BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Apr 15, 1927

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068260.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068260.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068260-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068260-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068260-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068260-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068260-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068260-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068260-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068260.ris

Full Text

Array THBL CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
•    *bta^     .. With    tohlnh   la   nnnotnUAa-tMA    tha   i%HlUI>k«J   Vuu
1-
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR—No. 15.
***
With wblch Is .consolidated the Cumberland News.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1927.
, SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Introduce  New Tax By-Laws
At Next Meeting Of Council
Under the heading of unfinished
business, the City Clerk had entered
on the agenda sheet at Monday's
Council meeting the concise notation,
"school finances," but when this point
was arrived at ill the evening's proceedings it was found tliat the Council
is still unable to take any definite
action until the attltudo of thc Dept.
of Education becomes clearly known.
Apparently the Department expects
the city to hand over luxes collected
on the outside school area, but the
city has no intention of doing this,
unless compelled by order-in-council.
Mayor Maxwell suggested writing the
Supt. of Education to the effect Hint
the Council was preparing to set the
1927 tax rate and would make collections as soon as the necessary by-laws
aro passed. No mention will lie made
of turning the taxes over to the Dbpt.,
which leaves the Superintendent no
alternative but to make the next
move.
Aid. W. P. Symons informed the
Council-by letter that lie would be
leaving at the end of May on a three
months' visit to England. Mayor
Maxwell expressed regret at losing
tlle help of Aid. Symons during that
period, but iioped that he would have
a very enjoyable trip. The remaining
Aldermen expressed slmlinr wishes
for good luck.
Jlr. J. A. .McCulloch Informed that
he had been transferred to Vancouver
and therefore would have to give up
the house he is at present renting
from the city. At the same time, Jlr.
John H. Robertson offered to occupy
the house us soon as Jlr. McCulloch
vacates lt. and this course proved
satisfactory to the Council.
Also under the heading nf unfinished business came the opening of
sealed tenders for the auditing of the
City Council and School Board books
for the year 1927. There were two
tenders—one from Messrs. Chas. II.
Mcintosh and Jas. Dick, and one from
Mr. R. J. Selfe. The bid ot Jiessrs.
Mcintosh and Dick was accepted,
being $100 for City and $50 for School.
Mr. Selfe's tender was only slightly
In excess of these figures.
Aid. Willlonis reported two new
cases of chicken pox, with three
released during the past two weeks.
Aid. Henderson reported on work being done on various city streets, while
Aid. Parnham gave out the following
bank balances: general account, $5
580; school account, $2,392; savings
account, $242.5-1.
Before adjournment, Aid. Parnham
asked permission to introduce a
General Rate by-law at the next
meeting, nnd Aid. Mumford asked permission to introduce a Scliool Kate
by-law at the same time. Both requests were granted.
BASEBALL FANS
ENDEAVORING TO
START GAME HERE
Some of the Cumberland Intermediates are endeavoring to get Baseball
started here again, and with thnt end
in view have called a meeting for
Sunday In the Athletic Club at 7:30.
If you aro Interested In the popular
game, better attend the meeting In
the Club on Sunday.
Dances Must Pay
Amusement Tax
Hy virtue of an amendment to Hie
"Amusement Tax Act" passed on the
5th March 1927, Dancing Halls and
Dances have^ been brought within the
ile ti nil Ion of place of amusement and
admission to all dances, unless they
can qualify for exemption, must bear
the 10 p.c. tax.
Claims for exemption must be filed
with the Provincial Collector at Cumberland at least one week before the
dance or entertainment ls put on, and
unless so tiled the admissions to the
dance or entertainments are liable to
the tax. Claims for exemption must
give uu outline of the aims and objects of the organization putting on
this entertainment or dance, the object they have in view in staging thc
entertainment or dance, and what it
is proposed to do with the profits and
further guaranteeing tliat the major
portion of thc gross receipts will be
devoted to patriotic or charitable uses
or to the use of any naval or military
organization or association.
Exemption may also be obtained
for entertainments of a religious
nature conducted by a religious body
or denomination and also for Industrial and other like exhibitions.
What Does Easter Mean To Us?
CUMBERLAND CRONIES
WILL CELEBRATE
GOLF TOURNAMENT
DANCE MONDAY
A big golf tournament is to lie held
at Qualicum on Easter Monday, lu
the evening a special dance wlll be
held In the Community Hall, Qualicum
Beach, with Lafe Cassidy s Orchestra
supplying the music. Harold Card.
King of the Ivories, will be at the
piano. Cents.. $1; Ladles, 50c. Refreshments  extra.   Dancing  9   till  2.
Easter Services
In Local Churches
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
GOOD FRIDAY, April 16th -
Lantern  Service   at   8  p.m.;   "Thc
last days of Our Lord."
SATURDAY, April 18th—
Servlce of preparation  for   Easier,
Communion nt 8 p.m.
EASTER DAY, April 17lh-
Holy Communion, 8:30 a.m.
Matins & Holy Communion, 11 a.m.
Children's Service, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
A happy and joyous Easter to all ls
the wish of the Vicar and congregation of Holy Trinity Anglican Church.
Cumberland United Church
Rev. J.  R.  Hewitt, Pastor
EASTER SUNDAY Service at 11 u.ni..
followed by Sacrament of the Lord's
Supper.
1:30 p.m.—Sunday School.
7 p.m.—Evensong, with special Easier
music by the choir.
EVERYBODY WELCOME
Accident Spoils
Soccer Game At
Powell River
POWELL RIVER.—On Sunday, thc
third Instant, the Dual game in the
local football series was played, the
oposing teams being Elks and Knights
of Pythias. At the call of time the.
wore stood one all. ' In the overtime
period the Elks succeeded In adding
two counters and won the right to
enter the British Columbia championship playoffs as .representatives of
Powell River. A regrettable accident
occurred with only a few minutes of
play remaining. Jimmy Anderson,
star of the Elks' team, had the misfortune to break his leg just above
the ankle. He was taken to the hospital where he Is recovering as well
as can he expected.
On the tenth Instant, the league
winners played a (earn picked from
members of the three other teams
comprising the league and the result
was a draw. A. .Mortimer, a former
member of the Cumberland soccer
team, Is a member of the K. of P.
club here.
This is a story of two Easter eggs.
It will appeal to old and young alike.
"The little unhatchetl chick gazed
at the wall surrounding It. 'Well,'
he snld, 'this Is all there is. 1 don't
see any purpose in this world. There
is no purpose. I just happen to be
here—that's all. So I might just as
well be philosophical and satisfied.
Who cares, anyway? I'll stay here as
long as I can, and when the end
comes, all right. There Is no telling
what might happen to me if I tried
to get out. I did not put myself here
and I'll not do anything to get anywhere else. I'll not let any foolish
thoughts get Into my head. I'll not
believe anything I can't see—and I
can't see very much, that's sure.'
"In the egg next to his was another
little chick who said: "Why am I
here? I don't know, but I believe
there's an object. I'm not here just
by accident. I believe there's a purpose In It, so I'll act on that belief
und see what happens. The only
thing I can do is to peck, but I must
have been given that power for a
purpose, so I'll use that power and do
my best. 1 have nothing to go on but
faith, but that is an incentive to
action. If I did not believe that there
was anything beyond, I should lie
down and stagnate. Well, here goes:
Peck, peck, peck!'
"Acting upon Instinctive faith he
pecked away until the shell cracked
and out he stepped Into a glorious,
beautiful world."
and downs of life, have lost their
faith and with It their hope. Then
there will be those, who also, through
the trials and difficulties of life, will
have had their faith strengthened and
with It their hope. But to both alike
there comes the same message from
the Christ Himself: "I am the Resurrection and the Life; he that bellevetli
on Me, though he were dead, yet shall
he live, and whosoever liveth and
bellevetli In Me shall never die." If
we allow our Instinctive faith to become dormant we shall be like the
first chick. We shall see no reason
or objective In life. Our existence
wlll be aimless. But lt we can build
up our lives on a faith which enables
us to "Be In Christ," we shall become
as S, Paul says "new creatures."
Life will become more beautiful and
purposeful. It is ln such words as
these that we learn the meaning of
the message of Easter:
"I am come a light into the world,
that whosoever belleveth* on me shall
not abide in darkness."
"I, If I be lifted up, will draw all
men unto me."
"I am the way, the truth and the
life."
"I am the bread of life; he that
cometh on me shall never hunger,
and he that belleveth on me shall
never thirst."
The experiences of ail types of
people, the rich and the poor, the
sinner and the saint, testify to  the
This   little   story  tells   us   much. | truth of these words which centre so
TYPEWRITING CONTEST
The annual typewriting contest In
connection with Jhc Courtenny Commercial Scliool. will bc held on Thursday, April 28th, In the Onlcly Theatre.
Courtenny, at 8:00 p.m. This contest
is open to all typists in the' Comox
district and the winner will receive
a sliver cup and bold tho title of
champion of Comox district for the
year 1927. Silver medals will also be
presented. All contestants must Bend
In tlielr names to the Courtenay Commercial School one week  before the
contest
There are people in the world to
whom the message of Easter conveys
nothing. Then there are those to
whom lt Is a wonderful time of hope
and Joy. To some Instinctive faith
comes more easily than to others.
