BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Apr 21, 1923

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068281.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068281.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068281-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068281-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068281-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068281-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068281-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068281-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068281-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068281.ris

Full Text

 THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
«Vm^    With which ls consolidated the Cumberland Sews.	
ti
FORTY-SECOND YEAR.—No.    16.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUM BIA, SATURDAY, APRIL, 21st, 1923.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
City Council To
Enforce By-Law
Non-enforcement of Pound By-
Laws was Asked.—Clean-up
Campaign.
The Cumberland City Council turned down the suggestion made by H.
Lelghton of Royston Road on behalf
of a number of cattle and dairymen
that there be no enforcement of the
pound by-laws during daylight hours.
The Council met on Monday evening
nnd transacted considerable routine
business. In regard to Mr. Lelghton'3
request all the aldermen were of the
opinion that the city's bylaws should
be strictly adhered to, otherwise there
would be no end of trouble.
While the Council was obliged to
refuse the appeal of the Salvation Army for an annual grant toward the
work of the organization, permission
was grouted Adjutant Tutte of Vancouver to solicit subscriptions ln the
city.
Alderman Potter reported on the
work which the city is carrying on In
the clean-up campaign, ln connection
with which the further co-operation
ol' the citizens is requested. The plan
ot burning refuse every Monday, Wednesday and Friday Is working out very satisfactorily.
The Council decided to call for tenders for the alterations and Improvements to the fire hall and it was also
decided to call a public meeting In Ihe
City Hall Thursday evening for the
purposo of laying plans tor a monster
,     May 24th celebration.
DENTISTS DECIDE
TO ESTABLISH HERE
Drs. R. B. Dier and W. Neen of
Nanaimo Opening Offices.
Dr. R. B. Dier and Dr. W. Neen of
Nanaimo, who have been associated ln
business for a number of years, have
decided to open up In Cumberland one
of the finest dentistry parlors on Vancouver Island. BoTh doctors were
visitors to Cumberland this week and
arrangements were made to take over
the premises on Dunsmuir Street adjoining Cavin's.
The premises will be overhauled at
considerable expense and the best
equipment obtainable will be installed. It ls estimated that the work of
altering and Improving the new dental parlors will be completed about
the end of next week.
Dr, Dier will be here the first two
weeks ln company with Dr. Neen and
as often thereefter as occasion demands, while Dr. Neen will be permanently In the new offices. Both
gentlemen are very well known on
Vancouver Island.
With the opening of the Cumberland
offices, Dr. Dier will have four branches, the other three being In Vancouver,
Nanaimo and Ladysmlth.
Oreat advances have been made In
dentistry in the past few years and
Dr. Dier announces that the Cumberland branch will be equipped with the
very latest appliances for the carrying on of painless and expert dentistry.
"We have had such a large patronage heretofore from Cumberland residents that we feel It Is only fair to
them that we should establish a
branch here. Our offices will always
he open for consultations and advice
will be gladly given anyone suffering
from troeble with their teeth." said
Dr. Dier to the Islander.
Drs. Dier and Neeu motored to Cumberland In the former's big Stutz, later
visiting Port Alberni, where Dr. Dier
has a brother in the dental buslnsu.
An announcement will be made tn
Uie Islander as to the exact date of
the opening of the new dental parlors.
SUNDAY CONCERT
* The Concert which was    to *
* have been given by the Cum- *
* berland    Amateur    Orchestral •
* Society in the Ilo-llo   Theatre *
* Sunday evening, but which wos *
* cancelled on    account of    the *
* fire    at    No. 8 mine, will    ho •
* held on Sunday evening, April •
* 22 at 8.30 o'clock. *
* A splendid   programme   has ♦
* been prepared aud it Is expect- •
* ed there will be a large attend- •
* ance.—Programme  on   page  5. *
CONSTABLE DUNBAR
TO BE TRANSFERRED
Popular   Officer of Provincial
Police Notified of Change.
Constable A. Dunbar, who has been
iu charge ot the local Provincial Police office since June, 1921, has been
notified that it is the intention ot the
Department to transfer him from his
present quarters to a station elsewhere In the Province, the Department not yet having notified him as
to where he will be transferred, or
the exact date ot his transfer.
Constable Dunbar will be missed
by his many friends ln the community. He first joined the Provincial
Police in 1912 and served in many
portions of the Province. He was
also with the Game Board and ran
the motor patrol boat In the Gulf
Islands ln the year 1920. He was over
seas during the Great War.
Cumberland residents will remember the good work carried out by Constable Dunbar. No word has been
received as yet as to who his successor will be.
SALE OF WORK
A sale of work and home cooking
will be held ln the Fraternity Hall
on Wednesday, May 2nd, at 2.30 p.m.
under the auspices of the Phythian
Sisters.   Afternoon tea will be sold.
A whlst drive will also be held in
the hall In the evening, commencing
at 8:00 p.m.
LAPSE OF MEMORY
Wliile suffering from a temporary
lapse of memory following a protracted nervous ailment lasting for
some months past, Mrs. W. Bird of
Union Bay wandered from home
Wednesday afternoon and it is believed that she fell off the wharf at
Union Bay.
Dick Ray on hearing a splash In
the water took a boat and Investigated. Mrs. Bird was recovered and
taken to the Nelson Hotel where first
aid measures were taken and Dr.
McNaughton of Cumberland was
called in. Mrs. Bird spent a fairly
good night and is doing well.
CUMBERLAND WILL
PLAY BASEBALL
Comox District League is Formed; Mr. Hojo Offers Cup.
Cumberland will have a good baseball team this season and there will
be a work-out of all Intending senior players on the recreation grounds
Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. Several meetings aud consultations regarding the organization were held
during the week and it was finally
decided on Wednesday to form the
Comox District League, which will
Include the North end of the Island,
Powell River and the Cumberland
Japanese  team.
The officers elected were as follows: President, J. McLeod of Courtenay; first vice president, J. B. Med-
ford ot Powell River; second vice
president, M. Iwasa, representing the
Japanese; secretary, J, L. Brown of
Cumberland.
The organization will seek affiliation with the British Columbia Amateur Baseball Association.
It was decided that the entrance
fee into tho league should be (10.00
and that five per cent of all gate receipts be turned over to the league.
These details will be finally settled
at the Ilrst meeting of the league
which will be held on Sunday, April
29th at 10.30 o'clock In the morning.
Mr. Hojo, on behalf of the Japanese Association, offered a cup for
competition and this splendid offer
was accepted with a great deal of
appreciation, the thanks of the members being extended to Mr. Hojo.
The secretary was Instructed to go
ahead and arrange for the printing
of the application forms.
BASEBALL SUNDAY
The first baseball game of the season tn the Intermediate series will
bo played on the Recreation grounds
Sunday afternoon commencing at 3
o'clock.
The teams playing will be the Japanese and the Cumberland intermediate.
Raging Fires Stalk
Through Comox Are a
LIVES AND PROPERTY ENDANGERED   WHEN   FLAMES
BREAK OUT IN VARIOUS  PARTS—DOWNFALL OF
RAIN RELIEVES   SITUATION
Raging forest fires threatened life
and property In various sections of
the Comox district last Sunday, the
outbreaks being earlier thlB year and
duo chiefly to the lengthy spell of dry
weather. A downfall of rain on Wednesday and Friday served to remove
immediate danger of further outbreaks.
Volunteers rushed to the scene of
the various fires and rendered every
possible assistance, the fire at No. 8
mine being the most serious of the
lot. It was there that the people had
to put up a big fight to protect their I
property and seventeen of the company houses which were vacant were
burned to the ground.
Huge volumes of smoke were seen ;
rising above the tree tops for miles
around and when night fell the sky I
was red with the glare of the fires.
Assistance was rushed from Cumber-
land and Courtenay and other nearby
places.
Fled From Flumes
Fleeing before the scorching flames
and the dense clouds of smoke which '
enveloped the place, the residents
fought their way through to safety by :
way of the Lake Trail. People were
seen everywhere rushing to places of
safety with their arms laden with per-
Bona! belongings. i
The Gwllt Shingle Mill was in dang-1
er for hours and it was only after a
valiant battle on the part of the army of fire-fighters that this property
was saved. A fairly stiff breeze added to the hazard and great credit is
due to the fire-fighters that they wero I
able to get the conflagration under
control, though this was accomplished
only after nightfall. I
Two families living In one of the
houses destroyed lost nearly everything they possessed. Some of those
driven out were fortunate In securing
housing accommodation near Courtenay.
Parson Flre-FIghler
Among the volunteers who rushed
to No. 8 immediately word of the Ore
was received In Cumberland was Rev
W. Leversedge, who stayed with thi-
Are fighters until the fire was uudei
control and the safety of the residents
assured. In consequence of his activities there was no evening service at
the Anglican Church.
Reports soon started coming in
from other sections telling of outbreaks of fire and loss of property but
fortunately there were no serious casualties. During the afternoon what
might have proved a bad lire broke
out iu the vicinity of the Royston Mill
but the gang of employees and others
managed to subdue the blaze.
At Merville
Three settlers at Merville were the
unfortunate losers through the fires
there. J. Mathers and Ed. Sackvllle
lost their houses and barns and F.
Pacquett his bam.
It seems that In all parts of the
district slashings were being burned
up and these added to the uneasy
feeling of the people who witnessed
Willi alarm the huge clouds of rising
smoke, many fearing that there would
be a repetition of last year's experiences from forest fires.
Bridge ln Danger
A blaze threatened the new bridge
over the Trent River at Royston, a
burning tree falling the full length
of the bridge. Owing to the activities of Frank Dalby the danger was
removed before the fire caught the
structure.
At Headquarters too the fires
looked dangerous for a time and
many of the families prepared to
leave. Fortunately, however, there
was no occasion for moving.
Many Humors Afloat
Throughout Sunday afternoon and
evening rumors were flying thick
and fast and it was difficult to separate the real facts. Reports were repeatedly circulated that Gwilt's mill
had gone but this proved luckily to
be untrue,    '
The Courtenay Fire Brigade responded to an emergency call from
the M. & M. lumber camp, where a
fire had been burning for some days
above the mill at Sandwlck. The
Courtenay Brigade also assisted at
the fire near Gwilt's mill on the Lake
Trail, where a force of men had been
fighting fire since Thursday night.
The roof of the Gwilt's dry-kiln
was ablaze Thursday evening but
through the quick action ot Rleve
Berkeley and others the building was
saved.
Season Closes Soon
During the burning season there is
always a good deal of trepidation but
with the arrival of a wet spell and
the fact that the burning season
closes April 30, there Is now a considerable feeling of relief, particularly as It Is believed that most of tbe
slashing have been cleared out by the
recent fires. The Forestry Department issues warnings to settlers and
others wishing to burn slashings that
In their own interests as well as
those of the entire community, they
should as far as possible do their
burning when there is no wind and
when it is wet.
After May 1st, permits to burn
will be Issued only ln cases ot urgent necessity as it is after that date
that the extreme fire hazards begin.
For that reason the Department Is
anxious tbat all areas of slashing
should he cleaned out.
CELEBRATION FOR MAY 24TH
PLANNED
Public Meeting Asks Co-operation For Kiddies Entertainment.
Cumberland will have a fine May
24th celebration this year, It was decided at a public meeting held In the
City Hall Thursday evening, the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association having added Its forces to the
meeting and volunteering to assist
tbe plans In every possible way In
order to make the celebration one that
will prove of great Interest to the
children and adults as well.
The co-operation of all good citizens of Cumberland is nuked In the
scheme for May 24th Is a children's
day and everyone should get together and make It one long to be
remembered by the children of Cumberland the meeting decided.
Those who attended Thursday's
meeting at the call ot Mayor Parnham voiced their determination to do
all In their power to make the celebration a success. Tentative plans
were made providing tor a parade,
a May Pole drill and a May Queen
celebration with sports for the kiddles. Further details will be announced In next week's Issue of the
Islander.
Officers were elected as follows to
the May 24th Celebration Committee.
LADY FORRESTERS
The Lady Forresters of Court
Cumberland No. 9831 have completed
their plans for the elaborate programme next Wednesday afternoon
and evening In the O. W. V. Hall.
From 3 to C o'clock there wilt be a
sale of work and home cooking, fish
pond afternoon tea and other features.
Commencing promptly at 8'clock In
the evening there will be a whist
drive and at 10 o'clock dancing will
begin. A great variety of useful and
attractive articles will be offered for
sale at the afternoon sessslon.
RE-OPENS STAND
"The Maples" the cozy Ice Cream
parlors at Royston operoted by W.
Ogllvlc on the Island Highway, will
rc-open on Sunday. April 22, Mr.
Ogllvlc  announces.
Afternoon teas, light lunches and
delicacies of various sorts will bo
served at the Maples, which proved
one ot the most popular resorts in
the district last season.
HENRY AUCHINVOLE
FUNERAL ON FRIDAY
Passed Away at Union Bay After Lengthy Illness
Henry Aucblnvale of Union Bay,
formerly of Ladysmlth and at one time
paymaster ot the Jingle Pot Mine,
died at the home of his brother, A.
Auchlnvole, District Supt. for the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited at Union Bay on Monday and the
remains were brought to Cumberland
by T. E. Banks, the undertaker for
preparation for shipment to Victoria,
where Interment will take place on
Friday.
General regret Is expressed at the
death of Mr. Auchlnvole. He had been
ailing for some time and recently returned to Vancouver Island from
Washington tor the benefit of his
health. He was nearly 37 years of
age. The widow and two children
preceded the remains to Victoria. Local members of the I.O.O.F. and the
Masonic Lodge ascorted the body of
the deceosd to the railway depot.
