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The Cumberland Islander Jan 15, 1926

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Array 1
5fflE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
1
"*%
■i'3
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland New*,
FORTY-FIFTH  YEAR—No.  3.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBIA       FRIDAY,  JANUARY  IB,  1926.
l"ogMkiItL> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:   TWO DOLLARS  PER ANNUM
Constable Hicks
Gives Up His Work
■-Well Known Here
PORT ALBERNI, Jan. 13. — The
resignation of Russell H. Hicks, who
had been police constable In Port
Alberni for a year past, was accepted
at a special meeting ot the Board of
Police Commissioners held on Monday evening,
Mr. Hicks, who had not been ln the
best of health for some time, left on
December 24th to spend the Christmas holidays with his wife's parents
at Union Bay. From Union Bay he
was ordered by his doctor to * Vancouver for the purpose of examination by a- specialist with the result
that he was advised to give up his
work and move to the Interior of the
province where he might find a drier
climate beneficial. He returned to
Port Alherni on Monday afternoon
and requested ' the police .commissioners to grnnt him immediate release from his duties. He expressed
regret at being obliged to give up
his work here where he had made
many friends, and he expressed appreciation  of the kindness  and  con-
COA8T LEAGUE STANDING
P. W. L. D. Pt
Cumberland    8 7 0 1 16
Westminster United  10 6 2 2 14
Ladysmith    9 6 3 0 12
St.  Andrews    10  4  3  3  11
Varsity   9  4 5 0    8
Nanaimo United   7  3  2 2    8
SL  Saviors   ,...W 2 7  16
North Shore United  9 17 13
Victoria Veterans   8  17  0    2
Big Bill Given Dose
Of Own Medicine
"Wild B1H» Kisses Canvass lor First
Time in Five *'lghts.  Wrestling
Tactics Were Too Much
T. H. MUMFORD RETURNED
AT HEAD OF POLL
PARENT - TEACHERS
TO MEET MONDAY
Alderman A. Maxwell Becomes City's
Chief Magistrate
. BELLINGHAM, Wash., Jan. 13
"Wild" BUI McKenzie, 240-pound
leather pusher from Vancouver
Island, found out what a ring knockout felt like when he took a right
to the Jaw delivered by Moose Nor-
beek, of Portland, In the second
round of a scheduled six-round boxing match here tonight.
Norbeck, who Is generally considered a wrestler, had McKenzie
bothered by his crouching tactics, and
j kept Bill from landing many blows,
sideratlon that had been shown him j The knockbut blow, which pushed,
by  the   commissioners   amT citizens; McKenzie partly through the ropes,
generally.
came shortly after the beginning of
The  Board  went on record as to. | *« second round.   McKenzie was try
the good conduct and official efflclen-1 ln& t0 r'8*- at the count of '<-•■■   Thl8
cy ot Constable Hicks, and instructed Chief, Cronk to present him with
a letter Iii that effect.
On the suggestion of Mayor Burde
the resignation was accepted to take
effect on Jan 31st and Mr. Hicks was
granted leave of absence for the
month.
The chief was authorized to advertise for an officer to fill the vac
was McKenzie's fifth fight. He ended
the others, by landing knockout blows
himself.
NOTICE
Everyone interested in Cumberland's
annual    old-timers'    Re-Union    are
asked to meet at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. McLellan, senr., at 7.30 p.m.
ancy, and, In the meantime, to em- j ***• MoI"-a!' eren"** n«<-* January 18th
ploy- what  temporary  assistance  he	
might require.
Mr. Hicks has many friends ln the
city of Cumberland and district who
will be very sorry to hear of his illness. He served here for some time
as a constable in the Mounted Police
when that organization had !>•—•"•»»
ln the city.
Municipal nominations on Monday
and the election on Thursday of the
present week did not cause any excitement In the city of Cumberland,
the residents evidently being satisfied
with municipal affairs of the past
year.
Nominations on Monday were as
follows: for mayor, Alex Maxwell,
elected by acclamation; for Aldermen,
Charles Parnham, T. Hi Mumford, W.
P. Symons, John Ledlngham, A. E.
Jeffrey, Harry Parkinson, with five
only to be elected; for Police Commissioner, Charles Parnham, elected
by acclamation; for School Trustees,
Mrs. Mary D. MacNaughton, Mrs. Eliza
F. Banks, Alex MacKinnon aud Wm.
Henderson Jr. Immediately after the
nominations closed Mayor Maxwell
resigned as trustee, causing four vac-
ances and makng an clecton unnecessary. W. H. Cope, returnng officer,
declared the four elected by acclama-
ton. Very little interest was taken
in the election on Thursday, the result
of  the  poll   for  alderman   being;
T. H. Mumford, 89; Charles Parnham, 88; W. P. Symons, 87; John
Ledlngham, 79; A. E. Jeffrey, 66;
| Harry Parknson, 61. The first five
I are elected, the sixth member of the
board being John J. Potter, who was
elected last year for a two-year term.
J. W. McKenzie
Becomes Mayor
Of Courtenay
See Jackie Coogan this weekend at the Ilo-llo Theatre in
"Old Clothes."
Comox Creamery .
Installing New And
Modern Machinery
COURTENAY, Jan. 13—With a view
to keeping pace with the requirements
of the poultrymen and the demand*,
of a rapidly; growing Industry In the
district, the Comox Creamery Association, an organization owned und operated by the farmers of the Comox
Valley and surrounding territory, is
now installing machinery for the production of cracked corn, cracked
wheat, groats and all feeds for the
raising of chicks from the day-old
stage to maturity. Besides taking
care of requirements of Its patrons,
lt ls possible Ihat the output will be
of sufficient capacity to supply the
trade of the district. Two cars of
Yellow Dont com from Omaha, Nebraska are now arriving. The corn
Is a good sample and is being cleaned
and cracked prior to going out as a
poultry and chick feed. At a recent
meeting ot the poultrymen held In the
Agricultural Hall here the question
of handling dressed poultry through
the Comox Co-operative Society was
discussed. Already a commencement
had been made and shipments of
dressed birds have been made to Vancouver and Powell River. These
orders are filled by a number of the
poultrymen of the district and lt ls
understood that the price is satisfactory to the producer.
New Goal-Keeper
Signs For United
A new goal-keeper in the person
of T. Orr, a brother of Jock Orr of
the Ladysmith footnan -team, arriven
in Cumberland Wednesday and we are
given to understand has signed for
the local team. Orr comes with a
good reputation, having played for
some first class teams In Scotland.
He stands five feet eleven and weighs
180 pounds and halls from Cowle
Stirlingshire, being a recent arrival
from the land of the heather.
SUCCESSFUL IN MINE
SURVEYING EXAMS.
Victoria, Jan; 13.—Mine surveyors'
certificates have been granted to the
following:.
Second Class.—Joseph O. Nicholl,
Nanaimo.
Third Class.—Harry Hopkins, Coalmont; John B. Oregson, Coal Creek.
JACKIE COOGAN IS
LIVING PROTOTYPE
OF HANS UN' FRITZ
LOCAL GIRLS WIN
BASKETBALL GAME
—MEN LOSE THEIRS
COURTENAY, Jan. 14.—Municipal
elections here today resulted as follows:
For Mayor—J.  W.  McKenzie
was unopposed.
For Aldermen, two year term—
William Douglas, trader, 168 votes,
elected; Wm. T. Fielder, builder, 161
votes, elected; Edward Lloyd, tug
boat owner, 112 votes, elected; Dalton Cudmore, saw flier, 88 votes, not
elected.
By-elections, to replace Alderman
Fielder, resigned 1925, two year term.
Theed Pearse, Barrister, unopposed,
one year to serve.
To replace Alderman H. Cooke,
resigned 1925, two year term—E. L.
Macdonald. electrician, 127 votes,
elected, one year to serve; Wm. Duncan, the retiring mayor, 81 votes,
not elected.
The 1926 City Council will also
include Alderman Fred Field, the
only 1925 two-year alderman who did
not resign.
Following are the school truBtee
election results:
Geo. H. Pldcock, 144 votes, elected;
John Sutton, 132 votes, elected; Ben
Hughes, 92 votes, not elected.
The above figures are unofficial, no
official count being given out at the
city hall tonight.   Owing to the pace
Qi   wUu-.h- tbo   bullotu   wure   cattail,, it
is probable that no one was able to
correctly record all results. An announcement was made that It was
probable that both by-laws for the
purchase of a public park and public
The regular monthly meeting of the
Parent-Teachers Association will lie
held in the Public School at 7:30
o'clock next Monday evening, January
18th. A question box will be placed
In the room so that any questions
relative to school matters will be
answered during the meeting,
attendance Is desired.
Girls' Hockey Club
Organization Is
Now Assured
Successful Tea held at School
Roy Cliffe Makes
Convincing Show
To Beat T. Frayne
For some time past It has been the
A full desire of the teachers as well as the
pupils of the Cumberland Schools to
have more organized games on the go.
Having got the Inter-School Field
Day organized) thc next step was to
get different organizations among the
pupils. Willi tliis object in view, a
meeting of all the High and Senior
Public School girls was held in December   to   discuss   tho   possibility of
,,      .           __      __-      .    .„   .  „       .1 raising   funds   for   ground   or   gra.ss
Courtenay Boy Winn In First Komitl | Ir. ,.   .    ,. 	