There will be those ln Cumberland
who will recall a time when they
believed in and loved the Easter
Season, but who now, through the ups
intimately on life itself. One's Easter
prayer ls, that to those who have
seemingly lost their faith, there may
arise renewed hope and courage to
carry on bravely, that to those whose
faith ls strong there may come that
sympathetic understanding and love
for those whose faith is weaker than
their own.
—E. O. R.
Roads In Comox District To
Be Oiled Again This Summer
Road To Hardy Bay To Be Completed
The Cumberland Cronies' Burns'
Club will hold a social evening on
Saturday of this week, at the Union
Hotel, when some phase of thc Scottish Bard's work wlll be discussed.
Death Claims
Dr. "Billy" Neen;
Well Known Here
The death occurred after a lengthy
illness in the Interior, on Sunday, of
Dr. William Arthur Neen, second son
of the late Jacob Neen and .Mrs. Neen,
of Nanaimo.
Dr. Neen, who would have been 28
years of age next month, was a native
son of Nanaimo, graduating from the
high school there in 1917, winning at
that time the Governor-General's
medal for school work. In 1922 he
graduated from the University of
Southern California with honors, and
was elected member of the Honorary
Dental Fraternity. Following graduation, he practised for nearly three
years iu Cumberland nnd Nanaimo,
being associated with Dr. R. B. Dler
here, and' later, for almost two years,
with Dr. O. C. Gilbert, Vancouver.
Dr. Neen Is survived by his mother, two brothers, Dr. Adam Neen,
of Vancouver, and John R! Neen. Nanaimo, and three sisters, Jlrs. T. H.
Stevens of Vancouver. Jlrs. J. White,
of Edmonton, and Jllss Wlnnifred, of
Trail, B.C. The remains were brought
to Nanaimo, and the funeral took
place on Wednesday afternoon from
the family residence, 444 Nicol St.
TENNIS COURTS ARE
NOW READY FOR PLAY
HOLIDAY DANCES
Special Holiday dances wlll he held
at the Ilo-llo dance hall during
Easter. After tbe concert tonight,
(Thursday), by the Young People of
Courtenay nnd Union Bay, a dance
will he held trom 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Saturday the usual old time dance
will bc held, and on Easter Jlonday.
a monster dance wlll be held, which
you ought to make a point of attending. Tlie only dance In the district
! on Enstor Jlonday.
COURTENAY, April. 14.—The annual meeting of the Courtenay-Comox
Board of Trade, which .took the form
of a social gathering combined with
a short business session, was held at
the Elk Hotel at Comox on Tuesday
evening. The largo dining room was
well filled to do justice to the excellent dinner provided by the management. Mr, *Wm. Eadle, president of
the Board for the last two years, was
In the chair and received a special
vote of thanks, proposed by J. McLeod
for the energy displayed during bis
term of office. Mr. H. E. Wallis, the
secretary for two years, was also th?
recipient of a vote of thanks.
Thc election of officers for the current year resulted In the election of
Jlr. E. L. .Macdonald. president; Mr.
II. E. Wallls, vice-president; and Jlr.
C. S. Wood, secretary. Sixteen namos
were proposed to form the council ul
the board.
Jlr. Joseph McPhee, who was president of the board at Its Inception, was
called upon to address the meeting.
He responded In a very optimistic
lone for the future of the district. A
number ot specially Invited guests Included Mr. P. P. Harrison, Jl.L.A.,
Jlayor .McKenzie of Courtenay, Mayor
Maxwell of Cumberland, and Messrs.
J. Sutherland and C. H. Tarbell, also
of Cumberland, all of whom briefly
addressed the meeting. Other speakers included Major A. M. Hilton. R.
U. Hurford, D. R. MacDonald, president of the Cumberland Board, Mr.
Humberstone of Victoria, J. Idlens,
Ben Hughes, A .B. Ball, and C. Plg-
gott. In the course of his address,
Jlr. Harrison Informed the gathering
that the road to Hardy Bay will be
completed this Summer. He paid a
glowing tribute to Jlr. Wm. Douglas,
chairman of the City of Courtenay's
Works department, whose persistence
won out In having the road constructed down to Kye Bay. The roads In
the district which have already been
oiled will receive another dressing
this summer, he said. The bridge
across Campbell River will depend
on the site chosen for the pulp mill
to be constructed  there.     Mr.  Har-
Although many tennis enthusiasts
of Cumberland have been making use
of the board courts near the Hospital
since early In .March, the fact that
the wire netting enclosing the courts
had outlived Its usefulness made playing more of a difficult task than a
pleasure, for scouting lost balls took
up more time lhan actual play. Now,
thanks to Jlr. A. R. Stacey and a few
more willing workers, the old wiring
has been completely replaced and the
only possible way to lose a ball Is to
knock It "over the top." Jlr. Stacey
I was also instrumental ln clearing
away brush and small trees near the
courts, considerably enhancing thc
light.
All things indicate an unusually
successful 1927 season for the Cumberland Tennis Club. Players new to
the game are flocking to the courts
ln great numbers, and former members are alBO back to the fold, so that
tlic membership this year should be
as large, If not larger than that of
the club's first year of existence.
Those who have not already paid
their fee should get In touch with the
Jllss   P.   Partridge,  before
rison said  that the Albernl-Cumber-
land road had been surveyed and he! secretary,
would be in favor of its construction | AP''** 271**' ofr'"-**a* opening day
If the cost is not prohibitive.
Throughout the evening a desire for
closer co-operation between lhe different parts of this district wus often
expressed.
SLIGHT INCREASE IN
ADMISSION CHARGE
As a result of a recent amendment
to the "Amusement Tax Act," where
by all dances are assessed 10 per cent
of the gross receipts, the management
of the old time dances every Saturday
night In the Ilo-llo has found It necessary to make a slight Increase In lhe
admission charge. The new prices
henceforth will be SOc for gentlemen
and 25c for ladies, making 75c per
couple Instead of 60c as heretofore.
Don't forget the usual dance this
Saturday from 9 to 12. Byng Boys'
Orchestra In attendance and a right
peppy time assured.
Mothers' Day Dance In the Ilo-llo
hall under auspices of Eagles Lodge,
Watch for announcement later.
Local Eleven To
Play For Island
Championship
Tlie Cumberland  Intermediate football  team   left  yesterday   (Thursday)
afternoon for Victoria where they will
meet Ksquimnlt  today for the championship of tlie Island In the Second
Division of tlie Pacilic Coast league, j
The winners of tills game will trav.il
to the mainland to decide the B. C.
championship.   The following team Is [
representing the Intermediates today: j
goal,    Stewart;    hacks,    Bickle    and
Marshall!  halves, Little, Farmer and i
Weir;     forwards,    JIcLeod,    Gibson, J
Campbell. Plump and Jackson.
| Courtenay Council
I And School Board
Settle Differences
j COURTENAY, April 11.- All differences between the city council and
the school board have now been
settled. The scliool estimates have
been passed and tlie 1927 school rate
set at 16H mills. This was done at
a special meeting of tlie city fathers
on Friday night, following a conference between .Mayor .McKenzie, Aid.
MacDonald and the school trustees,
when It was agreed thai the estimates
he cut down by some $1,750. This
wus accomplished by stripping tlie
estimates down to bare necessities.
Tlle cljj-, on their part, made concessions to the school board In the matter of the supply of electric light and
have undertaken to haul the coal for
school healing purposes In (he city
trucks. The ■ estimated ligure now
stands at $16,250 In "place of $18,000
as formerly submitted.
Mr. F. W. Kerton, of tlie board of
school trustees, attended with plans
of the proposed new four-room high
school for the purpose of explaining
why the cost figures had been raised
from $16,000 to $18,000. He showed
that it was more economical to construct the school with a ten foot basement and a low pressure steam heating plant than by carrying cut the
original plans. The by-law authorizing tlie erection and equipment of
this school then received Its first and
second reading. The site of the
building wus tho matter of discussion.
The mayor stated that the city owned
plenty of land, but it was a question
of selecting the most suitable site. A
committee consisting of Aldermen T.
Pearse, E. L. Macdonald and H. E.
Wallls was appointed to make this
selection and report at tlie next meeting.
The meeting had been called to deal
especially with by-laws, and the following measures received first and
second readings. Tlie readings were
not passed, however, but will be held
until the by-laws are ready to submit
to tlie ratepayers in Ihe form of u
plebiscite. Polling day was set for
April 25th, at the city hall. The city
clerk will act as returning officor.
On that day tiie ratepayers will be
asked to pass judgment on the by-law
to authorize the construction and
equipment of a four-roomed high
school at a cost to the city of $8,000.
A by-law to authorize the construction of additional equipment for the
supply of 13,200 volts electrical current at a total cost not exceeding
$10,000. Aid. Pearse statct) that this
was an Important matter involving a
new policy. lt was very essential
that It should pass. He therefore
hoped the chairman of the electric
committee would give It the necessary
publicity and explanation (o the ratepayers. The advisability of calling a
public meeting for lhls purpose was
discussed, as well as adverlising in
the papers.