CUMBERLAND RELIEF
In addition to the $87.00 realized
by the St John's Ambulance Association as a result of their dance
last Friday and turned over to the
Cumberland Relief Committee, the
committee acknowledges the sum
of (20.00 from the local branch of
the Fire Bosses' Association and
$53.75 from the Japanese residents
of Cumberland paid ln through Mr.
Hero.
CHOIR ENTERTAINMENT
Holy Trinity Church choir spent a
very pleasant ieventng Wednesday
when the members of the choir and
friends to the number ot about forty
gathered together for a social dance.
The affair commenced about 8.30
o'clock and concluded at midnight
with the serving ot refreshments.
All who attended thoroughly enjoyed
the entertainment, the choir members
proving excellent hosts.
BADMINTON CLUB
The Junior Badminton Club of
Holy Trinity Church will hold the
closing social event of the season,
Saturday evening, April 21st, ln the
Church Hall, commencing at 6.30
o'clock. Various games will be played
and refreshments will be served.
Each member will be allowed to Invite two friends.
NO EXTENSION OF
SHOP CLOSING HOURS
Board of   Trade   Disapproves
Opening Saturday Nights.
A special meeting ot the Cumberland Board of Trade was held in the
City Hall, Tuesday evening to consider the advisability of keeping the
stores open after 8 o'clock Saturday
evening, tbe suggestion being that
they remain open Saturday until 10
o'clock. The merchants of the City
had been Invited to attend and there
was a fair attendance. John Sutherland, president of the Board of Trade
presided.
The pewident explained that nt
Ihe previous meeting of the Board It
had been suggested that owing to
the establishment of n logging camp
within a few miles of Cumberland It
had beeu suggested that It might he
to the advantage of the merchants to
keep open later Saturday tn catch
some of the business from the camp.
There was considerable discussion
on the question and after hearing
both sides of the argument It was unanimously decided that the merchants
should abide hy the decision reached previously at least until such
time as circumstances warranted a
chnnge.
Emphasis was laid on the fact that
hereafter the City By-law calling for
all stores to close at 8 o'clock will be
strictly enforced. Heretofore some
of the merchants, It was pointed out,
had not lived up to this requirements.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
The music for the Sunday evening
service will Include an anthem hy
the choir, "The Homo of the Soul,"
and a solo by Miss Beckwith, "The
Ninety and Nine."
Dental Hygiene is
Subject of Lecture
Cumberland Parent-Teachers'
Association Hears Dr. Christie.
The special event of the evening's
programme at the monthly meeting
Tuesday evening In the High School
of the Cumberland Parent-Teachers'
Association was a fine address by
Dr. Christie on the hygiene of the
teeth, how they should be cared for
and how Important It Is for the
health that they should be properly  treated.
The lecture was very Interesting
and Instructive and the association
expressed its appreciation of the
helpful discourse. After the address
there was considerable discussion
and questions were Invited and answered by Dr. Christie. Dr. Mc
Naughton and Dr. Hicks were among
those present and added their expressions of appreciation of the address, pointing out that an ounce of
prevention was always worth a pound
of cure.
Principal Webb of the High School
gave an interesting report of the convention held in Vancouver recently,
emphasizing the good work that was
being accomplished through the cooperation of the teachers and parents.
The meeting waB presided over by
John Sutherland, president of the
Cumberland Parent-Teachers' Association.
LAST LEAGUE GAME
OF SEASON ENDS
IN SCORELESS DRAW
Locals More Than Hold Their
Own in Hard Game.—Gough
and Monahan Star For Home
Team.
The fast stepping Ladysmith team,
who are in the final tor the championship of the province, visited Cumberland on Saturday last and engaged
the locals ln au Upper Island Leigue.
bringing to un end the finish of the
schedule, as far as the Cumberland
team Is concerned. Owing to Conti
and Home having left town for Alberta, the home team was more of an
experimental one, whilst the Ladysmlth team were minus two of their
regular team.
Tbe game started promptly at 4
o'clock before a moderate crowd. The
home team early assumed the aggressive and were soon swarming
round the visitors goal, poor finishing
spoiling their chances for a goal.
Mldfleld play followed for some considerable time. Monahan and Gough '
shining tor the home team repeatedly breaking up the combined moves of
the visiting forwards.
Mortimer was knocked out during
the first period and retired to the side
lines for the remainder of the half.
Cumberland playing with four forwards were more than holding their
own, the visitors being exceptionally
lucky not to have a goal scored
uguinst them. Half-time arrived with
a blank sheet.
Second Half
The scond half was practically a
repetition of the first half. Mortimer
who was playing at outside right had
two glorious chances to score, the best
he could do was to place the ball
harmlessly over the line. During tbe
last few minutes of the game Mathe-
«nn for the visiters had n glorious
chance, with nobody to beat except
the goalie he made an absolute blunder putting lhe bull wide.
Time wus called with neither side
having scored. A. S. Jones refereed
tho game in n most capable manner,
keeping a firm hold nn the players.
Monahan and (lough for .the home
team played fin excellent game, tho
left half being the best man on the
field. Sandy Huston for the visitors
made a very capable centre- forward.
ANGLICANS WILL
FEATURE SALE OF DAYS
AT THEIR BAZAAR
The ladles of Holy Trinity intend
Introducing nt their Bazaar to he
held on May the 16th a novel idea
represented as "Wnsh-day stall"
ln Bazaar stalls, namely: "Every-day-
ln-the-wook stalls". Each day In the
week will be represented as "Washday"    stall,      "Ironlng-day"      stall,
"bnko-day" stall. "Cleaning" stall,
and so on. Some groat Ideas aro
promised to happen, sn put the date,
Wednesday, May 16th, open for n
visit tn this Interesting Bazaar. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 2lBt, 1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWAHD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, APRIL 21st, 1923
OVER THE BACK FENCE
We have often wondered why women stand talking In their back yards,
each hand thrust up the others sleeve,
when they know the water In the dish-
pan ts getting cold and the milk ought
to be put away. There Isn't any reason. It seems foolish, and It is foolish,
but they do It just the same, and the
men would do it If they were women.
Man would say that if he were going
to stay out lu Ihe cold he would put
on bis hat and coat. Woman would,
too, if she went through the performance with malice aforethought. But
tbe woman Is always going into the
house the very next minute. She
doesn't, however, even though she believes she will, and come to think of
It, a talk over the hack fence would
never happen If she deliberately planned it and wrapped herself up to keep
warm during the performance. A woman never does It deliberately. She just
stops as she carries out the potato
peelings or hangs up the stockings.
First, she calls, long distance, to her
neighbor, who is sweeping her hack
steps. Then each moves a little closer
until only the fence ls between them.
Each Insists that she Is very busy and
must go ln Immediately, and each one
tries to wrap herself in her apron or
her sleeves and each talks and talks.
Beginning with the never-disputed fact
that woman's work ls never done, to
say nothing about when it commences,
the back fence philosophy ranges widely, settling many intimate problems
that vex mankind and discussing the
more difficult problems of woman's
welfare. The experienced housekeeper tells the newly-wed how to tell him
everything—what he doesn't know
won't hurt him." The bride says her
husband does not like biscuits. Well,
If she makes good biscuits thcro Is
no reason why he should not like
them in time. Grocers, milkmen and
wash-women are more difficult problems to settle than husbands, and they
require hours of comparison and discussion. In the end they are decided
in as many ways as there are women,
nnd nre always ready to he brought into discussion again. No, women are
not shivering on cither side of the
fence over solicitude for the political
future of our city, or whether Germany will eventually pay the reparations
to France. They nre taking care of
the real questions of life—domestic politics and the eternal war ogalnst the
high cost of living.   God bless 'em.
husband and children, that there isn't
more tolerance and patience in her attitude toward her household.
Oh, to be just, yet kind; firm, yet
gentle; capable, yet loving; a wife,
yet still a sweetheart; a mother; yet
the children's comrade.
It's a big Job, girls, but if you "go
in" for this sort of thing, why not
determine to be a star?
With The
Churches
A CHANGED MAN
Not so very long ago the popular
conception of n farmer was an Uncle
Reuben who wore a tousley beard,
never put on a clean collar and "biled
shirt" except Sunday, who Bald
"b'gosb" with great frequency and
spat on the floor of his own home—
when mother wasn't looking.
The farmer of today Ib a very different looking kind ot a fellow. The
farmers' clubs, granges, bureaus and
federations have wrought the change.
Today we hear about co-operation in
buying and selling, legislation advocated and secured, good roads, better
country schools, etc. One of the greatest changes has come ln the broader
social life for the farm home. Time
was when most farmers went to bed
every night at eight, or at the latest,
nine o'clock. It was not so much that
they were tired, at that there was
nothing interesting to make it worth
while to keep awake. When the
grange and the farm bureau estab
llshed a meeting place at the cross
roads hall, with congenial amusements
and stimulating discussion, they
struck a blow at the worst of all ob
stacles in tbe way of agricultural ad
vance—the loneliness of tho farm. The
automobile has also brought the farm
closer to town, and the entire family
can get home from a picture ehow in
less time than It took old Dobbin to
jog through the covered bridge.
Keen observers of country people
say they are dressing much better and
appearing for neater and more stylish
I than they did ten years ago.   Social
I life always works that way.   If Reu
ben has got to go down to the Grange
! Hall to make a speech, the old hickory shirt won't do.
QUEBEC PUTS
SEAPLANES TO WORK
SPRING STYLES
One thing you can Bay about the
meal sack: It's useful if not ornamental. The present day gowns for our
women folk are neither. As we sec
them ln the fashion magazines nnd
displayed on those terrible wax Ilgures
ln the store windows the only difference between the meal sack and the
afternoon frock Is that the lntter Ib
caught up at tbe side with a hunk of
grapes or somthing. A couple of
lemons would bo more appropriate.
BE A STAR
We know a woman who Is blessed
with a good husband, healthy, Intelligent children, a comfortable home, a
large circle of friends; she is physically and mentally attractive, a faithful wife, a coiiBcleutlous mother, a
good housekeeper. We like her, yet
we never visit her that we do not
come away with an uncomfortable
feeling, a regret that there is not more
of love and less of order In her homo,
That there is nol more gentleness and
less of strength In her management of
Quebec, March.—Tiie Quebec For-
I est Service has made effective use of
' seaplanes to inspect forest conditions
I on the watershed of the Natashcouan
river. In 7 hours, the observer, Mr.
j Methot, F.E., waB able to make a
! sketch of the present situation of near
i ly .1,000 miles of forests. At the same
i time, a land party was examining the
name area and when they were back
two months later, the reports presented by both parties were compared and
found to be practically Identical. This
system will be continued hereafter as
there are numerous sections of the
Province on which the Government
has reports, which are twenty and
thirty years old and must be brought
to dale since fires, insect plagues and
windfalls may have brought changes
in the interval.
INDIGESTION
Relieved lu Two Minute* with
JO-TO
Gas. arid, sour burning stomach, all
quickly relieved with JO-TO. All Drug
Stores.
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
HOLY TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
Services  11  a.m.  unless otherwise
announced and 7 p.m.
Sunday School 2.30.
ST. GEORGE'S PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. James Hood
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class 1.30. Sunday School 2.30
GRACE METHODIST
Rev. George Kinney, B.A., F.R.O.S.
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday
School 2.30.
Visitors Welcome
ALL READY FOR
BIG FLOWER SALE
Affair   Will   Open   in   Grace
Methodist Church    Grounds
Wednesday.
Everything is ready for the monster sale of flowers, plants and bulbs
which will be held In the Grace Methodist Church grounds on Wednesday afternoon, April 2!ith, commencing at 2 o'clock and 111 connection
with which the Indies of the church
will also hold a sale of home conking
ln place of a supper In the schoolroom as announced last week.
There will be "armfuls" of plants
for the kiddies at very reasonable
prices and adults will also be able
to secure some extra fine selections
of plants and bulbs of many varieties. Among the thousands of plants
that will be offered for Bole thcro
will be scores of different varieties
offered for sale by Rev. George Kinney, who conceived the Idea for encouraging the children to study nnd
love nature by promoting an Interest ln the life of plants and flowers.
There will be tubs, hanging baskets and pots of all kinds and with'
very beautiful floral effects. Mr,
Kinney has gone to a tremendous
amount of work to carry opt his Idea
and he is being ably assisted by Mrs.
Kinney and members of the- congregation. It Is expected that there will
be a very large attendance at Wed
nesday's affair.
LADY FORRESTERS'
SALE OF WORK
Court Cumberland No. 9831 A. O. F.
will hold n Sale of Work and home
cooking on Wednesday, April the 25th,
at 3 o'clock In the G. W. V. A. Hall,
to be followed In the evening by
a Whlst Drive and Dance. At the Salo
of Work ln the afternoon, tea will be
served at a charge of 25c. The price
of admission for the Whlst Drive and
Dance has been placed at 50c Whlst
SHIPPING AT
BAY WHARF
8—10. Dancing 10—12.
UNION
CITY MEAT
Week  ending
April  20th.
S.S. Firleaf
Quallcum
Coastwise
Coastwise
MARKET
Faultless
Cheerful
Mantason  Main
Duncan Bay
Coastwise
Japan
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
Plunger &  Scow
Coastwise
PORK
C. P. Hulk 100
Victoria
	
Annacls
Coastwise
Fresh and Cured Fish
Beatrice
Coastwise
Vancouver
Charmor
A     HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
* ir
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons  • -    Proprietor
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B. C.