Roy Cliffe made a sensational show.
ing in the semi-final of a good show
who I Pat on at the Crystal  Pool.  Seattle.
j on Tuesday laat when  he  won over
Ted Frayne in the first round.   Cliffe
knocked  Frayne  down   with   a  right
cross  and  the  latter  took  the eight' :ill(] flowers by the pupils themselves
count.   He got up with  fight in his; Delicious   candies,   cakes,   pies   and
| Hockey. It was decided to hold a tea
■ The committee chosen was comprised Of pupils themselves. They
called upon Miss Gallivan to supervise the Tea and .Mr. Murray to organize a short programme1. The part
of the building set off for the "Tea"
was   prettily   decorated   with   greens
The Comox girls' and men's basketball teams were visitors to Cumberland lirei- rrmay evening' with the
outcome that the fans were rewarded
with two very fast and exciting games.
The Cumberland ladies made a better
showing for themselves than did the
men's team winning their match
against the visiting girls by 10 points
to 6. The winners had the game all
their own way almost all through,
and although the Comox girls put up
a hard struggle In the last half they
were  too  much   outclassed  to  make
any appreciable  showing. ,,«.„« .   * j
_.     .     , ,    . .   .      .     .      Victor B.  Harrison  was  re-elected
The local mens team had a hard,. „   ■
,    - . ..   .   . .. _, . Mayor  of Nanaimo  with    an    over-
row to hoe and Just failed' to turn i    ,   ,   , . " , ,     Inn
..    lM    ..     .:. , lt      ,_    whelming majority, receiving 483 more
the trick, the final score reading 17-;  ,      .,     . A     ,, .
,. .     . . _ .. :.     'than his closest opponent, which was
16 in favor of Comox.   At one time I
it looked as if Cumberland  had the
no definite information was available.
NANAIMO RESULTS
eye and in a melee caught Cliffe with
a short punch that knocked Hoy over.
Cliffe was up instantly. A right
cross caught Frayne flush on the chin
and he went down like a log, head
first. There was no need to do any
counting. The referee stopped the
fight as a towel came fluttering in
from Ted's corner.
It is now within the bounds of
possibility that Roy will meet Ernie
Owens, of Los Angeles, the sensational southern scrapper, as arrangements are going on apace for thc
two to meet sometime within the next
week   or  so.
Followers of Cliffe's career will
remember that Owens proved Roy's
Waterloo some time ago when the
two met in Los Angeles. Roy did
not have half the ring experience
and knowledge of boxing then that
he carries around now so it is confidently expected that Mr. Ernie Owens
will have slightly more than a handful in the local boy.
World Famous
Referee Is Dead
match in hand but Comox put up a
stiff fight and showed such good
teamwork towards the flnlnsh that
they carried off the victroy.
PROGRAM FOR THE WEEK
AT THE ILO-ILO THEATRE
Friday and Saturday this week
Jackie Coogan In "Old Clothes"
and a special added feature,
"Hell's Highroad," also news reel
Monday and Tuesday, January
18th & 19th, "In Every Woman's
Life" also Comedy and News
Wednesday nnd Thursday. January 20th and 21st, "Lightning"
and chapter No. 4 ot "The Ace
of Spades" und Comedy.'
Friday and Saturday, January
22nd and 23rd, Thomas Meighan
ln "The Man Who Found Himself," Comedy and News.
Child Star Evolves Scheme For Max
Davidson's Benefit Worthy
of Katienjammers
Max Davidson may not suffer from
insomnia, but hereafter he'll be careful about falling asleep on Jackie
Coogan's set at the Metro studios.
Max. who appears In Jackie's new
film, "Old Clothes," has a habit of falling to sleep on the set. Dad Coogan
nnd director Eddie Cllne feel that an
actor cannot give Ills best work after
being aroused from a slumber no
mutter how light.
During the filming of "Old Clothes,"
which comes to the ilo-llo Theatre
tonight (Friday) and tomorrow night,
came the blow-off The actors were
told to take their places, but Max
failed to put In his appearance, and
Jackie discovered him dozing peacefully In a big Morris chair. The little
star conceived a scheme to waken
Max that would have done justice to
the antics of. the Katzenjammer Kids.
Everyone on the set was pressed into
service to carry out Jackie's Idea.
Bang—clatter—crash! A revolver
went off into an empty barrel—lights
went out—a pan filled with loose Iron
pieces clattered to the floor—Max's
head was enveloped In a blanket and
a wind machine blew smoke Into the
set.
Up Jumped the erstwhile slumber
See Jackie Coogan this weekend at the Ilo-llo Theatre in
"Old Clothes."
not expected.
F. A. Busby was elected for a two-
year term as Police Commissioner
with a large majority.
The Hospital Loan By-Law was defeated. Local improvement rates
reduction received a substantial
majority.
Aldermen   were   all   returned
acclamation.
London, Jan. 13.—The death is
announced of John Lewis, vice-president of thc English football association.
Mr. Lewis, who was 72 years of
age, had a long career in connection
witii association football.
He founded the Blackburn Rovers
club In 1874, and was an active
playing member for several seasons,
dropping out owing to injuries in
1881. He later became a referee and
officiated at cup finals ln 1895, 1897,
and  1898.
Mr.   Lewis   managed   teams   which
toured   South   Africa   in    1920   and
Australia last summer.
With   other  officials   of   the   association on the occasion  of the cele-
by [ bration of the majority of the league
I in   1909   he   was   presented   with   an
' illuminated address.
pies
sandwiches  were   kindly   and   generously donated by parents and others.
Those in charge of the stalls were:
Edna Gear and Edith O'Brien, home-
cooking; Helen Parnham and Mary
Sweeney, candy. Those assisting with
tea were the .Misses I. McFadyen,
('. MacKinnon. E. Hood, V. Aspesy,
G. McFadyen, B. Bickle. Beryl Hudson,
Edna Conrod, Jean Johnson, Josephine Freeburn, Jessie Grant, Edna
Read  and  Emma  Picketti.
Owing to lack of room many items
prepared for the musical programme
bad to be abandoned and several impromptu items bad to be substituted.
The programme was as follows:
Piano solo, Cyril Davis; Cornet solo,
Robert Cossar; Dialogue, Preston
Bruce and Harold Hughes, Piano solo,
Sheila Conway; Song, trio, Archie
Welsh, Tommy Conrod. and Benny
Nicholas; Banjo solo, John Banner-
man; Song. Rhoda Walton, Piano
solo,  Mar/ Sweeney.
Pioneers' Re-Union At
Courtenay Brilliant Success
COURTENAY, Jan. 12.—The fourth kept the music going from 9:00 p.m.
annual Old Timers Re-Union held in j unln the home waltz was ployed at
the Gaiety Theatre here last "IB"'!;!;„o a.m., except for an Interval when
was even better than that on any of .  ,      ,,   ,
,. . , _ ; most of the old timers wcre at supper
the previous occasions.
Over throe hundred  persons  were »'••■'■■ Mr- Hl*rol<* Symonds was at the
present and all seem to have had an piano.
excellent evening's enjoyment.   They Tlie grand march, one of the big
came  from nil  parts  of the  district events   of  the  evening,   was   led   by
and also from Victoria nnd Nanaimo. .Mrs.  Florence  Cliffe  and   Mr.  J.  B.
The occasion also marked the seven- Holmes.   The supper was everything
tleth birth-day of Mrs. Florence Cliffe, that could be desired with plenty for
the first white woman In the Comox j everybody and to spare.   It was di-
"HELL'S HIGHROAD" IS
REAL ENTERTAINMENT
"Hell's Highroad," DeMillo supervised production showing at the Hollo Theatre tonight and Saturday, Is
unique In tliat while it is a story witli
a moral, at no time does Hie moral
stand out nor does the audience feel
that it is being Knight a lesson.
Thc story contains power enough
in  itself to carry one along  to the
climax;    the   characters    are    i I
enough to he human and tbe general
trend of the whole outwardly seems
to be built on one idea—to entertain.
Not until tlic story has digested Itself does tho theme of "Don't put
money above  love," come  upon  one.
The   locale  of  the  plt-luro  sweeps
from  the  lowly  and   crowded   cheap
districts  of  Chicago  nnd
ANNUAL MEETING OF
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
The annual general meeting of tlie
Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be held
in tbe Anglican Church Hnll ou Friday. January 22nd, commencing at
3:00 p.m.
B,  N. JUFFliEY, Sec'y.