Besides (lie by-laws authorizing the
Issue of debentures for both (he foregoing measures, other by-laws lo
authorize the city of Courtenay entering into an agreement with the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd
for the supply of electrical energy;
and a temporary loan by-law to enable (be cily to carry on business
until such time as tin' rate is definitely sel. also received their preliminary
readings. The proposed by-law t"
cover tiie construction of cement side-
walks for two blocks on both sides
of I'nlon Street, at a cost not exceeding $5,000 was opposed by Aid. Fielder, wiio considered ibe tearing up of
plunk walks constructed two years
ago. a waste of money. Aid. Douglas
and Macdonald slated that these
could In* used In oilier parte of the
city. Aid .Macdonald was In favor of
(Continued mi Page Five)
24th OF MAY CELEBRATION
A meeting will bo held In thc City
Council Chambers on Wednesday,
April 20th, at 7:30 p.m.. for the pur-
poso of arranging for the annual 24th
of Jlay celebration.
To Deliver Address
At Courtenay
Archie Dick, Comox District representative) in tin1 Forthcoming Orn-
torlcnl Contest, will deliver hla
address al Courtenay in tho Gaiety
Theatre between the first and second
shows on Saturday night The subject Ih, "Canada's Diamond .Jnhileo -
Ker achievements Blnce Confederation." Whon tlic run test Opens Itl
Vancouver, Archie will have to speak
before quite large crowds, so is availing himself of this opportunity in
order to accustom himself to an
audience.
Over the Hill th4teaKT*fSiio frieS6 Good Friday-Saturday PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1927.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUJ1EERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1927
WELCOME, STRANGER
Why do the young men hover about a maid
from a distance who is visiting in town ? Why,
does a strange young man interest girls who are
loved by tlie youngsters they know? Why do
the hills look green tar away and what is the urge
that drives young men into far places?
It is one of nature's tricks whereby she mixes
breeds and invigorates the tribe with new blood.
Without mixture there is inevitable deterioration
and eventual stagnation. The man who stands
still never i>*ets anywhere. The town that does
not welconv new people dries up and blows away.
.* settlers in America had been select-
■ity and were a hardy and independent
significant fact is that they came
from many lands. Out of the mixture of their
blood came the impulse that conquered a wilderness and mad,e a nation.
No race has a monopoly of courage, industry,
brains, or virtue. One produces philosophers,
another leaders, another builders. But when the
last barriers are down and the blood of more progressive peoples is' freely mixed all breeds profit.
For ages the negro lived in Africa and looked
out over the sea, but he never dreamed a boat.
China is the land of walled cities and look at
China today. It is the mixer, the fellow who
explores and gets out to see how others are living j
that brings back new ideas and builds up the
country and the community.
other story. Some of the old ewes did buck on
the bobbed hair. But take them all in all they
are pretty much alike. Look at them going down
the street. Did you ever see so much of a sameness, except in a cornfield of a flock of sheep?
There they go. Bare knees, bobbed heads, vermilion mouths, powdered noses, skin-tight skirts.
Millions of them. A jangle of multitudinous
bracelets, vanity cases and mesh bags, starving
to grow thin and tripping along on high heels
and fallen arches. Millions of them covering our
land.   Oh, woman, woman!
The eai i
ed by advei*.*
lol. but tho
OH, WOMAN, WOMAN!
'Sometimes we wonder why the dear ladies are
so like a flock of sheep. There is no logical reason
why women should copy each other so closely,
but they do. If you think they don't, you certainly have not paid much attention to the fair sex.
If one pretty lady raises her skirts to her knees
they all immediately do likewise. If one woman
gives a bridge luncheon the whole flock of sheeplike damsels get busy and give other bridge luncheons. If a debutante comes out with a little
hat that looks like a half a peanut shell, they all
want little hats.   And bobbed hair, oh, that's an-
GOING TO THE DOGS
Again we hear the voice of the pessimist wailing aloud and lamenting the downfall of the
country. This time it is Dr. Bradley Stoughton,
a prominent Yale scientist, who says we are all
going to the dogs. He assures us that the collapse of civilization is surely forecast by flippancy
and contempt for ideals, contempt for law and
authority, irreverence, license masquerading as
freedom, pessimism, despondency, nervous aulic-
tions, mental unbalance and suicide. Outside of
that, we are more or less all right.
It seems to us that away back on life's trail
we can recall our grandfather telling us that the
country was going to smash. At frequent intervals in our journey through this vale of tears we
have heard similar prognostications but up to
this time the country has not gone to smash and
on this bright Spring morning it doesn't look to
us like it was going to go to smash in the near
future.
In spite of these frequent prophecies of dire
calamity the public remains calm. It beats all
how calm the public can remain under the most
distressing circumstances. That is probably because we have always been going to the dogs.
Familiarity with predicted peril breeds contempt,
and the public has been familiar with this collapse of civilization ever since it left the cradle.
MORE MUSIC
The radio is doing a splendid service in putting
music into our homes. If the average man had
less meat and more music, he would live longer
and be worth more to the world while living.
Most of us stuff our stomachs and starve our
souls. Give the people plenty of work, not too
much meat, sufficient clothing, comfortable shelter, plenty of good music, and you create an empire of enterprise. Man may have a steady job,
plenty of brains, two Sunday suits and a tiled
bathroom, but let a man be without music and
his soul will dry up and scum over like a frog
pond in summertime.
OVERHEARD ,    A clergyman out for a walk with carefully," was the reply; "but I see
Phrend—What are you monkeying j his dog and his gun met a parishioner no reference to the Apostles having
with  the blame  set  for,  now?   You i whom  he knew.   "I  hope." said the gone  out  shooting."   "No,"  said  the
said it was working fine. clergyman,  "you  are  still  attending clergyman.   "Thc shooting in  Pales-
Phan—G'wan!   You   don't   under-1 church   regularly  and   reading your tine was very bad.   They went fishing
stand. Bible." "Indeed. I read my Bible very Instead."
i*»i=*>*i*<)i'!o'i*
ii
tassMasffisssMassess
Healthful Bread!   Tasty Bread!
,ririririwr-ifTir*'*ia*a*e«3|
DROSS   I
FROM THE MELTING POT    M
■ Cn^^^^^uS^^^il\\l,;&'... i'Lia!   .i   .riffl.*-.
WANTED TO BE SOLI)
He   was   selling   meat-slicing   machines  and   his  first  canvass  was  a
Dutch butcher.   He started right off
with a demonstration, slicing diligently at the slab of bacon until it had all
heen   cut.     Then   lie   turned   to   the
butcher   nnd   asked:   "What  do   you
think of 'er"?   Some machine, eh?"
j    The butcher, eyes shining and his
; face wreathed in smiles, .slapped his
; hands approvingly and said: "Py gol-
i lies!     Dot's   a   great   t'ing.     Ei'fry
butcher in dis town should huve vun."
\    Then elapsed a period during which
i neither spoke.   The salesman placed
i another slab of bacon in the machine
and repeated  the demonstration.   He
then turned  again to the  butcher.
[    "Don't   you   think   that's   a   time-
saver—a real investment?'
.    "Sure!    Dot's de stuff, all right."
"You   think   it's  a  good   thing  i'or
you?"
"Sure.   Dots de perries,"
"You know you need it, don't you?"
"Sure!    I  should say so."
"Well, why don't you buy it?"
"Veil,  vy  don't  you  ask  me?"
HANDICAPPED
"Poor old Bill! 'E's so shortsighted 'e's working 'imself to death."
"Wot's 'is short sight go to do with
it?"
"Well, 'e can't seo when the boss
ain't looking, so 'c 'as to keep on
shovelling all the time."
DAVID'S RESIGNATION
Two brothers who owned a Fife-
shire croft had never married, their
sister keeping house for them. By
and by she died, and the men folks
just did the housework themselves
for a time. Then one day the elder
one said: "Davie, this wey o' daein '11
no' dac.   Ye II hae tae tak' a wife."
"No, na," replied Davie, "it's you
that should tak' one. You're ablest,
an' hae the best richt tae the place."
"But you,*being the youngest, will
be mair likely tae get on wi' a wife
than an old fossil like me!" argued
the other.
"A' richt, then," said Davie resignedly. "It's aye the same here when
there's ony dirty work tae he dune,
it's me that has tae dae it."
BIG  FEET
At a drill parade of a company of
raw recruits, the instructor s face
turned scarlet with rage as he slated
a particularly clumsy man for his
awkwardness.
"Now, Rafferty," he roared, "you
spoil the line every time with those
feet of yours! Draw them back at
once and get them into line!"
Rafferty's dignity was roused, for
his feet were a standing joke amongst
his comrades on account of their almost  girlish  proportions;
"Please, sergeant," he said, "they're
not mine—they belong to Micky Doo-
lan here, in the buck row."
Use Comox
Whole Wheat
Flour
OBTAINABLE AT ALL GROCERY STORES
THROUGHOUT THE DISTRICT
ALSO COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER. EGGS AND
POTATOES
jfg3gt*****gi=ffl3S=gsrnr<rtt-i^^ < n n n n a&asssssngjsas,
Comox Creamery
Association
Courtenay.
BABY'S
OWN
SOAP
&rom Watiy'*.
ttitf oat i-d wof/ii. im_
AlbaralaapaUmlla,. Win, Maatiaal. WS**n\nS
M
iM^l-i*
S$P&»|^^ -   -   Proprietor!
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
SPECIALLY CATERED TO |
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE"
Feat Unequalled in Golf
1 The Fifth Croon—Note mini  In shirt
sleeves on n February afternoon.
2 Tho sixteenth green whore ho (lopUcn-
led tlie hole In one on tho fifth.
II F. Taimliii. In notion, playing one of Ills
holo-ln-ono shots.