SPECIAL SALE
About 500 yds Plain and Figured Voiles. Regular price 75c KA/»
Special Sale Price.   Your Choice, per yard           OUC
About 300 yards Fancy Figured Voiles in Exclusive Pattern. Reg. 90c CA/»
per yard. Special Sale Price. Your Choice per yard        OUC
About 250 yards. All Wool Voiles in Newest Patterns. Reg. $1.50. Qft/»
Special Sale price. Your Choice, per yard             t/UC
GO yards only Cotton Tweeds in Grey's and Blues. Extra Special KK/»
Values per yard        OOC
Job Lot Children's Mercerized Lisle Sox Values to 60c per pair. (fil   AA
Special Sale Price 8 pair for tpl.UU
The balance of our Stock of Ladies' Dress Skirts to clear, less than half price.
SEE OUR WINDOWS FOR SPECIAL SALE    PRICES
MEN'S DEPT.
Special Shoe Sale of Men's Black and Brown Velour Calfskin Dress Shoes in
the Newest Lasts. Regular $9.00 (UT CA
Special Sale Price  $ I   D\)
About 20 dozen Men's Dress Socks in Brown, Grey and Black. Special      (fi-t   AA
Sale Price. Your Choice, 3 pair for «J)A«UU
Special Values in Men's Spring Suits
$17.50, $22.50, $27.50
GROCERY SPECIALS
Chicken Haddie, tins 2 for 55c
King Oscar Kippered Herring, tins
2 for 35c
King Oscar Sardines, tins, 2 for .... 45c
Tiger Salmon, Flat tins, 7 for $1.00
Tiger Salmon, tall tins, 3 for 95c
Shrimps, 3 tins for $1.00
Royal Standard Flour, 49 lb. sk $2.00
Royal Household flour, 49 lb. sk. $2.05
Five Roses flour 49 lb. sk. per sk. $2.05
Purity flour, 49 lb. sk. per sk $2.05
Ogilvie's Rolled Oats, 6 lb. sk 40c
Small White Beans, 3 lb.s 25c
Japan Rice, 3 lbs  25c
Breakfast Bacon in piece, per lb 40c
Rolled and Boned Hams in piece
per lb  40c
Shelled Walnuts per lb. 50c
Black Cooking Figs, 2 lbs 45c
Blue Ribbon Tea. l's pkgs  fi5c
St. James Coffee, l's tins 60c
Fresh Ground Coffee per lb 50c
Pure Lard, 3 lb. tins 65c, 5 lb. $1.10
10 lb $2.15
Maecaroiii, long or ready cut l's 3
for     50c
Quaker Peaches 2 '4 lb. tins, halves 40c
Castile Soap. Pure French, 5 for .... 55c
Oatmeal Soap G to box 25c
Toilet Paper, per doz rolls 65c
Navel Oranges. Large size, 2 doz. $1.35
Navel Oranges, 2 doz. 95c and 3 dz. $1.10
Bulk Dates, 2 lb 25c
Fry's Cocoa, Vr lb. tins 30c
Ghirardellis ground Choc, l's tins .... 55c
Ghirardellis ground Choc, U>'s tins 30c
Fresh Tomatoes, Green Onions, Lettuce, Rhubarb, Cauliflowers, Green
Cabbage, Cucumbers,  Florida
Grape Fruit, Bananas, Garden Tools, Rakes, Hoes,
etc. and Garden
Seeds
CAMPBELL'S
—«°
CUMBERLAND
m
mmfm
YOUR MOST VALUABLE ORGAN
IS YOUR EYE
Save il as long as you can. Some
people lose their lull Bight early;
others, never.
It is our business lo consent the
sight ol both your eyes.
An examination nt periodic intervals  will  determine  their  condition.
IS years practical experience nt
your service.
FREE  EXAMINATION
L. R. STEVENS
Bjo Shrill Slieclnllsl
CUMBERLAND, R. C.
Daily They Come To Me
Tattered and Torn
Back They Go Looking
Like New The Next Morn.
From The
Family Shoe Repairer
S. DAVIS, %£*
UNION   HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION
First  Clasa  Accommodation.  Heated
throughout by electricity.
R.  YATES,  Proprietor.
CHILDRENS'
Fancy Dress Ball
will be held in the
Ilo-llo Dance Hall
—on—
FRIDAY, MAY 11th, 1923
under the auspices of
THE WOMEN'S BENEFIT ASSOCIATION OF THE
MACCABEES
CHILDREN FROM 7-30 TO 10.00 P. M.
Dancing for adults will commence after 10.00 p.m.
ADMISSION, CHILDREN—25 cents
ADULTS—50 cents
FOR   SALE
ANDERSON PAVILION AND BOAT HOUSE
situated at Comox Lake, including 32 ft. Gasoline
Launch, Dwelling House, Ice Cream Parlour
Table, Chairs.—Complete equipment.
Business as a going concern with beautiful surroundings. — For further particulars, apply
EDWARD ANDERSON
Comox Lake.
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY, APRIL 21st, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE
«f
News Of British Columbia
To Investigate New Life-Saving
Device for Miners
A matter of keen Interest to the
coalmining fraternity is the announcement ot Hon. William Sloan, minister
of mines, that an Investigation will be
made of the new life-saving device for
coal-miners. ThlB Is a small affair
weighing about a pound and somewhat
resembles the gas-masks worn by sot
dlers during the war. It provides sa
fety for seventy minutes after an ex
plosion, provided there is sufficient
oxygen in the air to sustain life, and
If found capable of doing what Is
claimed for It, should bo the means
of saving mnny lives.
* *    *
Vigorous Blow to
Bootleggers
Another vigorous blow has been
dealt the bootlegger ln British Columbia by Attorney-General A. M: Man-
son. After persistent efforts he has
succeeded tn having Ottawa pass regulations preventing whisky-runners
clearing for deep sea with liquor cargoes aboard. Most of the rum-running
of the past few years has arisen out
of the practice ot illicit traffickers
taking on their cargoes in Vancouver,
Prince Rupert, Victoria, and New West
minster and clearing for Mexico, while
they had no Intention of going farther
than some American city. Now only
fishing vessels will be permitted to
carry liquor and only sufficient for
medicinal purposes will be allowed.
American prohibition authorities have
written expressing their appreciation
of the step.
* *     *
Will Spend Huge Sums on
Roads of Province
While definite official figures are
not yet available, Hon. W. H. Sutherland, minister of public works, states
that this year's road programme in
British Columbia will mean the expenditure of between $1,200,000 and
$1.1100,000. Plans are being prepared
for the highways to be constructed
and repaired and work will commence
as soon as weather conditions permit.
* »     *
Save the Forests
"Save the ForestB" week will be observed throughout Canada from April
22 to April 28, and following tbe re-
T.WHERRY
WANNER
■«■< tor pries list ot
W.rfc—xsillni
Mads     '
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEBRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Nervousness
REMOVED BY   CHIROPRACTIC
At Clarke's Residence.
Hoars i Any Day Between 4 and i pjn.
E. 0. HAUKKOAL, Chiropractor.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
N.w shipments ot thus high-
grade confections arrlv. every
two w«eks, ensuring trash goods
all th* Urn*.
Henderson's
commendation of Hon. T. D. Pattullo,
provincial minister of lands, Ottawa
has given instructions for the carrying
out of an active campaign of protection during that time. Already the
British Columbia forests branch has
sent out a mass of literature and a determined effort is to be made to cut
down the Iobb from forest tires to a
minimum this year. LaBt year's losses were staggering, states the minister of lands, and only by the co-operation of every citizen can the forest
wealth be conserved.
*      *     •
Premier Meets with Great
Support
Reports everywhere from the prairie provinces Indicate that Premier
Oliver has met with surprising support in the provincial fight for equal
freight rates. Last week he spoke at
Calgary, Saskatoon, Swift Current,
Medicine Hat and Lethbrldge and was
assured ot the unanimous support of
the prairie people. His prediction that
British Columbia ports will be the
most important in Canada in ten years
and his clear explanation ot the
freight rates situation have stirrred
the businessmen and farmers of Alberta and Saskatchewan to the point
where the threo western provinces are
now putting up a solid front ln the
fight for fairer treatment.
*     *     *
Province in Better Shape
Industrially
Hon. John Hart, minister of finance
and of Industries, has about completed
his Inspection of industrial plants and
makes the statement that British Columbia is to-day In better condition
than for ten years past. Practically
every plant ls working full blast and
there ts actually a labor shortage in
some instances.
In the latter connection the announcement Is made by the department of labor, under Attorney-General
Manson, that for the first three
months of this year the government
employment bureax placed 9,000 men
and women in positions, or almost
double the number of placements for
the same period last year.
"The Superior Grocers"
Where  Most People  Trade
SPECIALS
One Price Only.
No Delivery Charge
Red Plum jam tZflg.
4 lbs tins       DUC
Pure Strawberry Jam QKrt
4 lb. tins       OtJt
0WDpSTia:.   75c
'""Sb™ .-.   65c
Jelly Powders -t A _
per pkt       JLUC
Malkins Best Baking Powder n A _
12 oz       L\JL
Malkins Best Baking Powder d»1   QC
a lb. tins <pl.£«J
B. C-Red Salmon 1 Pn
Va lb. tins       IOC
Paco Fried Salmon Ofifl
per tin       £AJ\s
Herrings on Tomatoe Sauce i P _
per tin          AOv
Prunes QAst
per lb      **t\fL
Delmonte Crushed Pineapple (fi~i   A A
35c per tin.—3 tins for    «P±»UU
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
Let Us Help You
Plan Your Old
Home Visit or
Holiday Trip Now
Full Information as to fares,
reservations, Transatlantic and
Transpacific Bookings. Call or write
E. W. BICKLE
Agent, Cumberland, B. C.
or C. F. Earle, District Passenger
Agent, Victoria, B. C.
McLaughlin-Buick
We have just received a shipment of the 1923 Models and can deliver
them at the following prices:
TOURING "6" SPECIAL $2*050
TOURING "4" SPECIAL $1/555
TOURING "4" REGULAR MODEL  $1*490
Call us on the phone for a demonstration.
When you are in Courtenay be sure and have a look at these new
Models in our showroom.
Geo. H. Pidcock Garage
ph«ne 25 Courtenay, B. C.
BURNING STOMACH
relieved In two minutes with
JO-TO
JO-TO relieves gas pains, acid stomach, hearthburn, after-eating distress and all forms of Indigestion quickly, without harm. All Drug Stores.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price of firBt-clasa land
ivdueed to ?5 an acre; second-class to
J3.5U an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only, ,
Records will be granted covering only
land suitable for ugr.cii.turm. purposes
and whicli Is non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
but parties of nqt more than four mmy
arrange for adjacent pre-emptions
with Joint residence, but each making
necessary improvements on respective
claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims ror
five years and make improvements to
value of $10 per acre, including egsar-
ing and cultivation of at least 5 jres
before receiving Crown Orant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation not
less than 3 years, and has made proportionate Improvements, he may, because or Ill-health, or other cause, he
granted Intermediate certificate of im
provenrent and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent of
5380 per annum and records same each
year. Failure to make improvements
or record same will operate as forfeiture. Tltlo cannot be obtained In
i6bs than 5 years, and Improvement)*
nf $10.00 per acre, Including 5 aeros
cleared and cultivated, and residence
of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Orant
may record another pre-emption, if he
lequlres land ln conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory Improvements made
and residence maintained on Crown
granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes;
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or Industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpnge.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a road
to them. Rebate of one-half of cost ot
road, not exceeding half of purchase
price, Is made.
PRE.EMPTORS' FREE GRANTS ACT.
The trope of this Act Is enlarged o
include all persons joining ar.d serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees
ff a deceased pre-emptor may apply
for title under the Act Is extended
from for one year from the death uf
Much person, as formerly, until one
your alter the conclusion of the great
'•var. This privilege Is alto made re-
trocatlve,
No feeB rolatlng to pre-emptions aro
due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after .Tune 2fl, 1318.
Tuxes aro remitted for five years.
Provision fur return of moneys ac-
«i ui'd. duo nnd been paid since August
I, 1914, on account of payments, fees
ut (axon on soldiers* nre-emptlons.
Interest on agreements to purchuse
town or city lots held by mombers of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1920.
SUB-PURCHASERS OP CROWN
LANDS
Provision made for Issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers or
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who railed to complete
purchase, Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, Interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price duo and taxes may
be distributed proportionately over
whole area. Applications must be made
by May l, 1920.
GRAZING
Gracing Act, 1919. for systematic
development of livestock industry provides for gracing districts and range
administration under Commissioner.
Annual gracing permits Issued based
nn numbers ranged; priority for estmb
Mshed owners. Btook-ownors may
lorni Associations for range management. Free, or partially free, permits
i'or settlers, campers or travellers, up
to ten head.
0a2^
Caseade
• OR-
U.B.C. Beer
PURE FULL-STRENGTH BEERS
They Wear Well
On the Market as long as the Oldest inhabitants remember and still the most
POPULAR    BEERS
Sold in British Columbia
Old Friends Are Best
—   Leave Your Order at any Government Store   —
WE  DO  THE   REST
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C. KOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 21st, 1923
Hollo Theatre
Friday and Saturday, April 20th and 21st
,j PRESENTS
HAIL THE
WOM f KT"
thegicat«l casi of
stars ererassemWcii
oadiescrrenlkiWim
•PLGRENCE VIDOK.
•LLOYD Minnie's
*rH£OPORE IDBBATS .
.MADGE UELLAMY /
•TUU.V MARSHALL
•CIIAELES NRMUH IU
•EIWIMU) MAJOINDB. \
•VERNON DENT '
•CEMH1IDE CLAIRE
•HAimus: uhuniw;k
A great drama of real people, of human emotions.