Valley, and the mother and grand- vided Into three sittings, and after
mother of a large family, members! the first sitting which accomodated the
of which are distributed throughout I oldest of the old timers, some rem-
the   district.   Mr.. Kenny   Sharp,   an I iniscences of by-gone days were told I apartment
old timer of Courtenay, and one who I from the stage by Mr. J. B. Holmes ', New Yorlt *° tlle sheer luxury of life
saw the Klondyke In gold rush days, nnd Mr. Wm. Duncan. Mr. "Bob" J among the Long Island millionaire
came all the way from Victoria.; Filburg replied for the late comers I ''aunts, with a suddenness that Is
Mr. Robert Swan, eighty years of age. and three cheers were given for the j breath-taking and yet with a suro-
wlth   twenty-five   more   residents   of  Pioneers. \ ness that makes this almost improb-
Denman Island, wns there too, bo- During the evening those present', al>l° change seem quite matter of fact.
sides numbers from Cumberland, were entertained with step dances Leatrlce Joy, who stars In the lead-
Union Bay, Headquarters nnd other by Mr. Tweedle of Fanny Bay and |lns •'ol°- is admirably -supported by
parts of the district. , Mr. Harry Blackhall, of Courtenay.    j Edmund Burns, Robert Edeson, Julia
All the dances were old time num-'     Prominent  amongst  the  oldest  pi-^aye and  a De.Mllle picked  east.
bers   with   but   few   exceptions.   The  oncers present last night were  Mrs.!
i Inir thesnlnn      rt     in, I mUS'C   Waa   fun,*"lletl   *'-v   a   special   Wm. Lewis of Courtenay; Mrs. Flor- i
'for hei   oI   hiI   ffih " W'W ahr'ek prchestrB of old "mers, composed of | enco Cliffe of Comox; and Mrs. Piercy I    The  many   friends   of   little    Brio
'    Tl" b    "8 he Bet* Messrs. Dave Roy. of Royston. Charles ' and   Messrs.  Jos.   McPhee,  Alec  Ur- j Martin will be pleased to learn he has
ihelr money aL In .allrt aM lnylng  Parnhara* o( Cumber,and* and Harry quhart and Wm. Duncan of Courtenay, i sufficiently   recovered   to   leave   the
0,11/ imCney g <*llls  tllat  Met   Murdock,   also  of  Cumberland,   who I Mr. Robert Swan of Denman Island.' Isolation  Hospital nnd return  to his
1 will sleep no more on the Coogan set. | were" assisted by Les Moody, and they j and Mr. J. B. Holmes of Comox.      j home.
Nanaimo Soccer
Team Play Here
Sunday   At   2
The re-organized Nanaimo Soccer
team will be here on Sunday to en-
gage the locals in a Pacilic Coast
Football League game. The Hub
cfty- team has been considerably
strengthened since Cumberland beat
them five .goals to two in a McDonald
Cup fame. The game Sunday is
scheduled to start at 2:00 o'clock
sharp wilh A. S. Jones, of Union Buy,
as referee. The following will do
duiy for Cumberland: Walker, Mortimer, Stewart, Monaghan, Conti and
Brake, Fowler, Plump, Foster, MacDonald and Hitchens.
GIRL (iVWK WORK
WILL BE DISPLAYED
AT KOYSTON SATURDAY
A display of Guide Work by the
Courtenay Girl Guides will take place
in the Imperial Pavilion, Koyston, on
Sai unlay, January 28rd, at 2:80 p.m,
Afternoon Tea. The public is cordially Invited. Silver collection In aid
f the  Koyston  (iirl  Guides,
PROGRAM FOR THE WEEK
AT THE GAIETY THEATRE
This Friday and Saturday, Mae
Murray in the "Merry Widow"
also the usual News Keels
Monday and Tut sday, January
18th and 19th, "The Street of
Forgotten Men" and chapter Xo.
3 of "The Ace of Spadcs"and the
Usual   Comedy.
Wednesday and Thursday, January 20Uj and i-'ist, Larry Bern-
on in the comedy skit of the
year "The Cirl in lhe UmoUBtne"
Friday and Saturday, January
22nd and 28rd, "Lightning" also
big comedy and news reels. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAT, JANUARY 15, U26.
j Bsmsm ■ ,,b, eaa -
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY l-'HIUAY AT
OUMBBHLiAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
Fill DAY. JANUARY   15,  1826.
WHEN WINTER   The holidays are ancient his-
COMES tory ami we are well on our
way into the new year. The
Christmas tinsel has been swept up or put -away
for the next celebration and the poor old Christmas tree crowns the ash heap in the back yard.
The boys and girls have settled down to their
work in school but poor old Dad is still struggling
with the Christmas bills. There is quite a
grade ahead on the pathway of life—the long,
cold, dreary, drizzly days that lay along the trail
toward spring. 'It always seems to us that .the
period between New Year and Easter is the dullest period of all the twelve months. There is
so little of sunshine and so much of colds and
coughs. The work seems so less interesting
for there is no romance in firing the furnace and
carrying out the ashes. The days drag along,
each one like the other. There is no blue sky
and fleecy clouds, no green grass and nodding
flowers. Just gray, sombre, days and nights
when the wind howls and the rain and sleet beat
against the window panes. But if your home is
blessed with an open fireplace you can get much
joy from the glowing embers. If you have a
few shelves filled with good books you will find
comfort in reading and above all, if you have a
good radio set you can tune in some southern
resort and hear the announcer tell you about the
everlasting springtime in which they are bathing
and dancing.
John McCormack singing "Then You'll Remem-'
ber Me," in New York City.
Radio, indeed, seems to us to be the greatest
achievements of the last quarter century.
The most significant part of this whole accomplishment is the fact that it has been done by
the common people, and they are the ones to be
most benefited by it. The class who stand at
the front in this great achievement are the radio
amateurs. They are the private citizens in all
of the various countries of the world. A few
years ago a few bright boys, with now and then
the help and encouragement of older men, were
building homemade one and two-tube radio sets.
Fathers and mothers were almost distracted by
the howls and shrieks, and the crashes of static
that the youngsters pulled into the homes. The
experiments were jeered at and radio was considered a fad that wouldd soon die out. But
these ambitious amateurs kept on building sets,
putting up aerials and testing batteries until tonight they transmit and receive radio messages
In the last twenty-five years, and for no financial reward whatsoever, and purely for the love
of achievement, they have bridged the greatest
terrestrial distances. These common people,
with no financial backing of any kind, have made
our world a place in which nothing is farther
away than one-tenth of a second. These radio
amateurs live in all of the civilized countries and
recently delegates from 28 nations met in Paris
and organized the International Amateur Radio
Union.
Do they not represent the most advanced
element in our civilization?
ISLAND LUMBERMEN
EXPECT BIG ORDER I
VICTORIA, Jan. 12.—Vancouver j
Island lumbermen expect to share
ln the 26,000,000 feet order for rail- j
way ties that, accordng to a cable
from London, British. Railways will
place In B. C. this year. No other
single announcement has ever been
of more interest to the trade, lumbermen said today, pointing out tliat the
order exceeds the B. C. total lumber
exports to Britain In 1923. Shipping
as well as lumbering would benefit
materially,  they expected.
the heap with a total point score ot
fourteen; Joe Lapsansky, formerly of j
Cumberland and Ladysmith, has netted six goals; Alex McDonald of the;
Stevedores   and- Westminster  United i
and Sammy Lewis have netted four
and   three  respectively  since  going
across the line recently, while Over-1
ton of Victoria has two. |
JacK Ackroyd, formerly of Cumber-'
land and of Vancouver, la now plar-
Ing with the Barbarians of San Francisco, who won the California championship last winter. Jack was a
member of the Barbarian's team,
which   woo  the   flve^asld(e   eompetl-1
tions on both Christmas and New
Years at Kwlng Field, played on the
forward line and was prominent In
the score sheet. Chalmers of the
Vancouver Engineers Ib playing with
the Italia Virtus eleven In the Southern League.
POLICE COMMISSIONERS
OF DUNCAN WILL HAVE
EASY JOB THIS YEAR
THE MOST Commenting upon  the  most
SIGNIFICANT outstanding achievement of
ACHIEVEMENT the quarter century recently
ended, Hiram Percy Maxim,
scientist and inventor, attributes the greatset
importance to the development of the radio.
When you come to think it over the last twenty-
five years have no doubt been the most revolutionary quarter century in all history. There
have been many wonderful achievements by men
during that period. The greatest struggle of
humanity took place during that time. In illumination, transportation and communication
the progress has been tremendous. But the
greatest stride has been made in communication
and communication between human beings begets interest, knowledge, and sympathy. Twenty
five years ago there was no practical form of
communication over great distances except the
carried letter or the telegraphed message. The
letter carried by human agency is necessarily
slow and the volume limited. Wires cannot be
strung everywhere and isolated regions had no
recourse to tho telegraph. But today the uttermost parts of the earth can be brought into instant communication by radio.
During the past week thousands of people in
Canada and the United States, sitting quietly by
their own firesides, heard the booming of Big
Ben in the Tower of London, and equal thousands
in England and Ireland and South America heard
TOLERANCE Among your New Year resolutions make one to be tolerant.
j Enthusiasm and energy are the qualities you
I will need to meet the new year. But they will
| be properly warmed into action only by the serene
| sun of tolerance.
Play your own game. Play it hard and well
| from start to finish. But remember your neigh-
j bor has an equal right to play a different game
! because he thinks it is the right game for him
| to play. Help him. He won't hurt you. That
j is the way tolerance should be applied.
But remember tolerance does not mean complaisance toward evil.     It means the willingness
; to see the right in others.
A woman's tears are the greatest water power
known to man.
The country is safe so long as it has a few
men who still have courage to wear suspenders.
A husband is a person who begins to love his
shoes about the time his wife tells him they are
disreputable.