F. Tanaka, local Vancouver golfer,
went out for a round on the Canadian Pacilic Railway "Langarn" golf
course one fine day in February this
year and created a world's record
when lie holed his tee shot twice in
one shot on thc fifth and sixteenth
green, a feat that has never heen
equalled In the history of golf. Mr.
Tanaka before this was not. known
to fame, hut now, of course, jumps
into the limelight. His shots were
duly vouched for by prominent Van
couver goiters who were with him
on the links nt the time.
The "Langara" course wos opened
lost year by the C.P.R. after construction at a cost of $160,001). The
all-the-year-golf that can be played
on this course is well indicated by
the photographs, which show the
fifth and sixteenth greens as they
appeared on that February afternoon
when Mi*. Tanaka astonished the
world.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES.
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS.
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 134X Courtenay
1 Office: 159 Cumberland.
You have Got to
DRIVE a new fifimctf,
in order to fully realize
all the improvements
You may have driven Ford Cars for years, BUT it will
open your eyes to drive this year's .model.
Phone or come in for a demonstration
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
Phone 46
Courtenay FRIDAY, APRIL IB, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
¥
PREVENT    FOREST    FIRES
If Forest Fives Continue Unchecked,
Hundreds of thousands of Canadian men and women depend upon the
forests for their livelihood. You may be one of them.
A lighted match, a cigarette butt, thrown down carelessly in the woods, or a
campftre left smouldering) may cost you your job. It is up to you; be careful of fire when in the woods.
CHARLES STEWART
Minister of tha Interior.
Cumberland Supply Store
LANDACT AMENDMENTS
Rickson's Old Stand
LHinsmuh' Avenue
aflaossa«^.a'-*.:-_i«.-f -*.-_.c3« ems;!i3*Hs^»j=5>3*=
To make room for new shipments of Men's Work Pants
and Shirts, etc., we are giving you reduced prices on
our remaining stock:
Men's black 8-oz Denim Bib Overalls, por pair $2.25
Men's black or blue Work Pants, large sizes only 1.93
Men's blue Bib Overalls, par pair   2.25
3.05
1.95
1.85
1.55
1.65
2.25
.35
.40
.70
.30
Men's blue or khaki Overall Combination.
Men's Khaki Pants, for present wear, per pair
Men's blue and white Chambray Shirts, each-
Men's strong Cotton Shirts, each 	
Boy Scout khaki Shirts, each 	
Ladies' khaki Hiking Breeches, per pair..	
Men's Work Suspenders, per pair 	
Men's Dress Suspenders, par pair 	
Men's President Suspenders, per pair	
Men's Rubber Belts, each	
Men's blue Jackets, for work, each   2.25
Men's Cottonade Pants, per pair  2.50
Look over our CASH PRICES ON GROCERIES,
here is where you can Has e money:
White Swan Soap, G for  25c
Sesqui Matches, per packet   40c
Gem Lye, 2 tins for  27c
Kellogg's Corn Flakes, 2 for   25c
White Star Yeast Cakes, each     6c
Lump Sugar, 2-lb packet   23c
Acme Gloss Starch, 2 for   25c
Toilet Paper, 6 rolls for   25c
Jif, (Suds in a Jiffy), cup and saucer free, 2 pks  45c
Tomatoes, 2s, per tin   13c
Heinz Pork and Beans, Hats, 2 for   23c
Shredded Wheat, per pkg  15c
Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Grapefruit,
Apples and Potatoes at Lowest Prices.
*5»ae*a»-ii-,ii^.a^— a*-;*-*- --.-._.: ..ij-.-aaaa^-:
T^E CUMBERLAND SUPPLY—THE CASH STORE
Telephone 155 fg
y -y,t,v ■■;• ri; ijv • _,; rj nv IV w-y* vi; irjOTSL ■.
in
'7
u
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
|      Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
vi.
Phones 4 and Gl Cumberland, B. C.     &
jqfflnL***lilii.'i *'".'. ii:; s7~.li*,'•.;":'. 7L_'u,Lv.i ii...ii**.'w!it^ "'*...... "i....: *':^•/JlSTl
■Blllllilllll'illllllllllllllHIII
E. L. SAUNDERS j
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER. f§|
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear |-;4
longer after repairing Hum when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and ||
Service at— |p
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address—              '      Opposite the Drug Store. \7s
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands muy be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intention
lo become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement tor agricultural
purposes.
Ku!l iiu'ormuiioii concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
gr.cn in Isuiletin No. 1, Laud Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land,' copies of
whicli cuu be obtained l'ree.ut charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent,
Uncords will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carr., ing over 5,000 board
feet per acre nest of the Coast Hauge
aud a.c^iu feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications- for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner ol* the Land Recording Division, in wliieh the laud applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can he obtained irom the Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
live years and improvements made
to value ot* $10 per acre, includiug
clearing and cultivating ut least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Laud."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not heing timherland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land Is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
hind $2.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lauds In given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase aod
Lease of Crown Lands."
.Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stunipnge.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may he leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected 111 tlle lirst year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
laud has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing nnd Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
muy bu leused by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the (liaising Act tha Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bend.
I GOODWILL DAY TO BE
I   ONCE MORE OBSERVED
I Goodwill Day is observed In the
schools of many countries of the
world on May 18 of each year, commemorating the first Hague Peace
Conference. British Columbia has
observed Goodwill Day for the past
two years, through the efforts of the
Provincial Parent-Teacher Federation
which have been approved by the
Department of Education.
Tliis year the program is being prepared by a committee of the B. C.
Teachers' Federation, working In cooperation with the Goodwill Committee of the Parent-Teacher Federation.
The program will consist of suggestions, lists of books, pictures, etc. from
which principals and teachers may
prepare their own program. There
will be, for example, a paragraph on
Arbitration, showing what Canada
can do for peace in this way. Details of the program will be published
ln the April number of the B. C.
Teacher, the magazine of the teachci...
Each year the programme has contained a practical feature, us well as
theory. In 1925 this took the form of
a Goodwill Society of which the children become members. As a result,
32,000 school children's signatures
were sent to be deposited in the
Hague Peace Palace. This brought
much favorable notice to British Columbia, not only on this continent,
but ln Europe.
This year the practical feature Is a
unique one—a doll dressing contest
for girls, and a boat making contest
for boys—dolls and boats to represent
the various nations of the world.
These are to be sent to the Goodwill
secretary by May 10, and on May 18-
21 an International Doll and Boat
Festival will be held In the David
Spencer store, Vancouver, where all
the entries wlil be on exhibit, and will
be judged.
Mr. Kyle, Superintendent of Technical Education will be one of the
judges of the boats; and Miss Mc-
Lenigan. provincial supervisor of
home economics, will be one of the
judges of the dolls. The prize list
will be excellent, as already a number
of prizes have been promised.
It is hoped that the rural schools
and those of the Interior will join
heartily In the contests. The schools
have been classified in the contest
miles, so that the smaller schools will
not   be   competing   with   the   larger
CANADIAN NATIONAL
EUROPEAN TOURS
A maximum of travel through particularly interesting countries at a
minimum of expense Is provided in
the Canadian National Educational
Tours this summer through Scotland,
England, France, Belgium, Switzerland and Italy.
Two tours have been arranged and
sailing will be made from Montreal,
July 8, on the S.S. "Andania," direct
to Glasgow. Very careful attention
has been given to Itineraries involved.
Tour No. 1 is a 37-day trip on sea
and land, visiting Important cities in
Scotland, England, France, Belgium,
Switzerland. All expenses, 1372.50,
Montreal to Great Britain and the
Continent and return to Montreal.
Tour No. 2 ls a 61-day trip on sea
and land, visiting In Scotland, England, France, Belgium, Switzerland
and Italy. All expenses, (501.00.
Montreal to Great Britain and the
Continent and return to Montreal.
There will be low excursion fares
to the seaboard from points In the
Prairie Provinces.
These tours will be personally conducted from WcBtern Canada, and
while overseas will be under the
direct care and supervision of thoroughly responsible and reliable
organization, fully qualified In every
particular to successfully look after
the interests of our patrons.
The sight-seeing program Is very
complete and generous. Automobiles
and motor coaches are freely used.
All sight-seeing ia well planned to
save unnecessary fatigue and to see
tlie worth-while places within the
time at our disposal. Competent lecturers will reveal to our patrons the
outstanding features, literary, historic,
artistic or scenic of -the Old World
centres visited.
Edward W. Bickle, local agent for
the Canadian National Railways, will
be glad to discuss these tours and
arrange all details. 14-21
SEAPLANES CAN
' BE REPLACED
The seaplane of Commander de
Pinedo was burnt at Roosevelt Dam.
Arizona, and the spectacular round-
the-world flight of the intrepid Italian
was interrupted to the disappointment
of millions who were anxious to see
the complete trip become history.
The cause of the loss was a match
thrown carelessly on the oil-coated
surface of the lake on which thc seaplane rested. The youth who lighted
his cigarette and caused the disaster
is the subject of general condemnation
in a press message which has been
broadcasted all over the world.
But what about the careless smoker
and tourists who throw away half
extinguished matches and  cigarettes
in our forest lands, causing lires thut
destroy millions of feet of valuable
timber, tlie harvesting and manufacturing of whicli gives employment to
thousands of workmen?
A new seaplane Is to he sent In a
week or two from Italy to enuble de
Pinedo to finish his flight, but It will
take a hundred years to replace a
forest.