A drama of Mother's Daughters, of Fathers, Sons,'
woven together with the deft touch of a master.
A great cast including Theodore Roberts, Madge Bellamy, Florence Vidor.
Extra Attractions
"DANGEROUS WATERS" one of the "Fish Patrol"
stories.
Pathe Comedy
MATINEE SATURDAY 2.30 P.M.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Jack Holt in "Making a Man"
Here is a picture that will hold your interest, full of comedy and Drama, everything that goes to make a good picture.
3 Reels of Comedy 3
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
"MY DAD"
This is without doubt one of the best pictures of the frozen North ever filmed.
Coming soon JACKIE COOGAN in his first super-special
"Oliver Twist"
8—L'nforgetable Reels—8
SEEDING NEW  MEADOWS
(Experimental Farms Note)
One of the interesting and success-:
till  lentures of the Illustration Sta-:
tlon work ls the comparison between
heavy and  light seeding of timothy
and clovers.    When making surveys
of many farms in each county where ■
Illustration Stations are    located    It |
was found that most farmers were not
sowing sufficient seed to give best re-1
stills.   To illustrate the advantage ot
heavier  seeding,    particularly    with:
clover, on each station a small portion
of the field is sown     to     the     usual
amount used   in    the    neighborhood
whicli is from two to four pounds of
clover and eight to ten pounds of timothy, and the larger portion of the
Held sown with a mixture of clover |
ami timothy    amounting    to    twenty |
pounds per acre.    Every  Illustration
showed the heavier seeding to give tiie
heaviest crops of hay.   The difference
in growth is so noticeable that farmers passing can see lhe line between
the two lots to a foot.   On several stations the clovers on the light seeded
portions were winter killed, while the
heavy growth formed a protection to
the roots and usually withstood the
severest whiter and spring frosts. Several operators report one quarter to
one third more bay on the heavier
seeding and hnve a much better chance
for a second crop of hay or seed the
same season.
When seeding sandy or clay loams
now eight pounds of Common Red
clover; two pounds alsike and ten
pounds of timothy per acre. In some
cases it is advisable to sow two
pounds of alfalfa in addition.
On heavy clay that is liable to be
damp or on light, acldy sand sow
eight pounds of alsike; two of Red
clover and ten of timothy per acre.
On black muck or peaty soil sow
eight pounds of alsike; two pounds of
Red clover; eight pounds of timothy
und two pounds ot lied Top per acre.
Tor a nurso crop on peaty soil, always sow barley.
JOHN FIXTER.
Chief Supervisor of Illustrations Stations. Central Experimental Farm.
The Cost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical installation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has to be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the BEST installation go to
umberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leaving Cumberland at 8 a.m.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE 10 ORDER.
Pressing    .    (Iwu^hk    ■    Kcpalrn
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. 0.
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously Inclined persons have tarn-
pored with the valves ol the mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out that It Is a scrloua offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Cturtenay, B.C.
Health - Peace
Plenty
Recovery of Ancient Eastern charm nrscnts on inestimable
boon to mankind In bestowing Power and Success upon oil
wearers.
Evil influences are removed, accidents warded off, planetary
malignance overcome. Its touch betokens the dawn of a new
existence. Its wear Immediately releases all the powers for good
and brings that joy and bliss, love and plenty, which you havi
long hoped for and struggled to obtain.
"Trilokbejoy" or The Mystic
Charm
(Conqueror of the Universe)
A Divine Gift! Sought after for centuries! Recovered hy uier,
accident from the disciple of a Hindu Sage, dweller of the sanctified, mysterious, snowy heights of the Himalayas. Confirmed
sceptics testily to its miraculous [lowers. Men and women everywhere acclaim its potentiality in realizing material expectations
bringing in prosperity and securing a lovers affection. To lie
worn ns u pendant or on Hie nrm. Write Name uud Address
legibly, stating SKX of the Intending nearer when ordering.
Health and Good Fortune Go Hand in Hand
PRICE t—Encased ln cupper, Inclusive postage, packing und
Registration Costs, etc, *1.60i Hon, $10. Silver, $2: do/, *I.V
Gold, $4.80; do/, *4.1.  CASH WITH ORDER.
Complete instructions on how to get best results with each Charm
THE MYSTIC CHARM COMPANY
At the Hindu Talisman Cottage,
123, Lower Circular I'd., Calcutta (India)
LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE SERVICE A REAL
ASSET TO THE EXACTING BUSINESS MAN
There are few advantages in modern business to
be compared in actual value with the service your own
office telephone is prepared at any moment of the day
or night to supply you with.
At a minimum outlay in minutes you can get in
direct touch with your desired party possibly hundreds
of miles away where postal or other delay would be
a decided drawback. Correspondence cannot compete
with the speed of telephone service, besides which consider carefully the undoubted advantages of a personal
talk.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES  AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159 Night—134-X Courtenay
H
ere an
dTh
ere
Canada's export trade grew 5174,-
000,000 in the first eleven months
of the fiscal year ending March 31st
A recent and popular Canadian
Pacific appointment U that of Mr.
Walter Maughan to Steamship Passenger Manager. The appointment
includes management of tl.e company's passenger business on both
the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
Fire insurance companies found
1922 the most disastrous year for
more than 20. The ratio of losses
to premiums was 68.64 "er cent,
British companies suffered mo?t severely, their losses to premiums being 71.48 per cent, mainly due to
the Northern Ontario fire.
A gold rush is in full swing and
it is expected to bring about the development of more mining camps in
the counties of Temiskuming and
Abitibi. Gold was discovered in
these two counties cariy in 1922.
and a rush of prospectors began in
March of that year. In October,
250 claims were staked, comprising
60,000 acres of land, and to date
about 90,000 acres have been staked.
In the last fiscal year, Canada
Imported 1,863,000 pound- of hutiif
from the United States, 297,01*1
pounds from Australia and 2,264,000
pounds from New Zealand. The
total exports of Canadian butter
were 8,430,000 pounds.
It is announced that the running
schedule of the Trans-Canada Limited, which will operate between
Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver,
commencing May 20th, has been cut
down one hour. Considering the all
steel equipment and luxurious appointments and its regular daily on
time performance, this is the finest
long distance train in the world.
Bungalow camps, such as aro
operated in the Canadian Rockies,
are to be built in the French River,
Nipigon Bay and Lake of the Woods
districts of Ontario by the Canadian
Pacific Railway. Low cost of construction and maintenance will enable the company to offer lower
rates than standard hotels. The first,
three will be ready for occupation!
by July 1st.
According to a recent rearrangement of ports ol! call i the Orient,
the Canadian Pacific Steamships
Limited, by omitting Manila as a
?ort of call between Shanghai and
long Kong, will bring the latter
port four days nearer to Canada, the
United States and Europe. This
makes possible a through service
from London, England, vii Canadian Pacific Atlantic "mpresses to
Quebec and rail to Vancouver and
via Canadian Pacific Empresses to
Hong Kong under 28 days.
During the year 1922 the Canadian Pacific Railway handled a
total of 8,433,825 pieces of baggage
as compared with 8,732,674 for th*
previous year. Of this amount
0,175,203 pieces were passengers'
baggage which compared with 6,-
486,455 for the previous twelve
months. 9,697 bicycles were handled,
19,336 dogs travelled as baggage
and 23,988 baby carriages wero
moved. There was also a considerable
increase in the movement of milk.
In 1922, the Company moved 1,023,-
707 cans as against 1,614,791 in
1921; and it is remarkable that most
of this increase was in the three
provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
and Alberta, which is an apparent
indication of the further development of mixed. farming in thos*
provinces.
One of the best examples of a
town "growing up o«er night" u
that of Climax, the end of steel on
the Consul-Assiniboia branch of th*
Canadian Pacific Railway. All that
there was on the quarter section on
February lilth, the dav ■>» whi-h the
site of the new town was finally
settled, was a homesteader's shsca
and a small barn. When the steel
was laid in Climax on March 16th
there was a restaurant, one roomrtrg
house, over a score of dwellings, two
blacksmith's shops, a drug store,
gents' furnishing store, a big general store, pool room and barber
shop. The new town is situated In
four large flat warehouses in
which nearly 100,000 bushels of
grain were stored, and a butcher
•.hop. The new town is situated In
Lone Tree R.M. number 18, about
JO miles south of Shaunavog, .
STEPHEN LEACOCK
SPEAKS ON FORESTS
Montreal, March.—Speaking before
a convention of foresters, Prof. Stephen Leacock of MiUIll University
pleaded (or the adoption ol a scientific system both of preservation and extension of Camilla's foreHt heritage.
"The human race," he said, "for a
hundred years has been living on Us
capital. In the midst of wealth it has
grown poorer. It Is now beginning to
find the limits of its boasted power
over nature In the exhaustion ot nature Itself. The adoption of a proper
policy of conservation needs the stimulation of public opinion."
As part of the campaign to introduce Alberta coal into Ontario, shipments arc now being sent forward to
that province for tho purpose or carrying out a scries of tests which will
be conducted under the auspices of
the provincial government's fuel engineer. The Ontario government Is
co-operating with the Alberta government In this move. The Alberta legislature has adopted a resolution urging the federal government to take
action seeking a freight rate that will
enable Alberta coal to be put on tho
Ontario market at a reasonable price. \A
SATURDAY, APRIL 21st, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
FIVE
News of Courtenay and Surrounding  District
BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
THIS IS YOUR CHANCE
Never Again Will You Have Such an Opportunity
FREE!
Yes, absolutely Free. There is no catch
about this advertisement. Everything is
exactly as represented.
For a few days only and on a limited
number o"f instrument we will present everybody who purchases a phonograph from
us with
A Cabinet phonograph
and 25 records for 	
- 50 Selections -
FREE
$18.75
That is 25 records
Regular 75 cent
records to a total
value of
FOR
$95.00
A   FEW   DAYS   ONLY
OUTFIT NO. 1
A phonograph complete with 25
records (50 selections). Regular
price $41.25.   Special Price
$22.50
TERMS ARRANGED
OUTFIT NO. 2
A Double Spring   Phonograph,
complete with 25 records (50 selections). Regular price $78.25.
Special Price
$60.00
TERMS ARRANGED
$18.75
worth of records. Regular 75 cent
records with every phonograph, purchased during this special offer
FREE
OUTFIT NO. 3
A three spring Phonograph with
25 records (50 selections) Free.
Regular Price   $93.75.   Special
Price
$75.00
TERMS ARRANGED
OUTFIT NO. 4.
A three spring Phonograph, fitted with compartments to hold
75 records together with 25 re-   1
cords. Full Cabinet size. Regular
price $113.75. Special Price
$95.00
Terms: 3f $1.00 per month
Call at our store Cumberland or Courtenay
MARSHALL MUSIC CO
Watch for the Banner at
COURTENAY:   Top of the town opposite the Church
CUMBERLAND :   Opposite Rickson's—Lavers old stand.
ACT  QUICKLY--SAVE  MONEY
$1.25
100--10in.   75c.  Records,  New,  3
for	
FINE PROGRAMME
OF ATHLETICS
MAPPING TIMBER
FROM THE AIR
Ottawa, March.—Important progress
lias been made during the past year in
the development ot torest typn mopping from the air. In Urltlsli Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and
Quebec much work of this nature has
been done from the Air Force Stations.
Topographical detail not shown on
existing maps Is first   sketched   ln
from the air on the map and the forest
types are then added.
Tho importance of this work cannot
be over-estimated as It enables those
responsible for the forests to gain reliable Information regarding districts
of which practlcallly nothing ls
known to-day. The value of the timber can be estimated quickly and easily, and lumbering operations are
greatly facilitated by means of the additional information made available.
Quebec.—The City Council will ask
the Provincial Government for grantB
towards street paving, In the same
way as grants are given for highways
In the country.
Thorold, Ont.—The paving of the
two main streets completes the "missing link" in the good roads.
Ottawa, Ont.—The Council will get
a report on placing all wires underground.
Courtenay Stages one of Finest
Events of the Season
The Courtenay Athletic Club scored
another triumph on Saturday last
when the members staged one of their
popular athletic entertainments, the
principal features being the boxing
bouts which were spiritedly contested.
Mr. Harry Jackson, of Cumberland,
was present with his company of artists and they presented a portion of
the programme that waa extremely
well received and appreciated by tbe
large audience that had come to the
Agricultural Hall from all parts ot the
district. This troupe put on acrobatic stunts, step dances and songs.
The boxing bouts, eight ln number,
were keenly contested and thoroughly
enjoyed. The first contest was one
between Andy Robinson of Courtenay
and Young Baker of Cumberland, the
former making the pace so hot that
his competitor was forced to retire ln
the second round after receiving considerable punishment in a real slugging match. This was a hard scrap
while it lasted.
In the 140 pound division Jack
Ewart of Courtenay and Art Thomson
of Putledge went three rounds to a
draw. Then the 140 pounders took a
chance at each other and after three
intensely spirited rounds In which Vic
Spencer and Bert Plercy were con-!
tenders the referee declared the bout I
a draw. Jones of Cumberland was too I
much for Roberts of Courtenay In the
135 pound division and won an easy
verdict. At 135 pounds Kid Larrigan
and Young Cuddy Johnston displayed I
a liking for each other's wares with
the result that at the end of the three
scheduled rounds neither bad secured
a lead. An extra round was boxed
but a draw was the popular verdict
rendered.' Young Cuddy represented
Union Bay and Kid Larrigan was from
Cumberland. Jimmy Dangerfield of
Union Bay and Jack Foster of Cumberland contested three rounds that held
plenty of tense moments for the assembled fans but Jimmy had the edge
on his opponent and was awarded a
well deserved decision.
