business.
*   .   *
Thomas Oraham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd.. left for Ladysmith Friday morning.
ATTENDANCE AT MEET.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
CUMBERLAND AND VETS
BATTLE TOMORROW FOR
BRACKMAN-KER CUP
Will tlie Brackman-Ker Cup, emblematic of ibe championship of the
Upper-Island, come to Cumberland
this year or will tt repose in Nanaimo
for tlie season us tlie property of tho
War Veterans soccer team? According to local supporters there are two
answers to tills question, "yes" for the
iirst part and "no" for the second; at
any rate manager Hill Walker Is trying to make their prophecies come
true for he is taking down the strongest team tbat tbc United is able to
Held. Tills is tlie line-up: Blair,
Mortimer, Stewart; Monohan. Contl,
Urake; Bannerman, Heyland, Fowler.
Plump and Hitchens. An interesting
history and description of each of
these players will lie found on page
seven of tills issue.
NOTICE
I'KOYIM 1AI.   PUBLIC   WORKS
DEPARTMENT
CARD (IK THANKS
Bridge
It    Like Trull  Itoild
During re-construction of tlie uhove
bridge; work starting Monday. March
28rd, inst., persons using tlie Lake
Trail Road ure requested to drive
slowly approaching the work. A detour will lie provided to accommodate
traffic.
I'. PHILIP
Deputy Minister and
12, Public Works Engineer.
We tender our sincere thanks to Dr.
Geo. K. MacNaughton, .Mrs. C. Dando
Jr., Mrs. 1). Gordon, tlie Matron and
nurses of tlie Cumberland General
Hospital for their very kind attention
and appreciate tlie services given to
our dear son and brother while a patient in that institution. We also express our appreciation for the kindness received from the Eagle Lodge.
both of Nanaimo ami Cumberland, tlie
floral tribute and expressions of sympathy In our recent bereavement.
Mr. and Mrs. II. E. Mounce,
and Family.
In conjunction with the further
loan of $3,000,000 fui colonization
to be authorized by the Quebec legislature this season, it is also intended to raise the bounty to settlers on the acreage cleared. At
present the government gives a
bonus of $6 nn acre. It will be
raised to $8 an acre. The province
spent $30,0011 in this way in the last
fiscal year.
The amount of butter exported to
Japan through Vancouver during
1924 was nearly twice that of 1923,
according to figures supplied by
the Japanese consulate at that point.
The report shows that in 1924 the
quantity was 476,454 pounds, as
compared with only 299,696 pounds
in 1923. Total cheese shipments to
the same destination last year
amounted to 2,685 pounds, as
against only 40  in   1923.
COURTENAY,    March    20.—At    a
meeting of the  Comox  Valley Fruit
Growers' Association held ln the Agricultural Hall lust night, It was decided to sign contracts with the central organization of B.C.     The meeting was but  poorly    attended,    only
about twelve growers being present.
' Mr.  Robert  Murray,  Dominion  Fruit
.and Vegetable Inspector addressed the
growers.     He showed much faith in
ihe future of the small fruit Industry
1 for Ihe district  particularly for  the
Loganberry.     During the coming ber-
* ry season the association Intends to
employ  a   special   man   to  handle  a
portion of the local fresh fruit trade,
i ns it was thought, that the commission
paid to the Comox Creamery Association  last  year,  which  amounted   to
about $125, would be well Invested In
i the employment of such an -Individual.     Mr. D. Paulson acted as chair-
: man at last night's meeting.
MASONIC GRAND MASTER
VISITED COURTENAY
A recent analysis of immigration
according to occupation of immigrants arriving in Canada since 1920
shows a steady increase in the ratio of agriculturists and domestics towards all others. In 1921
the figure was 35 per cent. It was
14 per cent for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1922, 47 per cent for
the fiscal year 1923-24 and 51 per
cent for the nint months April to
December,   1921.
!    Most    Worshipful    Grand    Master
Stephen    Jones.    Grand    Master   of
! llritish Columbia, paid an official visit
I to Hiram Lodge A".F.&A.M., and Cum-
: berland Lodge A.F.&A.M., at the hall
! of the  first  named    on    Wednesday
* evening last.      After an exemplification of degree work by tbe two lodges
; a banquet wns held ln the Courtenay
Hotel at which the    chief   speakers
' were Mr. Jones. IU. Wor. Bro. Graham
. and Wor. Bro. Smith, of Victoria, Rt.
Wor Bro. Yates ot Nanaimo, Rt. Wor.
: Bro. Abrams, Wor. Bros Searle. Carey
! and Fred Smith of Cumberland, and
; Woi*. Bro. Graham and Bro. Stubbs ot
' Courtenay.     A musical program was
■ also appreciated.