Save the Forest Week decided hy
Royal Proclamation aud supported hy
all Government, Provincial and Municipal authorises all over the Dominion is designed to educate our citizens
Into a realization of their responsibilities In protecting our great* forest
from destruction  by lire.
*-»
THE PUZZLE CORNER   |
I
 . . __♦
Puzzle No. 285
Each of the following sentences
contains the name of an Italian cily
or town:
His lecture was us tiresome as a
guide  book.
He wore a red cap rigidly held on
his head by a chin strap.
I discovered too lute we hud paid
tho Holel Co. more thun was their
due.
Corn took snapshots of every man,
woman and child iu the town.
In our eagerness for sight seeing
we guve George no afternoons to himself.
<S>   *>  4>
limfflitWK!S/*£SffiKSfX!I!'"HiaESs?i(2
READ THE LABEL
EXAMINE THE GOVERNMENT STAMP
ON ANY BOTTLE OF
^wiMf,
IT GIVES INFORMATION OF INTEREST TO YOU
riWB^^iTLj^jwms^mws^mjmm
Thit advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
.*■*■* iLzzsjisrwm nr
How better can you end the day
than by holding a long-distance
telephone conversation with a
friend?
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPLY
Puzzle No. 28(i
iEsop tells how a father and son
falling to ride their donkey in a way
to please  the  public,   Mnully  decided
to carry the beast.
They had not gone far, however,
with the aniinul swinging from a polo
which rested on their shoulders, when
they met the village schoolmaster.
He explained, tllat us the niun wus
stronger than the boy, und the donkey
weighed 220 lbs., they should adjust
the position of the weight so thnt the
man should curry 125 lbs. und tho
boy but 95. The distance of the pole
from shoulder lo shoulder  was four
I feet, so who can  tell   where the Inverted donkey, with his tour feet tied
' together,  should   be  suspended  from
the pole between the men's shoulders
In order to satisfy lhe pedagogue?
'v   'V   <"*>
Puzzle No. 287
Take an American nickname for an
Oriental, udd a feature of the human
head, subtract a fruit, add a weapon,
add an animal, subtract lhe back of
your neck, add a barbed weapon, udd
a vessel, subtract a little craft, and
the resulting letters will spell the
word, JAGIIAil.
Puzzle No. 288
An animal dealer bought a number
of puppies and rabbits,'an equal number of each, paying two dollars each
for the puppies and two dollars for
a pair or rabbits. He sold them at an
advance of lo per cent. When he hud
disposed of all but seven, he hud received just the amount of his investment, so that his profit was represented by the remaining seven animals.
What nre the seven worth at retail?
...      •'..      ,i,
Puzzle No. 28!»
Take a girl, add an oriental plant,
add another girl, add the President's
official family, subtract a pair, sifli-
tract a vehicle, subtract a mesh, add
the letter P, add an excavation, udd a
brood, subtract a roof, and the resulting letters  wlll spell  MISSISSIPPI.
Additional  puzzles  us   well  as  the
answers to the above will appear lu
this  column   next   week.
•t>   ■*   <S>
Answer* In Uisl  Week's Puzzles
.  No. 2811—Boston. Lewlston, Mobile,
J Annupolis. Bangor.
J    No. 281—There were 1021  peanuts
| The first boy received 266, then a girl
i 11)2, then 141 lo ihe next boy, unci to
the   little  tot   108,   which   left   Aunt
Mary 321.
i    No. 282—Percy owes Algy 2S cents
! for his share of the  luncheon.   The
pie cost -I cents per cut und the re-
1 malndcr of the hill wus -18c.
No. 288—Regarding ibe value of the
i letters of "T.  Owen,"  just   number
them consecutively-Tl. 02, W'.'l, El,
land N6.   Then lhe TWO are worth G;
TEN Is worth  1";  NONE is worth  III
while a TON amounts to s.
No.   284- Tin'   precocious   chicken
gets one worm oul of every *'ti.    Papa
keeps 24, inainma keeps six and gives
! six to the Hi chicks; bin as that little
j fellow Is equal to three he represents
. 3-18 of six. which  Is one.
21—TKI.EPIIOXE 10(1
TAXI
ASK FOB  CHARLIE  DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Holel
nt 0:00 a.m. every Sundav and
meets  boat at  Union   Bay.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES — ASSORTED PASTRY
TEA BUNS
APPLE, LEMON AND RAISIN PIES
Marocchi Bros.
Phone 11 Cumberland
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
Hatch fur further ulilieiinienlcnls
nf Eagles dunce lu llu-llii hull un
M«l hers1 Bar.
"Provincial  Elections  Act"
(iniiin Electoral District
NOTICE IH HEREBY GIVEN, that
I shall, on MONDAY tlie Kith duy ot
Muy, 1027. at the hour uf ten o'clock
In the forenoon, nl the Court House,
Cumberland, hold a silting of the
Court ot Revision for Ihe purpose of
revising the list of voters for the said
electoral district, uml of hearing and
determining any and ull objections
to the retention of any name on the
said list, or to the registration us t
1 voter of any  applicant   for  registration; and for the other purposes set
I forth   In   lhe   "Provincial    Elections
| Act."
I    Dated at Cumberland, B.C. this 1th
day of April, 1927.
JOHN CONWAY.
' Registrar of Voters.
14-17 Comox Electoral District. PAGE FOUR
TOE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL IB, 192T.
J&
.-•<«*■'•
Tuesday, only
April 19
■giaiaHi^'aaiaEEjaaHBiaEiiaiaiaiaia
f
with
Owen Moore
Renee Adoree
Mystery !
Strange happenings in the
murky London fog! Chaney
as the sinister ruler of the
underworld, here appears in
the thrill sensation of the
year, a romance of those who
adventure after dark.
The world's greatest character actor now adds his most
amazing part to his screen
triumphs.
Chaney's Gripping Successor
to
"THE UNHOLY THREE"
f'^teLj>
Wednesday
and Thursday
April 20 - 21
tgjsi3EjaaiaHaiaiaiaia0aaa*aaEigHai3
JOHN  GILBERT  IS  HERE
IN THE YEAR'S
ROMANTIC SENSATION!
Here it is—one of the biggest
productions of this or any
other year! John Gilbert,
great star of "The llig Parade," in his finest romantic
role—a part only Gilbert can
play. The most dramatic antl
moving love-story the screen
has ever seen!
laBIEM***®***!^
Adults 50c
Children 2ii<*
JOHN
GILBERT!
Friday and Saturday, April 22 - 23
The Greatest of All
mystery tellers.'
yP'Jfis mervelous
stc.iepldynoY'd
motion picture.
FIRST TIME ON ANY SCREEN
Who is the Bat 1
IN THE PICTURE f
See it/,
Solve it/
■VOffC
Sensational
Than ivtnl
The amazing story
of a mysterious
criminal who haunted and terrified 8
lonely Lon? Island
mansion and baffled the police^
iouliLMtm!
you'll Gasp!
Ilo-llo Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURrAY
Attractions for the
Coming Week
JJhe story oF
a great love*
A mother's love
TRICK ESCAPES IN
"THE BLACK BIRD'
|    Strange trapdoors,  patterned  after
j the trick escapes of illusionists llk*J
' Houdinl   or   Herrmann,   were   built
under  the  supervision  of 'a  profes
j sional mystlfler for details  ln  "The
Black    Bird,"    the    Mctro-Goldwyn
[ Mayer picture playing at the Gaiety
Theatre on Tuesday, April 19th.
These mysterious panels and trapdoors are those that Chaney is seen
using, as the Limehouse crime czar,
ln his baffling escape from Scotland
Yard.
The traps were designed by Harry
Sharrock, for many years famous lu
vaudeville as a mind reader and illusionist. Sharrock built them just
as they are constructed ln "escape
Illusions" and their effect as a secret
getaway for a criminal ln the picture
ls remarkable.
Chaney plays a dual role, one, that
of a crook ruler and the other a
crippled worker In a rescue mission
in the new story, which Tod Browning directed from Waldemar Young's
scenario. Owen Moore, Renee Adoree.
Doris Lloyd and other well known
players appear ln the supporting
■cast.
E. E. HORTON WANTS
TO MAKE PERFECTLY
USELESS MOVIE
Edward Everett Horton, the popular
screen farceur, who will be seen at
the Gaiety Theatre on Good Friday
and Saturday in the Universal production, "Taxi! Taxi!" has a greal
ambition.
He wants to direct one motion
picture and make It just the way hc
wants it.
But In this picture, Horton asserts:
Detectives and policemen will remove
their   hats   when   entering   private
| homes.
I Supposedly average Americans In
' moderate circumstances will NOT be
attired In the flashy clothes so popular ln Hollywood, with pleated
trousers and triple-breasted vests and
coats.
The hero—also in moderate circumstances—will NOT possess a home
I with a drawing room as large as the
Grand Central station.
The heroine will NOT attempt to
swallow her hand when the villain
locks her ln his apartment.
In fact the villain will NOT lock
the girl In his apartment.
The mother of the 18-year-old heroine will NOT appear to lie 90 years
old, as Is the case In most movies.
At no time will there be a symbolic
close-up of a wilted flower.
There is also a pretty fair chance
of almost no one In thc picture taking
the blame for a crime he did not
commit In order to shield someone
else.
SOJIN, A JAPANESE,
LOOMS BIG IN "THE BAT"
Hollywood, mclllng pot of genius,
can boast of a man who would rather
be a character actor in pictures than
the greatest dramatic star ami Idol
of millions In Ills homclnnd.