*   *   *    *   *
The difference between a success and a failure
is that the former lives on last month's income
and the latter lives on next month's.
Our own wife and many others in Cumberland would be willing to dispute the right of that
Iowa farm girl who claims to *be the worlds
champion hog feeder.
COMOX EGGS
EGGS HAVE NOW REACHED A PRICE THAT THE HOUSEWIFE
CAN ECONOMICALLY INCLUDE THEM IN THE DAILY DIET.
COMOX CREAMERY EGGS ARE CAREFULLY SELECTED AND ARE
FRESHLY GATHERED.     THE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF NEW LAID
EGGS SHOULD RECEIVE ATTENTION, AND THEY CAN BE PREPARED IN SO MANY TASTY DISHES.
DUNCAN, Jan. 12.—The Admirals
of the Swiss Navy will be made to
look like mere pikers for Idleness
by the Duncan police commissioner
when he is elected Wednesday. The
Duncan police force was abolished
last year, the Province taking over
the policing of the city. Through a
legislative oversight, however, the
oiitce was not abolished with the
force.
Two candidates, C. R. Mains, apd
Richard Whittington, have filed nomination papers for the position, and
the voters accordingly will solemnly
elect one of them to rule a police
force that does not exist.
It is the first time in the city's
history that there has been a contest
for the office.
ASK FOR "COMOX" WHEN ORDERING
BUTTER - EGGS — POTATOES — WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
FORMER B.C. PLAYERS
STAR ON U.S. TEAMS
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER ani  MtieiNB
MTA-M PCTI.ro
CUMBERLAND • - - B.C.
' I
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Oppsilts Ilo-Ile Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
ft-aetleal Barber * Hairdresser
Ladles* kalr cut, aay style SOc
CklUrsa's kalr eat any style lie
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual TuKien in
SHORTHAND - TTPllWItlTiNO - WOK KBBFINQ
BUSINESS UVniOM
New Lees Hen Opposite Cerield's Garage.
DONT SHIVER
British Columbia players are taking
a prominent part In scoring in the
Northwest Soccer League of Seattle, j
Jimmy   Bennett   of  Vancouver   leads:
UNION   HOTEL
CVMBEHXANB, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   aervlee.
26   rooms,   electrically   heated
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone IB.
R. TATBB, Manager.
I    EAT MORI MEAT DURING THE COLD WEATHER
|       AND KEEP WARM.     MEAT IS A HEAT AND
■H ENERGY PRODUCER.
Wt handle only the boat.
Our pricea art riffct.
A trial wlH Im appreciates.
Cumberland
Special
Stocktaking
Clearance
SALE
This Week
Bargains
in  all
Departments
See Handbills for
Special Prices
Wilcock  Bros.
BE
SOLEX  LAMPS
Electric Lamps of Quality
Tungsten and Nitrogen
TUNGSTEN LAMPS
15 watt "B" lamps. 82c.
25 watt "B" lamps 82c.
40 watt "B" lambs 82c.
60 watt "B" lamps .....82c.
80 watt "B" lamps 87e.
NITROGEN LAMPS
75 watt "C" lamps B8c.
10O watt "C" lamps 86c.
150 watt "C" lamps 85c.
200 watt "C" lamps fl.16
300 watt "C" lamps. $100
SsN By
Cumberland Elottric Lighting
C.,\M.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This ia a Vi-in. valve for use •» domestic hot water
supply systems for relief ef damaftaif pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND1 UNION WATER WORKS OO.
limited.
G. W. CLINTON, MaMginf Director. FRIDAY, JANUARY 15,  192G.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
b
Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland
ERIDAY AND SATURDAY OP THIS WEEK
JACKIE COOGAN in—
Old Clothes
also "HELL'S HIGHROAD"
Adults 50-t) Children 25.?
A3irtf
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, JANUARY 20 and 21
JOHN GOLDEN'S triumph
with a cafr of cinema celebrities <ro~
JAY HUNT-MADGE BELLAMY
ETHEL CLAYTON-J.FARMU MCDONALD-WALLACE rt'DOMALD
OTIS HARLAN - EDYTHE CHAPMAN- RICHARP TRAVERS
BRANDON HURST -JAMES MARCUS
(play by FRANK BACON and MNCHELL SMITH
knariolj FRANCES MARION ^JOHN FORD Reduction.
THE SEASON'S SUPREME SCREEN SENSATION
ADULTS 35*z>
CHILDREN 15<?
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JANUARY 22 and 23
THE MAN WHO,
FOUND HIMSELF
With VIRGINIA VALU
flflBQsB& ^
iuH cL_JI
MANSON TO MAKE
ANOTHER ATTEMPT
FOR LIQUOR BARRIER
Victoria, Jan. 9.—After three unsuccessful attempts. British Columbia is
to try again during the present session of the Canadian Parliament to
secure the passage of legislation that
would stop the private importation
of liquor into the Province and thus
abolish legal liquor export from bases
here.
Attorney-General Manson has given
this question some thought since the
Legislature adjourned and will consult his colleagues on the matter immediately. It is expected that a decision on the advisability of making
a fourth application to Ottawa will
be reached within a few days.
The Canadian House of Commons
has passed the desired liquor law
three times. On each occasion, however, the Senate has vetoed this legis
lation. Last year, while the Senate
was sparsely attended, a small group
of Senators were able to over-ride
the wishes of the entire House of
Commons.
The Senate's action on British Columbia's reform i.s one of the chief
arguments in favor of limiting the
powers of  the  Red  Chamber.
The Provincial Government takes
the stand that the private importation law is vitally necessary here.
The question it must decide, however,
is whether there is any hope of securing Uie passage of this legislation
over the continual objection of the
Senate in the face of the Common's
favorable attitude.
GOOD AMOUNT RAISED
BY JUMBLE AUCTION
TAXI TAXI   -j
j Safety andComfort
Day or Night
CAR   SERVICE
24 TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
: Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
J at   8:00   o'clock   every   Sunday
■ morning   and   meets    boat   at
Union Bay.
1 TOURING PARTIES CATERED
i TO  AT REASONABU:   RATES
ASK FOR
Charlie Dalton
COURTENAY, Jan. 11.—The postponed Jumble Auction Sale held in
the Agricultural Hall on Saturday
afternoon was quite successful and
resulted in upwards of one hundred
and fifty dollars being added to the
funds of the Comox Agricultural and
Industrial Association. Owing to the
efforts of the collection committee a
large number of diversified articles
had been inquired. These included
flower seeds, seed potatoes, roots,
vegetables, preserves, orders for day-
pld chicks, strawberry plants, raspberry canes, grain, flour, and a large
number of small articles which were
l| :
'CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
; WM. MERRIFIELD,..Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
TAXI
TAXI
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
m
Cumberland Supply   Co.
Rickson's Old Stand — Diinsmuir Ave., Cumberland
SAVE MONEY—BUt in doing ko, don't deny yourself
the necessities of life. Do your hading at the Cumberland Supply—which assures you of Quality, Service, and a saving of 5 per cent on all cash purchases.
Pine Apple, 2's, 3 for  $1.00
Quaker Peas, 2's, per tin 30
Peas and Corn, 5 for  90
Tomatoes, 2 '/o's, 2 for  35
Orange Marmalade, 41b tin for  60
Pine Apple Jelly, 41b tin for  85
Pep Bran and Shredded Wheat, each per pkg 15
Cooking Figs, 2tbs. for  25
Prunes, per lb  15
Dates, 21bs. for  25
Old Dutch Cleanser, per tin  10
Cumberland   Supply   Co.
S
P. O. Box 205
Phone 155
arranged Into some 160 lots. The
sale was conducted by Mr. E. Felix '
Thomas, the association's secretary,
assisted by .Mrs. Thomas as clerk'
and .Mrs. E. Tull as cashier.
During the afternoon the Ladles'
Agricultural Auxiliary In the persons of .Mesdames Margaret McPhee.
W. Drown, D. Dell, assisted by Mrs. j
G. G. McLennan, served delicious
afternoon teas in the adjoining hall. [
The collection'committee was com-'
posed of the following: Messrs. F. i
McPherson, P. L. Anderton. W, A. D.
Paul, D. M. Isenor. H. A. Pattlnson.:
J ,\V. Stalker, N. A. Pritchard. R. t;\
Hurford, J. Crockett. J. W. Gunn and '
tho Courtenay Scouts.
List  oi  Honors
Those wiio contributed articles for
the sale were as  under:
Messrs. 0. R. Worthlngton, T. Play-
lair.  G.  ('happen,  W.  R.  Perrey, T.
Knight,  11.  Foskett.  W, A.  D.  Paul. I
J. W. Gunn, R. U. Hurford. Mesdames i
R. E. Haas, E. F. Thomas, C. Tlppett.
G. W. Edwards, A. Orr, .1. J. McKen-'
zic. W. Hodgson, J. Robinson. Hugh
Stewart,   W.  Marshall.   H.   Morrison.;
A. U. Crump, R. Duncan. C. Beasley,
A. Shepherd, A. Stewart, R. Ramsay.
A. Loggie, J. M. Forrest. E. G. Ever-1
ett, C. S. Wood, A. Bennett, H. Smith. |
M. Blunt, A. T. Beckensell, II. Hornal.
M.  S.  Stephens. J. Thompson. E. M.
E. Johnson. A. Fielder. W. P. Bevan,
G. R. Ker, A. Stewart. W. R. Cooke.
A. G. Slaughter, E. A. Matthewson.
J.  McKenzie. F. C. Brock, E. Pottin-'
i ear,   E.   T.   Ellison,   A.   Sutherland.