At 155 pounds Max Blunt and Vic
Beckwith went the complete route.
Young Roy Cliffe was too much for the
veteran Bob Martin of Headquarters,
who put up a good scrap against his
youthful adversary who has improved wonderfully since his last appearance.
This was the last event of a great
programme. The referee was Mr. Harry Jackson of Cumberland and the
Judges Mr. R. FUberg of Headquarters
and Mr. R. B. Dixon of Courtenay.
LOGGER McCANN WAS
BURIED AT COURTENAY
Young Man Lost his Life in Log
Chute
The Funeral of the late Vivian
Warnford McCann who was killed at
a logging camp at Lloyd's Point near
Powell River on the April 12th was
held from Sutton's Undertaking Parlors last Saturday afternoon. Interment took place in the Sandwlck Presbyterian cemetery where services were
conducted by the Rev. W. T. Beattie,
pastor of St. Andrew's church.
Tho lato Mr. McCann was the son
of Mr, and Mrs. John McCann and
was born at Comox ,10 years ago and
had been a resident of the district
during the greater part of that time.
Ho was the victim of one of those unfortunate accidents that has cut so
many lives short in the woods, having
in the course of his day's work been
caught between a donkey engine and
a log chute leading to the salt water.
He was badly Injured Internally and
despite the splendid and heroic efforts of the staff at St. Paul's Hospital, Powell River, to save bis life
there was too much against him and
he passed away at seven o'clock on
the day of the accident.
The body was brought to Courtenay
by motor launch. Messrs J. W. McKenzie, Jr. Jas. E. Aston, Paul Hellan,
Leonard Piket, William Higgins, and
Thomson acted as pallbearers.
Mr. anil Mrs. John Sutton, accompanied by Miss Sutton left for Victoria
on Tuesday last.
From the Capital City Mrs. and
Miss Sutton will go to Seattle, where
they will spend a short vacation with
friends before returning to Courtenay.
Sole Agent for
TIP-TOP
TAILORS
in thii District
Our New
Spring Patterns
Have arrived.   Make your selection early and avoid
disappointment.
Ladies' Suede and Satin Shoes in brown, black or grey.
Everything for the rainy days in the woods.
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
Cumberland Amateur Orchestral Society
Programme
 Of An	
Evening Concert
Given ln the
ILO-ILO THEATRE ON SUNDAY 15th APRIL 1923 AT
8:30 P.M.
ARTISTES
Mezzo Soprano Mrs. J. Leddtngham
Baritone    Mr. R. Splttal
Bass Mr. Q. Ramsell
Piano Mrs. F. Oliver, R.A.M.
Conductor  Mr. A. J. Merry
PROGRAMME
1 Overture    "Consecration"     Kelar Bella
(Orchestra)
2 Sextette  (From "Lucia dl Lammermoor")  Donizetti
(Orchestra)
3 Song  'I'll Sing Thee Songs of Araby"  	
(Mr. R. Splttal)
4 Selection    "William   Tell"    Rossini
(Orchestra)
6       "Melody" In "F"   Rubensteln
(Orchestra)
6 Violin Solo   "Salut d'Armour"   Engles
(Dr. R. P. Christie)
7       "Gloria  ln  Excelsis"    Mozart
(Orchestra)
8 Bong  "The Two Cities"  Alison Deane
(Mrs. J. Leddtngham)
9 Selection   "The Gondoliers"  Sullivan
(Orchestra)
10 Cornet Solo  "Alice, where art thou?"  Ascher
(Mr,   il.   Ingham)
11 Song  "Out on the deep"  	
(Mr. G. Ramsell)
12 Selection   "Operatic  Airs"    Class
(Orchestra)
13 Selection    "Faust"   Gounod
14 Community Hymn „ "Jerusalem the Golden".... —
OOD SAVE THE KING
BASEBALL FANS
PLAN BIG SEASON
Courtenay Favors North End of
Island Organization.
comprising Powell River, Courtenay,
Cumberland and the Japanese team of
Cumberland. It was felt that with this
organization worked up as It should
be a fine series of games could bo
staged.
An enthusiastic meeting of baseball
fans was held In the Parlors of the
Riverside Hotel, Courtenay, last Sunday when plana were made for an active baseball season In which Courtenay will take a leading part.
J. N. McLeod was elected president,
Hugh Stewart manager and Hope
Herd secretary. The executive Includes: Messrs. R. D. Fllbcrg, A. B.
Ball, TV. J. Haggarty, J. W. McKenzie.
Jr., W. Fraser, P. L. Anderton and R,
B. Dixon.
Tho meeting went on record as opposed to the Courtenay baseball team
entering the mid-Island league but
favored the proposal to form a new
league ln the North end ot the Island
Mr. and Airs. J. McMillan left on
Tuesday morning for Vancouver
where they will spend the next month.
Mr. Andy Flawse has returned to tho
district after having made a tour of
the Southern States and Is ouce more
driving the Campbell River stage.
Preferred Sausage.
The cynic asked the butcher If ho
: had some tender beef. "Yes, sir," said
the butcher. "It's as tender as a wom-
| an's heart." "In that case, you'd bet-
. ter give me two pounds of sausage.'■
the cynic said. SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 21st. 1923
reasons why you
should demand them
J. Different and better
2. Stronger nnd safer
". Contain no poison
-:. Hats won*) gnaw them
5. W 1<li:!?nd.noremoisture
f.. VU1 not glow after um
7. Canadian made for Canadians
WeUworth
-   Ifcbac
MAPLE IMF
and fate MATCHES
THE CANADIAN /WATCH CO LIMITED-MONTREAL"
GORDON'S
New Swiss Organdies
Blue, Lavender, Flame, Yellow, Salmon and     "7K.p
White.  Special per yard  • "^
Another shipment of English homespun, just arrived.
A large selection of patterns to choose Q^k/*
from. 40" wide, per yard  vt/v
New Plaid Gingham. Special value— /lftf»
Per yard     '"**
SEE THESE SPECIALS now on show.   The price will
sell them quickly.
Gordon's
Phone 133
gjgiBiiBjgigiiiH^
A CONCERT
in aid of the organ Fund, will be held in
St. George's Presbyterian Church
TUESDAY, APRIL 24th
commencing at 8:00 P.M.
1.   Organ Solo—"Mlnuetto" from Samson   Handel
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE        I  AFTER EATING DISTRESS
Dentist ■ ond all forms of stomach trouble such
Office  and  Residence:   Willard| »8 eas pains, acid, »our burning sto-
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
FOR
moch are all relieved ln two minutes
by taking ,10-TO. JO-TO iiold by all
Druggists.
ARBOR DAY IS HELD
BY SCHOOL KIDDIES
Help Beautify School Grounds
and City Generally
Cumberland School kiddies are loy
ally lending their support to the movement to beautify Cumberland
through the medium of gardens ami
the clean-up campaign Instituted by
the City Council.
Monday last was Arbor Day for the
Cumberland school children and un
der the direction of principal Webb,
aided by the co-operation of G. E.
Apps and H. E. Murray a large number of shrubs, climbing roses, flowers
and plants of all descriptions were
planted. In addition to the work carried on In the school grounds the chll
dreu of Cumberland have done a lot
of good work In cleaning up back
yards.
The home garden competition whicli
is being conducted by the school Is
also attracting tho Interest of the
children. Prizes will be given for the
best gardens and the Parent-Teachers
Association at the meeting held Monday evening decided to contribute $23
toward the garden prizes.
The senior plots will be 200 feet
square and the junior plots 100 feet
square. There will be four divisions
ln the competition: senior boys over
twelve and junior boys twelve and
under; senior girls over twelve and
junior girls twelve and under.
Judging will be done in June and
September.
As an evidence of the improvement
that can be made In the school
grounds through the planting of trees
and shrubs, Principal Webb points to
the line rows of Maple trees which
were planted in the school grounds
twenty years ago at the instigation ot
J. R. Bennett. The school boulevard
was put In first class shape last year
and this season the play ground apparatus is receiving attention. The
school board and the teaching staff
are doing all in their power to give
the children every facility for studying
nature and Indulging in clean healthy
sport at the same time.
ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE
DANCE A BIG SUCCESS
Substantial Sum is Raised For
Cumberland Relief Fund
The G. W. V. A. hall was packed to
the doors last Friday on the occasion
of the whlst drive and dance given un
der the auspices of the St. John's Ambulance Association for the purpose of
raising money for the Cumberland
Relief Fund and so successful was
the affair that the sum of $87 was
realized and turned over to the Relief Committee.
The use of the hall was donated by
the G. W. V. A. All of the committees
in charge of the entertainment worked hard to make the drive and dance
a success and the association is in
debted to them for their effort.
There were twenty-one tables occupied In the whist drive and Mrs
McAllister and Mrs. J. Smith succeeded in winning first and second prizes
while W. Woods and A. Bird carried
off the honors for the gentlemen.
Dancing commenced ot ten o'clock
and was continued until two o'clock
Saturday morning.
SPOILING PLAYGROUND
Police Chief Merry raises the objection that a number of young men
hove recently been In the habit In
the evenings of making use of the
playground equipment which has been
Installed in the school grounds for the
benefit of the schoolars.
The equipment was mode for chll
dren and will not stand the rough
handling of those young men. The
chief finds It difficult to guard the
equipment at all hours and asks thai
people refrain from using the swings
and other apparatus.
KNOCKING
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENWIAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
•tlle* MM Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.' PHONE 11
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
CUMBERLAND
Knocking Is one of the easiest tilings
In the world to do. It only takes a
thimbleful of brains. And it is the
cheapest and easiest way to attract
attention. But It is a mighty expensive amusement. Everybody hates a
knocker. And by and by everybody
is afraid of him. No man ever got
very high by pulling others down. The
intelligent merchant does not knock
his competitors. The sensible worker does not knock those who work
wilh him, Don't knock your friends.
Don't knock your enemies. Don't
knock yourself. However you may
feel, don't allow yourself to soy cutting things. Speak pleasantly of everybody whether you are pleasantly
disposed or not. Shakespeare said:
"Assume a virtue if you have It not"
BooBt and you will be boosted.—
Knock and you will he knocked.
LOCAL JUNIORS TO
MEET THE BEST OF
VICTORIA JUNIORS
BBIBlBlBEIBIBflBMBIBBBIBIBBBB
Cumberland Boys Defeat Union
Kay in The Elimination Scores
for lhe O. B. Allan Cup, Emblematic of the Junior Soccer
Championship of the Province
In the replayed O. B. Allan Cup
game held on the local ground ou Sunday last, the Cumberland Juniors
iwjain defeated Union Bay by a score
of two goals to one. Mat. Stewart,
playing at outside left was not very
effective ond would have done much
better for his team bad he been allowed to play centre forward. R. Robertson the local centre forward managed to score just prior to half-time.
He had about 5 minutes to decide
whether he should shoot for goal or
not. In the writers opinion this player could do with a few quickening
powders, he might then bp of some use
to lhe team.
The second half produoed more of
an even game, but the boisterous wind
that developed spoiled all attempts
at good football, The Cumberland
boys scored a good goal driving this
half and retired winners of a hard
game by a score of two goals to nothing. We understand that they now
meet the best of Victoria, on the Nanaimo grounds, the winners to play
the best of the mainland in tbe final.
JOLLY BIRTHDAY PARTY
On Monday. April 16th, at their
home, Mr. and Mrs. E, E. Chandler entertained a number of young folks to
celebrate the birthday of their son,
Douglas, aged six. and their daughter,
Marie, aged two. Miss Jennie Boffey,
Miss Edna Cawdell and Miss May Taylor presided at the tables, which were
prettily decorated with flowers nnd
ribbon streamers. After partaking of
a dainty supper, tho young people
spent a happy time in games and
dancing. The following is a list of
those present:
Rita DeVoy, Ellse and Thelma Wa-
trliold, Irene Gomn, B. Herd, Mary
Walker, Dickie Cawdell, Harry Waterfield, Harvey Herd, Gordon Robertson, Charles Gomn, Gordon DoVoy,
George and Ben Nicholas, Willie Graham. Misses Jennie Boffrcy, Edna
Cawdell and May Taylor,
AFTER WE NELL ¥01}
A BATTERY—
our service to you has not ended, hut
has just begun. We stand ready at
all times to see that the battery you
buy from us shall give you maximum
results without trouble. Our battery
service is worth while.
CUMBERLAND GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
At Vancouver
Prices
We  carry  a  line    assortment    of
.Mouldings   and   Mounts.
Call and   sec them at the
MARSHALL  MUSIC  STORE
Cumberland or ('oiirtciiny
W. Emeric
MUSIC  STOKE  COURTENAY
S !■■■ S t^.-—■—-«S ===r=-*e****^
A Big Chance-—
DON'T FORGET THE WONDERFUL—
sale of flowers, bulbs and plants and
the sale of HOME COOKING which
will be held In the GRACE METHODIST CHURCH grounds commencing at 2 o'clock WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON,  April   25th.
To Encourage CHILDREN to love
nature "Armfuls" of 30 plants or
more including 17 varieties will be
sold for the small sum of 25c.
For Adults Too, there will he valuable 25c bundles.
Tubs and Hanging Baskets of
choice   plants   and   trailers,   50c
Pots of Maiden-hair ferns well
rooted.
A wonderful sight for all to sec
even If you don't buy.
COME ALONG!
Wednesday. April 25th
jySHiSlDiJSj^^
Now
Showing
For
Spring &
Summer
Wear-—
A large Range of Mens Hats in Felt and Tweed. Priced
from $4.50  To «p5.UU
$3.50
The latest styles in Men's and Boys'
Tweed Caps. Priced from 50c to	
Agens, Men's Tip-Top Clothing, made to measure of
All Wool Materials, fit and workmanship guaranteed.