Ho Is Sojin, brilliant portrnyer of
Oriental types, who left Japan at Ihe
height of his fame and came to thc
cinema capital of the world. His
success In America has been so great
that thc Mikado's empire may never
again see him In the plays of Shakespeare, Goethe, Ibsen, Tolstoy, Shaw
and other dramatists. Sojln's latest
nctlvlty ls a featured role in "The
Bat," which ls the attraction at the
llo-Ilo on Wednesday and Thursday,
April 20 and 21; and at thc Gaiety on
Friday and Saturday, April 22 and 23.
Sojin was on a fishing trip to San
Pedro when Douglas Fairbanks discovered lllm alld offered him the role
of thc Mongolian prince In "Thc Thief
of Bagdad." Since then he has appeared In more than twenty American
pictures, among thom being "East of
Sue**," "Proud Flesh," "The White
Desert," "Tho Wandoror," "The Sea
Beast" and now "Th« Bat."
FILM "OVER THE HILL"
HAS UNIVERSAL APPEAL
A goal for whicli motion picture
producers have boon striving for the
lust ten years apparently has been
reached. It has been their aim ever
since the appearance of super-productions, such as "Cablria" and "Thc
Birth of a Nation," to build up a pic-
Lure of universal appeal—a screen
story which would lind a ready response in every stratum of life.
"Over the Hill," the William Fox
picturization of Will Cniieton's poem,
showing at the Ilo-llo Theatre Good
Friday and Saturday, April 15 and 10,
is such a photoplay, according to indications wherover it has been shown.
It is a picture which evokes equal
response, whether shown before an
audience of the socially elect, the
great middle class or thoso in less
fortunate  circumstances.
"COMPROMISE" A FILM
THAT HAS EVERYTHING
When lovely woman stoops to compromising   her   Ideals   to  match   the
standards  of a less sensitive  world, I
she   stands   a   greater   chance    for
happiness.   At least so it would Becni |
after seeing charming Irene Rich In
"Compromise,"    the    Warner    Bros. |
Classic of the Screen which comes to
the Ilo-llo on Monday and Tuesday.
April 18 and 19.
While beautiful Joan Trevorc was
lighting against compromise, setting
her Ideals above the lax standards of
her friends, she suffered and wus
constantly humiliated. It was only
after she had forgiven her erring husband, and realized the weakness of
human nature, that she faced understanding and peace.
The supporting cast of "Compromise" includes Ciive Brook, Louise
Fazcnda, Pauline Garon, and Raymond McKee; as brilliant a group of
players as has been asselnbled for
one production In a .long time.
With Jay Gelzer's dramatic story,
deftly adapted to the screen by E. T.
Lowe, Jr. and perfectly directed by
Alan Crosland; and with the brilliant
acting of a sparkling cast, "Compromise" has everything that a good picture can have, and ls decidedly one
of the best screen offerings of tha
season.
GRETA GARBO SAYS
WEDDING RINGS ARE
WORN DIFFERENTLY
American women wear their wedding rings on the left hand—nearest
the heart.
European women wear them on the
right—perhaps because that's the
hand that reaches for Friend Husband's  pay  check  Saturday  night.
This difference In wedding customs
between the new and the old world
is explained by Greta Garbo, scintillating Swedish screen charmer, who
wears her wedding ring on her right
hand in the new Metro-Goldwyn-
Mnyer production, "Flesh and the
Devil," nnd explains that It's because
she's  playing a European  wife.
The German custom," she says, "la
for Uie engagement ring on the left
hand anil wedding ring on the right
so thnt after marriage both husband
and wife wear two rings—one on eacli
hand."
This'Is the custom she and Lars
Hanson carry out as husband nud
wife in the new picture, coming next
Thursday, April 21st, to the Gaiety;
and to thc Ilo-llo on Friday and Saturday, April 22 and 23rd.
It Is a lavish lllmlzation of Hermann Sudermann's famous drama,
"The Undying rest," a gripping, play
laid about the adamantine traditions
of lovo and marriage ln the old world.
John Gilbert plays the hero,
Miss Garbo, as a European siren,
has to charm both Gilbert, thc most
famous of American screen lovers,
and Hanson, famous as "The Swedish
Barrymore," In tho big piny. George
Fawcett. Barbara Kont, Eugenie B03-
sercr, William Orlamond and other
notables appear In the cast,
It was directed by Clarence Brown,
famous director.
from the precious
poems by •**•»•«. •%
will Carleton
Jfow Pilling theatres
cill over the country
!%e wonder picture
of the century that
will live forever*^
1 YEAR OM BRO.-VDWAY
COMPROMISE"
IRENE RICH
Clive Brook
Louise Fazendd
Monday and
Tuesday
April 18 -19
aia@MiEiBiaaiaEiaisisiaisiaiBHBEi5iaa
A sensitive
woman's
bitter struggle
against
adjustment
with life.
:*iMBJi"'HEfi?ja"'M
"Silent Flyer"
on Monday only
Wednesday - Thursday, April 20 - 21
The Greatest of all; %,
Mystery Thrillers/       V
&V&W
\fr   stage piai
0k marvelous
stage play now a
motion picture,
FIRST TIME ON ANY SCREEN
!EN     *W^^
Adults 50c
Children 25t}
.1
i
Friday and Saturday, April 22 - 23
Can a
passionate love
for a woman
destroy the
life-long
friendship
of two men ?
JL
Meiro-
JjWwt/n*
PICTURE
JOHN
GILBERT FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Iff
PAGE FIVE
News of Courtenay and District
Courtenay Conncil
And School Board
Settle Differences
(Continued from Page One)
cement sidewalks in connection with
street lighting and permanent improvements, and pointed out that the
school estimates may he reduced next
year. The mayor and Aid. Douglas
expressed the opinion that Courtenay
was on the verge of a great development and that the cement walks
would be a very decided improvement.
The mayor said tliat an effort should
at least lie made to obtain tho sidewalk, the ratepayers coud turn down
the by-law it they wished to.
A letter from the Agricultural Association soliciting lhe co-operation ol*
the city in the construction of fences
was referred to a committee composed
of Aid. Pearse and Douglas. A communication from .Mr. E. R. Bewell,
District Agriculturist, which stated
that a request had been received from
Mr. Mearns, secretary of the Victoria
AgricuMural body, inviting an exhibit
from thia district to tlie Victoria Fair
was left In the hands of the mayor
vised and went up the Island to get
what information could be secured.
No trace of the missing man has been
found.
CAMPBELL RIVER NEWS I
THE "CRUCIFIXION"
HEARD AT ST. JOHN'S
COURTENAY, April. 11.—Stainer's
■beautiful oratorio, "The Crucifixion,"
was rendered in St. Johns parish
church on Tuesday evening. The
■church choir, assisted by members of
the Cumberland choir, was under thc
leadership of Mrs. M. B. Tribe who,
■with her clear soprano voice, took
the part usually assigned to the first
tenor. Mr. J. H. Macintyre sang tlie
bass solos and Mr. Vincent Bayly was
the third soloist. Mrs. Finch, of Cumberland, was at the organ and her
playing greatly assisted the choir.
The singing gave evidence of careful truining, and wns perhaps at Its
best In "God so loved the world." This
passage, usually given us a quartette.
was rendered by the choir as a whole.
Mr. Macintyre and Mrs. Tribe gave a
very pleasing rendering of the dnet.
"So thou liftest thy Divine Petition."
The short service combined with the
oratorio was conducted hy the Rev.
E. 0. Robathan, vicar of Cumberland.
•Sy <***>
I Mrs. R. Jinkerson, of Bloedel, was
I visiting with friends here during the
week.
Mrs. John Anderson returned to
l.und on Friday.
Mr. J. D*. Black returned Friday last
to his homo at Vancouver.
Mrs. J. Rlorden moved to Bloedel
recently.
Mr. J. Whitehead gave his final picture for the season in the "Lilelanu
Pavilion" on Friday evening last. It
was entitled "Duchess of Buffalo" and
featured Constance Talmadge.
Mrs. Nettie Musters left on Tuesday
for Nakusp, where she will pay a
Short visit. On her return she intends
to reside here permanently.
Mrs. A. W. Nixon nnd daughter
arrived  Saturday from Port Alberni.
Miss Scott, of Vuncouver, Is a guest
of her sister, Mrs. A. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. Jus. Whitehead and
son left Tuesday for Vancouver.
Mr. W. H. May left here Tuesday
for his home at ViVctoria.
Friends of Margaret Granlund will
be sorry to learn that she had the
misfortune to cut her arm seriously
on  Monday evening.
Mr! Brewer paid a short visit here
on his way to Victoria, early in the
week.
Messrs. Herbert and Peter Barclay
have returned from the Shawnigan
school at Cadboro Bay to spend their
holidays with Mr. and Mrs. E. Painter.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Welsch have moved
into their new residence at Campbelton.
Miss Celia Galloway and Mr. H.
Burgoyne, of Hilllers, visited friends
here on Sunday last.
The concert and dance given by the
Arcadian Concert Party Saturday last
in the Community Hall proved most
successful. The hall was filled to Its
capacity, people coming from all the
surrounding district.
.Mr. George Higgins met with a very
painful accident at the I. T. Camp,
and is at present convalescing at
home.