K. G. Halley, M. Moncrleff, H. Gam-!
I Un, J. Sutton. H. Cooke. A. D. Greg-
■ son. M. II. Tribe. J. W. Stalker. A.
j Randall. C. Whyte. D. Hughes, and
. E. Peers, and Messrs. A. Barr, J.
I Clifford, J. Mathers, Horace Smith.
I Sid Smith. Saunders Supply Co.. H.
I A. Pattlnson, L. Pearse, J. Sldgwlck.
J. King. F. Hughes, D. Isenor. C.
j Taylor. It. Grant, E. Clark. A. Smith.
I W. S. Hunter. A. Wilson. J. Cleland.
' D.   Pattlsoh,   .1.   McPhee.   J.   Poivey,
F. Childs, H. Cooke, Graham and
Moncrleff. Comox Co-operative, Malpass and Wilson, P. McBryde, II.
Simms. C. A. Brown. Sun Drug Co..
Tarbells Ltd., The Mercantile Store,
A. M. Stark, Builders Supply, Over-
wailea Store. Farmers Produce, The
Courtenay Garage. Paterson's Bool
Store. A. G. Slaughter. T. Booth and
Sons, Lavers Store, J. Hannay, C.
Bool. Corllelds Ltd., G. H. Pldcock.
II. 1. Kushida. L. D. Piket. II. Bryant.
Hardy and Pearce, Brackman & Ker,
Edwards Lumber Co., Royul Standard
Feed Co.. Geo. Leighton. thc Comox
Creamery.   Venables   Bakery,   Leslie
Moody. R. I'. Hurford. McKenzie's
Store, Pritchard Bros.. Mesdames W.
Davis, G. It. Bates, and Messrs. J.
Casanave, II. Bridges, C. Holmes, H.
Cox. C. Carwlhten, G. Hornby. O.
Kaka. J. Crockett, M. Piercy and
others.
NEW RULES PROTECT
TRAVEL ON B.C. ROADS
VICTORIA. Jan. 13.—Big passenger
busses running on tlie Island Highway and other leading roads of B.
C. will soon operate under strict regulations designed to protect tlie safety
of travel, it was announced at the
Provincial Public Works Department
today.
These regulations are being drafted
by ollicials now under legislation
passed at the last session of the
Legislature. They will be Issued
shortly, but before they are put Into
effect Hon. W. II. Sutherland. Minister of Publlc Works, will hear all
representations tliat bus operators
may wish to make.
"it is not our intention to legislate
any 'busses out of business or to Interfere with legitimate operations,"
Dr. Sutherland explained today. '"We
are seeking only to protect our roads
and ordinary traffic from vehicles
that may tie too large or are operated
at  too high a speed."
I'ndcr the new regulations no bus
over eight feet in width will bo allowed to operate. So far as is known
none of the present busses In use in
the Province exceed this width. The
weight and length of the busses also
will be prescribed. Conditions or roads
on which various bus lines are operated will lie taken into consideration
In the framing of rules to govern
these vehicles.
Excessive speed will be prevented
by the application of fixed schedules
to all bus lines. If a bus arrives at
any point ahead of schedule thnt will
be sufficient to establish the charge
that it has been speeding. Tlie speed
limit for busses will be fixed according lo the condition of the road. In
some parts of the bus route the speed
may be faster than in other places
under this plan.
li is the Intention of the Public
Works Department to bring tiie new
rules into effect well ahead of the
annual tourist rush, which congests
the Malahat und other leading highways and increases the danger of
motor  travel.
When you are In need of a
I'luiuliliig tt Mealing Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phono 124 Phone 157
Courtenay or Cumberland
Your  needs   wlll   receive   Immediate
attention.
Freddy:    "Grandpa,   did   you   once
have hair like snow?"
Grandpa:    "Yes, my boy."
Freddy: "Well who shoveled It off?"
Experience nnd a llllle study of tbe
art of tuning are necessary for the
successful operation af any radio
receiver.
See Jackie Coogan this weekend at the llo-Ilo Theatre in
"Old Clothes."
fiiH
m
Jljftr.-xjaaw* las * *
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoe:; repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give thi best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
G-S
t-e-afr KWM
■ ifr *:.:■••'.•■*
rgr=s
MANN'S BAKERY
For Quality Bread, High Class Cakes and Pastries,
Scotch Oat Cakes' and Mixed Cookies
 SATURDAY SPECIALS	
Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Cream Cakes
and Cream Sponges
Doughnuts
Our Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls are a Treat
All Orders Delivered
MANN'S
Phone 18
Cumberland, B, C.
$2.95
A PAIR
Sizes 11 to 5 in Boys'
Strong Brown School
Shoes.
Will they wear well at that price?     If they don't
we will give you a new pair. Isn't that fair enough?
CAVIN'S SHOE STORE
Cumberland
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
B
39
,bse
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire,     goal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones I and 61
Cumberland, B.C. PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Everybody's Happy-
HERE   COMES
Jackie Coogan
The Kid Himself
THt Kid himself. In hit
greatest comedy hit
since "The Rag Man." He
travels the sidewalks of
New York once more in-
atead of whizzing by in
high-powered limousineil
It's a thrilling whirlwind of
merry adventure! You'll
love every second of it I
By WlUAItl) MACK: oW-
.4 b, EDDIE CUM.   UnJai
Ike     perianal     s.tcrvitt.n     *t
JACK   COOGAN,  SH.
here's the
successor lo
"THE RAG MAN"
Just  One  Laugh  After
Another
ALSO A SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION
Cecil B.DeMilie    .   .    %
^A^gnnrirFRS niSTRIBUTINi; CUKFOiWlON.
^touradftllO
1 Julia tTK
JjDly.rt Hci^B
JULIAN
NEVER BEFORE SUCH A STORY!
Friday - Saturday
of this week
Jan.  15 and  16
GREAT DOURLE ATTRACTION!
TWO SHOWS IN ONE!
CHILDREN 25c
ADULTS 50*f>
MATINEE SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT 2:30
CHILDREN 15c ADULTS 35ti
a
Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
I
Condition*
Extracts from the Monthly Letter of
the  Royal  Bank  of Canada.
FRIDAY, JANUARY  15,  1926.
! CONEY ISLAND FREAKS
BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR
The British Industries Fair, the
largest annual trade fair In the world
is to be held simultaneously at London and Birmingham from 15th - 26th
February, 1926. Different groups of
trades will be shown In the city. This
ls not to be confused with the British
Empire Exhibition now closed. It ls
a buyers' Fair, and Is organized by
the British Government Department
of Overseas Trade and Birmingham
Chamber of Commerce. Practically
all the Important Industries will be
represented.
Invitations to the Fair have been
Bent to 150,000 buyers In varions
parts of the world. Canadian manufacturers will exhibit in a special
section, which Is being organized by
the Canadian Chamber of Commerce
ln London. In past years, buyers
from all parts of the world have attended the Fair. It ls anticipated
that many Canadian buyers will attend as usual.
The clothing and allied trades will
exhibit for the first time. This ls essentially a trade Fair, but In response
to the request of the majority of the
exhibitors, the public will be admitted
during   certain   restricted  hours.   It
surpasses in size and diversity of products, all the Continental trade Fairs.
Information required by intending exhibitors or buyer can be secured from
the four British Government Trade
Commissioners in Canada, at Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancou-
THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 30
Here Is a neat little problem for
the merchant with honest scales.
Who can tell what Is the lowest
possible number of pounds that can
be weighed by both Troy and Avoirdupois?
We don't sell one item at a loss
to make it up on another.
Every  grocery  value   sold   at
Frelone's Grocery Store is constant—each   means   a   distinct
saving.
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cor. 5th nnd Dunsmuir.
Phone 122 Cumberland
Puzzle No. 31
Each of the lines is to be arranged
into a single appropriate word:
To  love  ruin.
Lady  Mine.
Moon starer.
Nine thumps.
Puzzle No. 32
A little girl visited the food show
and ate 17 different kinds of breakfast food and gathered 10 pounds of
sample packages. Then she stepped
on the free weighing machine and
found that her weight had increased
10 per cent, whereas if she had eaten
twice as much breakfast the gain
would have been 11 per cent. What
was her weight when she arrived at
the food show?
My friend, the squire, never falls
to take advantage of an opportunity
to exhibit his talent for quick figuring. On a street car the other day i
he paid his fare with a dollar bill
and the conductor having only 5
coins, which totalled 94 cents, was
ln a quandary.
"Never mind," said the squire, as
he pocketed 93 cents, "there's another
cent so you can buy a good 2 cent
smoke." What 5 coins made up that
94 centB?
VISIT WEALTHY HOME
Puzzle No. 34
Can you find the names ot seven
towns hidden ln the following short
letter from a traveler?
"We made a light royal boat with;
a mainsail. I waa the skipper that
came to a bad end." ;
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
ln our next Issue.