Tbe Grand Master was accompanied
i on his visit by Rt. Wor. Bro. D. Nicholson of Ladysmith. District Deputy;
lit. Wor. Bro. Capt. A. F. Yates of
i Nanaimo; Rt. Wor. Bro. Mark N. Graham of Victoria and Wor. Bro. Robart
Smith of Victoria.
Extra Specials for the
Week - End
8-lb. boxes Fancy Sodas, each $1.25
McCormick's Jersey Cream Sodas, 2 pkts for 55c.
Fancy English Mixed Biscuits 35c. 3 lbs. for $1.00
Chrisp Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for   55c.
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for   45c.
CANNED VEGETABLES
Corn, Peas and Tomatoe.i, 4 tins for 85c.
King Oscar Sardines, 5 tins for _ 95c.
Kippered Snacks, 4 tins for   25c.
Kippered Herring, 3 tins i'or 25c.
Beach Eakins Prune or Plum Jam, 4-lb. tins 85c.
Malkins Best Marmalade, 4-lb. tins 85c.
Local Fresh Eggs "Extras", 3 dozen for $1.00
White Wonder Soap, 7 bars for   55c.
SEED POTATOES
Early Rose, per lb. 5c. Netted Gems, per lb. 5c.
Kill, STOCK OF VEGETABLE AMI FLOWER SEEDS
ONION SETS, ETC
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN SEASON
Head   Lettuce,   Cauliflower,   Cabbage,  Onions,   Carrots,   Beets,
Parsnips- and Sweet Potatoes, etc.
Eating and Cooking Apples, Oranges, Lemons, Florida Orape
Fruit, and Bananas.
Matt Brown's Grocery
PHONE 38
RANGERS LOST TO was handling the whistle and did It
'PORTS POOR GAME I'" a very satls,5,inB man"er.     This
  I was tbe first game he has  refereed
Cumberland soccer fans were very I 8lnce hls ■"•"P*"*8'"** »<"*•« «"*e ago
for refusing to attend a meeting In
Nanaimo at which he was to have
been charged with failure to make a
full report of the Ranger-Nanalino
match when several of the ployers In-
much disappointed with the showing
put up by the Rangers on Sunday last
when they lost to the Davenports of
Nanaimo by the score of 2 gonls to 1
iu an Upper Island league match. Tbe j
game should have taken place some j to'SeA ■" «• free-for-all mlx-up.
time ago but the 'Ports had declined \ Sunday's game was marred by a
to come up to Cumberland on account j high wind against which the teams
of counter attractions in Nanaimo; j could do nothing, and it was the same
nevertheless Ihe executive of thc lea- j cold wind which accounted for tho
gue decided that it should be played, i poor attendance of spectators. Rang
although it had no bearing in the crs scored onco In the first halt while
league standing, and ordered the vis-1 the 'Ports copped their two In the
Itors to pay nil their own expenses as ' second period, but both teams lost
punishment for their offense. We j many golden opportunities thrqugh
noted witb pleasure that A. S. Jones   over-nnxlety.
One of tbe outstanding features
of the Grain Commission Board's
report for the season 1922-23, was
the tribute paid to the excellent
service rendered by the Canadian
Pacific Railway in handling the
western crop. Though tbe company
handled 105,000 cars of grain, it received only six complaints about
lack of ears from tbe railway and
commission combined. In 1923-24,
with an even larger number handled, there wcre only eight complaints.
EE==
Candy Specials
For this Week
See our Window
IOc.
PER DOZ.
Fresh Cut Local
Daffodils
10c.
PER DOZ.
"KODAK" TIME IS HERE ! WE CAN SUPPLY ALL
YOUR REQUIREMENTS.
Lang's
Driig Store
I used Lung's Crean
of Lilies this morn
ning, did  you?
-THE REXALL KODAK STORE-
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S'
Orchestras from the Canadian
Pacific steamships "Empress of
France" and "Empress of Scotland", when they arrived recently
at New York and before sailing on
their round the world and Mediterranean cruises which the company
starts annually from that port
broadcasted through WJZ a forty-
five minute programme of selected
Scots, English, Wel>b, Irish and Canadian airs, while the "Montroyal",
on her return from the company's
cruise to the West Indies, broad,
casted British und Spanish music
through W.IY of New York.
Information furnished by J,
Frank Callbreath, packing contractor and general merchant, shows
that during the 19114 hunting season, parties secured 12 moose, 25
caribou, 20 goat. 31 sheep, lj black
bear and 11 grizzles in the Telegraph Creek district of British Columbia. Of the caribou, the largest, shot by J. J. Sartori, of Brooklyn, N.Y'., bas a spread of 47 inches,
is 39 Vs inches long and has 27
points. The largest sheep horns
were 41V, inches long, with a spread
of 31 inches, and were secured by
A. D. Stewart, of New Y'ork.
The third annual Eastern International Dog Sled Derby, run off
at Quebec on February 19, 20 and
21, was a tremendous success.