Mrs. A. H. Venables snd Mr. and
Mrs. Herb. Venables, of Courtenay,
paid a short visit with friends here
on Sunday.
CARS CRASH ON
COURTENAY STREET
SWEPT OVERBOARD
IN ROUGH WEATHER
COURTENAY, April 9.—John Peterson of the fishing boat "Bumper
Catch" was swept overboard during
a south-east gale on Wednesday. The
boat was proceeding from Vancouver
to Alert Bay. The tragedy occured
off Mitclnncb Island in tlle vicinity of
Cape Mudge during a rough sea. The
Bumper Catch is a fourteen ton seine
boat and it was oft Mitelnach Island
that Peterson was found to be missing.   The Provincial Police were ad-
Yl O tC 1    ttcsonatjlc |
1
fjlleailalllartcra.
ACCOMMODATION TIIE BEST
Itooms Steam Heated
W. MEIIRIFIELD, Prop.
ateMaEEEEIBISElE
C0U11TENAY, April 9.—While on
his way to work Saturday morning in
a Ford touring car, Mr. Chas. Bool
had the misfortune to collide with
| Chief Joe Edwards of the Comox
Indian tribe, who was approaching
Union Street from Judson Street on
spMaiMiBsisEi*-^^
(^mjberland
Delicious Steak In No Time
One Day's Work
"Today, with 1 gallon of oil in my Perfection stove, I not tbe
breakfast, baked 2 apple
fin. 1 cutlarJ, 1 thick
fit, f p-jstie, 4 sausage
rolls, 12 bran Jems, J
chocolate cake, I rice
Pudding; got tin dinner, got tbe snppcr and
bad tome oil left. How
many can took at mucb
■with 27 cents in any
range with coal or
■uood? No one can, if I
know anything about It,n
Mrs, M. //., Llora, Ont,
Well done, medium or rare—steak
cooked savory brown and juicy! And
quickly, too, on the Perfection Stove!
You simply turn the wick until yellow
tips 1 Vi inches high show above the
blue area. The intense heat pours up
the long chimney, covering the entire
surface of the pan or broiler. The steak
is evenly cooked, delicious and tender.
You can cook anything on a Perfection
Slove. Be sure to use genuine Perfection wicki
only. Others cause trouble. See the latest
Perfection models, oriced from #9.00 to
-S170.00.   Distributed in Canada by
the Sheet Metal Products Co. 0PCANADA*«
LIMITED
MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG
EDMONTON        VANCOUVER        CALGARY _,
PERFECTION
Oil Cook Stoves and Ovens
the north. The chief's car was proceeding at a very moderate rate, but
both cars were damaged, Bool's being
badly smashed, with three tires punctured. Bool either jumped, or wus
thrown out of his car and landed on
the side of the road, his head striking
the sidewalk. He was picked up unconscious and taken to Dr. Briggs'
office, where he received attention
and recovered consciousness. He was
then conveyed per motor ambulance
to St. Joseph's hospital, where he la
progressing favorably and will probably be able to return to his home ln
a day or two.
I   POWELL RIVER NOTES   I
* *
Mr. J. R. Macintyre, proprietor ot
the Powell River Hotel, who hns been
111 for several weeks has gone tu
Vancouver for medical treatment. His
son Battleman, who has been on the
staff of the Son Francisco Chronicle's
finance department, has returned lo
Powell River and will act aB manager
of the hotel during his father's absence.
Miss Allen, who has been at San
Francisco since the lirst of the year,
has returned to Powell River.
Mr. A. M, Oliver has returned from
a holiday spent in California.
Steamships In for cargoes of palter
last week were the Wairuna from the
Antipodes; the Border King from Seattle and the Point Sur from the
United States.
Mr. George Moore, of the Merrill &
Ring Logging camp, Theodosia Arm,
was ln Powell River last Friday on
his way to Vancouver.
Fire ln the basement ot the residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Killen
on Tuesday did little damage.
Miss Dorothy Creech, of Prince
Rupert, has been a vlBltor in, Powell
River for the past week, the house
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Hughes.
Miss Creech ls granddaughter of Mr.
Charles Watson.
Mr. Ernest Liebenschell, of the City
Transfer,- returned on Wednesday
from a holiday spent with his mother
at his old home in Melbourne, Aus-
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
'COURTENAY, B. C.
tralla. He and Mrs. Liebenschell and
family have been away since the
middle of last December. The trip
was an enjoyable one.
Mrs. J. Parker, a former resident oi
Westvlew, was a business visitor tn
Powell River on Friday. She report-
that her mother, Mrs. A. Grant, left
Vancouver on the third Instant for
the Old Country.
Mr. Cecil "Cougar" Smith was a
passenger on the steamer Charmer
last Sunday from Comox. He was on
his way to Vancouver on business.
Last Sunday morning Mr. Hex
Paget brought in a big timber wolf
which he had trapped in the Haslam
Lake District, about Ave miles from
Powell River.
Great progress is being made on tin-
construction of the new Community
Hall. When completed It will have '■;.
ball room with floor space 00 by 105
feet and will house the Powell River
library us well as taking care of the
various lodges, whose meetings will
be held on the ground floor. Two
dining rooms and cloak rooms have
also been provided for and when completed the paper town wlll be able
to boast the finest community hall on
the coast.
Work has begun on the construction
of a new storage room for the Powell
River Company, the dimensions to be
140 feet wide by 400 feet long and In
be built of re-enforced concrete.
Latest additions to the motor family of Powell River are a Marmon
Baby Grand, put on the road by Mr.
Hugh Young, and a Buick recently
brought to the city by Mr. A. C. Kil-
Iin.
P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Banister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay           Phone 268
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone  115R  or  24
«=3wms=s3j  t»:
aassssesese
Itft^
■^••yA**.***-...*,
Hot  Cross  Buns
Don't forget to secure some of MANN'S delicious
HOT X BUNS
ORDER NOW
i      and have them delivered in time for your breakfast
on Good Friday
MANN'S BAKERY
i'hone 18
Cumberland
VENDOME HOTEL
Victor Marinelli, Proprietor
|     raSlfflSHEEMHEiaEKI2iaMfflaaKEIEHa*M
m
FIRST CLASS ACCOMMODATION
RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber A Hairdresser
Ladies' hair cut, any style SOc
Children's hair cut any style 35c
You've all heard of Robert B. Hand
He always is saying "life's grand!"
And the car he bought here
Is "the buy of the year."
It saved him as much as he planned.
Short Orders a Speciality
It's Wringer less
It
tIFE 1
GRAND
CAN YOU RECOGNIZE
A GOOD BUY?
If you act at once you can
secure a bargain that is unequalled. We have a few
cars we will sell far below
what we allowed on them.
Perfect condition. Guaranteed?   Certainly!
P. O. Box 190
•sMafiataseaeoataiaBeaeHesta
Telephone 61
atacaaisiMesiaeaataesHtatstaf:
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
USED AND THOROUGHLY REBUILT CARS        {j |®te'*M$^^
f
We have a reputation for Quality.   Purchase your
Bread and Cakes from
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
FOR HEALTH TRY OUR
PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT HEALTH BREAD,
HEALTH ROLLS AND
HEALTH MUFFINS
Phone for a demonstration in your home.
.For salt on easy terms b*)
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
•™dWs
i
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This ia a '/Vin. valve for use on dohiestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by Statu and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
^-f^^ PAGE SIX
TUB CTTMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1927.
Store closed Friday and Monday
Wear a Pair and
Compare the Wear
Four-ply strength is woven into
toes and heels. Double strength
into aoles. Extra strength in tha
elastic knit tops to avoid garter
runs. And the "Tapering Too**
gives just enough extra "big toe**
room to prevent "stretched
stitches" the main cause of big
toe wear.
Made for men, women and children In
Pure Thread Sill(, Silk and Wool Com*
binations. Botany Wool, Mercerized
Litle and Can.hrr.ere.
skeasateitassssHt*****^^
Personal Mention
Mr. and MrB. Geo. Apps and young
daughter are spending tlle Eastei
vacation with relatives at Mission,
Fraser Valley.
* *   *
Mrs. J. Vernon-Jones left on Wednesday morning for Vuncouver, where
she will spend Easter vacation.
* •   •
Mr. and Jlrs. William Walker and
family left Wednesday afternoon to
spend the Easter week-end in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. Charles Graham, of Vancouver,
was a visitor to Cumberland during
the week, returning to the terminal
city on Wednesday.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Beryl Hudson
to Mr. Alexander Davison takea place
at S o'clock Saturdny evening In the
Cumberland United Church.
* *   *
Mr. nnd Mrs. W. P. Symons nnd
young son intend to leave Cumberland
in the near future for a three months
visit to England.
* •   *
Miss Beatrice Bickle and Miss G
McFadyen, of the teaching staff o;
the Cumberland Public School, wil!
spend Easter holidays in the terminal
city.
* *   *
First, second and third prizes in
the checker tournament recently conducted by the C.L. & A.A. were won
respectively by Messrs. R. Coe, W.
Simpson and G. Shearer.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
W. P, Symons, of the City Meat
Market, begs to notify his many
patrons that during his absence from
the cily, his Interests in the City
Meat Market will be taken care of
by .Mr. H. Mamlei'ville. Quality and
service will continue, trusting you
will accord the same patronage in the
future as in tlie past. Thanking you.
W. P. SYMONS.
DON'T FORGET THE
AUCTION SALE
Saturday, April 20
at 2:00 p.m.