Answers to Last Week's Puzzles   j
No. 25—The time was 9.36 a.m.,
because one-quarter of the time from
midnight would be 2 hours and 24
minutes, which added to half the time
until midnight (7 hours and 12 mln-'
utes)   equals  9:36.
No. 26—As the difference between
a price which Is 10 per cent advance
upon $1 and one which is 20 per cent
advance upon 90 cents, ls 2 cents,!
which is 1-55 of the fromer price, bo '
in thla case the price for which the |
I suit sold ls 55 times 25 cents, which'
is »3.76. '
No. 27—The largeBt gun llred 300
pounds, the medium 150 pounds, and i
the smallest 50 pounds.
No. 28—Four letters produce LONE.
Take away ONE and there ls left!
the letter L. Remove L (50) and
naught Is left.
No. 29—Washington's generals concealed in the sentences In the following order:
Gates, Putnam. Morgan, Allen and
Stark.
Coney Island, with all Its blazing
lights, all its freaks and fakes, all
Its dancers and sword swallow*ers,
reproduced in minute detail for a
party on a millionaire's estate, makes
one of the big scenes and forms the
background for a great part of the
Intense dramatic situations that a-
bound In the Cecil B. DeMille supervised production, "Hell's Highroad."
which will be shown at the Ilo-llo
Theatre this evening (Friday) and
tomorrow evening  (Saturday).
The party Is given by Anne Broderlck, one of. the world's wealthiest
women, on her beautiful Long Island
estate. Underneath all this gorgeous
display lies her burning desire to win
Ronald McKane from his devoted
wife, Judy, by dazzling him with gold.
Judy looks on, watching fearfully for
the effect of this display on the man
she loves. Too quickly the critical
moment arrives and she must act or
lose him.
Just what Leatrlce Joy, who stars
in the role of Judy does to offset the
lure of the rich woman's gold and
win her husband, played by Edmund
Burns, back to her heart again makes
up one of the important and gripping
crises that appear constantly In this
dramatic screen narrative.
Rupert Julian directed "Hell's High
road," under the personal supervision
of Mr. DeMille. Others In the cast
Include Robert Edesou, Julia Faye.
and Helene Sullivan.
Mink-Raccoon
I want thousands of these for
immediate manufacture and will
pay a Dollar a piece more for' Lad>r: "But don,t ■""• "*"1 that
Prime Skins than anyone else h°"**M<* 'M** 8'ves one a head-
in the trade, if shipped immed- ache?'
iately; also need a large quantity of Muskrat, Beaver, Skunk,
Marten and Weasel for which I
»m paying fancy priooo.
Instructor: "Emphatically no, madam, Just the reverse."
J. H. Munro
Revelstoke, B.C.
Branches at Calgary, Moose
Jaw, Brandon and Kenora.
Sunkist Oranges
q      DOZEN FOR      QK«
40c.        50c.        60c.        75c.        90c. per dozen.
Choice Indian Ceylon Tea, 2 lbs. for   $1.25
Rosedale Tea, 2 lbs. for   $1.45
Fresh Ground Coffee, 60c. per lb and  70
Robin Hood Rapid Porridge Oats, cooks in a
few minutes, family pkg. 30c or 2 for 55
Shredded Wheat, 3 pkgs. for 50
Chrisp Cinnamon Snaps, 35c lb or 3 lbs. for.... $1.00
Lemon Snaps, 30c. tb or 2 lbs. for 55
Ginger Snaps, 25c lb or 2 lbs. for  45
Fancy Mixed Biscuits, 35c lb or 3 lbs. for  $1.00
Chrisp Graham Wafers, 2 It) pkgs 55
Extra Special in Canned Fruits
Sliced   Peaches,  sliced  Pineapple,  Plums,   Apricots,
Blackberries, Strawberries and Loganberries
3   TINSF0R   85c
Toilet and Bath Soap, large cakes, 5 for 50
Pure Castile Soap, 5 cakes for 25
White Wonder Soap, 7 cakes for 55
Swifts Classic Cleanser, 3 tins for  25
King Oscar Sardines, 7 tins for   $1.00
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE, PHONE 38
Of    Iho    world's    hoota    nnfl     shoes
more than 45 per cent, are made In
Massachusetts.
B. C. MOTORISTS
ARE CAUTIONED
Caution comes from the British
Columbia police to motorists who
have purchased their new 1926 license plates.
"Always carry your receipted application form ln the car," Is the Injunction.
The motoring publlc is reminded
that the law requires both the certificate for the car as well as thc
driver's license.
Some of the more ingenious drivers
have permanently fastened the papers
In the car.
It prevents worry, police say, pointing to th* regulation that drivers
must remember to carry tneir nrivmg
permit. The old driver's is good In
1926.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Lumber
In every sorti of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOW!, DOORS.
SHINOLES.
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS.
AND    FURNISHINGS
WU DELIVER TO ANYWHBRB IN SHORT
NOTICI WITH REASONABLE CHARGES
Rojtton Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
[ Night oalli: 1I4X Courtenay
(Office: 111 Cumberland
Illlll
lllllllll
COPPER TRAILS
Extending to various parts of southwestern Rritish
Columbia, the copper trails which we call telephone
lines are ready to carry long-distance conversations
at speeds ranging from 8,000 to 178,000 miles per
second.    'When speed counts—Long Distance.
jf        BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY       jj
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii FRIDAY, JANUARY 15,  1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
Gaiety Theatre
Courtenay
ss=s
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, THIS WEEK
MAE MURRAY in—
The
Merry Widow
Adults 50C
Children 25«r>
MONDAY AND TUESDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19
^gtreetof
Forgottei    "
Men*
COURTENAY POST
OFFICE HANDSOME
BUILDING—NOW OPEN
COURTENAY, Jan. 7.—Postal business was transacted for the first time
In Courtenay's fine new Post Ofiice
built of brick and stone, last night.
On" entering the building one felt that
an era of progress could be marked
by this occasion. Owing to the
strangeness of his new surroundings,
postmaster, Perrot was naturally
somewhat handicapped In the sorting
of the mall Into the various boxes
and drawers, the numbers of ail of
which it is necessary for the postmaster and his able assistant, Miss
Margaret Sutherland, to commit to
memory. The work last night, however, was accomplished without any
Inconvenience to the public; and keys
for the new boxes were Issued between the hours of seven and eight
p.m.
The new post offlce stands at the
corner of Alice and Isabel streets
on well laid out grounds. The new
location of the post office wlll now
make it unnecessary for most of the
residents of the city to descend the
hill or to cross the tracks of the
Comox Logging and Railway Co., as
mail time arrives, and when the approaches leading to the new building
have been improved for pedestrians
and vehicular traffic, which will undoubtedly be taken in hand at once,
the citizens of Courtenay will have
just cause to be proud of this their
first public building erected by the
federal government. Courtenay has
been desirous of acquiring a. better
post ofllce for a number of years
past. As far back as 1913 the sum
of $20,000 was appropriated for such
purpose;  but the grant was allowed
to   lapse   owing  to  the   citizens   of
Courtenay at that time being unable
to   agree  on   a  building  site.   After
the war the Comox Board of Trade
again  took  up  the  matter  through
Mr. A. W. Neill, the federal member
for Comox-Alberni  riding, and lt is
very  largely  through   his   persistent
and thorough representation'that the
first vote of 112,000 was made in 1924
for the preliminary* work and In the
spring of lust year a further sum of
: 130,000 was voted.   The new building,
I which   Is   both  handsome  and  sub-
I stantlal, Is modern in every way and
I Is situated on a double corner on a
site  given  by  Mr.   M.  Perez.    The
, whole of the ground floor Is  occu-
! pled  by the post office, the Govem-
i ment  telegraph and  Customs offices
| being on the first floor, as also Is the
i comfortable modern flat provided for
the janitor's living quarters. The con
structlon of this building was by local
contractors  McDonald and Brethour.
Mr. E. R. Tarllng, representing the
Dominion authorities under Mr. J. G.
Brown,    Victoria,    district    resident
architect  for the  Dominion  department of Public Works.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Ofiice Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
J. W. McKENZIE, Jr.
BECOMES CQURTENAY'S
MAYOR FOR 1926 TERM
COURTENAY, Jan. 12.—There was
no great amount ot Interest shown
ln nominations for municipal offices
on Monday, nomination day. The
reason for the lack of Interest is
probably because the city's finances
arc ln good shape and taxes, generally speaking, at a low level. The
only nomination for mayor ia that
of J. W. McKenzie jr., who wlll therefore hold that ofllce by acclamation
for the coming year. This will be
his second term as the city's chief
magistrate, as he held the ofllce ln
the year 1917-18.
Four names have been put forward
to fill three seatsat the council table.
They are Edward Lloyd, tug boat
owner; W. T. Fielder, builder, who
retired from the council early In the
year   and   who   ls   now   seeking   re
election; William Douglas, merchant;
and Dalton Cudmore, saw filer. Owing to the resignation during 1925 of
Aldermau Fielder nnd Cooke, Alderman Fred Field, who headed the poll
last year, is the only member of the
old council who will carry on with- i
out nomination.