One Price
only    	
Hobberlin Clothing for Men. Made to     (j*Or7 KA
your individual measure. Priced from «P^ I •tlvr
Hundreds of samples to select from.
You want a suit for yous boy, we have a large Range
to select from all sizes 22 to 35.
Priced from 	
and upwards.
Men's Ready Made Suits
$15.00    $17.50    $25.00
in all latest Fashions
Men's Odd Pants in good serviceable Tweeds and
Navy Serge- (fin KA
Priced as low as—per pair      «|?0.tJU
NOTE THE ADDRESS—
$27.00
$5.00
The  Model
Clothing and Shoe Store
Opposite the Post Office
CUMBERLAND
P. 0. BOX 343
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co-
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S
WEAR
Dalnly Creations at Most Reasonable
Prices
Buy Here and Save Money
ARMSTROWS-Cumberland, B. 0.
100'/£ Dunsmuir Street
NURSING HOME
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity cases will be given th»; very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundr
ings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 YEARS' EXPERIENCE
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B, C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds ot Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop In and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent ln Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our  Work  and  Service
Will Please Ion  it   ti
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.      I      Phone S802
Car  For  Hire
at Reasonable Prices
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason. SATURDAY, APRIL 21st. 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVEN
1S
At Lefts Heavy wight AB Silk Canton.
Vleated panel /row, ueui Irregular hem line.
Soft toned embroidery adds individuality on
sleeves; also glimpsed ut icaist under softly
bloused bodice.   Black, 'Navy, Negro.
16-20, 36-42
At Right: Fining (ileated panel flutters
over fluted side draping. Oddly beaded
ornament holds panel, and knije-pleated
Qeorgelte /oniu part 0/ sleeve terminating
In a petal cu# All Silk Canton Crepe.
Black, Nacy, Negro.   16-20, 36-42.
Why Should PARIS MODELS be Limited
to the Fortunate Few?
THIS Spring and Summer you can be
as smartly go|wned as though you
bought on Fifth Avenue or the
Rue de la Paix.
There is in every McMULLEN model a
touch truly Parisian—the verve and lure
of advanced styles that will not be seen
elsewhere for months to come.
McMULLEN makes the art of being   No matter how low McMULLEN prices
well-dressed possible for women of   may seem to you, you will find the silks
modest means. At prices you can well
afford to pay, you can now indulge your
craving for exquisite dresses of silk and
sports fabrics.
In a flock of rare colour blendings, winsome silks and modish
fabrics, trim flattering lines,
McMULLEN frocks and
sports dresses will keep you a
pace ahead of the very newest
spring and summer fashions.
Look for this Label on
Genuine McMULLEN Dresses
of a rare quality, the tailoring and work*
manship exquisitely done.
So very unusual is the combination of
style, quality and price that well-dressed
women who are prepared to pay more
are content to pay less
The ONE frock made for YOU,
adapted to your figure, your taste, per-
sonality,pocketiookiswaitingforyou.
See the McMULLEN Dresses at the
store which advertises them in your
heal papers.   Sold at the best storta.
The HENRY McMULLEN CO. LIMITED, Montreal
M?MULLEN
sm<mxl2)resses
Sports
Stores with a reputation for Fine Merchandise
will gladly «how you the newest
McMULLEN Stylet
For Sale by Campbell's, Cumberland
SHINING THE STARS
Oscar Is the Man Who Docs It
You may not know It, but the most
important employee who figures on
the pay roll of any well-established
movie studio In the bootblack, according at any rate, to Oscar, the very
black bootblack at the l.asky Studio!
In he not the man who helps Ihe
stars to shine? Has he not. for many
years, been faithful at his post with
his brushes antl pads, his bottles anil
tins—and his cheerful grins?
Mary Plckford's dainty "two's" wero
always a source of delight to Oscar,
and you may be sure no polish wns
ever brilliant enough! in his eyes for
the "World's Sweetheart." On the
other hand, Oscar's greatest worry In
life has always been that Charlie
Chaplin rarely stooil ln need of the
bootblack's aid, for screen purposes at
tiuy rate.
Ills Favourite Star
Although Oscar declares that all the
actors and actresses are "sure nice
and kind." Ask him who is his favourite "star-ess," and promptly you
elicit the following reply:
"Why, sah, sure. Miss Compson. Fo'
sure, sail, cver'body luv Miss Compson. Always so sweet and kind! Never cross nor put out. Jos lies a kind
word for cvcr-hotly, sah."
One successful pupil, ut least, stands
to Oscar's credit. When Dorothy Glsh
played the role of a London boarding-
house slavey ln a dim called "Boots,"
she had to be taught how to clean
boots!
Of course her teacher was the famous nnd Important bootblack, who afterwards felt quite fatherly towards
the picture, and really considers that
a good deal of Its success was entirely due to his efforts! He did admit,
however, that Dorothy was an extremely apt pupil.
The Truth of It.
A short while ago Oscar found himself called upon to perform a very
consequential part—ln his eyes, especially in the town of Los Angeles.
An amazing yarn in circulation concerned Conrad Nagel, and had been
given publicity In the usual manner—
by a loud-voiced conversation In a
tramcar!
"I do adore Conrad Nagel. I think
he's so fine looking."
"Ah! Hut I guess you wouldn't like
him if you knew all about him. He has
cork legs!"
Conrad's admirer just didn't believe
It.
"Hut my dear, I know! My friend
saw the accident. He was run over
by a lorry ln the town a year ago.
Mind you, though, I think he's wonderful the way he manages to walk so
well on cork!"
The yarn reaching the alert ears of
the nigger bootblack, he felt that no
one like himself could so confidently
give It the lie like he could do.
Why, hadn't ho only a week ago
been reproved—to put it mildly—for
knocking Conrad's pet corn with his
shining brush. And corns don't grow
on cork!
He's Just an Shaky
When many a feller travels,
He's fussed throughout the trip,
Because he can't get off his mind,
What he's got on his hip.
"HAIL THE WOMAN"
Fine Audience Picture Produced
by Thomas H. Ince.—At the
Ilo-llo Theatre, Friday and Saturday.
"Hall the Woman" ls built upon a
theme that reaches ln and grips both
the mind and the heart and therefore
the continuous attention of the average moving picture theatregoer. This
theme ls superbly Interpreted In every
department of production. And tt Is
an argument—mind you, not a preachment nor a sermon—against one of the
vital problems of the day: that of the
double standard of morality. All of
which presages an "audience picture"
of sure Are proportions.
Written by C. Gardiner Sullivan, the
story presents a vitally human document. It ls Interpreted by a cast that
performs brilliant work individually
and perfect team play collectively,
which guarantees tremendous effectiveness. And even amid the excellent
work of all of the other players, Theodore Roberts stands oul, giving an
Inspired performance that will rank
among the finest pieces of character
work that has ever been screened. It
is acting art of the highest possible
type.
The direction, done by John Griffith Wray and supervised by Mr. Ince,
enhances to the full extent the dramatic power and the humanness of the
story, not to mention Increasing its
universal appeal. There are times
when the tempo seems to be slightly
retarded but this fault is always relieved immediately after it has happened. There has been created an atmosphere that ls not only seen but
felt. The continuity could not be improved upon.
The Story
The story deals with Oliver Beres-
ford, a grim and bigoted New England
farmer, whose uncompromising creed,
"Men and their sons first," disposes
harshly of woman's destiny. Beres-
ford's son, David, who Is studying for
the ministry, secretly marries Nan,
stepdaughter of the village odd-jobs
man, and their union ls about to be
blessed with a child. The elder Bercs-
ford learns of Nan's condition, and of
his son's responsibility. True to her
promise to her weak husband, who
stands In fear of his father, Nan does
not announce that she is David's wife.
The elder Beresford buys off the brutal odd-jobs man, and Nan Is driven
trom home. She goes to New York,
where her child ts born; and where
she falls Into a life of shame, through
want and poverty. Her husband, David, maintains a cringing silence.
Judith Beresford, beautiful daughter
of the intolerant Puritan, takes Nan's
part, and is likewise driven trom home
through a combination of circumstances. She meets Nan In New York,
and when Nan dies takes care of the
child. Before she dies, Nan tells Judith of her marriage to David. Time
passes, and Judith decides that her
brother shall clear Nan's memory and
name, and recognize his child. She
and the child arrive ln the old New
England home on the day that David
Is to be ordained a missionary to foreign lands. As he stands before the
congregation, Judith confronts him
with his child. Overcome with remorse, he confesses his sin and recognizes his child.
WTV. A. NOTES
Specific Charges
against the Board
of Pension Commissioners by the G.W.
V.A. and the. Royal
Commission Findings in Tabloid.
1. That the regulations based on section 25 (3) of the
Pension Act have been so amended by
'.he Board as to nullify the intention
of this section, and thus cause the
cancellation of many awards previously made, and the rejection of legitimate claims now under consideration.
-SUSTAINED
2. That the 1920 and 1921 amendments to section 11 of the Pension
Act have been applicable to cx-servlec
men of the C.E.F., contrary to the Intention of Parliament In accepting
these amendments and the assurances
publicly given by the Commissioners,
thus withholding pension from a large
class of dependents.
-SUSTAINED
3. That regulations were secretly
Introduced under which the Board assumed power to reject applications
for insurance policies under the Returned Soldiers' Insurance Act on medical grounds, despite the decision of
Parliament that such Insurance would
be available to all qualified applicants
without regard to the conditions of
health at the time of application.
-SUSTAINED
Eliminating word "secretly."
4. That the aforesaid regulations
have been illegally concealed and that
adverse decisions have been rendered
thereupon without disclosing Bame to
tho Individuals affected, thus causing
great distress and dissatisfaction.
-SUSTAINED
with the elimination of Illegal concealment ot the Royal Commission expresses the opinion that the
publicity given the Board's decision was Insufficient, and would
cause the effect claimed by the
O.W.V.A.
5. That the general procedure of
the Board was such as to place the
burden of proof with regard to attrl-
butablllty (of a disability to war service) entirely upon the claimant for
pension, and that as a result many ex-
service men and dependents have been
denied a proper opportunity to establish their rights.
-SUSTAINED
6. That pensions have been reduced
following a review of the findings of
the local examiners by the headquarters office in a manner contrary to
the prosedure announced before the
Select Committee of the House ot Com
mons (on pensions and re-establishment).
-SUSTAINED
7. That undue severity has been
exercised with rspect to disability ratings, which to some extent confirms
the report that secret instructions
have been Issued to reduce pensions
ln every way possible.
-SUSTAINED
With the elimination of the words
mission stating that the
"undue" and "secret," the Royal
Comm. stating that there was a
limited revelation ot the Instructions, but not sufficient to avoid
suspicion that some ulterior action had been taken by the Board.
OVER THE HILL
"Over the Hill" fame comes again
Wednesday and Thursday to the Ilo-
llo Theatre ln a tensely dramatic story of the snow country called "My
Dad." "My Dad" ls based upon the nobility of sacrifice. The son, played by
Mr. Walker, risks his life, undergoes
the tortures of numbing colli, the dang
ers of frozen trails to procure the evidence that proves his father innocent.
Build up to a smashing climax, in
which Is depicted one of the most thrilling hand to hand conflicts ever flung
upon the screen. If we were to make
a choice between this fight scene antl
the light scene In "Tol'-able David."
we would hesitate long before making
our selection. Personally wc think
that the fight in "My Dad" is more
thrilling anil that It ls done with a
trifle more realism, thanks to the acting of Johnnie Walker, who Is at home
I on this type of role.
still another striking feature of this
production ls the snow-capped grand-
< eur of the mountains amid which the
action takes place.    The vastness of
; the snow lands, the utter desolation
of winter, the loneliness of the trails,
frozen tight from the numbing cold, all
j combined to make a picture of rare
I pictorial effectiveness.   It Is a produc-
1 Hon well worth seeing.   Will be shown
Wednesday.
New York interests have purchesed
fifteen mineral claims on Dome mountain in the Smlthers district, Central
British Columbia, and will develop tho
property at once. Charles Earle.
C. Denning, and Hugo Blumenlhal aro
named as members of the purchasing
syndicate, and T. E. Jefferson the
vendor.
qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq
CORD and
AH Styles -
FABRIC
All Sizes
DUNLOP
Coast-to-Coast
Popularity is Due to:
The Quality in The Tire.
The Service That Goes
With The Tire.
The Mileage That Results
From The Tire.
qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 21st, 1923
i
BARGAINS  GALORE  AT  OUR
STOCKTAKING  SALE
FOR EIGHT DAYS ONLY
Starts on Friday, April the 20th
BUY   HERE   AND   SAVE   MONEY
Onions, 10 lbs. for  85c
Juicy Oranges, 26c doz., 4 doz. tor   95c
Juicy Oranges 35c doz. 3 doz. for   95c
Juicy Oranges 50c and 75c doz.
Lemons, doz  60c
Grope Fruit, 4 for   85c
Orape Fruit, 10 for   $1.00
Eating or Cooking ApploB, 3 lb. for .... 25c
Thermos Hottlcs, reg. $1.75 for   $1.36
Aluminum Roasters reg. $275 for   $2.45
Alum. 2 i|ts. double boiler, sale price     1.65
Copper Boilers, reg. $5.00 for   $4.50
Copper Boilers No. 9, reg. $6.00 for .... 16.50
Ten l'ots 75c, 95c and $1.75 each.
Glass Table Sots. $1.75 Set
Berry Sets, $1.65 per set.