FOR MR. McCULLOCH, DERWENT AVENUE
I
F. C. PEARCE
Auctioneer
LEO ANDERTON
Real Estate
Phones 10 and 22
DOESN'T CRACK
SCALE OR CHALK
* Brandtam'i
Genuine tut.
It /lilt* l.utt.
-I,*tlit.r„f,he
■i^^Z2&.
PRACTICAL at* (o» genera.
*» tio-is under Canada'*
varying temperature* ha*
proven t*ie worth of the exeln.
Slve B-H 70.30 CormuU-70
r--.fi* oc Pure White Lead' aad
30 purls of Pure White lino.
The perfect combination ol
Iheia two superior whit* pig.
taenia i ..met b-h "EngUth"
Paint elastic It dees not crack
or seal*, leased on the exact
nnd unvarying proportion* ol
70.SO, the paint (film with,
■land* ih* action of th* ole.
it-,.--. it does not chalk. It
. ear-; and wears and WEARS.
B-H "Finnish" Paint go*s
Horther ~ It* hiding power la
i.-e.-.fi.. 'ihe minute partial**
ot put* while lead differ In
shape trom those of pure whit*
line, They dovetoll exactly.
Sloth1 i.*:get* through th* paint
11:01.
Ash lac •iii Dealer lot t hlnpure
p.airu with the 7o-*t0 gtiaiaat**
'she low COM Of puiiaalng with
pure t .;,.-]< will amaxe yon.
RBANURAM-|<ENDI»g^H
*./aani tf »•.,,< U*l~r.ini,-l**ilm-lK*», .
*70Y T"''l!-'-Hl*:art(wirliinmt,aBwm|(tS«Wl,iial
OU* *   Oaiwtaa B 11. Wh„, 1.«! ami Im*. PW. CM OaUa at
yy WhltaZlac.   Cafltbtnad [a tli. idaal propcioa of jd to jo,. .
y\ nf pral ...ri.,- I, if form*!, produting a  I'iinl Film Ul ia. a.
Wiaurj *"*"* »l""'r •"* raafcaaaaa tu vrathcr ani Mat.
WHITE, BLACK AND 30 POPULAR COLORS
SOMETHING NEW!
Under auspices of the Jr. W. B. A.
a GINGHAM DRESS DANCE will be
held in the Anglican Church Hall on
April 22nd, 1927. Dancing 8 till 2.
Refreshments will be served. General
admission, GOc. 15-16
CARD OF THANKS
MrB. Thos. Wilson and family, of
Royston, desire to thank their many
friends in Royston and Courtenny,
also the Royston Girl Guides for their
sympathy and ready help in their
hour of sorrow and grief, suslained
by the loss of a loving husband and
father.
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FK0JI MONTREAL
To Plj-montti.f'hcinourff-Londun
Alaunia Apr. 29 Ausonla May 6
To BeKast-LIverpool-Cliisgow
Letitla May 6 Athenla May 20
FROM NEW YORK
To Queenstown and Liverpool
Caronla Apr. 23       Samaria Apr. 30
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Berengaria April 27, Mny 17, June S
•Mauretania May 4, 25, June 15
Aqultania May 11, 31, June 22
To Londonderry nnd (ilusgow
Transylvania April 23
Cameronla May 7
To Flymonth-Hiivro-London
Lnncastria Apr. 23   Carmania Apr. 30
FROM BOSTON
To Queenstown and Liverpool
Samaria May 1 Scythla May 15
• Calls at Plymouth, Eastbound
For Sale by
Alex. MacKinnon
Wm. H. McLellan, Jr.
TOURIST THIRD CABIN
Bulling! from MONTREAL
To Ilclfiist-Llverpixil-dliisgnw
Letitla May ii. June 3. July 1
Athenla May 20, June 17. July 10
To Glasgow and Liverpool
Auranin June 21    Andania July *i
To  IMymoutM'lierbnurg-Londnn
Ausonlu June 10    Ascaniii June 24
Alaunia July 1, July 29, Aug. 20
Money orders, drafts nnd Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Full Information from local agents or Company's Offices, 622 Hastings St. W.,
Vancouver, B. C.
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland, B. C.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone 15 Phone It
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good  service,  reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel
Mr. Tom Graham Jr. will be a
visitor to Vancouver over the Easter
week-end.
* •   •
Mr. Hector Stewart la spending the
Easter  week-end  in  Vancouver.
* *   «>
Mr. L. Hardy, of the teaching staff
of the Cumberland High School, will
spend Easter vacation in Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss Christina MacKinnon is spending the Easter holidays with friends
in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mra. M. B. Stewart and son, and
Miss Dolenia Wilson left Thursday
evening to spend the week-end with
Mr. and Mrs. T. Wilson, Nanaimo.
* *   *
Mrs. J. Hassell, of Vancouver, ih
.he guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. It. Stacey
;>f the New Townsite.
* *    *
Miss Annie Mium  is spending the
Easter vacation  in  Vancouver.
JUVENILE MUSICAL
COMEDY COMING
Howard Le Roy's celebrated Kute
Kids Hevue is billed for the Gaiety
Theatre for Monday, 18th, with a
matinee performance at 2:110 and the
evening performance at S. It bring.-:
to this part of the country a kiddie
production of the better class, with a
brilliant cast of tiny tots of fame
May Sherwood, a real baby doll prima donna, a harmony team that is
unequalled, clever comedians ami
dancing dolls, with snappy songs and
jokes, the best of the old ones and
ihe best of tlie new ones. One of the
outstanding numbers is Ihe opening
tuneful affair, Hawaiian Melodies
with hula dancers, sailors and everything, and the parade of the Wooden
Soldiers, with Royal Corps de Rallet
in their elaborate uniforms and big
hats.
The whole revue is- artistically
staged, chuch full of chuckles with
wee, winsome wonders and presented
in your own 'town with all the pomp
and splendor as was presented on the
Pantages circuit for two seasons as
headliners and the same that will he
seen at the Crystal Gardens in Victoria.
Sunday Hours will be observed on Good Friday.
IN HARMONY)
WITH EASTERi
It is the one day when all the world's in tune.   And
here is a store which, after weeks of preparations, is
ready to serve you for this special occasion.
PLAIN AND DECORATED CHOCOLATE EGGS,
BUNNIES, CHICKENS, ETC.
Largest and most complete stock in the District.
•iwssMsassreassfcSMsasesKMa*'^^
EASTER NOVELTIES EASTER CARDS, 5c up.
aaMSMw-asaaw*^^
WE SUGGEST YOU PLACE
YOUR ORDER EARLY
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
—CASH DISCOUNT BONDS—
NOTICE
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned will be received by
ibe Board of Directors of ihe Cumberland General Hospital up to 12 o'clock
noon on Tuesday. Mny loth, 11127, for
Hie erection of a new win**:, wiring,
plumbing and heating for same anil
also other alterations.
Plans, specifications and full Information may be obtained on application to the Secretary, or to Mr. J.
Conway at the Government Building,
City. A deposit by certified cheque
of ten percent (10%) of the amount
tendered will be required with each
tender as a security that the tenderer
will, if called upon, enter Into a contract for the performance of the work.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
CHAS. J. PARNHAM, Sec'y.
Cumberland, 13. C.
lt.
Canadian National
EUROPEAN
EDUCATIONAL
TOURS
PERSONA
I.    Y
CONDUCTED
SAIL FHOM MONTREAL, JULY % ON TIIE
S.S.   "ANDANIA*   DIRECT   TO   GLASGOW
37-DAY TOUR
On Sea and Lund
$372.
50
eWEST BRITAIN
Prance.    Iltflqium
S W ITZ B R Ln IM O
All expense Montrenl lo Great
Britain and the Continent and
return  to Montreal.
51-DAY TOUR
On Sua and Land
nn GRB»T   KRITniN
,""    Prance, llelnlum
Switzerland. Italy
All expense Montrenl to Great
Britain and the Continent and
return  tn  Montreal.
$501
Cost of Tour Number One from Victoria or
Naunlmo to Europe ami Return, exclusive ot
meals and sleepers en route bol ween Victoria
or Nanaimo and Montreal, ls (510.05. Tour
Number Two will cost  $030.45.
I
EDWARD Vi. BICKLE
Cumberland. B. C. Telephone 35
Or Write C. P. Earle, D.P.A., Victoria, B.C.
'A'BZiKXMS
I
I
*n^Ti*n!",Qi*'nj'*;•*: !^™^^
Holiday Attraction, Easter Monday
THE SUCCESS OF THE SEASON
A JUNIOR MUSICAL COMEDY CO. OF WEE, WINSOME WONDERS
Howard Le Roy's   J
KUTE KIDS REVUEn
—Featuring all the  biggest little stars—
MAY SHERWOOD
Baby Doll Prima Donna
SINGING, SYNCOPATING SERENADERS
CHRISTIE McARDLE
Character Comedian, Singer
ftLEVER Komical ^ftiJlfis
Juvenile Zeigfeld Follies, Chuck full of Chuckles.   The biggest little show in America.
Reserved Seats, 75*t> General Admission, 50<J Kiddles, 25**?
also conrad nagel   «Thp Fxnuisite Sinner"
and RENEE ADOREE in        l I1C   -^AqUlblLC  OUJliCi
Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay
wrnmmmi^Mmiimm.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068260/manifest

Comment

Related Items