There  would   have•*,been  two  by-
elections but Theed Pearse Is tlie only '
nominee  to  till   the  vacancy  caused
by the resignation of W. T. Fielder
who was elected last year for a term !
of two years.   Tho only  by-election
now   necessary   will   be   the   contest
between retiring mayor Wm. Duncan
and   ex-alderman   E.   L.   Macdonald.
The  ratepayers  choice  of these  two
candidates  will till the seat vacated ■
by the  recent  resignation  of Alderman H. Cooke who was f:.o returned
for a term of two years at thc last ,
civic  elections.
Nominations for Police Commlslon-
er are F. W. Kerton, builder, and II.!
E. Wallls, druggist, one only to be |
elected. There arc three uonilna-;
llons-for school trustees, two of which
must be returned. They are Geo. H.
Pidcock. garage proprietor; Ben ■
Hughes, publisher; and John Sutton, I
undertaker. Elections wlll lake place
on Thursday the 14th  Inst.
TO SELL TOBACCO
IN BEER PARLORS
Vancouver. Jan. 11.—It ls learned
here that Commissioner Hugh Davidson's changes in lhe liquor regulations of British Columbia for 1926
Include removal of Hie prohibition on
the sale of tobaccos, cigars and cig-1
arettea in beer parlors,
On the oilier hand, a new prohibition removes all musical Instruments, Including rudios, -from beer
parlors,   -
"It was nol so much tho bedtime
stories which Commissioner Davidson objected lo. according to reports," says the Vancouver Sun, "but
the dance music which was occasionally stirring up such enthusiasm
among the patrons of these places
that they stepped out between the
aisles to indulge In an occasional
fox trot. Dancing is also now directly forbidden.1'
HOCKEY PICTORIAL
Second Edition
COURTENAY LOCALS
Chapter 3 of
"THE ACE OF SPADES"
CHILDREN 15*i>
ADULTS 35*r*
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, JANUARY 20 & 21
^>Girf/y,/fe
Limoujine"
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JANUARY 22 AND 23
WILLIAM FOX presents'
THI PIAY THAT BROKE
THE WORLD'S RECORD'^
UGHTHIN
JOHN GOLDEN'S triumph
•with a casT-of cinema celebrities c-<=—
JAY HUNT - MADGE BELLAMY
ETHEL CLAYTON- J. FARRtU MCDONALD-WALLACE WD0NALD
OTIS HARLAN -EDYTHE CHAPMAN - RICHARD TRAVERS
BRANDON HURST -JAMES MARCUS
%</ by FRANK BACON and WINCHELL SMITH
Lariolj FRANCES MARION ~JOHN FORD pduction
THE SEASON'S SUPREME SCREEN SENSATION
Comedy and News
EpfSIBfiMKILS''^^
COURTENAY, Jan. 6.—Mr. Campbell Hlghet. who for a number of
years past has been in charge of the
local business of the Vancouver .Milling and Grain Co., has now accepted
a position with the local branch of
Messrs. Brackman and Ker. .Mr.
Hlghet has a large number of friends
in lhe district and wlll no doubt be
renewing old acquaintances In his
new capacity.
...
Mrs. H. V. Collins leaves tomorrow
to Join Mr. Collins In Vancouver,
where he has a position with the
Vancouver Harbor Commission. Thoy
have been residents of Courtenay for
some years past and will be missed
by n large circle of friends.
...
Mr. and Mrs. A. Alberg and little
daughter left this morning for England. They have been residing In
Courtenay since giving up their
holdings at  Merville.
The second edition of the Hockey
Pictorial is on the market, more complete and up-to-date than the original
edition, which was received with such
acclaim by followers of the great winter snort. Most favorable comments
have been passed upon the publication
by sports writers the continent over,
and Iho general opinion as expressed
by players and scribes Is tliat no moro
comprehensive or handsome book In
the spoiling line whs ever printed.
A feature that Bhould possess a marked appeal not only lo puck-chasers
of the present, but to ol'd timers, are
Hie many group pictures of champion
leanis, dating back to the early history of hockey. The new edition not
only contains the history of hockey
In Canada, bul covers the history of
the gnme In the I'nlted States aa
well, with handsome engravings of
Canadian and American teanis, and is
right up to the minute in every
respect. Any further information pertaining to the book can be obtained
by writing to George King. Publisher,
84 Victoria St., Toronto, Out.
See Jackie Coogan this weekend at the Ilo-llo Theatre in
"Old Clothes."
!faM3EM?jaj»*5E®5HS®aMSiai!!Ji
MATERIAL OF  ANY  DESCRIPTION
Call and See Our Stocks Get Our Figures
EDWARDS LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
Mill Street, Courtenay
Phone 17 P.O. Box 62       m
B'^?jaaMSEjaasraraM^jaa®si5MBEjaBjasia
Corporation of the City of Cumberland
DISTRIBUTION OF POLL TAX. 1925.
Total Amount Collected 	
DISBURSEMENTS *
To  Schools     1,000.00
To Hospitals    549,35
Relief to V. Fouraco   158.60
Relief to W. Willard   549,90
Commission     U7.26
18,1.70.00
92,870.00
fc.VI7.MJO
Corporation of the City of Cumberland
BALANCE SHEET AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1925.
ASSETS
Cash A snots.
Cash In Bank General Account   5,320.74
Cash  In  Dunk  Savings  Account        12.36
Deferred  expenses,  unexpired   Insurance  premiums
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE.
Soldiers Housing Loan   6,203.22
Tax Suspense Account       26.05
Tax Arrears    1,068.31
FIXED ASSETS.
Real Estate 	
Municipal Buildings  6,139.81
Motor Trucks   4,800.00
Fire  Apparatus    2.080.44
Wagons,  Sleighs, & Plows      421.60
Horses    „„     260.00
Tools   „          26.00
13,716.76
less depreciation reserve   1,296.67
5,333.10
151.50
7,286.68
800.00
12,421.08
tSaW&i*
LIABILITIES
Outstanding Cheques     iss.oo
Provincial  Government  Loan   .      .   3,850.00
Owing 10 School Board   1090.47
Surplus  Account   20,913.79
2,».902i'«
Signed on behalf of Ihe City Council   ™? *%™HMI- ""*'
W. II. COPE, Treasurer.
Certified Correct
It. J. SKI.KE. Auditor. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 15,  1916.
Special Sale of
Ladies' Hats and
Coats
L
m
Our complete stock of Ladies Hats, regular prices to
$8.50. For a (|iiick sale now reduced to • d*0 AC
P.e on time and get your choice at each  ...*Pfci»t/tl
Ladies' Felt Hats, only a few left. (Pi   PA
Clearing price,  each   tDAelJvf
Ladies Coats will be greatly reduced for quick sale.
We ask your inspection and* comparison.    Smart, up-
to-the-minute Coats are all offered at reduced prices.
Underwear Bargains
In Girl's Vests we still have a fair assortment of fine
values, comprising All-Wool Vest that were $1.50 per
garment.    Odd sizes.
To clear at each 	
Boys' Shirts and Drawers, fleece-lined.
Clearing Price, each 	
50c
50c
SEE OUR COUNTERS FOR MANY BARGAINS
PRIOR TO STOCK-TAKING.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
REDUCED PRICES
Every Car reduced to a rock bottom price. Don't
miss this opportunity to buy a "Guaranteed Used Car"
on easy terms.
We have a variety of popular makes. Here are a few:
McLAUGHLIN Six Touring, all good tires, repainted
and pulls like new, fl?OCA
Sale Price   tpejDU
DODGE Roadster, a very serviceable car. tjj-fl fff?
Sale Price    «p± I O
FORD Touring, good tires, battery and (JJQAA
upholstery, Sale Price    <u)OUU
FORD Light Truck, good tires, battery and flJQOC
in A.l. Condition, Sale Price    vO^O
CHEVROLET Superior Touring, late model, has had
very little use, 5 good tires (UCCA
Sale Price     >d>U0U
CHEVROLET Touring, starter, good tires, &1 PA
Sale Price   tpltlU
FORD Touring, late model, good tires, top UJOCA
ami  Upholstery, Sale Price    «P*J«)U
We have several others at equally low figures. They
include CHEVROLET and FORD tourings, a STAR
special touring, a DODGE roadster, FORI) sedan, etc.
BLUNT & EWART, Ltd.
Agents for
McLAUGHLIN-BUICK & CHEVROLET CARS
Courtenay, B. C.
CITY MEAT ;
MARKET   \
For Best Quality
KEF.F, VEAL, MUTTON  AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
T "hotels AND CAMPS    I
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Personal Mention
AT HOME WEDNESDAY
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Gear and family,
New Townsite, Cumberland, have re- j
ceived an invitation to the golden wed j
ding  of   Mr.   and   Mrs. John Duncan '
which   is  to   be  held  at  the latter's
home in Weston, New  South Wales.
Australia.   The   occasion   will  be   a j
rather unique one as their family of
five girls and two boys will be present
with them on that occasion with the |
exception of their 3rd eldest daughter
Mrs. Gear, of this city.
Mrs. E. W. Bickle and Mrs. Sidney
Horwood will be at Home on Wednesday, January 20th, from 4 to 6
at the residence of Mrs. Edward W.
Bickle,  Dunsmuir Avenue.
Mrs. John Bruce and Mrs. Thomas
Hudson, of Union Bay, left on Saturday for Harrison Hot Springs.