Plain White Cups and Saucers, per doz 1,96
Plain White Cups only, per doz $1.86
Clover Leaf, plain white Cups only
per doz   $1.65
Water Tumblers. 3 for   25c
7 lb. boxes Sodas  $1.00
Fairy Sodas, plain or salted, 25c package.
2 for   45c
Bulk Sodas, 2 lb.s for   25c
Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for   85c
Graham Wafers. 2 lbs. for 45c
Jell-0 and Jelly Powders, all flavors
6 pkgs for   66c
Holbrooks Custard Powder, 1 lb. tins
35c hi lb. pkgs, 2 for  _  85c
FRESH GROUND COFFEE, NONE BETTER
Supreme per  lb    70c
B. &. I). No, 1 per lb 60c
B. & B. No. 2 per lb 50c
Teas, advanced 10c to 15c per lb.
B. & B. Choice, per lb 60c
Put your stock in at the old prices.
1). &B. Ceylon per lb  60c
Empress Ceylon per lb  65c
Saladn per lb  66c
Jamesons per lb „  66c
PANCAKE FLOUR
Aunt Jemima pkg. reg. 30c sale price
2 for   45c
Aunt Jemima bags reg. 65c, sale price
for    50c
Log Cabin reg. 30c, 2 for   15c
Robbie Burns, reg. 30c, 2 for   15c
Rogers Syrup, 2 lb. tins for  25c
Rogers Syrup, 5 lb. tlnB for  80c
Rogers Syrup, 10 lb. tins for  $1,011
Coru Syrup, 2 lb. tins for  25c
Corn Syrup 10 lb. tins for  $1.10
Waffle Table Syrup, (its. reg. 85c, for .... 70c
Squirrel Peanut Butter, 1 lb, tins for .... 25c
Squirrel Peanut Butter. 5 lb. tins tor.$1.25
Salt, 3 lb. Sack   15c
Salt, 7 lb. sacks 30c, 3 for   85c
Shaker Salt, 16c or 4 for 65c
"PURE"' Jams nnd Marmalade
lied Plum, 4 lb. tins, each   65c
Stanley's Peach, 4 lb. tiiiB, each .... 76c
Victoria and W'agstaffe    Strawberry,
4 lb. tins, each   85c
King Beach Apricot and Raspberry
4 lb. tins, each 85c
Empress Strawberry Jam, 1 lb. tins
35c, 3 for   $1.00
Empress Raspberry Jam, 1 lb. bottlo
35c, 3 for   $1.00
Orange Marmalade, 4 lb. tins each 85c
Orange Marmalade, 2 lb. tins, eacli 50c
Plumade, 1 lb. Jar 35c, 3 for #1.00
Canned Fish, etc.
Sardines Brunswick, 3 tins for
... 25c
Chicken Haddie per tin \	
... 80c
Pilchards % lb. tins, 2 for 	
... 25c
Pilchards, 1 lb. tins 25c. 2 for ....
... 15c
Pink Salmon %s, 2 for 	
. 15c
Tiger Sockeye Salmon l's 35c, 3
for	
$1.00
Success Lobster \'t lb. tins 35c
3 for	
$1.00
Kippered Snack per tin 	
10c
Kippered Herring per tin	
20c
Libby's Pickles
Limits, 3 bottles with order
Sweet Mixed, Sour Mixed, Sweet Show
Sour Chow, Onion Pickles and Sweet
Oerklns
Regular 45c a bottle, sale    price
35c or 3 for $1.00
Bob White Matches, 2 pkgs for   75c
Pilot Matches, 2 pkgs. for   45c
Maple Leaf Matches 15c, 3 boxes for .... 40c
O'Cedar Polish 25c and 50c per bottle
Liquid Veneer, per bottle 25c and 50c
Ocean Blue, 4 pkgs for 25c
Day & Martins Shoe Polish
The old Reliable
Black, Tan and Oxford, 2 tins for   25c
CANNED VEGETABLES, ETC.
Van Camp's reg. 15c tin, 7 for 95c
Del Monte Butfet, 10c tins, 6 for 45c
Tomatoes and Corn, 2 lb. tins, 6 for .... $1.00
Tomatoes (large) or Penai   6 for $1.10
Sour Kraut 2% lb. tins, reg. 35c for .... 25c
California Asparagus, 35c tin, 3 for .... $1.00
Victory and Wagstaffe Strawberry,
4 lb. tins, each   85c
King Beach Apricot and Raspberry
4 lb. tins, each   85c
Sour Mixed Pickles, gallon Crocks .... $1.65
Empress Raspberry Jam, 1 lb. bottle
35c. 3 for   $1.00
Orango Marmalade, 4 lb. tins, each .... 86c
Orange Marmalade, 2 lb. tins, oach .... 60c
Plumade, 1 Ib. jar 35c, 3 for   $1.00
.Spaghetti, Vermlcllli, Maccaronl 1 lb.
packages, 3 for   50c
Libby's prepared Mustard, reg. 25c, Hale
price    20c
Worcester Sauce Vi lit. bottle, reg. 35c
sale  price     25c
Pan Your Pickle, reg. 50c, sale price .... 40c
Buffet    Pitted Olives, reg. 35c for 25c
Pickled Sweet Beet Root and Pickled
Onion, 35c, 3 for  $1.00
Quart bottle table Vinegar, Malt or White
Vine, 25c oach, 2 for 46c
Quaker Oats, small pkgs, 2 for   26c
Quaker Aluminum Oats 40c pkg. 2
tor   75c
Kiinkle Corn Flakes 5 pkgs. for   55c
Currants 25c, pkg. 2 for   45c
Seeded Raisins 20c pkg. 2 for   85c
Seedless Raisins 25c pkg. 2 for 45c
Fancy Dates, 25c pkg. 2 for   45c
Corn Starch 15c pkg. 2 for 25c
Laundry Starch 15c pkg. 2 for 25c
St. Charles Carnation and Pacific Milk
•     16 oz. tills 15c, 7 for 95c
Baby size 10c, 12 for   95c
Cowan's Cocoa H'« 30c 2 for 65c
Cowan's Cocoa, l's per tin  50c
Cocoanut, 20c pkg. 2 for 86c
SOAPS, ETC.
Palm Olive, 3 cakes for  25c
Oatmeal Soap, 0 cokes for  26c
Castile Soap, 6 cakes tor 25c
Castile Bars, each  25c
W. W. Soap, 7 for 60c
White Swan 30c carton, 2 for   55c
Fels Naptha Soap per carton   90c
Old Dutch, 2 tins for 25c
Pearllnc small pkg. 2 for   26c
ClorkB Roast Fowl, regl 60c for  46c
Potted Meats small 10c, 3 for   25c
Potted Meats large 15c, 2 for   25c
Stewed Kidneys per tin   25c
Map    of Italy. Puro Olive Oil, bottle
reg. 45c for   35c
Alymor Boneless Chicken, reg. 66c tin 60c
Wild Rose PaBtry Flour 10's each .... 50c
Purity and Royal Standard Flour 49's
per sack $2.10
Small White Beans, 3 lbB. for 26c
No. 1 Rice, 4 lbs. for 80c
Robin Talcum Powder, 2 tins for 25c
Abbys Fruit Salts, 75c size for 65c
Abbys Fruit Soils 40c size for 85c
Princess Soap Flakes per pkg 25c
One half tiie price of Lux and goes further.
6 lb. Sacks Rolled Oats per sack   40c
20 lb. sacks Rolled Oats per sack $1.15
Wheatlcts 6 lb. sacks, each 50c
Ground Rice, 3 lb. sacks   85c
Rico Flour, 3 lb. sacks   85c
TEA SETS
Blue Bird design, $9.50 set for  $&60
Rldgways Blue Band $9.50 set for .... $8.50
Spodes Copeland Ware $7.60 set for $740
Spodes Copeland Ware $13.05 set tor $12.00
Spodes Copeland Ware $13.96 set for $12.85
Combination
Special, Extra
1 bottle Sweet Relish, reg	
1 bottle Catsup, reg	
1 bottle Marmalade, reg	
45c
40c
30c
Regular price
Special Sale Price	
$1.05
75c
All Crockery, Cutlery and Kitchen Enamelware less 10 per cent.
DONT BE  DISAPPOINTED-DO  YOUR  SHOPPING EARLY
SISHBKKISHBEIcM
BURNS & BROWN
B. and B. GROCERY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, B.C.
m
r
2E SATURDAY, APRIL 21st, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
NINE
i
News of  Courtenay  and  Surrounding  District
BY OUR SPECIAL  CORRESPONDENT
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
Spring Time Is Electric
Stove and Plate Time
We have Them At Reasonable Prices
OUR   RADIO   DEPARTMENT    IS   OPEN    FOR
INSPECTION   DAY   AND   NIGHT
Call and Inspect Our Stock
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Phone 164
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
♦      —
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR  TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars In for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.1
Workshop at the Condensary. SOMETHING GOOD TO EAT!
MASONS DEDICATE
FINE NEW QUARTERS
Largely Attended Ceremony is
Held in Courtenay.
Over two hundred members o£ the
order ot Ancient, Free and Accepted
Masons from Nanaimo, Cumberland,
Vancouver, Victoria and other places,
attended the dedicatory ceremonies
Thursday evening in Courtenay when
Hiram Lodge No. 14 dedicated Its
new temple.
The ceremony was performed by
Orand Master McCreary of Vancouver, assisted by P. 0. M. John Rudd
of Nanaimo.
Hiram lodge Is one of the oldest
In the province, Its origin dating back
to July 22, 1891. Last year a fine
new home was constructed along modern lines on Union Street, the second floor being used for lodge purposes and the stores underneath being rented for business purposes.
Up to the first of this year the lodge
was housed In the building erected
by A. Orant under an arrangement
with the late Wm. Lewis. Ten years
ago the membership had grown to
such an extent that the members purchased the lot for the construction of
more suitable quarters but the work
was held up owing to the war.
Orand Master McCreary on Thursday's occasion paid his official visit
to both Courtenay lodge No. 14 and
Cumberland lodge No. 26. After the
meetings and the official ceremonies
were concluded a banquet was given
in honor of the visiting officials.
The affair was a very pleasant and
fraternal one ln every reBpect and
Courtenay and Cumberland lodges
were complimented on their steady
growth and usefulness in the community.
BEVAN NOTES
A very pleasant evening was spent
by the Burns Club of Bevan on Saturday last at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. D. Aitken, dancing and music
being Indulged In until early morning.
Those who attended Included Mr.
and Mrs. S. Cameron, Miss Jean Cameron, Miss Elizabeth Henderson,
Cumberland, Mr. and Mrs. J. Weir,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Boag. Mr. and Mrs.
H. Buchanan, Mrs. J. Irvine, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Miller, Sam Robertson, Cumberland, Mr. and Mrs. W. Vale, J.
Drummond and Mrs. A. Aitken.
Vocal selections were given by Mrs.
J. Boag, Mrs. J. Irvine, Miss Henderson nnd Harry Buchanan. J. Miller
contributed a recitation. Sam Robertson furnished the music for the
dancing.
C. G. WILSON
fonrtenay
British Columbia
Something made of good flour, of
good milk, ot good, nourishing coin-
pressed yeast, of good shortening!
Car  For Hire!
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
RHEUMATISM
BANISHED BV CHIROPRACTIC
Sra Me at Clarke's Residence, Near
Union Hall, Any Day Between
i and fi pjn.
E. 0, HAUKEDAL, Chiropractor.
A PURE FOOD PRODUCT
A product with a fine, natural flavor,
with a satisfying slice, with a crisp
crust.
What could It be but Bread—the
perfect food.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat more
of it.
HALLWAY'S BREAD
Is Bread at Its Best—Insist on it.
A GOOD BAKERY
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Announcement
"THE MAPLES" Ice Cream Parlors
—at—
ROYSTON
on  the   Island  Highway
RE-OPENS
for the Season
SUNDAY, APRIL 22nd
Afternoon  Teas—Light  Lunches
W. ORilvIe, Proprietor.
FINE CONCERT FOR
CHURCH ORGAN FUND
Big   Attendance   Expected at.
Presbyterian Church Tuesday
Following tlio recent installation
of their splendid pipe organ, the St.
George's Presbyterian Church will
hold on Tuesday evening, April 24th,
a church concert which for excellence i
In the selection of musical numbers
and the choice of artists who will
participate will excel anything offer- j
ed the people of Cumberland for a
Iouk time in the way of a musical
treat.
The affair will commence at 8
o'clock In the church auditorium and
the proceeds will go toward the or
gan fund. Organ solos will be played
by Messrs. Slllence and Edwards; A
violin, organ and cello trio, by Messrs
Graham, Owen and Slllence; vocal
selections by Miss Crawford, Mrs.
Tribe and Mr. Haines and violin solos by Miss Howard and Mr. Colvllle
Graham In addition to other interesting numbers.
COUNCIL DEALS
WITH APPOINTMENTS
Courtenay Council
With Engineer's
Other Matters.
Dispenses
Position;
Dr. T. L. Butter was reappointed
health officer and L. D. Plket's selection as Are chief by the Courtenay
Brigade approved at the Courtenay
City Council meeting held Monday
evening. When the question of reappointment of a City engineer was
dlscusssed the Council decided not
to fill that office this year and therefore engineer Cokely's position ls
cancelled. A vote of thanks was
tendered J. M. Mitchell for his services as City solicitor.
Dog taxes have been paid in only
twenty cases and dog owners will be
warned that the legal requirement
must be_complled with by May 1.
The Council Is considering the
question of establishing a City park,
negotiations being under way with
Joseph McPhee.
It was decided that the water committee should be authorized to take
necessary measures to protect the
City's water pine lino after an Inspection is made.