Twenty-two mushers and their
teams from many parts of Canada
and the United States competed
over the 120-mile course, the race
being won by F.mile St. Godihrd. of ,
Le Pas, Man., who also won this
year's derby at that place. The
last day's lap w-us run tin lugh a
blinding snowstorm, which gave the
thousands of sports visitors from
Canada and the United Slates who
witnessed it. a vivid impression of
normal conditions experienced by
these outfits.
MERCANTILE STORE CO.
PHONE 133 CUMBERLAND. B.C. PHONE 133
FOR SATURDAY WE ARE OFFERING SPECIAL LINES SELECTED FROM THIS
GREAT BANKRUPT STOCK THAT WILL BE   BARGAINS   YOU   WILL   ALWAYS
REMEMBER
We would advise you to come early as there is a limited quantity in each line and we
cannot guarantee that all lines will last throughout the day.
Until 10:00 p.m. Saturdays
Remember we do not close
BARGAINS
MEN'S SHOES
Men's "Work Boots,
About 60 pairs taken from our huge
stock of Work Boots
They Include Skook-
um, Miners, etc. Reg
$6.50 nnd $7.50 pair.
Saturday   $1.4.,"-
Ladies'
Slippers
Ladles* Spanish Style Slip
pers ln Black Patent or
Suede, also Log Cabin -
a very slvllsh shoe. Reg.
price $6.60 and 67.60 pair.
Saturday Bargain ....tUiO
BARGAINS
Ladies'
Shoes
MEN'S SHOES
Men'n    Dress   Shoes-
Derby make   In  Black
and Brown. Reg. $8.'j0.
Saturday $5.90 I'nir
MEN'S SHOES
Miner's White   Rubber
Boots, Hi press  make.
Reg.   price   6 50   pair.
Saturday only $1.25
Ladles' Brown and Sand
Two-tone Slippers, low
heel and strap in One
quality of Suede trimmed
kid. Keg. price $6.50 pair.
Saturday   $11.85
DRY GOODS
GINGHAMS
Anderson's 32" wide Ginghams,
about 5 pieces, some plain
Cbambruy amongst this lot.
Reg   45c. per yard.     Saturday
only   •*-»*■•
CRETONNES
150 yards 30" Cretonnes, some
beautiful colorings. Reg. 00 and
75c   yard Saturday Special 29c.
*•>,».". Flannelette sheet *!.«-">
55 pairs 10/4 Flannelette Sheets
Saturday only per pair
$1.65
Miscellaneous Specials
Electric  Olobes-25  & 40  wait
each 19f.     60 watt
Laco, 76 watt, each .
Allnimnuiu   Coffee
each	
Alluinlnmu  6 quart  saucepans
each ,,s''
25c.
50c.
Percolators,
98c.
GROCERY  SPECIALS
"Pay Cash and Save"
Rosedale Tea, special lb  65c.
Nabob Tea, per lb  75c.
Malkin's Best Ten, per lb. 75c.
Lanka Tea, per lb. .... 70c.
Braid's Best Coffee, per lb. 65c.
Nabob Coffee, per lb  65c.
Tudor ColTee, per lb  05c.
Fresh Ground Coffee, lb SOc.
Canned Tomatoes, 2V4's 2/25c.
Canned Tomatoes, 2's, each 15c.
Canned  Peas   S/5"ic.
Conned Corn,  _  $/55c.
Del Monte Peaches, 2's .... 25c.
Del   Monte   Peaches,  2',4's   40c.
Quaker Pears, 2%'s   40c.
Alnsley's Fruit Salad, can SOc.
Grimsby Strawberries, in heavy
syrup. 2's, per can   SOc.
All British Pineapple 2's .... 20c.
Blue Berries, 2's, per can SOc.
Quaker Strawberry Jam 4's SOc.
EmpresB Pineapple Mlde .. 90c.
Malkin's Best Mlde. 4's .... 65c
(linger Snaps, per lb  20i\
Arrowroot Biscuits, lb  40c.
Christie's Sodas, per tin .... 50c.
Ormonde Dainty Mixed, tin 05c.
Oranges, Bananas, Apples, Lettuce, fresh for Saturday selling.
MEN'S   FURNISHINGS
Men's Tweed Pants.    In    dark.
Some  light  patterns,  value to
$3.50.     Saturday    11.95
ALL WOOL SOX
A pure wool dress sox, which
we   have   sold   for   SOc   pair
Saturday onh*  ....  29c.
MEN'S 811T8
15 Men'B Suits, In dork Tweeds
and Blue Serges, value to 527.50
Saturday  _... $14.50
OVERCOATS
5 only Men's Overcoats, a pleasing dark   gray   mixture,   half
leather   lined,   belt   at   back.
$27.50   for  $15.00
WOOL
Baldwins Purple Heather Wool
Black, Navy and Heather. Reg.
price $2.75 per lb. Saturday
only  _  $1,95
Pay Cash And Save"

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