See Jackie Coogan this weekend at the Ilo-llo Theatre in
"Old Clothes."
Our Motto:
"QUALITY  AM) SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
(Alt
CAR
Mason's Taxi
21  HOURS SERVICE
At Very Reasonable Prices
1   meet all trains and  boats.
A few cents extra will bring
you nt your house or from your
house lo tlie station in Comfort
ami Style.
ANYWHKIIK nt ANY TIME
See Geo. Mason
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
(Alt CAR
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over IH years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over B.UtlO board
feet per acre west ot the Coast Range
aiid 8,0011 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied tor
Is situated, and are made on primed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can he
received.
For more detailed Information Bee
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PUKCIIASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tituberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first class (arable) \nnd is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment cf
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may he leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.   .
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based in
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
b°ad.
COURTENAY NOTES
A charivari and surprise party was
given Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Rees last
Thursday night by about sixty people
from Courtenay and the surrounding
district. The charivari proved a success and the crowd was Invited In by
Mrs. Rees. Mr. Hurford and Mr. Wain
were In charge of the entertainment
and a very enjoyable programme was
given "by many of those present.
Dancing and supper followed. The
party broke up about one o'clock and
everybody voted lt a good time.
...
Mr. D. Wallls, a graduate of the
University of British Columbia, has
been appointed assistant to Mr. J.
W. Young in the Courtenay High
School. Mr. Wallls specialized ln
chemistry and mathematics In his
studies at the university. He is the
son of Mr. H. E. Wallls, of the Sun
Drug Company.
H
ere an
dTK
ere
William Valgardson, a farmer at
Taber, Alberta, is glad he went into
sugar beet raising. He secured a
$350 return from three and one-halt
acres of land.
Winter sport activities at old
Quebec are in full swing. This is
considered the most brilliant season
of entertainment for years past.
Hundreds of sport enthusiasts and
tourists from the New England
states, Canada, and other parts of
the continent are turning up in force
at the Ancient Capital.
Miss Isabel Coursier, only nineteen years of age, is the world's
woman champion ski jumper. She
created a world record at Revelstoke, B.C. at the age of sixteen In
1922. This winter, taking part ln
the winter sports at Quebec, Miss
butirait-l    incite  o   jiai..j>   ..t   OO  foot  in
the International-Intercollegiate Ski
contest.
THANKS
I take this opportunity of thanking
all those who gave me their support
during the recent election for Aldermen for the City offc Cumberland and
to assure you that when the time
comes again, if my friends are still
anxious to have me In the field. I
shall be only too pleased to offer my
services.
HARRY  PARKINSON
CARD OF THANKS
To the electors of the City of Cumberland Alderman T. H. Mumford
extends his thanks for the honor
conferred by returning him at the
head of the poll In the election held
Thursday. By his work in the year
1926 Alderman Mumford wlll endeavor
to show the electors that their faith
in his ability has not been misplaced.
start the New
Year right
by using
OLD
DRURY TEA
(Blended to Suit the Waters of the District)
OLD DRURY COFFEE (COSTAPAN)
(Blended from finest Costa Rico and Panama Coffees)
Mumford's Grocery
'If You Get It At Mumford's, It's Good!"
50c
Worth Double the
amount asked
WHAT?
Why    Lang's
Cream of Lilies
Of
course
FOR THE HANDS, FACE AND LIPS
IS THE FINEST LOTION ON THE
MARKET TODAY.   GIVE IT A TRIAL
Obtainable only at the place of manufacture.
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal tt Lang's
THANKS
IN MEMORIAM
Alderman A. E. Jeffrey hereby tenders to all those who so willingly
assisted him and voted for him at the
recent election his sincere thanks,
and to assure the citizens of Cumberland that he will, at all times, serve
the interests of the City to the best
of his ability.
ALDERMAN A. E. JEFFREY
NOTICE
On and after this date any perion
or persons found removing coal or
other material from the yards, cars
or property of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited without a permit wlll be prosecuted to the (nil
extent of the law.
CANADIAN   COLLIERIES
(DUNSMUIR) LIMIT1D.
In loving memory of our dear
brother, Walter "Scotty" Clark, who
died at the Providence Hospital,
Seattle, on January 11th, 1925.
"We mlas him most who loved him
beBt."
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Brown.
FOR SALE - OVERLAND COUPE
1926 model. Only run 1930 miles,
better than new, everything In perfect condition. No reasonable offer
refused. Apply W. J. Keenan, Derwent Avenue, Cumberland, B.C.
„    * 3-6
FOR SALE—Remington Typewriter,
No. 10. Apply Sutherland's Dry
Goods Store, Csmberland.
asy Lessens in *
AUCTION
BRIDGE
New Series by WYNNE FERGUSON
(Author of"Ferguson on Cuiucrionlbutgf
»«BaBBaBBHBHaMBaBa1aaBaa»aaaB=
Cov»l|l» WU by Hoyti, Jr.
ARTICLE No. 7
In tint preceding article, the writer
referred to several hands that were mis-
played and asked for criticism. The first
band was aa follows:
! Y i
:A Bi
:     Z     I
Hearts—6
-Clubs-K, 0,9,8
"•—7
Diamonds
Spades-A,Q,J,9.7,« 2
Kore, rubber game. Z dealt and bid
Noscore, . .--... ,
lour spadea (a fine preemptive bid, by
the way). A doubled, Y passed and B
bid live hearts. Z and A now passed and
Y doubled. When all passed, what should
Z have opened? Thia hand offers an excellent example ot the proper opening
lead after a double. If a player doubles
after his partner has made a bid, he expects his partner to lead the suit he has
bid. K a player has made a bid of his
own and later doubles, he expects his
partner to lead that suit. In this example hand, Z has bid four spades and his
partner, Y, has doubled five hearts. Under these conditions, Z should have
opened his ace of spades. This opening
would have set the contract one trick.
Y had a singleton spade and doubled
with the expectation of a spade opening. Z, however, thought of none of
these very good reasons (or a spade
opening. He opened the king of clubs
and AB just made their bid and thus
scored game and riituVr. This hand is a
fine example no s' iidy it over carefully.
The f olio wi ng is n notlicr fine example:
Hearts—5
Clubs-9, 8, 6, 3
Diamonds — 7, 6, 2
Spades —A, K, 8, 7,6
 !-—        Hearts-K, 6, 2
Y     :       Clubs- K, ft J, 4
B:        Diamonds—K, 8
Z Spades—Q, 10,4,2
lows: "What sort ot hand did Z have to
justify at (our heart bid? If he had
wanted a heart lead, he probably would
have doubled. His tour heart bid probably consists of at least eight hearts
with (our honors and very little side
strength. He also probably has a singleton spade and bid (our hearts in the
hope of shutting out a spade bid. Therefore, my best play ia to lead the ace of
spade* and hope that Z can trump the
third round of spades." If Y had followed this line of reasoning, he would
have eet the contract one trick. He
failed to do so, however, and led a
heart at trick two, which A trumped.
A then led trumps and scored game and
rubber, losing only two spade tricks.
This is another hand that should be
carefully noted.
The play in the following hand should
be easy but sometime* the easy one*
are the one* that go wrong:
I if i
:A Bi
t    Z     ■
t
:A
No score, rubber game, Z dealt and bid
four hearts, A bid five diamonds and
all passed. Y opened the king of spades
and B's hand, the dummy's in this instance, was placed on the table. Z played
the three of spade* and A the five. Y
should have reasoned somewhat as foi
Heart*-K,Q,9,M
Clubs—A, 4
Diamonds— J, 7, tS, 2
Spades—9,3 ,.„
No score, first game. Z dealt and bid
one heart, A and Y passed and B bid
one spade. Z and A passed and Y bid
two hearts. The final bid wa* (out
spade* due to the (act that Y raised the
heart bid twice more. He also doubled
four spades. What should Z open? This
hand is similar to the first one in that Z
hss bid a suit and his partner Y has
doubled. Under the rule set down in thc
analysis of that hand, Y certainly expected a heart lead by Z. Irrespective
of that (act, however, Z should have led
a heart in the endeavor to set up a trick
in that suit before he lost his reentry in
clubs. Instead of doine so, however. Z
opened the ace of clubs and then led
the four, hoping as he said, for a ruff.
This lead gave AB a game that they
couldn't have scored if Z had opened
the king of hearts. Note all three of
these hands very carefully for they are
typical hands and involve points that
come up in every session of play.
■*•«<■$.•■
Hearts — Q, 8,7,9
Clubs—K
Diamonds—none
Spadea-10,8,6,4.1
Problem No. S
Hesrts —3
Clubs —A, 6, 5,4
Diamonds—Q, 10
Spade*—9,7,2
,
Y
t
•A
Bt
t
Z
>
Heart* —none
Clubs—10,9,8,2
Diamonds —1,9,8,7
Spade*-K, J
Heart.-K. J. 9,$
Clubs—Q. J, 7, S
Diamond*—non*
Spade*-A, Q
There are no trump, ami I k h **«• ^t.JSSTJSlX^W lSi?t«rt 2Sfc3
tricks against any defense? This Is a tricky Httto problem that hu just arrived
from England Solution in the twat artJele.

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