Aid. Bramley asked what provision
would be made for traffic during the
construction of the new steel bridge
over the Courtenay River which it is
estimated will cost about $65,000,
and in connection with which the
Government ls now calling for tenders. The Mayor replied that the
Government would make the necessary provision.
NATIVE SONS MEET
Courtenay Assembly No. 3 Native
Sons of Canada held their final whlst
drive of the season Wednesday evening.   There was a large attendance.
Mrs. K. B. Dalby won ladles first
MrB. Thomas Gwllt second and Mrs.
F. P. Jeune consulatlon prizes. J. W.
McKenzie, Jr. won gentlemen's first,
J. Stevenson, second and H. Crawford consulatlon.
Stephen Jones, proprietor of    the
Dominion Hotel, Victoria, paid Courtenay and other points on the north
J end of the Island a visit this week.
It Pays to Deal nt Lang's
Saturday
CUT-RATE DRUGS, ETC.
$1.00 Sarsaparllla  Blood  Tonic     !8c
75 Milk of Magnesia  Mc
1.00 Beef Iron and Wine   Mc
25 Health  Salts     18*
50 Face Cream   Me
60 Jergen's Rose Cold Cream   48c
50 Tebeco Tooth Paste 81c
WEEK-END CANDY SPECIALS
Our window tells the story.
SOAP .
Large Shipment of JERQENS 100% pure CASTILE SOAP
Just received. Price 25 Cents per full size bar.
Lang's Drug Store
It Pays to Deal at Lang's
Send us your MAIL ORDERS.
"Master Mechanic" and
"Western King" Shirts
and Over-Alls
Master Mechanic pants, par pair   $2.75
Western King Black pants, per pair $2.50
Khakie Shirts, all sizes .... $1.95, $2.50, $2.35 and $3.00
Men's Khakie pants $2.65,$3.25 and $3.75
Young Men's Khakie pants, per pair .... $1.75 and $2.25
A good strong work shirt $1.65
Childrens' Khakie O'Alls trimmed with red $1.10
Penman's Underwear, all sizes per garment $1.25
SHOES
Leckies Pit-Shoes—Leckies Shoes for Boys, all sizes
Girls School Shoes, all sizes, a good shoe—
$2.90, $3.35 and $3.95
Our Wall papers are selling rapidly now is the
time to make your selection.
Try a tin of our Maple Leaf Paint. It will give
you satisfaction.
BEDS
We are local agents for Simmons Beds, Spring, and
Mattresses, and will be pleased to show you our stock.
We are adding several new lines to our stock and
invite your inspection.
A. MacKinnon
i
Announcement
Having arrived in Cumberland for the
purpose of establishing a permanent business
here, until we are able to secure a suitable
location, I beg to announce that I will be at
the Cumberland Hotel Parlors until Saturday
night, April 14th.
After that date I shall be in Cumberland
every fortnight for two days, or longer if required, dates and particulars to be published
in the Islander
In reference to CHARGES, we wish to emphasize that it is not our policy to take advantage of you with high prices but they will
be the same as we charge in our head office
in Nanaimo or those charged in Vancouver
or Victoria.
We are here to stay and we solicit your
patronage. We carry a full equipment in
Cumberland which assures you the best
service. Come and consult me about your
eyes. You are under no obligation to buy
glasses. Furthermore, we will not prescribe
them unless you require them.
R. D. Kaplansky, O.D.
Registered  Optometrist  and  Optician.
Mgr. B. Forcimmer, Jewellers aud Opticians, Nanaimo, B. C.
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Ceal, Wood and Goods ot Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts ol District
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE   CQ   TELEPHONE
w Leave Oritn at Veidome HotoL
Veteran's Wood
Supply
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
for 	
Any length required.
PHONE VOUB ORDERS TO 6-8.
A. A. BROWN,
I jyston Road EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 14th, 1923
New Spring
Suits
For many years
we have we have
handled Coppley
Noycs & Randall
line of High Grade
made to measure
clothing and we
have every confidence in suggesting
you come and inspect our full range
of new cloths. The
line comprises the
latest designs and
colorings, in tweeds,
homespuns, worsted
Navy and black
Serges.
The tailoring of
C N. & R.s clothing is of the very
best, the linings are
guaranteed to give
satisfaction.
The models are de
signed for men who
are looking for distinctive fabrics &
tailoring. To those
men who want the
individuality of fine
custom made
clothes, tailored to
their exact measure.
Drop in and let
us show you.
MENS' AND BOYS' PANTS
Men's Tweed pants made of good heavy reliable
tweed, well made from $4.50 a pair.
Mens'   special Tweed Pants will give great wear
We invite you to inspect this line. Price    tp*J*t/v
Boys' Bloomer-Pants in Tweeds and Serges, all
made with the Governor Fastener   We have a specially attractive assortment at present.
A few specials in the Ladies Department D & A
Elastic Girdle Corsets. (fi-t   rjr
Price       *pL. I tl
D. & A Pink Corsets in sizes 21 to 26. (fi-t   PA
Price       tpl.OU
Mercury Silk Lisle Hose in leading shades
Price  	
75c
J. Sutherland
Dry Goods and Gents'Furnishings
For Results Advertise in The Islander
USED CARS
THE REASON FOR OUR RECENT BIG TURNOVER
OF USED CARS IS THAT OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
We have several CHEVROLET'S from 1917 models
to 1920 at prices
from
FORDS without starters
from
FORDS with starters
from
$250 up to $400
$200 to $250
$350 up
ALSO
A big, high powered car, suitable for stage work,
and a Six Cylinder car that would make an ideal family
ear.
WE GIVE SATISFACTION
VERY EASY TERMS ARRANGED
REPAIRS
See ns for prices on repair work, and save money.
Only first class mechanics employed.
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
Phone 61    THE COURTENAY GARAGE    Phone 61
Local Briefs
Mrs. Earle Fletcher of Nanaimo ia
visiting relatives ln town.
Dr. Dier and Dr. Neen of Nanaimo
visited town this week.
Mr. John Dando arrived from Vancouver on Sunday on a short visit.
COMMISSION HERE
ON MINING CASES
Mines Department Hears Evidence re Bulatovitch and Cunliffe.
Mr. J. P. Hicks of Victoria visited
town this week,
Hev. Fred. Comley accompanied by
Mrs. Comley, formerly of dumber-
land, and now of Metchosin, II. C. arrived in town on Monday and nre the
KUests of Mr. and Mrs. T. II. Mumford.
Mr. A. Dunbar of the Provincial l'n
lice,   returned   from   Vancouver
Monday.
mi
Mr. W. Rogers who is now residing
In Alberta Is In town visiting friends.
Miss Bess B. Stewart of Cumber-
laud, who ls in training at tbe General
Hospital, Vancouver ls at present
spending three weeks vncatlon In Seattle.
The friends of Mr. Herbert Roy will
be sorry to learn that he is confined to
the General Hospital, Vancouver,
where he is suffering from an attack
ot inflamatory rheumatism.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Su-1
perintendent, Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd. accompanied by Mrs. Graham, re-!
turned from Vancouver on Saturday.
There were no new development at
the Commission inquiry before Commissioner W, Wall of Nanaimo at the
.Court House Thursday and Friday
when tlle cases of Michael Bulatovitch and Thos. Cunliffe, Fire Bosb
at Nn. 4 mine. Cumberland for Infractions of the Coal Mines Regulations Act, were reviewed.
James Dickson, acting chief inspector ot Mines. Victoria, and Thomas Jackson, district inspector, Na-
niilino appeared for the department
and Mr. Dickson questioned the various witnesses.
Dulnlovlcli was lined $10.00 lu the
local court for having a Wolf flume
safety lamp in No. 4 contrary to the
regulations and Cunliffe was fined
$ lti.HO for firing shots underground
in No. 4 without proper inspection
for gas.
The evidence given before the commission sent here by the Mines Department was much the same as that
given at the hearing when the fines
were imposed.
Commissioner Wall gave no decision at tiie hearing but he will do so
when the short-hand notes arc transcribed by the stenographer, probably by Monday.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd. ls at present confined to tbe
General Hospital here, but expects to
be around again In the course of a
few daya.
Mr. and Mrs. Lobley of Nanaimo
and Mrs. McEwan of Vancouver visited Mrs. Farmer last week-end.
Mrs. Orr and Mrs. Mickey of Ladysmith visited Cumberland to take in
the senior football game.
Mr. and Mrs. William Richards of
Extension were In Cumberland last
week-end.
An enjoyable affair was held at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. O'Brien,
Dunsmuir Avenue, on Wcdnsday of
this week when their daughter. Kathleen gave a birthday party to a number ot her little friends in celebration
of her tenth anniversary. Various
games were played and after an enjoyable supper the party attended the
Ilo-llo theatre.
W. Heggle, cashier of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce and a popular
member of the younger set of Courtenay, has been transferred to the Duncan branch, the move being in the
nature of a promotion. Ills many
friends will regret his departure.
Mrs. Hicks and son returned from
Victoria on Tuesday.
FINE CONCERT FOR
CHURCH ORGAN FUND
Big    Attendance   Expected at
Presbyterian Church Tuesday
Following the recent installation
of their splendid pipe organ, the St.
George's Presbyterian Church will
hold on Tuesday evening, April 21th,
a church concert which for excellence
iu tne selection of musical numbers
and the choice of artists who will
participate will excel anything offer- ;
ed the people of Cumberland for n
long time in the way of a musical j
treat.
The affair will commenro at 8
o'clock In the church auditorium and
the proceeds will go toward the or
gan fund. Organ solos will be played
by MesBrs. Slllence and Edwards; A
violin, organ and cello trio, by Messrs
Oraham, Owen and Slllence; vocal
selections by Miss Crawford, Mrs.
Tribe and Mr. Haines and violin solos by Miss Howard and Mr. Colvlllc
Graham ln addition to oilier Interesting numbers.
For Job
Printing
Of the Better
Kind Try The
Cumberland
Islander
Born;—At the home of Mrs. Frelonl, to Mr. and Mrs. J. Aspecl, on
Saturday April 14th. a daughter, Gloria Lavina.
FOR SALE
FOIt SALE:—HOUSEHOLD FURNI-
ture, snap for quick sale. For particulars phone 148 or 1'. O. Box
607. A21 |
FOR SALE.—GRADE JERSEY COW
about due.   Rich milker, very gentle
Good family cow. $50.00.—It. Waddell, Mlnto. A2S
FOIt SALE.—BARRED ROCK HATCH
Ing Eggs, from good layers. 10c each.
Apply Stalkers Ranch, Happy Valley. Phone 9,1 M.
FOR SALE:—5  ROOMED HOUSE.—
Reasonable price. Apply Mrs. N.
Bevls, Derwcnt Ave.
FOR SALE.—YOUNG PIGS. BERK-1
shire, C weeks old, $6.00 each, also ,
a few sleeted registered Berks.
$16.00 each with papers. Sired by i
II. ('. Herald. Ex. Queen of Glcnnrn. I
H. Waddell.
FOR SALE:—"INDIAN"' TWIN Motor Cycle, cheap. Apply, A. Johnston, Union Hotel, City. A28
TO LET.—THREE COMFORTABLY
furnished housekeeping rooms, corner Penrith and Fourth Street. For
further particulars, see Airs. M.
Yarrow.
REGULATION POOL TABLE FOR
Sale.—Can bo converted for American Billiards. Good condition.
Cheap for cash. Also cook stove
4 hole.—Apply Secy. G. W. V. A.
FEMALE HELP WANTED.—CAP-
able of taking charge of small home.
Two children. Apply K. E. Attree,
Courtenay;  Phone 146.
FOR RENT—FOUR ROOMED
House : Apply :108 Windermere
Avenue or 100'4 Dunsmuir Ave.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.1.C, B.A.
ARCHITECT
(lltil B.C. Permanent Loan llliltt
PIIONK Sill8      VICTOBIA, B.I.
Big   Stock-taking
Sale Now On
For Prices see page 8
i
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
TASTE
Webster defines taste as "Partaking of keen enjoyment". To all women, few pleasures can be keener
than a leisurely visit to our store.
This week especially, for we have a delightful display of rugs and carpets suitable for every room in
the home.
And we have not forgotten the "Head of the
House" for he will find here deep cosy chairs to match
his pipe and slippers.
Jeune's Furniture Store
By the Double Arrow Sign
PHONE 144 COURTENAY
A Mechanic may know Cars
A Battery Man, Batteries
And a Lawyer, the Law—so
BUY YOUR TIRES FROM US
because while we don't profess to know anything1 about
Cars, Batteries or Law—We sure do know TIRES
Bool and Wilson
COURTENAY NANAIMO
GAS      OILS       VULCANIZING, ETC
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - • B. C.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Auction Sale
At Agricultural.Hall and Grounds, Conrtenay,
Saturday, May 5th, 1DSS
A CAR LOAD OF FARM HOUSES
Now on rail—Further Particulars later
Also Farm and garden produce. Live stock; household furniture, etc. including: Six hole Fawcett Range aa new; Exten-
tion dining table; "Toronto'' couch or folding bed; occasional
table; Simons double bed; two rockers; oak framed mirrors;
dresser with four draws; three cots; heating stove; cheat of
draws; baby's go-cart; about ten doz fruit Bealcrs; man's bicycle; two horse saddles (one English and one Texas); sundry tools. Also quantity of poultry Including R. I. Reds; Barred Rocks; and a pen of Bantams.
Further entries gladly accepted.
E FELIX THOMAS
Auctioneer :: All Kinds of Insurance :: Notary Public

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068281/manifest

Comment

Related Items